THE JEWISH WAY OF LIFE

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					THE JEWISH WAY OF LIFE
      HOLINESS IN LIFE
The Jewish Way of Life, whose primary aim
is to achieve holiness in life involves:

TORAH

WORSHIP

ACTS OF LOVING KINDNESS
            TORAH
Studying the Torah (the Five Books of
     Moses as well as its Jewish
   Interpretations) & observing the
    commandments in the Torah.
      WORSHIP:

Worshipping One God
ACTS OF LOVING KINDNESS
Engaging in Deed of Loving kindness &
Righteousness
         REVELATION
Approximately 3,250 years ago, God
gives the Torah to the People of Israel
that includes:
   TORAH AND TALMUD
1) The Torah (i.e. Five Books of
Moses)
2) A Jewish way to understand and
interpret the Torah that remained in
oral form & was not written down for
more than 1000 years. When committed
to writing, it becomes known as the
Talmud.
JEWISH PATH TO REDEMPTION
Through observance of laws in Torah.
Although there are important Jewish
Beliefs such as the affirmation that
there is only 1 God, God gave the Torah
to Jewish People, soul is immortal and
God will send the Messiah for the 1st
time in the future, Jews emphasize:
“Deed over creed”, observance
over dogma.
       THE TANACH =
    HEBREW SCRIPTURES
Hebrew Scriptures = Protestant Christian
“Old Testament” but books different order.
1ST Part: Torah (Holiest part of Tanach).
2nd Part: Prophets (Joshua through 12
“minor” prophets).
3rd Part: Writings (remaining books of
Tanach including Wisdom Literature & such
books as Psalms, Ruth, I & II Chronicles,
Daniel & Ezra-Nehemiah).
          JEWISH LAW
613 commandments in Torah.
2 types of Jewish law:
1) Ethical Commandments (Between
human-beings) e.g. Giving Tzedakah
(charity), not stealing, honoring elders
2) Ritual/Ceremonial Commandments
(Between God and Jewish People)
  RITUAL LAW: MEZUZAH
“And you shall write
them [the laws] on
the doorposts of
your house and
upon your gates.”
   --Deut. 6:5-9

Reminder to follow
commandments
       RITUAL LAW:
  TALLIS = PRAYER SHAWL
“The Eternal spoke
to Moses: Make
fringes in the
corners of garments
… when you look
upon the fringe you
will be reminded of
all of the
commandments.“

--Numbers 15:37-41
        KASHRUT
   JEWISH DIETARY LAWS
Involves
combination of
Ethical and Ritual
Jewish Laws.
Kosher = Fit,
Proper.
1a) CHOOSE KOSHER ANIMAL:
        MAMMALS
 According to
 Torah, mammals
 that walk on land
 must have split
 hooves and chew
 their cud to be
 kosher.
 e.g. bulls, goat &
 sheep can be
 kosher.
1b) CHOOSE KOSHER ANIMAL:
           FISH
According to
Torah, must have
Fins and Scales
to be kosher.
Shellfish never
kosher
1c) CHOOSE KOSHER ANIMAL:
          BIRDS
According to
Torah,
domesticated
Birds can be
kosher.
Birds of Prey
never kosher
2) MERCIFUL SLAUGHTER
Reverence for all Life & Kindness to
Animals.
Not Causing Pain to Animals:
Pious, learned Jewish Ritual
Slaughterer, uses very sharp knife to
cut animal’s neck so that it feels no
pain.
 3) DRAINING THE BLOOD
Process of Soaking and Salting Meat
Torah emphasizes:
Soul/life of the animal is in the blood
NOT MIXING DAIRY & MEAT I
“Do not boil a kid in
its mother’s milk” X
3 in the Torah
Complete
Separation of Dairy
and Meat (Not eaten
at same meal and
separate trays,
utensils and dishes)
NOT MIXING DAIRY & MEAT II
 3rd Category:
 Pareve—neither
 dairy nor meat.
 e.g. fish, eggs,
 fruits, vegetables.
WORSHIP
             YARMULKE
Yarmulke (a.k.a.
Kippah, Skullcap)
Most Orthodox men
cover head all of the
time to show humility
before God. Most other
Jewish men (& some
Jewish women) wear
Yarmulke for prayer &
in synagogue.
Most Orthodox women
wear wig when in
public.
        JEWISH PRAYER
Traditionally, Jews
go to shul, namely,
to the synagogue to
pray, 3 times a day,
7 Days a Week.
Morning
Afternoon
Evening
JEWISH HOLIDAYS
 MAJOR JEWISH HOLIDAYS I
Mentioned in Torah & work restrictions on at
least some days of Festival. (e.g. no writing,
using money, driving/riding in car, lighting/
extinguishing flame, using electricity)
Respect should be given to Jewish
residents’ decisions in regard to baths,
therapy & other aspects of care that can
be rescheduled or modified so that they
can attend Sabbath/Holiday Services &
celebrations.
MAJOR JEWISH HOLIDAYS II
             2 white candles
             lit/blessed, Kiddush (a
             blessing) recited over
             wine/grape juice & Motzi
             (a blessing) recited over
             challahs (braided loaves
             of bread enriched with
             egg), except on
             Passover.
             Festive meals eaten &
             Torah read at Morning
             Services.
 THE SABBATH/SHABBAT
Friday Sunset to
Saturday Nightfall
Weekly day of rest
for Jewish People,
commemorating
creation of the world
as described in
Torah: God created
entire universe in 6
days, rested on 7th
day.
 Sabbath Morning Service
Most important weekly Service occurs on
Sabbath (Saturday) Morning when Jews
read from the Five Books of Moses
according to a yearly cycle of Torah
reading so that during the course of a
Jewish year, the entire Five Books of
Moses is read.
  THE HIGH HOLY DAYS
ROSH HASHANAH: THE JEWISH NEW YEAR




