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“A Date in Palm Springs”

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					                        2009 American Rose Society
                        Fall National Conference & Rose Show
                        Sponsored by the Desert Rose Society - www. desertrosesociety.com



                                       “A Date in Palm Springs”

                     Friday, November 13th – Saturday, November 14, 2009
                                   Doral Desert Princess Resort

                              ARRANGEMENT DIVISION

                     SECTION A – ARS NATIONAL CHALLENGE CLASSES
   Only current American Rose Society members using arranger-grown roses may enter these classes.

Class 1 DR. & MRS. HARRY B. OVERESCH TROPHY
       “America the Beautiful: Across the Fruited Plain”
       A Standard Traditional design using arranger-grown roses and incorporating fruits, nuts and/or
       vegetables.

Class 2 MILLIE WALTERS MEMORIAL TROPHY
       “The River”
A shopping and entertainment complex in Rancho Mirage featuring water features such as meandering
streams, ponds and cascading waterfalls.
       A Miniature Modern Horizontal design not to exceed 8” in height, width and depth. All rose(s)
       must be arranger-grown and classified as miniature roses.

         SECTION B – PACIFIC SOUTHWEST DISTRICT CHALLENGE CLASSES
        Open only to American Rose Society members residing in the Pacific Southwest District.
                                    All roses must be arranger-grown.

Class 3 JOHN & DOROTHY VAN BARNEVELD ARRANGEMENT TROPHY
       Palm Springs Aerial Tramway
Rotating cable cars transport visitors from the desert floor to an elevation of over 8000 feet on Mt. San
Jacinto in just 15 minutes. It’s been a tourist favorite since its opening in September 1963.
       A Standard Modern Hanging design. Free-moving design using a frame or other suspension. All
       roses must be arranger-grown.

                                                     1
Class 4 FAIR FRIENDS OF ROSES MINIATURE ARRANGEMENT TROPHY
       Desert Modernism
The dramatic mountains and desert of the Coachella Valley inspired this style of architecture during the
middle of the 20th Century. The style featured the use of glass, clean lines, deep overhangs and inventive
materials.
       Miniature Modern Stretch design not to exceed 10” in height, width or depth. All roses must be
       arranger-grown and classified as miniature roses.



                       SECTION C – TRADITIONAL ARRANGEMENTS
                   Eligible for ARS Royalty Award or ARS Miniature Royalty Award

Class 5A
       El Mirador (“The View”)
The El Mirador was one of four major hotels and an “in” spot in Palm Springs after its grand opening on
New Years Eve 1927. All that remains today is the bell tower.
       A Standard Mass design

Class 5B
       San Andreas Fault
The well-known fault line separating the Pacific and North American teutonic plates runs through the
Coachella Valley, roughly parallel to Interstate 10.
       A Standard Line or Line-mass design

Class 6A
       “Gem of the Desert”
This slogan was coined to promote the city of La Quinta, which was incorporated in 1982.
       A Miniature Mass design not to exceed 8” in height, width and depth; the rose(s) must be classi-
       fied as miniature and/or miniflora roses.

Section 6B
       Rio del Sol (“River of the Sun”)
This north-south thoroughfare in Rancho Mirage was built in the 1920’s. It was later renamed “Bob
Hope Drive.”
       A Miniature Line or Line-mass design between 5” and 10” in height, width and depth; the rose(s)
       must be classified as miniature and/or miniflora roses.




                                                    2
              SECTION D – ARRANGEMENTS IN THE ORIENTAL MANNER
                   Eligible for ARS Oriental Award or ARS Miniature Oriental Award

Class 7A
       Idyllwild
This quaint village is nestled amid pine forests in the San Jacinto Mountains above Palm Springs in an
area originally known as Strawberry Valley. It was named Idyllwild in 1901.
       Standard design utilizing a low, open container

Class 7B
       Cathedral Canyon
Early visitors in 1850 noted that an area canyon resembled the interior of a cathedral. The idea stuck and
was later used in 1925 as the name of the area’s first official sub-division.
       Standard design utilizing a tall container

Class 7C
       “The New Beginning”
A steel and glass sculpture by David Falossi Studios is located on Buddy Rogers Drive in Cathedral City.
       Standard Free Style design

Class 8A
       Agua Serena (“Calm Waters”)
A world class spa nestled in the manicured grounds of the Hyatt Grand Champions Resort in Indian
Wells. The hotel opened in 1986; the spa opened in 2003.
       Miniature design using low, open container not to exceed 10” in height, width and depth; the rose
       (s) must be classified as miniature and/or miniflora roses.

