MANAGING PEOPLE AND ORGANIZATIONS Course 83368414037 Tuesdays, 950 by jkl91005

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									                            MANAGING PEOPLE AND ORGANIZATIONS
            Course 833:684:14037 Tuesdays, 9:50 - 12:30, Civic Square Building, Rm 112
            Julia Sass Rubin CSB 276 732-932-2499, ext. 609 jlsrubin@rci.rutgers.edu
                             Fall Office Hours: Tuesdays 1:00 – 3:00

This course is designed to enhance your understanding of your own motivation and behavior, as well as
that of others, in order to increase your effectiveness in present and future positions and (more
importantly) your satisfaction with your career.
Course Readings
Class participants can access all the readings on Sakai (https://sakai.rutgers.edu/portal) under the
Managing People and Organizations heading.
Course Requirements
Class Participation
Because this is a seminar, active and informed participation in class discussions is critical and will count
for 25% of the overall course grade. It is difficult to participate if you’re not in class, so participation will
include attendance. Each course participant will be allowed one absence. Any additional absences, with
the exception of those caused by emergencies, will result in a 5-point reduction off the total grade.
Anyone who knows in advance that s/he will miss class must let the professor know as soon as possible.

Weekly Response Papers/Assignments
In addition to regular participation in seminar discussions, course participants will be required to write
short (one page, single spaced), weekly response papers analyzing that week’s readings, or fulfill
assignments related to specific topics. These will not be returned with individual grades and comments,
but will be read carefully by me in preparation for each week’s class and will count for 25% of the overall
grade. The syllabus indicates which weeks require a response paper or assignment. These must be e-
mailed to me by noon on the Monday before class. Any papers e-mailed later than that will not be
accepted.

In-Class Presentation
The presentation is an oral version of a research paper. It should last approximately 20 to 25 minutes
and can be on any topic related to class content. You also can present and analyze a case study of a
“real world” example of a specific phenomenon covered in class. The presentations will be graded on
both the content and quality of the presentation itself. Class presentations will take place during the
second half of class, beginning with the October 21st class and continuing through the December
16th class. Your one-page topic proposal is due October 7th and a presentation draft is due two
weeks before you present. The presentations will be worth 25% of the overall grade.

Final Paper
Course participants will write a 10 to 15 page paper that analyzes their personality, motivations, interests
and career options going forward. The purpose of this paper is to help you reflect on where you are right
now in terms of personal and professional development, and to consider where you would like to be in
the future and how to get there. This paper will be read only by me and will be graded only on the quality
of the work you have done in putting it together and not on your findings. In addition to doing the
analytical exercises in Chapter 2 of Managing Human Behavior (which are assigned for week 2 of class),
discuss your findings with a relative or close friend (as suggested on page 30 of Managing Human
Behavior), and follow the suggestions on page 32 of Managing Human Behavior under the Increasing
Self-Knowledge and A Vision Statement sections, particularly the informational interviews component.
The paper also should demonstrate knowledge of conceptual material drawn from the readings, as
applicable to the topic. Some additional questions that may help frame your thinking for this paper
include:
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How would you describe yourself as a person? What values are especially important to you? What
concerns do you have? What personal characteristics help you, and hinder you, in getting along with
other people? In working with and managing other people, what comes easiest for you, and what do you
find difficult? What style of management/leadership do you respond to most favorably, and what style do
you typically provide to others? What is really important to know about other people? What are your
problems in dealing with others? What aggravates you about other people and what do you think it is
about you that may aggravate others?

In responding to these questions, think about any particular experiences or events that may have
happened in your past to make you the kind of person you are now. These may be events from school,
job, family, social, and other situations. Why are you here at this school now? What do you hope to get
out of your education?

Think about the future. How do you hope to be different when you graduate? Where do you want to be
five years from now….ten years from now?

The paper will count for 25% of the overall course grade and is due by 5 pm. on Friday, December
19th.

Week 1: September 9
Introduction and Course Overview

Week 2: September 16
Knowing Yourself

   •   R. B. Denhardt, J. V. Denhardt and M. P. Aristigueta, Knowing and Managing Yourself, Chapter 2
       in Managing Human Behavior in Public & Nonprofit Organizations, (2009), pp. 17-30.
   •   R. P. Vecchio, Personality and Perception, Chapter 2 in Organizational Behavior-Core Concepts,
       (2003), p. 26-43.
   •   D. Coleman, Working with Emotional Intelligence, (1998), business summary, pp. 1-11.
   •   J. Tierney, As Barriers Disappear, Some Gender Gaps Widen, New York Times, September 8,
       2008, Available at: http://www.nytimes.com/2008/09/09/science/09tier.html

Assignment: Do the Lifeline, Personal Values Inventory, Fundamental Interpersonal Relations
Orientation-Behavior Inventory, Locus of Control Inventory, Career Orientation Inventory and Emotional
Intelligence self-assessment exercises in Chapter 2 of Managing Human Behavior and write a response
paper that incorporates an analysis of your findings and of the other readings for this week.