YOM KIPPUR: THE DAY OF ATONEMENT
     ROSH HASHANAH I
The Jewish New Year
2 day Holiday in September or very early
October
According to Jewish legend, celebrates
anniversary of creation
Start of “Ten Days of Repentance”: Jewish
People examine their deeds during past
year, make amends & resolve to do better
in New Year.
     ROSH HASHANAH II
Blowing the Shofar (i.e. Ram’s Horn) to
spiritually “wake up” Jewish People to
engage in repentance
Apples & honey eaten to symbolize desire
for sweet New Year
New Year’s Cards sent to family & friends
       YOM KIPPUR:
  THE DAY OF ATONEMENT
1 day Holiday 9 days after Rosh
Hashanah
Holiest day of Jewish Year
Culmination of ten days of repentance.
Jews fast if healthy
   SUKKOT: THE FEAST OF
      TABERNACLES I
9 days long in September or October,
begins 5 days after Yom Kippur
Jewish harvest festival.
Sukkah (i.e. Temporary Hut) built in which
Jews spend time during Holiday to recall
that ancestors lived in temporary huts after
liberation from Egyptian bondage when
wandering through desert for 40 years
    SUKKOT: THE FEAST OF
       TABERNACLES II
Blessing & waving of
lulav & etrog: “4
species”: branches/twigs
from palm, willow &
myrtle trees bound
together & lemon-like
fragrant fruit called etrog:
waving of luvav together
with etrog reminds Jewish
People that God is
everywhere.
No work on 1st 2 days.
       SHEMINI ATZERET &
        SIMCHAT TORAH
Last 2 days of Sukkot—no work performed

Shemini Atzeret: 8th day of Sukkot
Jewish People pray for rain in Israel.

Simchat Torah: Last day of Fall Jewish
Holidays. “Rejoicing over Torah”: Marks end of
annual cycle of readings from Torah; Read last
section of Deuteronomy & immediately begin
reading 1st passage of Genesis
Joyous processions with Scrolls of Torah & flags
          PASSOVER I
8 day Festival in March or April but work
restrictions on 1st 2 & last 2 days only.
Recalls liberation of Jewish People from
slavery in Egypt over 3,000 years ago.
Festive meal called “Seder” eaten on 1st
two nights of Holiday: Involves eating
foods & reciting prayers/blessings in
specific order to re-enact passage from
bondage to liberation.
              PASSOVER II
Israelites hurriedly left
Egypt so no time for
dough to leaven.
During Passover, Jews
don’t eat leavened bread
nor any foods that may
contain leavened bread.
Jews eat unleavened
bread namely, “matzah”.
Higher level of Kashrut
throughout Festival.
             SHAVUOT I
2 days long in May or June
“Festival of Weeks” or “Pentecost”: Occurs 7 X 7
days or 7 weeks plus a day (i.e. 50 days) after
2nd night of Passover.
Celebrates God giving Torah to Moses & Jewish
People at Mt. Sinai
Dairy food eaten
           SHAVUOT II
“Tikkun Lel Shavuot”: Studying
Torah/sacred Jewish texts all night long or
part of night on 1st night of Festival
Reading Book of Ruth
In some synagogues, Jewish youth mark
conclusion of formal Jewish Study by
celebrating Confirmation.
MINOR JEWISH HOLIDAYS
Not in Torah & no work restrictions
              HANUKKAH I
Festival of Rededication
8 days long in late Nov. or Dec.
Celebration of religious freedom; commemorates victory
of Judah Macabee & small group of Jews over Syrian
Greeks who sought to eradicate Judaism over 2,000
years ago.
Miracles of Hanukah: With God’s help, small Jewish
army triumphs over large Syrian Greek army; Judah
Macabee & followers recaptured Temple in Jerusalem
defiled by the Syrian Greeks; when rededicate Temple,
discover small quantity of pure oil for the Menorah (ritual
candelabra); oil lit Menorah for 8 days.
Latkes (potato pancakes) eaten since fried in oil.
                HANUKKAH II
9 branched Menorah lit during
the Holiday; middle branch is
shamus (helper) that lights
other 8 candles. 1candle lit on
1st night, 2 candles on 2nd etc.
until all 8 candles lit on final
night of Festival.
Dreidel (Spinning Top) spun
during the Holiday: One
Hebrew letter on each side of
top reminding Jewish People
that “a great miracle happened
there”.
Hanukkah Gelt, (money or
chocolate coins), given to
children during the Festival.
                      PURIM I
1 day Festival in Feb. or Mar.
Celebration based upon the
Book of Esther: King’s wicked
viceroy, Haman, plotted to
destroy Persian Jews but with
help of God & through
intervention of Esther &
Mordechai, Haman defeated &
Jews saved.
Megillah, (Scroll of Esther)
read; Graggers,
(noisemakers) used to blot out
Haman’s name.
                       PURIM II
Festive meal eaten on Purim.
Friends send Shalach Mones
(Gifts of Food) to one another
& gifts to poor
Hamentaschen, (three-
cornered pastries filled with
poppy seed or jelly filling that
resembles Haman’s three-
cornered hat or his ears) eaten
on Purim
Jews dress in costumes &
perform comical Purim plays.
 ACTS OF LOVING KINDNESS
Giving Tzedakah/Charity   Reverence for Life