Class 8B
       Desert Willow
The unique use of desert landscaping is featured in the two golf courses of this Palm Desert resort, which
opened in 1997.
       Miniature design using a tall container not to exceed 10” in height, width and depth; the rose(s)
       must be classified as miniature and/or miniflora roses.

Class 8C
       Aerie Art Garden
This private desert estate combines art and botanical gardens. It was featured on HGTV in 2000.
       Miniature Free Style design not to exceed 10” in height, width and depth; the rose(s) must be clas-
       sified as miniature and/or miniflora roses.

                                                    3
                           SECTION E – MODERN ARRANGEMENTS
                     Eligible for ARS Artist’s Award or ARS Miniature Artist’s Award

Class 9A
       Sunnylands
The estate home of the late Walter & Lenore Annenberg, close friends of Presidents, built in Rancho Mi-
rage in 1963 includes 12 man-made lakes and hundreds of eucalyptus and olive trees.
       A Standard Modern design

Class 9B
       Elvis Honeymoon Hideaway
The home where Elvis & Priscilla Presley spent their honeymoon night on May 1, 1967 was built by
Robert Alexander in four perfect circles on three separate levels and is an example of Desert Mid-
Century Modernism.
       A Standard Parallel design using three or more groupings appearing as one arrangement.

Class 9C
       Chill
The local baseball team’s opening game on February 1, 2008 marked the return of winter baseball to
Palm Springs.
       A Standard Transparency design. Depth is emphasized by some components seen through others.

Class 10A
       El Paseo
Palm Desert’s main street is known also as the “Rodeo Drive of the Desert” for its posh retail stores, lush
landscaping, and outdoor sculptures.
       A Miniature Modern design not to exceed 8” in height, width and depth; the rose(s) must be clas-
       sified as miniature and/or miniflora roses.

Class 10B
       Splashtopia
The newest water park in the area opened at the Rancho Las Palmas Resort in 2008 with such features as
“Rio Rancho,” Marble Beach,” and dual water slides named “The Rattler” and “The Sidewinder.”
       A Miniature Modern Underwater design not to exceed 10” in height, width and depth; the rose(s)
       must be classified as miniature and/or miniflora roses.

Class 10C
       Painted Canyon
This canyon in the heart of the Mecca Hills Wilderness (created in 1994) is known for its impressive rock
formations in shades of pink, orange, and grey.
       A Miniature Modern design not to exceed 10” in height, width and depth; the rose(s) must be
       classified as miniature and/or miniflora roses.

                                                     4
                        SECTION F – PRINCESS OF ARRANGEMENTS
                            Eligible for ARS Princess of Arrangements Award
                           or ARS Miniature Princess of Arrangements Award


Using roses with rose foliage, hips, canes and roots. Only fresh rose materials may be used. No other
plant materials or accessories permitted.


Class 11A
       Village Green Heritage Center


Set in a park-like setting on Palm Canyon Drive, the Village Green features two restored pioneer homes:
the McCallum Adobe (built 1884) and Miss Cornelia’s “Little House” (built 1893 from leftover railroad
ties).
       Arranger’s choice of Standard design, noted on entry tag.


Class 11B
       The Living Desert
The Living Desert’s amazing collection of plants and animals proves there is much more to a desert than
barren sand. This Wildlife and Botanical Park was established in 1970 to promote awareness & apprecia-
tion of our desert habitat.
       Arranger’s choice of Standard design, noted on entry tag.


