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Interviewing

VIEWS: 43 PAGES: 61

									Illinois workNet Center
   Employment Power
        Workshop




    Interviewing
        Introduction

 In this session we will talk about
          Interviewing

 The importance of the 3Ps:
       Preparation,
Presentation and Perception
       What’s an Interview?

An interview is -
 The most important step in your job
  search process.
 A conversation:
     The employer hopes to determine whether
      or not the applicant is suitable for the job.
     The applicant tries to learn more about
      the position while also impressing the
      employer.
          THE INTERVIEW


 All your hard work has paid off and you
  have received a call for an interview.

 Let‟s take a look at the different types of
  interviews.
           Types of Interviews

 Phone Interview – Typically used to screen candidates to
  narrow the pool to those who will be invited for in-person
  interviews.

 Preliminary Interview (HR Manager or Panel) – You‟re
  being looked at not only as a candidate, but as a
  performer in the organization.

 Second Interview (HR Manager + Hiring Manager) –
  Expect to spend more time at the company and to have
  your skills and personality more closely scrutinized.
    Phone Interview Techniques

 Ask to set an appointment for the interview
 Find the best place to take the call
 Do research, have all materials handy
  (pen,paper,portfolio, résumé,planner)
 Stand up, speak clearly & smile.
 Dress for the part.
 Follow up with a thank you note.
Source:www.illinoisworknet.com & best-job-interview.com/phone-interview-tips.html
Pre-Interview Guidelines
  Do research on the company
  Check the company‟s website
    Read the Annual Report

         Confirm location
       Dress appropriately
Bring extra copies of your résumé
  Carry a list of your references
  Be on time (15 minutes early)
Pre-Interview Guidelines
              Stay Calm

                Listen

   Be careful not to talk too much

      Use appropriate language

            Ask questions

   Reiterate your interest in the job

    Ask “What is the next step?”

        End with a thank you
What to Bring to an Interview

 Portfolio or notepad and pen
 Copies of your resume and a list of
  references on quality paper.
 List of past jobs and references
 Work samples (if relevant)
 Breath mint
 Driver‟s license/Passport
What Not to Bring to an Interview

 Cell phone
 iPod
 Gum
 Cigarettes
 Candy
 Soda or coffee
 Scuffed shoes, messy and/or not-so-
  clean clothes
While you wait . . . . .

 Greet the receptionist.
 Be friendly and pleasant, but not
  overbearing.
 If you need to wait, sit quietly
  (no phone calls) and patiently.
 Shake hands with the interviewer.
  Your handshake should be firm.
First Impressions Count

 The image the interviewer has of you when you
  first meet is the one that is going to last.

 Slouchy posture speaks loudly about sloppy
  work and low self-esteem.

 When practicing for an interview, work on your
  nonverbal communication as well as your other
  interviewing skills. It could be what clinches the
  job offer for you.
Remember. . .


     There is never a
      second chance
         to make a
     first impression.
     Nonverbal Communication
       During the Interview
 Make eye contact with the interviewer for a few seconds
    at a time.
   Smile and nod (at appropriate times) when the
    interviewer is talking, but don't overdo it. Don't laugh
    unless the interviewer does first.
   Be polite and keep an even tone to your speech. Don't be
    too loud or too quiet.
   Don't slouch.
   Do relax and lean forward a little toward the interviewer
    so you appear interested and engaged.
   Don't lean back. You will look too casual and relaxed.
   Keep your feet on the floor and your back against the
    lower back of the chair.
    Nonverbal Communication
      During the Interview
 Pay attention; be attentive and interested.
 Listen.
 Don't interrupt.
 Stay calm. Even if you had a bad experience at a
  previous position or were fired, keep your emotions to
  yourself and do not show anger or frown.
 Not sure what to do with your hands? Hold a pen and
  your notepad or rest an arm on the chair or on your lap,
  so you look comfortable.
 Don't let your arms fly around the room when you're
  making a point.
Non Verbal Communication
      “The most important thing in communication is
      hearing what isn't said.” -- Peter F. Drucker


 According to some studies,
     55% is body language
     38% is intonation
     7% verbal content

 Nonverbal communication is as
 important, or even more important,
 than verbal communication.
Non-Verbal Communication

To leave a bad impression:
 Reek of cigarette smoke or chewing gum
 Talk on your cell phone or listen to an iPod while waiting


What's important:
 Appear professional and attentive throughout the
  interview.
 Make sure you are dressed professionally, neatly
  groomed, & your shoes are polished.
 Don‟t overdo the perfume or aftershave.
Beware of the Following

   Who‟s uncomfortable?
 Both you and the interviewer

 Interviewer‟s lack of training

     Be aware of space
        Illegal Questions
Federal and state laws prohibit prospective employers from
    asking questions that are unrelated to the job under
   discussion. Questions must not be designed to obtain
 personal information. Be wary of the following topics...

