A guide to creating a Risk Inventory Evaluation (RIE) by owp20669

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									A guide to creating a Risk Inventory & Evaluation (RIE) tool

You are seeking to develop the content of the digital RIE tool for companies in your
sector, and to offer this sector-specific tool to them.

Before you start making an RIE tool, it is a good idea to first give thought to a number
of matters. This will save you time, as you will not have to make many changes later
on, and it will save end-users time when using the tool in practice.
The following themes are worthy of consideration.

1. The structure and content of the RIE tool in relation to the end-user:
      a. it will be an entrepreneur or someone in a company who will ultimately be
          using the RIE tool. The structure of the tool should be as relevant as
          possible to the thought processes and day-to-day activities of people in
          such companies;
      b. the language in the tool should be easy to for everyone to understand.

2. The structure of an RIE tool in relation to its use.
   Structure refers to:
       a. the establishment of a profile in the tool. A profile determines which
          modules the user of the RIE tool will deal with (because the user ticks
          certain boxes with regard to the use of the digital RIE tool when he starts
          to fill it in);
       b. modules that start with a selection question. Selection questions determine
          whether or not the content of the module applies to the company in
          question;
       c. modules with sets of questions centred around a particular subject. A
          module may contain sub-modules.

1. The structure and content of the RIE tool in relation to the end-user

a. The structure in relation to the end-user

Who in fact is the end-user and what does this mean for the structure of the RIE tool?
It is important that you realise that the end-user thinks in terms of his own business
processes. In doing so, he thinks in his own language, which means that he refers to
things by names that are familiar and usual to him: try to factor this in as much as
possible.
Often, this differs from the practice of the person drawing up the content of RIE tools.
This person, too, thinks in terms of his own work processes and uses his own
language.
The end-user is essential: he has to be able to use the RIE tool for his own purposes
without any problems or difficulties in interpreting it.
Some examples:
 the end-user thinks of physical work, while the expert thinks of physical load;
 the end-user thinks of working in the heat or in the cold, while the expert thinks of
     the thermal environment;
 the expert thinks of safety and creates a module containing everything in that area.
     The end-user may think of opening and closing a shop, for example, and what that
     involves, or dealing with aggressive customers and what to do about them.


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It is important to structure the tool so that it is in line with the way the average end-
user thinks and acts. It makes the content recognisable, and it makes it easier to carry
out a plan of action.
Thorough consideration of the structure will pay dividends later on, so classify the
subjects in a way that is relevant to end-users. Please note that such classifications are
usually different to how experts might normally envisage them.
The basic tool upon which you can build variations contains the following modules.
In the Content Management System (CMS) manual you will find more information on
the content and how you can use this content as a basis.

1. Every building
2. A few buildings
3. Storage room / warehouse
4. Office work
5. Delivery and removal of material
6. Physical work
7. Working on site
8. Working with customers / clients / guests
9. Noise
10. Climate: heat, radiation, cold, outdoors
11. Vibrations
12. Hazardous substances as raw materials
13. Hazardous substances as a result of / during work
14. Heights / crawl spaces / closed spaces
15. Tools / machines / means of transport
16. In case of emergency
17. Working and resting times
18. Tasks / functions of employees
19. Unwanted behaviour of employees
20. Basic agreements concerning occupational health and safety
21. Information
22. Agreements on absence from work
23. Accidents
24. State of progress of the plan of action
25. Organisation of preventive measures
    1. Prevention duties
    2. Tailor-made scheme / safety net scheme
        • Tailor-made scheme
        • Safety net scheme



b. The content in relation to the end-user

Language
The content of the tool should be easy for everyone to understand. This means you
should look carefully – keeping the end-user in mind – at the type of language that
you use.
It is important to use spoken rather than written language. The end-user has to be able
to understand in an instant what is written and to be able to respond to it.


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In addition, it is recommended that sentences should be no longer than ten words.
Keep the needs of the end-user in mind!
Short sentences and clear everyday language that can easily be read by the layman
will prevent the user from developing an aversion, and enable him to draw up an
inventory and use the RIE tool properly.