Week 3: September 23
Motivating Yourself and Others

   •   R. P. Vecchio, Changing Employee Behavior through Consequences, Chapter 3 in Organizational
       Behavior: Core Concepts, (2003), pp. 50 – 63.
   •   R. Vecchio, Enhancing Employee Motivation Using Rewards, Goals, Expectations, and
       Empowerment, Chapter 5 in Organizational Behavior: Core Concepts, (2003), pp. 90 -112.
   •   E. Preston, Task Force Report: Compensation in Nonprofit Organizations
   •   H. G. Rainey, Chapter 9: Values and Motives, in Understanding and Managing Public
       Organizations, Third Edition, (2003), pp. 219-288.
   •   A. Sutherland, What Shamu Taught me about a Happy Marriage. The New York Times, June 25,
       2006. Available at: http://www.nytimes.com/2006/06/25/fashion/25love.html
   •   S. Kerr, On the Folly of Rewarding A, While Hoping for B, Chapter 6 in Psychological Dimensions
       of Organizational Behavior, Barry M. Staw (ed), (1991), pp. 65-75.
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Response Paper

No class Tuesday, September 30th in honor of Rosh Hashanah holiday

Week 4: October 7
Leadership

   •   R. B. Denhardt, J. V. Denhardt and M. P. Aristigueta, Leadership in Public Organizations,
       Chapter 7 in Managing Human Behavior in Public & Nonprofit Organizations, (2009), pp. 167-
       202.
   •   H. G. Rainey, Leadership, Managerial Roles, and Organizational Culture, Chapter 11 in
       Understanding and Managing Public Organizational, (2003), pp. 289-331.
   •   R. J. House, J. Woycke and E. M. Fodor, Charismatic and Noncharismatic Leaders: Differences
       in Behavior and Effectiveness. Chapter 33 in Psychological Dimensions of Organizational
       Behavior, Barry M. Staw (ed), (1991), pp. 437 - 450.
Assignment: Think about the questions asked in Developing a Leadership Autobiography, do the
Transactional Versus Transformational Leadership and Assessing Your Leadership Style self-
assessment exercises in Chapter 7 of Managing Human Behavior, and write a response paper that
incorporates an analysis of your findings and of the other readings for this week.

Week 5: October 14
Fostering Creativity and Innovation

   •   R. B. Denhardt, J. V. Denhardt and M. P. Aristigueta, Fostering Creativity, Chapter 3 in Managing
       Human Behavior in Public & Nonprofit Organizations, (2002), pp. 57 - 82.
   •   T. M. Amabile, Within you, Without you: The Social Psychology of Creativity, and Beyond,
       Chapter 40 in Psychological Dimensions of Organizational Behavior, Barry M. Staw (ed), (1991),
       pp. 537 - 558.
   •   G. Steiner, The Creative Organization, Chapter 41 in Psychological Dimensions of Organizational
       Behavior, Barry M. Staw (ed), (1991), pp. 560 - 75.
   •   P. C. Nystrom and W. H. Starbuck, To Avoid Organizational Crises, Unlearn, Chapter 43 in
       Psychological Dimensions of Organizational Behavior, Barry M. Staw (ed), (1991), pp. 591 – 600.
   •   A. J. Chopra (1999). Managing the people side of innovation, (1999), Chapters 1,2 and 3, pp 1 -
       85.

Response Paper

Week 6: October 21
Understanding an Organization's Culture

   •   R. P. Vecchio, Cultural Influences, Chapter 14 in Organizational Behavior: Core Concepts,
       (2003),
       pp. 332 – 345.
   •   L. Berkowitz, Foundations of Social Influence, Chapter 20 in Psychological Dimensions of
       Organizational Behavior, Barry M. Staw (ed), (1991), pp. 269 – 292.
   •   C. O’Reilly, Socialization and Organizational Culture, Chapter 21 in Psychological Dimensions of
       Organizational Behavior, Barry M. Staw (ed), (1991), pp. 293 - 305.
   •   G. R. Salancik, Commitment and the Control of Organizational Behavior and Belief, Chapter 22 in
       Psychological Dimensions of Organizational Behavior, Barry M. Staw (ed), (1991), pp. 306 - 312.
   •   E. H. Schein, The Role of the Founder in Creating Organizational Culture, Chapter 23 in
       Psychological Dimensions of Organizational Behavior, Barry M. Staw (ed), (1991), pp. 312 - 326.
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Response Paper

Week 7: October 28
Communicating Effectively with Others and Managing Meaning

   •   R. P. Vecchio, Communication, Chapter 12 in Organizational Behavior: Core Concepts, (2003),
       pp. 286 – 300.
   •   S. S. Brehm and S. M Kassin, Perceiving Persons, Chapter 15 in Psychological Dimensions of
       Organizational Behavior, Barry M. Staw (ed), pp. 187 - 207.
   •   J. G. Thomas and R. W. Griffin, The Power of Social Information in the Workplace, Chapter 18 in
       Psychological Dimensions of Organizational Behavior, Barry M. Staw (ed), pp. 249 –257.
   •   J. Martin and M. E. Powers, Organizational Stories: More Vivid and Persuasive than Quantitative
       Data, Chapter 19 in Psychological Dimensions of Organizational Behavior, Barry M. Staw (ed),
       pp. 258 -266.

