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									                         Baptist Union of New South Wales


                    Baptist Church Membership

This document contains reports presented to the 1994 and 1995 Baptist Union Annual
Assemblies concerning membership in Baptist Churches in New South Wales and the
Australian Capital Territory.


In particular these report address questions relating to whether a Baptist Church affiliated with
the Baptist Union of New South Wales can be only a "closed Membership" church ie one
whose membership - and therefore governance - is limited to persons who have been
baptised as believers only by immersion or whether a church can have a more open form of
membership to include persons who have come to faith (ie who are believers) but who have
not been baptised in this way.


The reports also consider whether a church can amend its constitution to include such
persons and the requirements if a church chooses to do so.




            Reports presented to the 1994 and 1995 Baptist Union Annual Assemblies concerning
                           membership in Baptist Churches in NSW and the ACT
     BAPTISTS AND THE CHANGING DENOMINATIONAL SCENE

Especially in the country, but also in many city areas, we have an interesting development;
many Christians attending Baptist Churches are not traditionally. Baptist some still claiming
basic allegiance to another Christian tradition. The problem is that in many cases, these
people are amongst the most committed and energetic in the congregation! Two problems
emerge: first, one of membership and leadership; secondly, one of function in the
community.

Churches are struggling on the first issue to find ways and means, not only to make their
brethren feel "at home", but also to give them a voice and some significant leadership.
Interesting ways of doing this are being tried out in some churches. Eventually we shall need
to face this question as a denomination, rather than pretending it does not exist!

Secondly, in an age of remarkable regrouping among Christians, are we being called to be a
significant Christian body within a local community, which could be "home" for a variety of
Christian people? Basic distinctives, including an evangelical hold on the scriptures must be
preserved, but a loving inclusiveness might be our new challenge. (Dr WE Andersen,
President's Review, 1990 - 91.)

INTRODUCTION

We are living in a very mobile society where social changes are rapid and accelerating. No
longer do families reside in the same house during the period their children are with them and
churches are exercising different ministries to those of thirty years ago. Families moving to
new areas no longer automatically attend the nearest church of the denomination in which
they were reared. They “try out” various churches until they find one that best suits the needs
of their total family and where they can best use their gifts in ministry.

Recent research has confirmed that in many of our churches Christians who are ineligible for
membership in a Baptist Church under the present criteria are very active in significant
leadership roles including Missionary Directors, Sunday School Superintendents and
Teachers, Brigade Officers, Playgroup Leaders, Christian School Principals, Church
Treasurers etc. One church unable to find a competent and willing member to be Church
Secretary has appointed a person ineligible to be a member as an Administrative Assistant
who is, in fact, their Church Secretary.

At least fourteen churches have a form of membership open to Christians ineligible for full
membership to enable them to be appointed to leadership positions and vote on most matters
at members' meetings. Without such people many churches would be severely restricted in
their ministries.

ASSEMBLY RESOLUTION

The 1992 Assembly resolved "that a group of persons be appointed by the Executive
Committee, to be set up to study the issues raised in the President's Review under the
heading "Baptists and a Changing Denominational Scene" and report their findings to a future
Assembly as soon as possible.

The Executive Committee appointed the General Superintendent, the Honorary Legal
Adviser, the General Secretary, Rev's G Chatfield, B Powell and Mr R Jarvis as the
committee.


           Reports presented to the 1994 and 1995 Baptist Union Annual Assemblies concerning
                          membership in Baptist Churches in NSW and the ACT
BIBLICAL BASIS

An obvious starting point is to consider the teachings of Scripture and how such teachings
apply to us today. Baptists agree that New Testament baptism was a baptism of believers
only by immersion. It is important to note the close association of baptism in the New
Testament with repentance and faith. In the book of Acts, the pattern set at Pentecost of
repentance and baptism in the name of Jesus Christ (Acts 2:38) is repeatedly confirmed.
Reference should also be made to Acts 8:35-38; 10:34-48; 16:27-34.

In Romans 6:1-11 baptism is seen as an act expressing identification by faith with Christ.
This is seen to be a decisive turning from the old sinful life and entry into newness of life in
Christ. In Galatians 3:26-27 the apostle Paul places faith and baptism in parallel. He
interprets baptism as "putting on Christ". The apostle Peter speaks of baptism as “an appeal
to God for a clear conscience, through the resurrection of Jesus Christ” (1 Peter 3:21). From
the above it is dear that those who believed in the Gospel promptly expressed their faith in
Christ through baptism.