Class 12A
       Agua Caliente (“Hot Water”)
The Agua Caliente Band of Cahuilla Indians, the descendants of the original inhabitants of the Coachella
Valley, now operate two major casinos and own much of the real estate in Palm Springs as a result of an
1876 Executive Order.
       Miniature arrangement not exceeding 8” in height, width and depth; the rose(s) must be classified
       as miniature and/or miniflora roses. Arranger’s choice of design, noted on entry tag.


Class 12B
       Point Happy
At the geographical center of the Coachella Valley, Point Happy is a piece of bedrock 50-60 feet high,
less than a mile from mountains that rise 1000 feet above the sand.
       Miniature arrangement not exceeding 10” in height, width and depth; the rose(s) must be classi-
       fied as miniature and/or miniflora roses. Arranger’s choice of design, noted on entry tag.




                                                    5
                        SECTION G – DUCHESS OF ARRANGEMENTS
 Eligible for ARS Duchess of Arrangements Award or ARS Miniature Duchess of Arrangements Award
Using fresh roses with dried and/or treated dried plant material, no fresh plant material other than roses.


Class 13A
       Box Canyon
The twisted, buckled and eroded sides of Box Canyon formed by upturned strata mark this unusual ra-
vine that runs through the Mecca Hills Wilderness (created in 1994) in the eastern end of the Coachella
Valley.
       Arranger’s choice of Standard design, noted on entry tag.


Class 13B
       Palms to Pines Scenic Highway
Built in 1934, this 66-mile highway from Banning through the San Jacinto Mountains into Palm Desert is
a route of unparalleled wild beauty from lofty pine forests above to the palm tree-studded desert oasis
below.
       Arranger’s choice of Standard design, noted on entry tag.


Class 14A
       Thorny Theater
This Palm Springs theater, which opened in 2006, features live performances. It gets its name from the
“thorny” issues it deals with.
       Miniature arrangement not exceeding 10” in height, width and depth; the rose(s) must be classi-
       fied as miniature and/or miniflora roses.


       Arranger’s choice of design, noted on entry tag.


Class 14B
       Joshua Tree National Park
Two deserts (the low Colorado with abundant creosote bush and the higher Mojave with its distinctive
Joshua trees) meet in this 800,000 acre park. It opened as a national monument in 1936 and was up-
graded to a national park in 1994.
       Miniature arrangement not exceeding 10” in height, width and depth; the rose(s) must be classi-
       fied as miniature and/or miniflora roses.


       Arranger’s choice of design, noted on entry tag.


                                                     6
                            SECTION H – DUKE OF ARRANGEMENTS
                              Eligible for ARS Duke of Arrangements Award


A small arrangement greater than 10” but not more than 20” in height, width and depth. Roses are to be
in proportion to size of arrangement. Any class of roses may be used.


Class 15A
       Indian Canyons
Along the eastern escarpment of Mt. San Jacinto are six major canyons whose impressive rock formations
and stately palms have captivated visitors since the Cahuilla Indians first inhabited the area.
       Arranger’s choice of design, noted on entry tag.


Class 15B
       Shadow Mountain
The first golf course/tennis club in Palm Desert opened in 1952.
       Arranger’s choice of design, noted on entry tag.




                             SECTION I – PERSONAL ADORNMENT
                               Eligible for Personal Adornment Certificate.
                                  Not eligible for ARS Medal Certificates


Class 16A – Posey Pin
       “Fountain of Life”
This fountain, the focal point of the Cathedral City Civic Plaza, reflects the nature & history of the desert
with sculptures of animals, birds and fish found in the area now and in the past.
       A lapel posey pin with all fresh materials. To be staged by attaching the posey pin to an individ-
       ual standard-sized floral foam block wrapped in black fabric. Floral foam will be provided by the
       host society.