      Age               Method    of transportation

      Sex               Color   / race / ethnicity

      Religion          Marital/family   status

      Disability        Sexual    orientation

      Birthplace           National origin
       How to Answer Illegal
            Questions
 Answer the question.
 Answer the "intent" of the question. For example, if you
  are asked whether you are a United States citizen (not
  legal to ask), reply that you are authorized to work in the
  U.S., which is a question the employer can ask you and
  which is appropriate to answer.
 Try to change the topic of conversation and avoid the
  question.
 Refuse to answer the question which might cost you the
  job if you are very uncomfortable with the question.
  However, consider whether you really want to work
  somewhere where you are asked questions that are not
  appropriate.
    Interview



Know your Job Skills
      Technical Skills

   Specialized Software, License

 Such as: SAP, C++, Quick Books,
Peoplesoft, CPA, CFP, HVAC, Crystal
Reporting, SQL, RN, CNA, Java, MRP,
       BASIC, LSW, EMT, CPR
             Soft Skills
Willing to learn       Confident
Resourceful            Trustworthy
Team Player            Efficient
Initiative             Adaptable
Honest                 Customer Service
Courteous              Positive
Ethical                Language
Reliable                Problem Solver
Verbal Communication   Writing Skills
Prepare for the
        Following Questions

  Tell me about yourself. (99.9% of the time)
          What are your strengths?
         What are your weaknesses?
    Where do you see yourself in 5 years?
           Why should I hire you?
      What interests you about this job?
       Why did you leave your last job?
        Interview Session
     Behavior Based Questions
Tell me about a time when you had to deal with a co-worker
who wasn't doing his/her fair share of the work. What did you
do and what was the outcome?

Tell me about a time that you didn't work well with a
supervisor. What was the outcome and how would you have
changed the outcome?

Give an example of an occasion when you used logic to
solve a problem.

What do you do when your schedule is interrupted? Give an
example of how you handle it.
    Behavior Based Questions

Give me an example of a time when you tried to accomplish
something and failed.

Describe a situation where you found yourself dealing with
someone who didn't like you. What did you do?

Describe a time when you were faced with problems or
stresses at work. What did you do?

Why should we hire YOU? What can you do for us that
someone else cannot?

Describe a decision you made that was unpopular and how you
handled implementing it.
  Answering Behavior Based
         Questions
Behavior based questions are answered with the
following formula:
 P – Problem - give an example of a problem
   you have encountered.
 A – Action – tell what action you took to resolve
   the problem.
 R – What was the positive result that happened
   because you took appropriate action to resolve
   the problem – Always relate the result to how
   you can help the hiring company solve
   problems.
Other Information You May
     Need to Provide

Names of past employers, job titles and
       dates of employment


What were your starting and final salaries?


Many employers will check references and may confirm your
salary history prior to making a job offer. A discrepancy
between what you reported and what the employer says
could knock you out of contention for the job.
    Other Information You May
         Need to Provide
Job Responsibilities

 Be specific and be positive about what you did in your
   previous position(s).

 Describe your responsibilities in detail and try to connect
   them to the job you are interviewing for.

 Try to tie your responsibilities in with those listed in the
   job description for the new position.

