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					       Human Resource
State Employment Law Summary




                     NEVADA
                                                       Table of Contents
                                                                                                                                                   Page

Appearance and Grooming.................................................................................................................... 1
   Uniforms ..................................................................................................................................... 1
Arrest and Conviction Records ............................................................................................................. 1
At-Will Employment ............................................................................................................................. 1
Breaks and Rest Periods ........................................................................................................................ 2
   Breastfeeding .............................................................................................................................. 2
Child Labor ............................................................................................................................................ 2
   Federal Law ................................................................................................................................ 2
   Types of Work ............................................................................................................................ 2
     Minors Under 18 ..................................................................................................................... 2
     Minors Under 16 ..................................................................................................................... 3
   Hours of Work ............................................................................................................................ 3
     Minors Under 18 ..................................................................................................................... 3
     Minors Under 16 ..................................................................................................................... 3
     Minors Under 14 ..................................................................................................................... 3
   Permits and Postings ................................................................................................................... 3
   Tutoring....................................................................................................................................... 3
COBRA ................................................................................................................................................. 4
   Insurance Continuation ............................................................................................................... 4
Employee Conduct and Work Rules ..................................................................................................... 4
   Guns in the Workplace................................................................................................................ 4
Equal Employment Opportunity and Equal Pay ................................................................................... 4
   Sexual Harassment ...................................................................................................................... 5
Family and Medical Leave (FMLA) ..................................................................................................... 5
   Pregnancy.................................................................................................................................... 5
   School Visitation......................................................................................................................... 5
Files and Access .................................................................................................................................... 5
   Employee Review of Files .......................................................................................................... 5
   Copies ......................................................................................................................................... 6
   Employee Explanation ................................................................................................................ 6
Hiring Procedures .................................................................................................................................. 6
   Credit and Investigative Checks ................................................................................................. 6
   New Hire and Rehire Reporting Requirements ......................................................................... 7
   Mandatory Background Checks .................................................................................................. 7
Holidays ................................................................................................................................................. 7
Jury, Witness, and Voting Leave........................................................................................................... 7
   Jury and Witness Leave .............................................................................................................. 7
   Voting Leave ............................................................................................................................... 7
Labor-Management Relations ............................................................................................................... 8
Layoff and Reduction in Force.............................................................................................................. 8
Medical Testing and Examinations ....................................................................................................... 8
   Drug Testing ............................................................................................................................... 8
   Medical Examinations ................................................................................................................ 8
  Genetic Testing ........................................................................................................................... 8
  HIV Testing ................................................................................................................................ 8
Military Leave ....................................................................................................................................... 9
Noncompetition Agreements................................................................................................................. 9
Overtime ................................................................................................................................................ 9
Political Activities ................................................................................................................................. 9
Polygraph/Lie Detector Tests ................................................................................................................ 9
Reference Requests ............................................................................................................................. 10
  Protection for Employers .......................................................................................................... 10
Sick Leave ........................................................................................................................................... 10
Smoking ............................................................................................................................................... 11
  Use of Lawful Products Off the Premises................................................................................. 11
Termination Procedures....................................................................................................................... 11
  Paychecks .................................................................................................................................. 11
  Service Letters .......................................................................................................................... 11
Unemployment Compensation ............................................................................................................ 11
  Unemployment Insurance ......................................................................................................... 11
  Unemployment Insurance Contribution Rate ........................................................................... 11
Vacations ............................................................................................................................................. 12
  Payment at Termination ............................................................................................................ 12
Volunteer Firefighting and Rescue Activities ..................................................................................... 12
Wages and Hours................................................................................................................................. 12
  Paydays ..................................................................................................................................... 12
  Minimum Wage ........................................................................................................................ 12
  Withholding or Docking Pay .................................................................................................... 12
  Garnishment .............................................................................................................................. 13
  Direct Deposit ........................................................................................................................... 13
  Living Wage.............................................................................................................................. 13
Workers’ Compensation ...................................................................................................................... 13
Pre-Employment Inquiry Guide .......................................................................................................... 13
Required Posters .................................................................................................................................. 13
  Required Federal Posters .......................................................................................................... 13
  Required Nevada Posters and Contacts .................................................................................... 14
_______________
                           STATE LAW SUMMARY

Appearance and Grooming


  Uniforms
  In Nevada, an employer must supply, without cost to employees, all uniforms and accessories
  distinct as to color, style or material. Employers must clean the uniforms, again without cost
  to the employee, if a special cleaning process is required and cleaning cannot be easily done
  by the employee.