Class 16B – Nosegay
       Ingleside Inn
Originally built as the Deusenberg Estate by the famed auto manufacturing family in the 1920’s in Span-
ish style, it was converted into a hotel in 1935. It’s still considered a romantic hideaway for the rich and
famous.
       All fresh materials must be used. To be staged by the exhibitor in a 12” by 12” space.

                                                      7
                             SECTION J – DRIED ARRANGEMENTS
                   Eligible for ARS Keepsake Award or ARS Miniature Keepsake Award
   Using dried roses (correctly named) with dried and/or treated plant material, all natural materials.
                                  No artificial plant materials allowed.


Class 17A
       Windmills
A virtual army of hulking, electricity generating windmills stands guard at the west end of the valley,
taking advantage of a natural wind tunnel that provides wind 300 days a year. The first windmill was
erected in 1929, but the idea of harnessing wind for power here didn’t catch on until the early 1980’s.
       Arranger’s choice of a Standard Traditional design


Class 17B
       SilverRock Resort
Opened in 2005, SilverRock in La Quinta is one of the newer golf courses in the valley and was recently
added as one of the courses used in the Bob Hope Chrysler Classic.
       Arranger’s choice of a Standard Modern design


Class 18A
       Thunderbird
A one-time dude ranch became one of the valley’s first country clubs when it opened as Thunderbird
Country Club on January 9, 1951. Ford borrowed the name for its iconic sports car in 1954.
       Arranger’s choice of Miniature Traditional design, not to exceed 8” in height, width and depth;
       the rose(s) must be classified as miniature and/or miniflora roses.


Class 18B
       Stagecoach Festival
Since its debut in 2007, the Stagecoach Festival has become one of California’s premier country music
festivals. It’s staged outdoors at the Empire Polo Club in Indio.
       Arranger’s choice of Miniature Modern design, not to exceed 10” in height, width and depth; the
       rose(s) must be classified as miniature and/or miniflora roses.




                                                    8
                                    SECTION K – ROSECRAFT
                  Eligible for ARS Rosecraft Award or ARS Miniature Rosecraft Award
   Using dried roses (correctly named) with dried and/or treated plant material, all natural materials.
             No artificial plant materials allowed. Staging to be furnished by the exhibitor.


Class 19A
       Fantasy Springs Casino Resort
What began as a card room in 1980 has evolved into one of the area’s largest casinos, complete with ho-
tel, event center, bowling alley, and golf course.
       Standard Rosecraft: Pressed Flower Picture


Class 19B
       Walk of Stars
Founded in 1992, the Walk of Stars recognizes celebrities and others who have contributed to the com-
munity with “Golden Palm Stars” placed in the sidewalks of downtown Palm Springs.
       Standard Rosecraft: Arranger’s choice of design


Class 20A
       Tranquil Touch
The day spa is located at the Caliente Tropics Resort in Palm Springs, which was a popular hangout for
celebrities such as Elvis and the Rat Pack when it opened in 1964.
       Miniature Rosecraft: A wreath whose dimensions are not to exceed 10” in height, width and
       depth; the rose(s) must be classified as miniature and/or miniflora roses.


Class 20B
       The Doll House
The Doll House was one of the most popular restaurants and watering holes in Palm Springs during the
“golden years” of 1945-1959.
       Miniature Rosecraft: Arranger’s choice of design, not to exceed 10” in height, width and depth;
the rose(s) must be classified as miniature and/or miniflora roses.




                                                    9
                                   SECTION L – TABLE CLASSES
       Eligible for the ARS Court of Etiquette Award or ARS Miniature Court of Etiquette Award
                                       and ARS Medal Certificates


The design components for Standard classes must include fresh roses and may include other fresh and/or
treated materials. The design components for Miniature classes must include fresh miniature and/or
miniflora roses and may include other fresh and/or treated plant materials.


Class 21A
       Festival of Lights Parade
This annual Palm Springs holiday parade debuted on December 5, 1992 and has been held on the first
Saturday of December ever since. The evening parade features floats and other units decorated with
twinkling lights.
       Functional Table
       A functional table for an evening meal for two to be staged on a freestanding 34” x 34” card table
       provided by the host society. Dishes, glassware, linens and/or place mats are to be provided by
       the exhibitor. No flatware is allowed.

