Docstoc

Thank you very much for the privilege of speaking to you today It

Document Sample
Thank you very much for the privilege of speaking to you today It Powered By Docstoc
					Thank you very much for the privilege of speaking to you today.  It is a great 

pleasure to be on the mighty George Washington.  As we commemorate 

Women’s History Month, it is appropriate to reflect on George Washington’s 

legacy.  There is little question that he appreciated the contribution that women 

made during the Revolutionary War.  His wife, Martha Custis Washington, worked 

hard to help provision the troops, provide them clothing, food and medicine.  The 

full measure of Martha’s contribution and the contribution of other women of the 

Revolutionary War is getting greater attention now than has received throughout 

the history of the United States.  I commend to your reading Cokie Roberts’ book 

Founding Mothers, which provides great detail on the efforts of Martha 

Washington, Abigail Adams, and other women patriots.  This example of the  

longstanding lack of attention to women’s contributions in history  illustrates why 

we need to have an event that works to “Write Women into History.”   


 


From the viewpoint of U.S. Navy history, women’s contributions were long limited 

by legal restrictions on women’s participation in the Navy.  While women began 

to serve in the Navy during the War of 1812, on a contractual basis as nurses, it 

has been a long journey to the open professional opportunities we enjoy today.  


                                          1
Despite having women serving for almost two centuries, the Navy has yet to fully 

integrate women into the full Navy mission set.  But the changes continue to 

come.  Women still mark “firsts” with some regularity.  A notable first for women 

in the Judge Advocate General’s Corp occurred on 14 August 2009, when CAPT 

Nan DeRenzi became the first woman in the JAG Corps to be selected for the 

position of Deputy JAG, and promoted to the rank of RADM, a two‐star position.  

A positive achievement, particularly when we consider that by law, until 1967, 

women in the service were limited to a maximum rank of Captain or Colonel.   


 


When I first looked at joining the Navy, in 1974, because my boyfriend was in 

Navy ROTC at the University of Pennsylvania, the doors of the Naval Academy 

were still closed to women.  Moreover, women's roles were limited to 

administrative and medical functions, but we had virtually no opportunity to 

serve on on Navy vessels.  I decided at that time that it made little sense to join an 

organization where I could never be part of the essential mission.  The first year 

that women were admitted to the service academies was in 1976, my final 

semester as an undergraduate.  But the overall role of women in the Navy was 

still very proscribed – they served largely as unrestricted line officers in a support 


                                           2
role.  It took until 1978 before women could be assigned to non‐combatant 

vessels and 1979 before the Naval Flight Officer Program was opened to women.   


 


When I was commissioned into the Navy, in November of 1990, women were still 

prohibited from being permanently assigned to a combatant vessel.   As a JAG, I 

was never going to be a shipdriver, so the continuing restriction didn’t bother me 

quite so much, but it was clear service on a ship – and not just any ship, on a 

combatant ‐ was a prerequisite to reach the top ranks in the Navy.   The option for 

women who wanted to go to sea at that time was to serve on a tender or on the 

USS Lexington, which, as the training aircraft carrier, was not considered a 

combatant.  Individual women, supported by forward‐thinking commanding 

officer and mentors, constantly worked to break the barrier on service by taking 

the tough jobs that were hard to fill and performing well.   


GW has its own female pioneers, one of them in the JAG community.  Lawyers are 

all about loopholes, and LT Noreen Hagerty‐Ford found one that made it possible 

for her to be assigned to an aircraft carrier ‐ the George Washington as it was 

being built in Newport News Naval Shipyard.  A vessel under construction was not 

considered a combatant under the law, and so she asked to be assigned as the 


                                          3
discipline officer.  She was supported by the Navy JAG chain of command, and, 

because of superb work she had done for the U.S.S. Lincoln, the aviation 

community also supported her.  She reported as the discipline officer in June 

1991, and became a plankowner of the ship.  The GW was commmissioned on 

July 4th, 1992.  The day after the commissioning, Noreen had to detach from the 

ship, be assigned to an ashore command, but then continued her service on the 

GW in a TAD status until January, 1993.  CDR Hagerty‐Ford noted in a recent email 

to me, "I believe that finding a way to open a door often means taking a 

measured approach.  I was hopeful that the opportunity I was given to serve as 

ship's company on a precommissioning unit would someday lead to a change in 

the law allowing for the assignment of women aboard combatants."    