 It's also important to be honest. Don't embellish.
     Other Information You May
          Need to Provide
Why are you leaving your job?
   There isn't room for growth with my current employer and I'm ready to
    move on to a new challenge.
   I'm looking for a bigger challenge and to grow my career and I couldn't
    job hunt part time while working. It didn't seem ethical to use my former
    employer's time.
   I was laid-off from my last position when our department was eliminated
    due to corporate restructuring.
   I'm relocating to this area due to family circumstances and left my
    previous position in order to make the move.
   I've decided that is not the direction I want to go in my career and my
    current employer has no opportunities in the direction I'd like to head.
   I am interested in a new challenge and an opportunity to use my
    technical skills and experience in a different capacity than I have in the
    past.
   I recently received my degree and I want to utilize my educational
    background in my next position.
     Other Information You May
          Need to Provide
Why did you leave your job?
   I am interested in a job with more responsibility, and I am very ready for
    a new challenge.
   I left my last position in order to spend more time with my family.
    Circumstances have changed and I'm more than ready for full-time
    employment again.
   I am seeking a position with a stable company with room for growth and
    opportunity for advancement.
   I was commuting to the city and spending a significant amount of time
    each day on travel. I would prefer to be closer to home.
   To be honest, I wasn't considering a move, but, I saw this job posting
    and was intrigued by the position and the company. It sounds like an
    exciting opportunity and an ideal match with my qualifications.
   This position seemed like an excellent match for my skills and
    experience and I am not able to fully utilize them in my present job.
   The company was cutting back and, unfortunately, my job was one of
    those eliminated.
    Other Information You May
         Need to Provide
What have you been doing since your last job?

 I worked on several freelance projects, while actively
   seeking for a job.

 I volunteer for a literacy program that assists
   disadvantaged children.

 My aging parents needed a temporary caregiver and I
   spent time looking after them.

 I took some continuing education classes and seminars.
Interview Questions: Work History – 1
Name of company, position title and description,
dates of employment.

   Interviewers expect a candidate for employment to be able to review
    their work history in detail. Be prepared to tell the interviewer the names
    of the companies you worked for, your job title, your starting and ending
    dates of employment, how much you earned and what your job
    entailed.

   You'd be surprised how many job applicants fumble when asked about
    prior employment. Don't be one of them! Refresh your memory prior to
    the interview by reviewing your resume, so, you can speak about your
    prior work history in detail and accurately.

   If you don't have a resume, make sure what you tell the interviewer
    matches what you filled out on your job application. The best way to
    prepare is to prepare a sample job application ahead of time. Complete
    the sample application and bring it with you when you are applying for
    employment. This way you will be able to copy the information rather
    than having to remember dates and other employment information.
Interview Questions: Work History – 2
What were your expectations for the job and to
what extent were they met?

   In many cases, interviewers will want to know what you expected from your last
    job when you were hired, so be prepared to answer the interview question, "What
    were your expectations for the job and to what extent were they met?"

   There isn't a right or wrong answer to this question. The best way to respond is to
    discuss what you expected when you took the job and give examples of how the
    position worked out for you. If the job wasn't exactly what you expected, it's fine to
    mention that. However, you should focus on the job itself, not the company, your
    boss, or your co-workers (if they were a problem). Do be careful how you answer
    and don't focus too much on the negative. Instead, address the highlights of the
    job.

   When responding, be specific. Prepare some examples to share with the
    interviewer in advance. For example, if your job involved creating web applications
    using Cold Fusion, discuss the specific programs you developed and the
    responsibilities you were given. If you were provided training and opportunities for
    professional development to help you achieve your goals, mention that, as well.
Interview Questions: Work History – 3
What were your starting and final levels of
    compensation?

    Interviewers expect a candidate for employment to be able to provide
     the details of their compensation history. Be prepared to tell the
     interviewer how much you earned at each of your prior positions.

    Make sure that what you tell the interviewer matches what you listed on
     your job application. Refresh your memory prior to the interview by
     reviewing your compensation history, so, you can speak in detail and
     accurately. Don't exaggerate or inflate your earnings. Many employers
     will check references and confirm your salary history prior to making a
     job offer. A discrepancy between what you reported and what the
     employer says could knock you out of contention for the job.

    The best way to prepare is to prepare a sample job application ahead of
     time. Complete the sample application and review it prior to the
     interview.
Interview Questions: Work History – 4
What were your responsibilities?


 When you are asked questions related to your current or
   previous positions, it's important to be specific and to be
   positive about what you did in your previous position(s).

 The best way to respond is to describe your responsibilities in
   detail and to connect them to the job you are interviewing for.
   Try to tie your responsibilities in with those listed in the job
   description for the new position. That way, the employer will see
   that you have the qualifications necessary to do the job. Focus
   most on your responsibilities that are directly related to the new
   job's requirements.

 It's also important to be honest. Don't embellish your job,
   because you don't know who the hiring manager will be
   checking with when they check your references.
Interview Questions: Work History – 5
 What major challenges and problems did you
face? How did you handle them?