Class 21B
       Lost Horizon
Frank Capra worked on the screenplay for the film while staying at the La Quinta Resort & Club, built in
1927 as a secluded hideaway for celebrities.
       Standard Exhibition Table
       A non-functional exhibition table, to be staged in an area not larger than 30” wide by 30” deep.
       Arranger provides his or her own freestanding background, if desired.

Class 21C
       Caliente Tropics Resort
Built in 1965, this resort is perhaps the finest remaining example of a Polynesian-themed motel so popu-
lar in the 60’s with its A-frame entrance and golden Tiki gods.
       Standard Tray
       A functional beverage travel for two with a decorative design to be staged on a table top in an
       area no larger than 36” wide by 30” deep. No flatware is allowed.




                                                    10
Class 22A
       Palm Springs Follies
This vaudeville-style variety show with music, dance, and comedy of the 30’s, 40’s, and 50’s features per-
formers ranging in age from 55 to 85. The show is now in its 18th year.
       Miniature Exhibition Table
       A non-functional miniature exhibition table, to be staged in an area not larger than 24” wide by
       24” deep.
       The rose(s) must be classified as miniature and/or miniflora roses. Arranger provides his or her
       own freestanding background, if desired.

Class 22B
       Opera in the Park
Every April music lovers bring lawn chairs and blankets to enjoy an afternoon of great opera performed
outdoors at Sunrise Park in Palm Springs.
       Miniature Tray
       A functional miniature picnic for from one to four to be staged in an area no larger than 24” wide
       by 24” deep. No flatware is allowed. Decorative unit must take up no more than 1/3 of the total
       appropriately sized “tablecloth” area and must be between 3” to 10” in height, width and depth.
       A color-coordinated tablecloth of appropriate size may be used. The rose(s) must be classified as
       miniature and/or miniflora roses.




                               SECTION M – NOVICE ARRANGERS
                                    Eligible for Best Novice Certificate
                      This Section is restricted to exhibitors who have never won an
                   arrangement award in an arrangement section of an ARS rose show.


Class 23A
       Big League Dreams
This amateur recreational sports facility was built in Cathedral City in 1997 and includes a baseball facil-
ity that replicates Yankee Stadium.
       Standard arrangement - arranger’s choice of design, noted on entry tag.


Class 24A
       Pioneertown
This Old West town was built in the early 1940’s near Yucca Valley as a set for filming movies and TV
series.
       Miniature arrangement not exceeding 10” in height, width and depth; the rose(s) must be classi-
       fied as miniature and/or miniflora roses. Arranger’s choice of design, noted on entry tag.

                                                     11
                                        SECTION N – JUNIORS
                                  Eligible for Junior Arrangement Rosette
                      This Section is restricted to arrangers 17 years of age and under.


Class 25A
       Spring Break
Masses of college students traditionally spent spring break in Palm Springs until the “anti-thong” ordi-
nance of 1991 discouraged them. Text messages were used in 2009 to bring them back.
       Standard arrangement - arranger’s choice of design, noted on entry tag.


Class 26A
       Old MacDonald Ranch
This was the original name of the area which eventually became Palm Desert, which was incorporated as
a city on November 26, 1973.
       Miniature arrangement not exceeding 10” in height, width and depth; the rose(s) must be classi-
       fied as miniature and/or miniflora roses. Arranger’s choice of design, noted on entry tag.




                                        SECTION O – JUDGES
                               Eligible for ARS Best Judge’s Entry Certificate
                 This Section is restricted to Horticulture or Arrangement Judges and/or
                                    Apprentice Judges judging the show.


Class 27A
       Under the Umbrellas
This outdoor art show of artists exhibiting their original work along Main Street in Old Town La Quinta
has been presented annually since 2004.
       Standard arrangement with no design or material(s) restrictions. Arranger’s choice of design,
       noted on entry tag.