 


Much in the same way, I got two opportunities to serve at sea on a combatant 

vessel using a legal loophole.  While I could not be permanently assigned to a 

combatant vessel, I could be sent TAD for 179 days to a combatant ship or an 

operational staff.  First, in 1992, I was sent TAD to the USS WASP (LHD‐1) for a 

four month period when WASP was conducting law enforcement operations in 

the Carribbean Sea.  My commanding officer told the CO of WASP that the only 

lawyer he could spare for the 4 month underway was a female, fully expecting a 

                                         4
pushback.  To his surprise, the response was immediate and positive.  Of course, 

we didn't know that USS WASP had just been informed they would have the first 

embarkation of female midshipman for a summer cruise.  Clearly, women were 

pushing the combatant ship envelope ‐ during that period, my roommate was the 

OIC of a helicopter squadron, also TAD to the ship, using the same loophole.  I 

know that both the CO and the XO were very happy to have a female LT JAG with 

them as they embarked 22 female midshipman for a Carribbean cruise.  But we 

proved we could do the job and meet the mission.   


In January of 1993, I had the privilege of being assigned TAD to Amphibious 

Squadron TWO for their CENTCOM ARG deployment, the first female JAG to serve 

in that role, and only the third JAG to deploy with any ARG.  Some of you will 

remember that in 1993, Somalia had descended into chaos, after the 

assassination of Said Barre in 1992, and the United Nations was undertaking its 

first mission under the authority of Chapter VII – peace enforcement, since the 

Korean War.  Our ARG spent most of the deployment off the coast of Somalia, 

supporting the U.N. relief mission ashore.  Through that period, I was the only 

woman on the ship, and, for that matter, with the four ship Amphibious Ready 

Group.  We had completed the deployment and returned to Norfolk before the 



                                         5
law changed.  Finally, in September, 1993, Congress changed the law, permitting 

women to serve on surface combattants.   


 Women began to be assigned in small numbers, first to the Navy’s big decks, 

because they had the space to accommodate them.  Slowly, the Navy integrated 

women into the surface navy.  Today, women are serving on combatant vessels at 

every level, from deck seaman to commanding officer, and there is no debate on 

their effectiveness.  That said, women still have some firsts to achieve, including, 

for example, CO of an aircraft carrier.  The pipeline to achieve that status takes 

quite a long time.  Moreover, we are watching the dawn of the next Navy 

transformation, the integration of women into the submarine forces.   


 


A recitation of the timeline of change doesn’t provide you with the level of effort 

that these changes have required,  both from women and from men.  We need to 

appreciate the huge cultural change that was required for all of us to be standing 

here, serving in an environment where a significant percentage of the sailors on 

our ships are women.  The change did not come because of the efforts of a single 

individual, although there are many notable pioneers.  The change did not come 

just because of women –  it was not possible without the support and mentoring 


                                          6
of men in positions of authority, as well as our male shipmates.  We cannot 

underestimate the effort that the women who served before us made to prove 

that women can be effective Officers and Sailors across the spectrum of required 

specialities and professions.  We should strive to ensure that our service honors 

the sacrifices of those who we follow, and that we remember their life stories, 

their contributions to history.  Where we know of an individual's story, we should 

ensure that their story is annotated in the history books.  Finally, we must 

continue to serve, with honor, courage, and commitment, so that we leave a 

positive legacy for our daughters and sons, nieces and nephews, and all the young 

Americans who seek to serve the U.S. Navy. 




                                          7

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:8
posted:5/10/2010
language:English
pages:7