A recognition of this New Testament pattern should influence our practice of baptism. It
should also call into question any practice which seems to treat baptism as an act of further
obedience separated from a person's public confession of repentance from sin and faith in
Christ.

Such direct New Testament teaching on the relationship between baptism and church
membership favours baptism into membership. Luke speaks of those baptised at Pentecost
as being “added” and goes on to describe their active involvement in the life of the church at
Jerusalem (Acts 2:41-42). Paul speaks of baptism into the body of Christ, though the phrase
“by one Spirit” has caused some commentators to question whether water baptism was in
mind (1 Cor 12:13). Whatever our opinion about this, it would seem to follow from an
understanding of baptism as identification with Christ that it must also be identification with
the church as the body of Christ. This reasoning is confirmed by the sequence of thought to
be found in Galatians 3:26-28.

If this is a correct understanding then the norm should be a close association of baptism with
both "coming to faith" and "coming into membership". This should move us as Baptists to
avoid either membership without believers' baptism or believers' baptism without membership
as a normal practice. This however leaves open the question of what should be the attitude
of the local autonomous church to any departure from the norm. Some will take the view that
there should be no departure from the norm. Others have already taken the view that it is
appropriate that there be departures from the norm whether by having believers' baptism
without membership or by providing for membership without believers' baptism.


DIFFERENT BAPTIST ATTITUDES

It is fundamental to a Baptist Union of Churches to acknowledge that as Baptists we adhere
to the autonomy of the local church. At the end of the day the interrelationship between
believers' baptism by immersion and church membership is a matter for the local church.
Notwithstanding this, the committee believes it is helpful to trace certain different attitudes on
the part of Baptists. In so doing, it is to be hoped that the local church will be better informed
in any decision it makes concerning this issue.

The most stringent practice, exemplified historically by the Strict and Particular Baptists, is the
maintenance of both closed membership and a closed fellowship of the Lord's Supper. This


            Reports presented to the 1994 and 1995 Baptist Union Annual Assemblies concerning
                           membership in Baptist Churches in NSW and the ACT
practice protects Baptist principles, especially believers' baptism by immersion and
regenerate church membership. On the other hand this practice runs the risk of failing to give
sufficient recognition to the reality of fellowship in Christ among all who genuinely love Him.

The other extreme is a practice (largely unknown in New South Wales, but found in other
parts of the world including South Australia and some churches in Western Australia) of both
open membership and open Table. This practice gives practical expression to an emphasis
on a personal faith in Christ and the unity of all who share such faith, but runs the risk of
departing from the Baptist distinctive of baptism as of "believers only by immersion".

A middle position which has been generally followed by New South Wales Baptists is the
combination of closed membership with open Table. It has often been argued, and with some
justification, that this position sufficiently safeguards the Baptist distinctive of baptism as
believers only by immersion, but permits the Lord's Supper to be a truly Christian celebration
in fellowship rather an exclusively Baptist one. On the other hand this approach is open to
the charge of a certain inconsistency to the effect that people are invited to take part in the
local church's most precious celebration of common faith in Christ (viz the Lord's Supper) but
denied church membership.

Many Baptists have found none of these three positions entirely satisfactory. They have
sought to modify closed membership without moving all the way to open membership. It is
difficult to summarise or categorise a variety of such endeavours without considerable
oversimplification. Nevertheless these different views include the following:-

(a)    those who insist upon baptism as a believer as being essential to membership in a
       Baptist Church without insisting on baptism by immersion;

(b)    those who accept as a member any baptised believer active in the life of a church
       regardless of whether the person was baptised as a believer and regardless of
       whether the person was baptised as a believer by immersion;

(c)    those who accept into membership any believer who conscientiously assents to
       believers' baptism by immersion (even where that person conscientiously denies the
       appropriateness of such baptism at his or her stage of Christian experience);

(d)    those who have recourse to Associate Membership in order to maintain closed
       membership yet give formal expression to acceptance of other believers into the life of
       the church.