Class 28A
       Casa Chiquita (“Petite House”)
This building, originally constructed in 1934, is the oldest documented house in Rancho Mirage.
       Miniature arrangement not exceeding 10” in height, width and depth; the rose(s) must be classi-
       fied as miniature and/or miniflora roses. No design or material(s) restrictions. Arranger’s choice
       of design, noted on entry tag.

                                                     12
Notes:
All Standard arrangement classes are designated with an odd number; all Miniature arrangement classes
are designated with an even number. Duke of Arrangements entries (Class 15) will be staged with the
Standard (odd-numbered) arrangements; Personal Adornment entries (Class 16) will be staged with the
Miniature (even-numbered) arrangements.


There are three types of designs that may be noted on the entry tag: Traditional, Modern, or Oriental.


Exhibitors (including Arrangement Judges) must pre-register all entries except for the National and Dis-
trict Challenge Classes in Sections A and B. Pre-registration for the challenge classes is not required, but
is requested and encouraged for the purpose of staging. Contact Alice Hamilton at (760) 346-7325 or
amhamilton98@yahoo.com to register entries. The deadline for registering is 12:00 Noon PST on
Wednesday, November 11.


                   MILLER AND FEURER AWARD FOR THE BEST ARRANGEMENT
                    to be awarded to the best entry in the Rose Arrangement Division
                          Certificate and cash award - Sponsored by Ron Feurer


                                     Rules for Rose Arrangements

1.       Exhibits must be entered and in place by 9:30 a.m. on Friday, November 13, 2009 and remain un-
til the closing of the show at 12:00 Noon on Saturday, November 14. Trophies will be awarded at 11:00
AM on Saturday, November 14. If an exhibitor is unable to be at the closing of the show, he or she will
have to make their own accommodations for the pick up of their containers and accessories.
2.    An exhibitor will be limited to one entry in each class, but may enter as many classes as desired.
Each entry must be the exhibitor’s own work.
3.     Tabletops will be covered with black colored drapes. Arrangements will be staged in front of
black colored drapes that will extend 5½ feet above the table tops. Space allocated for standard arrange-
ments is 30” deep by 24” wide, unless otherwise stated in schedule. Space allocated for miniature ar-
rangements is proportional to the arrangement.
4.     All roses must be outdoor garden-grown and should be of high quality. Florist roses are never al-
lowed. An exhibitor may use garden-grown roses other than those from his/her own garden unless he/
she wishes to be considered for an American Rose Society Medal Certificate (see #7 below.)
5.     The names of all roses in each arrangement should be written on the entry tag. All roses should
be correctly named in accordance with latest edition of the following official ARS publications : Modern
Roses 12 (book and database), the Official List of Approved Exhibition Names for Judges & Exhibitors,
the Handbook for Selecting Roses, the “Rose Registrations” column of the American Rose magazine or
“Recent Registrations” on the ARS website. In cases where a variety is not listed in any of the above ARS
publications, a listing in the Combined Rose List is acceptable. Classification of all roses shall be in accor-
dance with ARS publications to the date of the show.