  Tikkun Olam: Being      Honoring Elders
  God’s Partners in
  Fixing World
      VISITING THE SICK
Recite prayer of healing when visiting the
sick
VIDUI: THE FINAL CONFESSION
Prayer of Healing recited.
Death as atonement for transgression
Affirmation of Faith (Jewish Prayer from
Deuteronomy): “Hear O Israel, the Eternal
is our God, the Eternal is One.”
Recited by resident or rabbi on his/her
behalf.
Rabbi should be called when Jewish
resident critically ill.
 REVERENCE FOR BODY OF
   JEWISH DECEASED I
Created in the divine image.
For Orthodox Jews: Body of Jewish
resident should not be touched by
caregivers after death has occurred.
For most Jews: Customary procedures are
acceptable.
 REVERENCE FOR BODY OF
   JEWISH DECEASED II
Shomer: “Guardian”
Stays with body &
recites Psalms.
Chevrah Kaddisha:
“Holy Society” of
Jewish volunteers:
Washes & places
white shrouds on
body.
 REVERENCE FOR BODY OF
   JEWISH DECEASED III
No Autopsies unless to save life in future.
No Cremation: Considered desecration of body.
No Embalming unless mandated by State.
Funeral should occur A.S.A.P. after death but
not on the Sabbath or major Jewish Holidays.
Donating Organs:
Honoring the Deceased vs. Saving Life.
Orthodox vs. Non-Orthodox.
No Viewing: Casket always closed
Simple pine box with no metal.
  COMFORTING MOURNERS:
         SHIVAH
Traditionally, 7 Days.
Family does not go to work.
Services held in family’s home.
Mourner’s Kaddish (Jewish
memorial prayer) recited.
Sending flowers not a Jewish
custom.
Donation to appropriate
charitable organization is
always appropriate.
 COMFORTING MOURNERS:
      SHELOSHIM
3 Weeks after Shivah.
No attendance at celebrations, musical
events.
No attendance at weddings.
No cutting of the hair or shaving.
Attendance at Jewish Services as much
as possible to recite.
Mourner’s Kaddish recited.
 COMFORTING MOURNERS:
    THE TEN MONTHS
Ten months after first month of mourning
Jewish mourners who have lost mother or
father continue to attend Services in
synagogue as much as possible & recite
Mourner’s Kaddish.
 COMFORTING MOURNERS:
       YAHRZEIT
Yearly Anniversary of Death according to
Jewish/Hebrew Calendar.
Attend Services in synagogue & recite
Mourner’s Kaddish.
Rabbi announces name of deceased from pulpit.
 COMFORTING MOURNERS:
        YIZKOR
Memorial Services
4 times a year at conclusion of major
Jewish Holidays.
BRANCHES OF JUDAISM
ORTHODOX: “Traditional”

CONSERVATIVE: “Mainline”

REFORM: “Progressive”
             ORTHODOX
Most traditional Jewish movement
Believe that Jewish Way of Life not changed
over time & very little chance that Judaism can
change today.
Believe that only men can become rabbis, lead
Services & read from Torah.
Most Orthodox Jewish men & women will not
shake hands with person of opposite sex.
Will expect same-sex caregiver as loved one.
       CONSERVATIVE
“Mainline”, “middle of the road” Jewish
movement
Believe that that Judaism has changed &
Rabbis can make changes in Jewish law.
In 1980’s, role of Conservative Jewish
women was equalized & they could
become rabbis & cantors & lead Services
for first time.
             REFORM
Liberal/progressive Jewish movement
Judaism has changed. Autonomy is
emphasized: Each Jewish person decides
for him/herself which Jewish practices are
meaningful.
More emphasis on ethical rather than ritual
Jewish law.
Men and women treated equally in every
way.
              YIDDISH
Regardless of denominational affiliation of
Jewish Residents, most speak at least
some Yiddish, which is Medieval German
(German spoken 1,000 years ago) written
in Hebrew Letters.
E.g. “Zie Gezunt” = Be well!

				
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