Arrest and Conviction Records


  Employers are prohibited from requesting an arrest record of an applicant or employee.
  However, employers may request or inquire into conviction records.

  Caution: Private employers considering using arrest or conviction records should do so with
  caution, even in states that allow the use of arrest or conviction records for employment
  purposes. An arrest might never result in a criminal guilty plea or conviction and it is always
  possible that a person has been arrested for something he or she did not do. Moreover, the
  federal Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has stated that use of conviction records
  might be discriminatory given that, according to the EEOC, minorities are often more likely
  to have such a record. The EEOC cautions that employers should only inquire about felony
  convictions, should state that a criminal record is not an automatic bar to employment and
  should ensure that there is a legitimate business reason for requesting such information.
  Employers should consult with their attorneys for more information and guidance on this
  issue.

At-Will Employment


  Nevada law provides that, unless shown otherwise, an employment relationship for an
  indefinite period is an at-will relationship and can be terminated without cause. At-will status
  can be modified by oral or written statements. Adequate contract disclaimers and at-will
  statements in documents given to employees (handbooks, policies, etc.) can help minimize
  the risk that such documents may be alleged to have created express or implied employment
  contracts. Nevada law also recognizes that discharges may occur in violation of public
  policy. This type of claim is typically one brought by a whistleblower, a person asserting a
  legally protected right, or by a person who has refused to commit an illegal act or who has
  reported one to public officials. If a statute provides the employee with adequate protection,
  typically no public policy cause of action is available in Nevada. A Nevada statute prohibits
  employers from hiring under false pretenses, i.e., concerning the nature and compensation of
  the work, the conditions of the workplace or the existence or nonexistence of labor problems.
  A Nevada statute also prohibits discharge based on the report of a hired “spotter” or
  “detective” unless the accused employee is given notice of the same, a hearing, an
  opportunity to confront the spotter and the right to present evidence.

Breaks and Rest Periods


  A Nevada employer must not employ someone for a continuous period of eight hours without
  allowing at least a one-half hour meal period. Employers must also allow rest periods of at
  least ten minutes for every four hours worked. A narrow exception applies if only one
  employee works at the site of employment. Rest periods must be allowed in the middle of the
  work period insofar as practicable

  Breastfeeding
  A mother may breastfeed her child in any public or private location where the mother is
  authorized to be.

Child Labor


  Federal Law
  Minors may be limited in the hours they work and may not be employed in occupations
  considered hazardous by federal law or by the U.S. Department of Labor’s rules and
  regulations. When school is in session, federal law requires work of minors age 14 and 15 to
  be limited to three (3) hours per day and eighteen (18) hours per week. When school is not in
  session, minors age 14 and 15 may work up to eight (8) hours per day and forty (40) hours
  per week between 7:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. (or 9:00 p.m. June 1 through Labor Day). Federal
  law does not limit work hours for minors age 16 and 17, regardless of whether or not school
  is in session. Except in limited circumstances, employers are generally prohibited from
  hiring minors under age 14. In addition to these federal restrictions, the following provisions
  address employment of minors in Nevada. Additional Nevada provisions regulate both the
  type and hours of work in which minors can engage. Note that the stricter law, the one that
  most benefits employees, prevails.