Some believe that baptism as a believer is the essential requirement of membership in a
Baptist Church. For them, although immersion is the most appropriate mode, it is not of such
importance as to invalidate the baptism of a believer carried out by pouring or sprinkling. In
fact some would take the view that to baptise somebody again merely for the sake of
immersion would reduce baptism to a purely external rite unrelated to confession of faith. An
example of this can be found in the constitution of Wedgewood Baptist Church, North
Carolina:

“We accept any person who presents himself as a candidate for membership from any
Christian denomination, without regard to his or her form of baptism, as long it was believer’s
baptism and at the time of administration it was for that person an act of obedience
symbolising his or her identification with the Christian faith and the whole Church as Body of
Christ. If the candidate's baptism was other than 'believers baptism' the candidate will be
immersed."




           Reports presented to the 1994 and 1995 Baptist Union Annual Assemblies concerning
                          membership in Baptist Churches in NSW and the ACT
For those who place the emphasis upon accepting into membership any baptised believer
active in the life of the church, insistence is upon the church being “the fellowship of
believers”. They take the view that believers should not be excluded on the grounds of infant
baptism where they have now come to personal faith. They would argue that baptism years
after such a person has come to faith and become active in the life of the Christian church is
not so much a confession of faith after the New Testament pattern as a mere legal
qualification for church membership. An example of this is the constitution of Nashville
Baptist Church, North Carolina which provides:-

      “People are accepted by transfer from other Christian churches provided they
      accept Jesus Christ as their personal Lord and Saviour. They are instructed in
      our baptism position and the meaning of baptism. They are offered this baptism
      if it will be meaningful to them as a symbolic experience. However, those who
      feel that their baptism to them was a valid experience and that to submit to any
      further ceremony in this regard would be to refute their former religious
      experience as Christians are accepted into membership on the basis of their faith
      in Jesus Christ as Lord and Saviour and the validity of their baptismal experience
      to them.”

For those who accept into membership any believer who conscientiously assents to believers'
baptism by immersion regardless of their personal experience, an unbaptised person who has
long been a believer and has publicly confessed faith in a fashion other than baptism is seen
not necessarily to be an appropriate candidate for baptism. An example of this is a church in
Hamburg Germany which provides:-

      “In special cases, believers who have become members of the body of Christ
      with a different baptismal practice to ours, can upon application and testimony
      become members of our church, as long as they agree that the baptismal
      teachings and practice of our church are scriptural and are prepared to support
      it.”

Finally there are those who have recourse to Associate Membership in order to maintain
closed membership yet give formal expression to an acceptance of other believers into the
life of the church. Advocates of this practice are able to say truthfully that they are only doing
more formally and openly what many others in fact do, but are open to the criticism of
creating two classes of membership, of recognising a strangely ambiguous status of “almost
belonging” to a local body of Christ.

THE LEGAL POSITION

Because of an awareness that a number of churches affiliated with the Baptist Union of New
South Wales have constitutions which provide for varying degrees of membership other than
closed membership, the Executive Committee authorised that a legal opinion be obtained
from Messrs RA Ellicott QC and GC Lindsay SC. Amongst the matters upon which they were
asked to advise was the legal implications (if any) which might arise if any church affiliated
with the Baptist Union of New South Wales permitted membership of persons other than
those baptised as believers by immersion and/or people who did not hold to the doctrine of
"baptism of believers only by immersion”.

Messrs Ellicott and Lindsay have advised that there is no legal impediment to a local
autonomous church permitting its membership to include:-

(a)   persons who hold the doctrines stated in Schedule A of the Baptist Union Incorporation
      Act 1919 (see 1995 Baptist Union Handbook page 206) as their general tenets, but who


            Reports presented to the 1994 and 1995 Baptist Union Annual Assemblies concerning
                           membership in Baptist Churches in NSW and the ACT
      by reason of exceptional circumstances (for example physical disability precluding
      baptism by immersion) have not in fact been baptised by immersion; or alternatively

(b)   persons who do not subscribe to the doctrine of "baptism of believers only by
      immersion" provided such members are not eligible for appointment as delegates of the
      church to the Assemblies of the Union nor are they entitled to vote on any resolution
      proposed for the purpose of giving the Baptist Churches of New South Wales Property
      Trust a direction under Section 42 of the Property Trust Act.

The joint Opinion reaffirms the requirement of Section 22 (2) (d) of the Property Trust Act to
the effect that any person appointed to officiate as a pastor of a church is a person who “is of
the Baptist denomination and holds as general tenets the doctrine set forth in Schedule A of
the Incorporation Act and further that 'trust property' invested in the Property Trust on behalf
of the church is applied towards the attainment of the general objects of the Union, including
the promotion of the Schedule A doctrines, and for incidental purposes."