                                                      13
6.     A rose or roses must provide the dominant flower interest in all arrangements.
7.     American Rose Society Medal Certificates may be awarded to arrangements using arranger-grown
roses. Entry tags should be marked ARRANGER-GROWN or AG if the roses were grown by the exhibi-
tor.
8.      In classes for arrangements using miniature roses, the arrangements must conform to the size
specified in each class, and ONLY those roses classified by the ARS as miniature or miniflora may be
used.
9.     Backgrounds, niches and underlays may be used, if desired, but must be provided by the exhibi-
tor. The only size restriction for a standard arrangement is that the arrangement must not overhang the
30” tabletop. In miniature arrangements, backgrounds, niches and underlays are considered a compo-
nent of the design and must conform to any size limitation. If used, backgrounds must be freestanding.
10.     Accessories are allowed unless stated otherwise in the schedule. Flowers other than roses and
dried and/or treated dried plant material are allowed unless prohibited by the schedule. Natural wood
(dried, weathered, treated, etc.) is considered dried plant material unless it has been made into an art ob-
ject (e.g., a statue.) It is then considered an accessory.
11.    A card of intent may be included with an arrangement as an explanation of the arranger’s inter-
pretation of the theme or class title.
12.   The Rose Show will be governed and judged by the rules, regulations, and guidelines of the
American Rose Society, as set forth in the Guidelines for Judging Rose Arrangements.
13.    The exhibitors are responsible for placing their own arrangements. An arrangement incorrectly
placed in a class will be judged in the class in which it has been placed. No one but the exhibitor may
touch or move an arrangement. However, in extreme circumstances, if all efforts to locate the arranger
have failed, an arrangement chairman may carefully move an arrangement.
14.    All exhibits must be the work of a single exhibitor.
15.     Flowers other than roses and dried and/or treated dried plant material are allowed unless prohib-
ited by the schedule. Plant material other than roses may be commercially grown. All roses must be
fresh, except for Keepsake, Miniature Keepsake, Rosecraft, Miniature Rosecraft and classes that specify
dried roses.
16.    First place winners must score 90 or higher. To be eligible for American Rose Society Awards,
arrangements must score no less than 92 points. Only first place winners are eligible for American Rose
Society Awards.
17.     Arranger’s name should be clearly marked on all vases and accessories but out of view of the
judges.
18.     All reasonable care will be taken, but the Show Committee, the Desert Rose Society or Doral De-
sert Princess Resort will not be responsible for loss or damage.
19.    By entering this show given under ARS rules, exhibitors agree to abide by those rules.
20.    Arrangement Judges, judging arrangements in this show, may enter only in the Judges Section.
21.      Novices are not limited to classes in Section M – Novice Arrangers and are encouraged to enter all
classes.



                                                     14
22.    Most awards and trophies will be presented at 11:00 AM on Saturday, November 14 and should be
accepted by winners or their representatives, Pacific Southwest Trophies at the District Breakfast and
National Trophies at the Awards Banquet.
23.    Trophies will be awarded for arrangements judged Best in Section.
24.    All exhibitors must be registered for the conference.
25.    There shall be no communication of any results of this show to anyone, whether by electronic
means or otherwise, until the judging is complete and the Chairman of Judges has declared the results
final.


       Infringement of the following rules will result in severe penalty:
                 1.         Painted or dyed fresh plant materials and live creatures are not allowed.
                 2.         The use of plant materials on the state or local conservation lists is not permitted.
                 3.         The American flag or flag of any country may not be used in an arrangement.

       There are but two causes for disqualification of an arrangement:
                 1.         Roses are not outdoor grown
                 2.         Use of artificial plant material

                                 SCORE CARD for Judging Rose Arrangements

       Conformance (5 points per Category) ........................................... 15 points
       Naming of roses, conformance to type of design, other specific requirements of schedule
       Design (5 points per Principle) ...................................................... 30 points
       Balance, dominance, contrast, rhythm, proportion and scale
       Perfection of the Rose(s) ................................................................ 30 points
       Including condition of other plant material
       Creativity and Expressiveness ......................................................... 15 points
       Distinction ........................................................................................ 10 points
                 Uniqueness, sets the design apart, superiority in every respect
                 Includes technical execution/construction

                 Total ................................................................................... 100 points

Conference Co-Chairs                                                            Rose Show Co-Chairs
      Cliff Orent cliffofthedesert@yahoo.com                                           Robert Martin petrose@aol.com
      Hal Reynolds Datebeatle@aol.com                                                  Barbara Steffensmeier Bjspd@aol.com
Arrangement Judges Chairman                                                     Clerks Chairman
      Marylou Coffman Coffmanml@aol.com                                                Larry Galuppo cdrlarry@aol.com
NOTICE TO ALL EXHIBITORS: A refrigerated storage area that will be monitored for security will be
available from 8:00 a.m. Thursday until preparation area opens on Friday morning at 4:00 a.m.

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