  Types of Work
     Minors Under 18
     Minors under 18 cannot be involved in the following hazardous jobs: begging; indecent
     or immoral exhibitions or practices; practices dangerous to life, limbs, health or morals;
     in any public dance hall where alcohol is served; messenger for delivering letters,
     telegrams, packages or bundles to any house of prostitution or assignation; messenger for
     distributing promotional materials that include an offer for alcoholic beverages, or in
     casino areas where gaming or sale of alcoholic beverages is the primary commercial
     activity, unless to provide entertainment pursuant to an employment contract.
   Minors Under 16
   Minors under 16 are prohibited in the following jobs:
   •   With any compound in which dangerous or poisonous acids are used
   •   Manufacture of paints, colors or white lead; dipping, drying or packing matches
   •   Manufacture of goods for immoral purposes
   •   Mine
   •   Quarry
   •   Smelter
   •   Laundry
   •   Tobacco warehouse
   •   Cigar or other tobacco preparation or manufacturing plants
   •   Distillery, brewery, establishment where malt or alcoholic liquors are manufactured,
       packed, wrapped or bottled
   •   Any glass furnace
   •   Outside erection and repair of electric wires
   •   Oiling hazardous or dangerous machinery while in motion
   •   Switch or gate tending, track repairing
   •   Brakeman, Firefighter, Engineer, Motorman or conductor on railroads
   •   In establishments where explosives are manufactured, stored or compounded
   •   Or in other declared hazardous jobs
Hours of Work
   Minors Under 18
   Minors under 18 cannot work from 10:00 p.m. to 5:00 a.m. as a messenger for a telegraph
   or messenger company in incorporated cities and towns.

   Minors Under 16
   Minors under 16 cannot work over an eight-hour day or 48 hour week except in domestic
   service, motion picture performance or farm work.

   Minors Under 14
   Minors under 14 cannot be employed during school hours without special permission.

Employers cannot induce or attempt to induce minors to be unlawfully absent from school
unless the student has special permission.

Permits and Postings
An employer must have employment certificates for all minors between ages 14 to 17 who
are employed during school hours.

Tutoring
Certain entities that employ children in the entertainment industry will be required to pay for
tutoring or other educational or instructional services upon the request of a parent or
  guardian, where the child is employed under contract for over 91 school days and where the
  child is exempt under the state’s compulsory attendance laws.

  A child receiving equivalent, approved instruction is excused from compulsory attendance if
  they are taking part in a special education program, certain extracurricular activity, are
  enrolled in a private school, or are receiving instruction at home.

  A child between 14 and 17 years of age who has completed eighth grade may be excused
  from full-time attendance for employment or apprenticeship; a written permit is required.

  Attendance is excused if child 14 years of age or older must support himself or his parent.

  Child labor law can be both challenging and confusing. Employers of minors should
  closely review federal and state child labor law differences and contact their attorneys
  or the Department of Labor to ensure they are in full compliance.

COBRA


  Insurance Continuation
  Many states have legislation requiring small employers (those not subject to COBRA) to
  provide insurance continuation if an employee becomes ineligible for group coverage (such
  as through a termination). Such provisions are complex and very technical. You may want
  to contact your attorney or insurance broker to determine if you are meeting all applicable
  federal and state requirements.

Employee Conduct and Work Rules


  Guns in the Workplace
  Workplace violence continues to be a concern for employers. Many organizations adopt
  policies (such as the one found in the HRN manual) banning guns and other weapons on
  company property. However state law differs widely regarding employees’ weapons rights.
  You may want to contact the state employment agency or an attorney for further information
  regarding your specific policy and any possible liability that may result.

Equal Employment Opportunity and Equal Pay


  Similar to federal law, Nevada state law prohibits discrimination in employment or terms and
  conditions of employment based on race, color, religion, sex, age, national origin, and/or
  disability. Included in the definition of unlawful discrimination is wage discrimination based
  on gender. Retaliation is also prohibited. Nevada law also makes it unlawful to deny women
  leave for sickness or disability because of a medical condition due to pregnancy when leave
  is granted for other medical conditions. The law applies to private employers with fifteen or
  more employees. Complaints of discrimination are filed with the Nevada Equal Rights
  Commission.

  Caution: Some municipalities may have adopted city ordinances expanding EEO
  protections. Please check local laws for more details.

  Sexual Harassment
  Sexual harassment is prohibited in the workplace. Temporary and extended protective orders
  may be granted to employees who claim they are being harassed.

Family and Medical Leave (FMLA)


  Pregnancy
  If an employer grants leave with pay, leave without pay, or leave without loss of seniority to
  his employees for sickness or disability because of a medical condition, the employer may
  not fail or refuse to extend the same benefits to any female employee who is pregnant. The
  female employee who is pregnant must be allowed to use the leave before and after
  childbirth, miscarriage or other natural resolution of her pregnancy, if the leave is granted,
  accrued or allowed to accumulate as a part of her employment benefits. Paid leave is required
  only if the employer normally offers paid leave.