It must be stressed that what provision is made for membership of a local autonomous church
is a matter for that local autonomous church. Assembly cannot dictate to a local autonomous
church either what it will or what it will not provide in its Church Constitution concerning the
matter of who can be a Church member. On the other hand, in the light of this opinion, it
would seem to this committee to be unwise in the extreme to disregard the legal advice that
has been received from Messrs Ellicott and Lindsay. Accordingly if a church is minded to
"open up" its membership or where a church has already done so, then such a church should
have regard to the advice that has been obtained. The Honorary Legal Adviser of the Baptist
Union, Mr Geoffrey Moore, has prepared a summary of the full legal opinion which is attached
to this report.

In summary, the joint Opinion recognises that, subject to the constraints of the law of trusts, it
is open to the membership of each local Baptist Church to define for itself the rights and
duties of its members or, if it chooses, different classes of members. Baptist Churches
having adopted a congregational system of church government, and the notion inherent in
that concept that each congregation of the gathered church is able to administer its own
affairs, membership of a Baptist Church generally depends on agreement between the
persons who comprise the membership, subject only to any common constraints as may arise
from the need to deal with property.

CONCLUSION

The issue of the link between baptism and church membership is a matter for the local
autonomous church. It is important that legal restrictions be observed. It is highly desirable
that any church proposing to change the composition of its church membership should
proceed with care. If any church is minded so to proceed, then it should adopt an unhurried
procedure which gives all members an opportunity for reflection and expression of conviction.
The leadership of individual churches is encouraged to consult with representatives of the
Baptist Union of Churches including the Honorary Legal Adviser so that all legal implications
are fully understood and so that the fellowship of believers within a local church and with
other churches of the Baptist Union is in no way impaired.




            Reports presented to the 1994 and 1995 Baptist Union Annual Assemblies concerning
                           membership in Baptist Churches in NSW and the ACT
                                   SCHEDULE A


  DOCTRINES AS SET OUT IN THE BAPTIST UNION OF NSW
INCORPORATION ACT 1919 (NSW) AND AMPLIFIED BY THE 1979
               BAPTIST UNION OF NSW ASSEMBLY




        1.       The nature and unity of the Godhead

        2.       The deity and humanity of Christ

        3.       The Holy Spirit

        4.       The divine inspiration of the Scriptures

        5.       The sinfulness of man

        6.       Christ's atonement for the sin of man

        7.       The work of the Holy Spirit in salvation

        8.       The baptism of believers only, and by immersion

        9.       The communion

        10.      The return of the Lord Jesus Christ

        11.      The resurrection of the dead

        12.      Rewards and punishments in a future state




     Reports presented to the 1994 and 1995 Baptist Union Annual Assemblies concerning
                    membership in Baptist Churches in NSW and the ACT
MEMBERSHIP OF A LOCAL BAPTIST CHURCH: LEGAL OPINION

A. QUESTIONS RAISED ABOUT FORMS OF CHURCH MEMBERSHIP

In recent years some churches affiliated with the Baptist Union of New South Wales have
sought advice as to the legal implications (if any) which might arise if their respective
constitutions were to permit membership of their church to include:

1.    Members who hold as their general tenets the doctrines set forth in "Schedule A" to the
      Baptist Union Incorporation Act 1919 (“the Incorporation Act”) but have not been:

(a)   baptised as believers by immersion; or

(b)   baptised as believers.

2.    Members who hold as their general tenets all the Schedule A doctrines other than the
      doctrine of “Baptism of Believers only by Immersion”.

Such requests for advice raise questions about the nature and pre-requisites of membership
of a Baptist Church and involve the concepts of "open membership" and "closed
membership". Without here debating the merits or otherwise of either form of membership it
should be noted that the expressions "open membership" and "closed membership" are
usually used in relation to local congregations which, under their individual constitutions
(whether written or not), admit into membership of the local church:

(a)   Christians whether baptised as believers by immersion or not (open membership); or

(b)   only those Christians who are baptised as believers by immersion (closed membership).

Although closed membership has generally been the norm in New South Wales it cannot be
assumed that, as a matter of law, Schedule A to the Incorporation Act requires closed
membership and is inconsistent with all forms of open membership.