   When asked the job interview question "How did you handle a
    challenge?" be sure to include specific examples of how you handled a
    particular difficult situation. Discuss how you researched the issue and
    contributed to finding a solution. Examples of good responses include:

   During a difficult financial period, I was able to satisfactorily negotiate
    repayment schedules with multiple vendors.

   When the software development of our new product stalled, I
    coordinated the team which managed to get the schedule back on
    track. We were able to successfully troubleshoot the issues and solve
    the problems, within a very short period of time.

   A long-term client was about to take their business to a competitor. I
    met with the customer and was able to change how we handled the
    account on a day-to-day basis, in order to keep the business.
Interview Questions: Work History – 6
What was the biggest accomplishment / failure
in this position?


   Your potential employer will want to know what you accomplished, and what you
    didn't, in your current or last position.

   The best way to respond is to give an example of something you accomplished
    that is directly related to the job you are interviewing for. Review your resume and
    review the job posting. Find the best match and use that to show how what you
    accomplished will be beneficial to the company you are interviewing with.

   If you wrote a targeted cover letter when applying for the job use the information
    you included to create your response. For example, if you are interviewing for a
    job at a school where you will need to manage student registration, explain to the
    interviewer how you registered students for courses, designed and managed
    registration software, and solved customer problems.

   If you didn't fail at anything, say so. If you can think of an example, be sure that it's
    a minor one and turn it into a positive. For example, if you were working on a
    project that was behind deadline, explain to the interviewer how you adjusted the
    workload and the timeline to get back on track and ahead of schedule.
Interview Questions: Work History – 7
What was it like working for your supervisor?
What were his strengths and shortcomings?



 A typical interview question is "What Was it Like Working
   for Your Supervisor?" The reason it's asked it to find out
   how you got along with your boss. Be careful how your
   answer. Interviewers don't like to hear too much (or much
   at all) about bad bosses because it could be someone
   from their company that you're talking about next time
   around.

 Instead, accentuate the positive and minimize any difficult
   situations. Discuss the strengths your past supervisors
   had and how they helped you succeed in your positions.
Interview Questions: Work History – 8
Who was your best boss and who was the
worst?


With the question "Who was your best boss and who was
  the worst?" the interviewer is trying to discover if you
  assess blame or carry a grudge.

Best Answers--

 I've learned from each boss I've had. From the good
  ones, what to do, from the challenging ones - what not to
  do.
 Early in my career, I had a mentor who helped me a great
  deal, we still stay in touch. I've honestly learned
  something from each boss I've had.
Interview Questions:9

Why are you leaving your job?
   There isn't room for growth with my current employer and I'm ready to move on to a new
    challenge.
   I'm looking for a bigger challenge and to grow my career and I couldn't job hunt part time
    while working. It didn't seem ethical to use my former employer's time.
   I was laid-off from my last position when our department was eliminated due to corporate
    restructuring.
   I'm relocating to this area due to family circumstances and left my previous position in
    order to make the move.
   I've decided that is not the direction I want to go in my career and my current employer
    has no opportunities in the direction I'd like to head.
   I am interested in a new challenge and an opportunity to use my technical skills and
    experience in a different capacity than I have in the past.
   I recently received my degree and I want to utilize my educational background in my next
    position.
   I am interested in a job with more responsibility, and I am very ready for a new challenge.
   I left my last position in order to spend more time with my family. Circumstances have
    changed and I'm more than ready for full-time employment again.
   I am seeking a position with a stable company with room for growth and opportunity for
    advancement.
   I was commuting to the city and spending a significant amount of time each day on
    travel. I would prefer to be closer to home.
   To be honest, I wasn't considering a move, but, I saw this job posting and was intrigued
    by the position and the company. It sounds like an exciting opportunity and an ideal
    match with my qualifications.
   This position seemed like an excellent match for my skills and experience and I am not
    able to fully utilize them in my present job.
   The company was cutting back and, unfortunately, my job was one of those eliminated.
Interview Questions: 10
What have you been doing since your last job?
   If you have an employment gap on your resume, the interviewer will
    probably ask you what you have been doing while you were out of work.

   The best way to answer this question is to be honest, but do have an answer
    prepared. You will want to let the interviewer know that you were busy and
    active, regardless of whether you were out of work by choice, or otherwise.
    Here are some suggestions on how to explain what you did while you were
    out of the workforce.