  School Visitation
  Nevada law prohibits the termination of employees who attend school conferences or are
  summoned to school for emergencies involving their children. Violations of the law can be
  punished with criminal sanctions and civil lawsuit damages claims.

  Caution: Complying with the federal FMLA (and state law, if applicable) can be both
  challenging and confusing. You will likely want to contact your attorney, the Federal
  Department of Labor, or the appropriate state agency for further information and
  clarification.

Files and Access


  Employee Review of Files
  Upon request of the employee, a private or public employer, including employee referral
  agencies, is required to give an employee a reasonable opportunity to inspect the employee’s
  personnel records. Employees are allowed to inspect files containing information used by the
  employer to determine the employment qualifications of that employee; and any disciplinary
  action taken against the employee, including termination. Employers may not keep secret
  records.
  The records to which employees have access do not include confidential records from
  previous employers or investigative agencies, or information concerning an investigation,
  arrest, or a conviction of that employee for a violation of the law. An employer must allow
  an employee to inspect his or her records within 60 days of termination.

  Copies
  If an employee was employed for longer than 60 days, an employer must also furnish, at its
  actual cost, copies of such records, excepting confidential reports from previous employers or
  investigators, other confidential investigative files or information concerning the arrest or
  conviction of that person. An employer may not maintain secret records of employment.

  Employee Explanation
  An employer must allow an employee to submit, for inclusion in the file, a reasonable written
  explanation responding to any written entry in the records. Finally, if notified in writing by
  the employee that something in the file is inaccurate, and if the employee is correct, the
  employer must change the information in its file.

Hiring Procedures


  Credit and Investigative Checks
  No Nevada credit or investigative check requirements have been adopted that exceed those
  required by the federal Fair Credit Reporting Act and Consumer Credit Reform Act of 1996.
  Under federal law, employers may not obtain a consumer report, (which includes checks on
  an employee's or applicant's credit standing, and which is obtained through a consumer
  reporting agency), unless a clear and conspicuous written disclosure has been made to the
  applicant or employee before the report is performed and the employer obtains written
  authorization from the applicant or employee. The disclosure must be made in a separate
  written document (not as part of a job application or other form) and must consist solely of
  the disclosure. Credit checks must be used for employment purposes only and may not be
  used discriminatorily in violation of any applicable federal or state law or regulation.
  Employers must also make written disclosures of investigative reports where personal
  information such as the applicant's or employee's character, reputation, etc is obtained
  through interviews with neighbors, friends, and others.

  Before an adverse employment action (such as refusal to hire) is taken based in whole or in
  part on information reported in a consumer or investigative report, the employer must inform
  the applicant or employee, and provide a copy of the report and a summary of consumer
  rights under the law. A post adverse action notice is also required under federal law. You
  may want to consult your legal counsel for detailed information.

  Caution: While not always required by law, it is generally a good practice to get releases
  from applicants for any background checks undertaken. You may want to contact your
  attorney for release requirements and related details.
  New Hire and Rehire Reporting Requirements
  A Nevada employer must report new hires or rehires to the Employment Security Division of
  the Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation within 20 days of hiring
  or rehiring. The report must include the employee’s name, address and social security
  number and the employer’s name, address and federal tax identification number. Employers
  may choose to submit a W-4 form instead. Employers can also choose to submit reports by
  email twice a month, no more than 12 but no less than 16 days apart. Multi-state employers
  can choose to designate one state for reports but must notify the other states where the report
  is filed. For more information, employers can access the Department of Employment,
  Training and Rehabilitation at http://detr.state.nv.us/uicont/uicont_newhire.htm.

  Mandatory Background Checks
  Many states require mandatory background checks of applicants in certain highly sensitive
  areas such as in teaching, childcare, healthcare and security positions. Such checks may
  include criminal history and fingerprint checks, various reporting requirements, and requiring
  job references. Contact your local state agency or attorney for further information.

Holidays


  No Nevada statute has been enacted requiring private employers to give employees paid
  holiday time off or to pay premium pay for time actually worked on holidays.

Jury, Witness, and Voting Leave


  Jury and Witness Leave
  A Nevada employer cannot deprive an employee of employment, or threaten the same,
  because the employee reports for jury duty service under a summons or gives testimony as a
  witness under subpoena or, as a parent or guardian, appears with a child in court. An
  employee may be required to give at least one day notice for jury leave. Violations are
  punished by criminal sanctions and civil suits for damages.