B. LEGAL OPINION

The Union has recently obtained a joint legal Opinion on these questions from Messrs RA
Ellicott QC and GC Lindsay SC. In their opinion it is open to a local Baptist Church, with
safeguards designed to avoid breaches of the trusts for which the Incorporation Act and the
Baptist Churches of NSW Property Trust Act 1984 ("the Property Trust Act") provide to
adopt a form of constitution which provides for or permits: (a) admission to membership of
the church of persons who hold the Schedule A doctrines as their general tenets, but have
not, because of exceptional circumstances been baptised by immersion; and/or (b) a limited
form of open membership.

On the first point (which is relevant to all churches irrespective of whether their membership is
“open” or “closed”) the joint Opinion is to the effect that, consistently with the Incorporation
Act and the Property Trust Act, the constitution of a Baptist Church might properly provide
for admission into membership (without restriction) of a person who holds the Schedule A
doctrines as his or her general tenets but who, because of exceptional circumstances (eg
involving physical disability precluding baptism by immersion) has not in fact been baptised
by immersion; what is essential for the admission of such a person to membership is that the


            Reports presented to the 1994 and 1995 Baptist Union Annual Assemblies concerning
                           membership in Baptist Churches in NSW and the ACT
person's subscription to the Schedule A doctrines be both overt and conscientious, bearing in
mind that there should be a reasonable explanation for the fact that despite a professed belief
in the doctrine of “Baptism of Believers only by Immersion”, the person has not been baptised
by immersion.

On the second point, the joint Opinion is to the effect that a form of open membership of a
Baptist Church is consistent with the trusts for which the Incorporation Act and the Property
Trust Act provide if and only if:

1.    Members of the church who do not subscribe to the doctrine of "Baptism of Believers
      only by Immersion” are not eligible:

(a)   for appointment as delegates of the church to Assemblies of the Union; or

(b)   to vote on a resolution proposed for the purpose of giving the Baptist Churches of New
      South Wales Property Trust (“the Property Trust”) a direction under section 42 of the
      Property Trust Act.

      the only members of the church being eligible to exercise those rights being members
      who hold as their general tenets all the Schedule A doctrines; and

2.    Conformably with section 22(2)(d) of the Property Trust Act, any person appointed to
      officiate as a pastor of the church is a person who “is of the Baptist Denomination and
      holds as general tenets the doctrines set forth in Schedule A” to the Incorporation Act;
      and

3.    “Trust property” vested in the Property Trust on behalf of the church is applied in or
      towards attainment of the general objects of the Union, including promotion of the
      Schedule A doctrines, or for incidental purposes.

C. MAINTENANCE OF AN OPEN MEMBERSHIP ROLL

In the opinion of Messrs Bob Ellicott QC and Geoff Lindsay SC there can be no objection in
law to a local Baptist Church maintaining an "open" membership roll provided that care is
taken to ensure that; (a) only those members of the church who hold the Schedule A
doctrines as their general tenets attend Assemblies as delegates of the church and vote on
section 42 property resolutions; (b) each pastor officiating at the church is a Baptist who
holds the Schedule A doctrines as general tenets; and (c) church property is applied in or
towards attainment of the general objects of the Union, including promotion of the Schedule A
doctrines, or for incidental purposes. Accepting that in exceptional circumstances (eg
involving physical disability precluding baptism by immersion, imprisonment or an absence of
water) a person might hold the Schedule A doctrines as general tenets, but not in fact have
been baptised by immersion, the first proviso would generally require that only a person
baptised by immersion could be eligible to attend an Assembly as a delegate and to vote on a
Section 42 property resolution. That does not mean that membership of a church must
necessarily be characterised as a class of membership other than ordinary membership.
Thus, for example, a church constitution might not distinguish between classes of
membership as such, but simply limit eligibility to attend Assembly as a delegate, and
eligibility to vote on Section 42 property resolutions, to persons who have been baptised by
immersion (or at least persons who have overtly and conscientiously subscribed to the
Schedule A doctrines); on this example, a membership roll maintained by the church might
list all members of the church (baptised or not) without distinction other than a notation
(referrable to baptism by immersion or conscientious subscription to the Schedule A
doctrines) identifying those members eligible to attend Assembly and to vote on Section 42


           Reports presented to the 1994 and 1995 Baptist Union Annual Assemblies concerning
                          membership in Baptist Churches in NSW and the ACT
property resolutions.