Questions/propositions
The tool works with ‘propositions’ rather than ‘questions’.
The structure of the content of the RIE tool is based on propositions.
 A situation (the proposition) is ‘in order’ or ‘not in order’; the answer is either a
    clear ‘yes’ or ‘no’.
 If a situation (the proposition) is not in order, the subject (the proposition) is
    included in the plan of action.
The text of the proposition in the situation given (in order or not in order) is the same
as that in the plan of action. It then becomes the situation that is to be attained.
Because a response has earlier been given to a particular situation, the wording is
familiar.
As well as being familiar to the end-user, it also has the advantage for the person
devising the content that the situation only has to be described on one occasion. If
(statutory) changes would have to be made to the tool in the future, then any such
change will only have to be implemented once.

Avoid any negative statements in the propositions
In principle, the only possible answers to the propositions are ‘yes’ and ‘no’.
It is therefore important not to put any negative statements in the propositions.
For example: ‘there is no asbestos in the building’.
In practice, the end-user will not be sure whether his ‘yes’ or ‘no’ will be interpreted
as agreement or disagreement with the proposition, so it will not be clear whether
asbestos is present or not.
Reformulating the proposition without using a negative would result in ‘the building
is free of asbestos’. ‘Yes’ – the matter is in order and will not feature in the plan of
action. ‘No’ – the matter is not in order (in other words, there is asbestos present in
the building) and various situations may feature in the plan of action.

The ‘not applicable’ option
The ‘not applicable’ option can also be used with propositions in modules. If this is
the case, then you should state this in the Content Management System (CMS). You
can use the CMS to provide the content of the digital RIE tool. However, you should
consider using the ‘not applicable’ option as little as possible. It is better to work with
a profile or with selection questions. In the case of a profile question, a selection is
made at the start of the RIE tool of any modules that can be excluded. In the case of a
selection question, the answers given at the start of the module determine whether the
content of the module should be answered. For more information on this, please read
below.

2. The structure of the RIE tool in relation to its use

This section deals with:




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a. establishing a profile in the tool. A profile determines which modules the user of
   the RIE tool will deal with (because the user answers certain questions at the start
   of the digital RIE tool);
b. modules that start with a filter question. Filter questions determine whether the
   content of the module applies to the company in question;
c. modules with sets of questions centred around a particular subject. A module may
   contain sub-modules.


a. The profile

When using a profile question, you examine various aspects of companies and the
activities in which they may be involved.
The end-user of the tool answers a number of questions before actually applying the
RIE tool.
The answers to these questions determine which modules the end-user will and which
modules he will not be dealing with. An example from the fish retail trade:
• Do you have a shop?
• Do you have a stall on a market?
• Do you have a mobile sales vehicle?
Similar situations may occur in the sector where you work. It may also be the case
that some of the companies transport their goods to their clients themselves, while
others contract such activities out to third parties.
Working out in advance whether a profile is relevant means that the end-user does not
have to deal with modules that do not apply to his company.

b. Filter questions

A filter question is the first question in a module. The question determines whether a
situation is relevant. If the answer to the question is ‘no’, then the subsequent
questions in the module are not displayed.
Modules with filter questions can also be useful in certain situations.
An example of a filter question is, ‘there is a warehouse or storage area present’.
This prevents the end-user from having to answer questions in modules that are not
relevant to his company.

It is possible to work with both profile questions and filter questions.

c. Main modules and sub-modules

Another way of providing structure is to use main modules that contain sub-modules.
What matters is that you make it is easy for the end-user to complete the RIE.
You can start the sub-modules with a filter question for the purpose of determining
whether the sub-module is relevant.
For example:
Main module:                         Building
Sub-module:                          Every building
                                     and questions regarding the building




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Sub-module:                          Some buildings
Starting with a filter question:     The public is received in the building
                                     and questions regarding receiving public
Sub-module:                          Some buildings
Starting with a filter question:     There are stairways, escalators, lifts in the
                                     building
                                     and questions regarding those subjects
Sub-module:                          Some buildings
Sub-module with a filter question:   There are kitchens present in the building
                                     and questions regarding this subject


3. Finally

You have gained an idea of how you can construct the content of the digital RIE tool.
By focusing on the possible structure:
• in a way that is relevant to how the end-user thinks and acts;
• and at the same time including all the subjects that, from an occupational health
   point of view, should feature in the structure and in such a way that the end-user
   can readily understand and relate to them,
you will help the end-user complete the digital RIE tool.
The digital RIE tool can be used for other purposes too, such as for providing more
detailed explanatory information and solutions, links to websites, or for adding
photographs.
To find out more about these additional uses, please refer to the CMS (Content
Management System) manual.

Fenny Michel.




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