   I worked on several freelance projects, while actively seeking for a job.

   I volunteered for a literacy program that assists disadvantaged children.

   My aging parents needed a temporary caregiver and I spent time looking
    after them.

   I spent time being a stay-at-home mom and volunteering at my daughter's
    school.

   I took some continuing education classes and seminars.

   It doesn't really matter what you did, as long as you have an explanation.
    Hiring managers understand that people lose their job - it can happen to
    anyone - and it's not always easy to find a new job fast. Also, there are
    legitimate non-employment reasons for being out of the workforce.
Interview Questions
Behavioral - 1
  Tell me about a time when you had to deal with a co-
  worker who wasn't doing his/her fair share of the
  work. What did you do and what was the outcome?

 I worked closely with Brenda who, for the most part,
   always carried her fair share of the work load. During a
   stressful time, working on a project with a deadline, I
   realized Brenda‟s contributions to the project were almost
   minimal. I made the decision to wait until after the project
   to speak with her. I'm glad I did, because I learned she'd
   been going through a very tough time in her personal life
   and she appreciated my willingness to go the extra mile
   so the project was completed on time. As a result, our
   ability to work well together significantly increased.
Interview Questions
Behavioral - 2
  Give me an example of a time when you took
  the time to share a co-worker's or
  supervisor's achievements with other?

 At my most recent position, one of my co-
  workers, Dan, did an outstanding job of calming
  an irate customer, solving the customer's
  problem and completing a sale. When our boss
  asked me how things were going, I told him
  everything was going fine and that Dan had just
  completed calming an irate customer and
  closing a sale. It was a win-win-win- for our
  boss, Dan and the customer.
Interview Questions
Behavioral - 3
   Tell me about a time that you didn't work well with a
   supervisor. What was the outcome and how would you
   have changed the outcome?

 Early in my career, I had a supervisor (Judy) who was in a fairly
   good mood on Monday, but it deteriorated each day until by
   Friday, the supervisor was finding fault with everything I did. I
   didn't realize, until I left that position, that I had been a
   contributor to the decline in her mood. Judy would ask me how
   my weekend was (on Monday) and during the week she would
   ask how it was going.

 I would tell her how much fun I was having (I was single) and
   how I was looking forward to the weekend plans. After I left, I
   realized my life was in complete contrast to hers and I reminded
   her of it almost daily. When she asked the questions, I should
   have had a quick answer, and then asked her how she was
   doing!!!!
Interview Questions
Behavioral - 4
  Have you worked with someone you didn't
  like? If so, how did you handle it?

 Yes, I've worked with someone whom I found
  difficult to like as a person. However, when I
  focused on the skills they brought to the job and
  their ability to solve problems, the two things I
  did appreciate, slowly my attitude towards them
  changed. We were never friends, but we did
  work well together.
Interview Questions
Behavioral - 5
Tell me about a time that you helped someone.

 Most recently, we had a new hire (Paul) that
  was really struggling with getting to work on
  time, and I knew the boss (Al) was getting
  irritated. Over lunch one day I explained to Paul
  how important it was to our boss for everyone
  to be there at least 10 minutes early. It was
  personal with Al, but you could really get on his
  bad side when you were frequently late. The
  new employee was grateful for the advice. At
  his previous employment, the boss was only
  concerned about the work getting done on time;
  he/she did not "watch the clock".
Interview Questions
Behavioral - 6
  Tell me about a time that you misjudged a
  person.

 There was a long-time employee (Michael) at
  my second company who was very gruff when
  he spoke to me. At first, I went out of my way to
  win the Michael's approval. Then I realized that
  was compounding the problem. So I observed
  how he interacted with other employees and
  discovered I wasn't alone. He was gruff to most
  people. I quit trying to gain his approval and, in
  the process, discovered he'd learned his
  behavior from a former boss he'd had whom he
  admired.
Interview Questions
Behavioral - 7
  How do you get along with older (younger) co-
  workers?

 Suggested answer if your co-workers are older: There
  are times when I just know that a new way of doing
  something makes more sense to me; but, first hand, I
  learned that my "better way" may not be the best way to
  get the job done. As a consequence, I respect my older
  co-workers knowledge and I've learned how to make a
  suggestion at the appropriate time.