Response Paper

Week 8: November 4
Working in Groups and Teams

   •   R. B. Denhardt, J. V. Denhardt and M. P. Aristigueta, Working in Groups and Teams, Chapter 10
       in Managing Human Behavior in Public & Nonprofit Organizations, (2002), pp. 295-321.
   •   R. P. Vecchio, Group Dynamics, Chapter 9 in Organizational Behavior: Core Concepts, (2003),
       pp. 210 – 224.
   •   I. L. Janis, Groupthink, Chapter 38 in Psychological Dimensions of Organizational Behavior, Barry
       M. Staw (ed), pp. pp. 514 – 533.

Response Paper

Week 9: November 11
Decision-Making

   •   R. B. Denhardt, J. V. Denhardt and M. P. Aristigueta, Decision Making, Chapter 5 in Managing
       Human Behavior in Public & Nonprofit Organizations, (2002), pp. 121 - 145.
   •   R. P. Vecchio, Decision Making, Chapter 8 in Organizational Behavior: Core Concepts, (2003),
       pp. 180 - 199
   •   M. H. Bazerman, Foundations of Decision Processes, Chapter 34 in Psychological Dimensions of
       Organizational Behavior, Barry M. Staw (ed), pp. 453 – 478
   •   I.L. Janis and L. Mann, Individual Decisions in Organizations, Chapter 35 in Psychological
       Dimensions of Organizational Behavior, Barry M. Staw (ed), pp. 479 – 496.
   •   B. M. Staw and J. Ross, Understanding Behavior in Escalation Situations, Chapter 36 in
       Psychological Dimensions of Organizational Behavior, Barry M. Staw (ed), pp. 497 – 504.

Response Paper
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Week 10: November 18
Power and Organizational Politics

   •   R. B. Denhardt, J. V. Denhardt and M. P. Aristigueta, Power and Organizational Politics, Chapter
       8 in Managing Human Behavior in Public & Nonprofit Organizations, (2002), pp. 221 – 246.
   •   A. R. Cohen and D. L. Bradford, Influence Without Authority: The Use of Alliances, Reciprocity,
       and Exchange to Accomplish Work, Chapter 28 in Psychological Dimensions of Organizational
       Behavior, Barry M. Staw (ed), pp. 378 – 387.
   •   G. R. Salancik and J. Pfeffer, Who Gets Power – And How They Hold On To It: A Strategic-
       Contingency Model of Power, Chapter 29 in Psychological Dimensions of Organizational
       Behavior, Barry M. Staw (ed), pp. 388 – 402.

Response Paper

No class Tuesday, November 25th – adjusted class schedule for Thanksgiving holiday

Week 11: December 2
Managing Conflict

   •   Vecchio, Managing Conflict, Chapter 10 in Organizational Behavior: Core Concepts, (2003), pp.
       230 – 242.
   •   C. K. W. De Dreu, Productive Conflict: The Importance of Conflict Management and Conflict
       Issue, Chapter 1 in Using Conflict in Organizations, (1997), pp. 9 – 22.
   •   M. E. Turner and A. R. Pratkanis, Mitigating Groupthink by Stimulating Constructive Conflict,
       Chapter 4 in Using Conflict in Organizations, (1997), pp. 53 – 71.
   •   C. K. W. De Dreu and N. K. De Vries, Minority Dissent in Organizations, Chapter 5 in Using
       Conflict in Organizations, (1997), pp. 72 – 86.
   •   L. L. Putnam, Productive Conflict: Negotiation as Implicit Coordination, Chapter 10 in Using
       Conflict in Organizations, (1997), pp. 147 – 160.
   •   A. Donnellon and D. M. Kolb, Constructive for Whom? The Fate of Diversity Disputes in
       Organizations. Chapter 11 in Using Conflict in Organizations, (1997), pp. 161- 176.

Response Paper

Week 12: December 9
Organizational Change

   •   R. B. Denhardt, J. V. Denhardt and M. P. Aristigueta, Organizational Change, Chapter 12 in
       Managing Human Behavior in Public & Nonprofit Organizations, (2002), pp. 353 - 383.
   •   Vecchio, Managing Organizational Change and Development, Chapter 15 in Organizational
       Behavior: Core Concepts, (2003), pp. 355 – 370.
   •   M. Tushman, W. Newman, and E. Romanelli, Convergence and Upheaval: Managing the
       Unsteady Pace of Organization Evolution, Chapter 47 in Psychological Dimensions of
       Organizational Behavior, Barry M. Staw (ed), pp. 646 – 657.

Response Paper

Week 13: December 16
Presentations

								
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