As a caveat to their Opinion Messrs Ellicott and Lindsay have recorded that, although it is, in
their opinion, open to a local Baptist Church to adopt a constitution providing for a limited form
of open membership, a church which resolves to do so must expect that in taking that course,
it might oblige the Property Trust and the Union to review the church's administration more
critically than might otherwise be required for a proper discharge of its statutory obligations.

D. CONCLUSION

In summary, the joint Opinion recognises that, subject to the constraints of the law of trusts, it
is open to each congregation comprising a local Baptist Church to define for itself the rights
and duties of its members or (if it chooses) different classes of members. Baptist churches
having adopted a congregational system of church government and the notion inherent in that
concept that each congregation of a gathered church should be able to administer its own
affairs; membership of a Baptist Church generally depends on agreement between the
persons who comprise the congregation subject only to such, if any, constraints as may arise
(by statute or otherwise) from the need to deal with property. Except in relation to property
many, or perhaps most, of the terms of a church's constitution (including statements of
doctrine or general tenets) might be binding only in conscience, not in contract. Although a
local Baptist Church is generally unable unilaterally to vary or revoke the trusts to which “trust
property” held for the church by the Property Trust is subject, each church retains a
substantial degree of autonomy in the governance of its affairs.

As Messrs Ellicott and Lindsay have noted in their joint Opinion, the general policy of courts is
to avoid making decisions about theological questions unless it is necessary for them to do so
in the determination of some property or other civil right. Recognising both the reluctance of
the courts to become involved in theological controversy and their obligation to make
decisions where property rights are in dispute, a church which resolves to adopt a form of
open membership (and churches generally) should consider including in its constitution an
express acknowledgment that church membership does not of itself confer an interest in
property on a member.

Geoffrey Moore
Honorary Legal Adviser
The Baptist Union of New South Wales




            Reports presented to the 1994 and 1995 Baptist Union Annual Assemblies concerning
                           membership in Baptist Churches in NSW and the ACT
     A BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE LEGAL POSITION REGARDING
          BELIEVERS' BAPTISM AND MEMBERSHIP OF A
                  LOCAL BAPTIST CHURCH
1.   Each local Baptist Church is autonomous and can regulate its Constitution concerning
     membership.

2.   It is possible for a local Baptist Church to have a Constitution which breaches
     obligations insisted on by the Baptist Union Incorporation Act 1919 and/or the Baptist
     Churches of NSW Property Trust Act 1984. The danger of breaching such obligations
     is that the local Church would no longer be regarded as being “of the Baptist
     denomination” and the local congregation would no longer be permitted to use the
     Church property.

3.   In order to satisfy the requirements of the Incorporation Act and the Property Trust Act
     a local Church must at least have the following:

     A. The adherence to and the teaching of the doctrinal basis set out in the (see 1996
        Handbook p.210 Preamble) including belief in “the baptism of believers only by
        immersion”.

     B. Only persons who hold the belief of *the baptism of believers only by immersion”
        can

     (a) be called as a Pastor of that local church
     (b) be a delegate of that local church to Assembly
     (c) be entitled to vote on a resolution concerning property (see Section 42 of the
         Property Trust Act)

4.   Normally persons who hold a belief in something put it into practice. In belief in “the
     baptism of believers only by immersion” there may be some people who by reason of
     health or other reason have been unable to put their belief into practice. On the other
     hand there may be persons who do not believe that baptism by immersion is
     appropriate for them. In such cases it is hard to argue that they “believe” in “the
     baptism of believers” only by immersion. People who assent belief in baptism of
     believers only by immersion would need to give a reasonable explanation as to why that
     belief has not been put into practice.

5.   Local churches can maintain a policy of closed membership if they wish.

6.   On the other hand if they prefer a more "open" form of Church membership then they
     MUST ENSURE that each of the requirements in paragraph "2" above are clearly spelt
     out.

7.   For a fuller statement of the legal position please note the legal opinion included in the
     1995 Annual Assembly White Book.

Geoffrey Moore                                                                          31 May 1996




          Reports presented to the 1994 and 1995 Baptist Union Annual Assemblies concerning
                         membership in Baptist Churches in NSW and the ACT

								
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