 Suggested answer if your co-workers are younger: I
  quickly realized it was not my job to "parent" the younger
  people with whom I work; it was my job to get to know
  them and for us to find common ground where we could
  effectively work together. It took time, but the result was
  worth the effort.
Ask Questions
 Why is this position available?
 Who would be my supervisor?
 What do you like about working for this company?
 What is this company's culture?
 What do you consider to be the company's strengths and
 weaknesses?
 Describe the opportunities for training and professional
 development.
 Are there opportunities for advancement within the
  organization?
 When can I expect to hear from you?
Ask Questions
 How would you describe the responsibilities of the
    position?
   How would you describe a typical week or day in this
    position?
   Is this a new position? If not, what did the previous
    employee go on to do?
   What is the company's management style?
   Who does this position report to? If I am offered the
    position, can I meet him/her?
   How many people work in this office/department?
   How much travel is expected?
   Is relocation a possibility?
   What is the typical work week? Is overtime expected?
Ask Questions

 What are the prospects for growth and advancement?
 How does one advance in the company?
 Are there any examples?
 What do you like about working here?
 What don't you like about working here and what would
    you change?
   Would you like a list of references?
   If I am extended a job offer, how soon would you like me
    to start?
   What can I tell you about my qualifications?
   When can I expect to hear from you?
   Are there any other questions I can answer for you?
Questions you should not ask
 What does this company do?
   (Do your research ahead of time!)
 If I get the job when can I take time off
  for vacation? (Wait until you get the offer
  to mention prior commitments.)
 Can I change my schedule if I get the
  job? (If you need to figure out the
  logistics of getting to work don't mention
  it now...)
Top Ten Interview Blunders
1.  Not being prepared
2.  Dressing inappropriately
3.  Poor communication skills
4.  Too much communication
5.  Talking too much
6.  Not talking enough
7.  Fuzzy facts
8.  Wrong answers
9.  Bad mouthing previous employers
10. Forgetting to follow up
     Why you didn’t get the job

 Poor at interviewing    Poor communication
 Lacking job skills         skills
 Job hopping               No self confidence
 No experience             Lack of education
 Background info           Too old
 Bad attitude              Too young
 Poor salesperson          Bad manners
 Cultural issues           No motivation
 No sense of humor         Ethical issues
 Poor soft skills          __________________
                Ending the Interview
   If you're interested in the position, let the interviewer
         know by stating at the end of the interview:

"I am very interested in this position. Is there
   anything preventing you from offering me this
               position right now?"

                             Remember--
          Firm handshake with good eye contact & smile.
Don‟t leave without the interview‟s name, title, & contact information.
         Post-Interview Follow Up

 Take detailed notes about interview content.
 Evaluate what went well & what didn‟t.
 List information you neglected to share.
 Deliver any requested information & a thank you
  note within 24 hours, even if you e-mail a thank you.
 Don‟t wait for the interviewer to call you.


Go to www.illinoisworknet.com--Jobs--Prepare for a Job-
  Prepare for an Interview for more helpful tips, & a link
              to www.best-job-interview.com
                    References
                    Personal or Business?
 List only professional references, unless personal references
  are requested by the employer.
 References should be your co-workers or immediate
  supervisors.
 Always obtain permission of the reference.
 Send a copy of your résumé to every person you have listed
  as a reference.
 Have someone test what kind of „reference‟ you are being
  given.
               Remember 3Ps
Preparation - It‟s important to prepare. Practice. – It‟s
important to be familiar with your marketing tool (i.e.,
résumé ) and your cover letter. Know your accomplishments.

Presentation - There is never a second chance to make a
First Impression. The more people you leave with a good
impression, the better your chances of being remembered.

Perception - Demonstrate you‟re listening. Ask Questions.
Show them why you will be successful in their organization.
         Don’t Forget

In a majority of interviews a positive
       decision is based on the
      interviewer LIKING YOU.

 (….not necessarily the skills and
      experiences you have)
            Any Questions?

 Illinois workNet and its dedicated team of volunteers hope that
 these workshop presentations have been helpful to you and will
          bring you the rewarding outcome you desire.

    In addition to offering employment workshops at the Illinois
 workNet Center in Arlington Heights every other Wednesday, our
team also offers them at many local libraries & community centers
                         throughout the month.

       Please forward your comments and suggestions to
                  mfaheem@worknetncc.com

								
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