  No Nevada statute requires payment for jury duty, however the federal Fair Labor Standards
  Act restricts deductions from the pay of salaried, exempt employees.

  Caution: Employers should consider contacting their attorneys before denying pay for jury
  leave.

  Voting Leave
  A Nevada employer must give time off to an employee who does not have sufficient time
  available to vote during non-working hours. Sufficient time during nonworking hours means
  one hour if the distance between the place of employment and polls is 2 miles or less, two
  hours if it is more than 2 but less than 10 miles, or three hours if it is more than 10 miles.

  Employees cannot be penalized, punished or suffer wage loss for such absences. Leave must
  be requested prior to election day. Violations of the law are punished by fines.

Labor-Management Relations
  Various labor relations laws allow and/or regulate the rights of employees to unionize,
  bargain collectively, file grievances, picket, strike, and wear union insignia and govern the
  resolution of labor disputes. Contact the Nevada Labor Commission for more information.
  Note also that federal law governs, and in fact pre-empts, many aspects of this area of law.

Layoff and Reduction in Force


  No applicable Nevada statute exists. Nevada has not enacted a state "WARN" law or other
  legislation regarding layoffs. However, employers must still comply with the federal WARN
  Act.

Medical Testing and Examinations


  Drug Testing
  Nevada has enacted no statute that regulates employee drug testing by private employers.

  Medical Examinations
  If an employee has been exposed to a hazard and the Nevada Division of Industrial Relations
  determines that a medical examination is needed, the employer must pay the cost of the
  examination.

  Genetic Testing
  Many states have implemented laws prohibiting genetic testing and/or discrimination on the
  basis of genetic conditions or carrier status. An employer planning to implement a genetic
  testing program may wish to contact an attorney or the Department of Labor for further
  information.

  HIV Testing
  Nevada has enacted no statute that governs the testing of HIV by employers. However, if an
  HIV test is performed, Nevada law requires that the test results be kept confidential.
   Caution: In addition to state law, employers should also ensure that any testing undertaken
   conforms with federal law (e.g., the ADA and FMLA). Contact your attorney if you propose
   to undertake such testing.

Military Leave


   It is unlawful for a Nevada employer to discriminate against an employee because of his or
   her membership in the Nevada National Guard. An employer must, upon application, allow
   leave time and reinstate any employee who performs active military service, or service in the
   armed forces during time of war. An employer is not required to pay for military leave.
   Reinstatement must be to a like position, pay, etc., to the greatest extent possible.

   Caution: Military leave legislation is complicated and technical. In addition to any
   applicable state law requirements, employers should ensure that they are in compliance with
   federal laws.

Noncompetition Agreements
   A Nevada statute and Nevada court decisions govern this area of the law. The Nevada statute
   says that noncompete agreements may be used as well as nondisclosure agreements related to
   trade secrets, business methods, customer lists, secret formulas or processes or confidential
   information learned during the course of employment. Protectable employer interests also
   include goodwill and customer relations. Such agreements must be supported by valid
   consideration and be reasonable in scope including geography and duration.

Overtime


   Overtime pay is 1 ½ times the regular pay for each hour worked over the maximum work
   week (40 hours) or the maximum work day (8 hours). By mutual agreement, an employer
   and employee can set the workweek at 10 hours per day and 4 days per week without
   triggering overtime payment responsibilities.

Political Activities


   A Nevada employer cannot make any rule or regulation prohibiting or preventing any
   employee from engaging in politics or becoming a candidate for any public office in Nevada.

Polygraph/Lie Detector Tests
   In addition to federal regulation of polygraph testing, Nevada law provides that an employer
   may not request, require, use, inquire about or suggest the use of a polygraph by an employee
  or discipline or discharge any employee who refuses to submit to a polygraph examination.
  An exception for employees applies if:
  1. The employer is investigating an economic loss, and
  2. The employee had access to the property in question, and
  3. The employer has a reasonable suspicion that the employee was involved in the incident
     that led to the employer’s economic loss under investigation, and
  4. The employer gives the employee written notice, before the examination, of the
     particularities of the incident being investigated, the notice is signed by the employee and
     retained for three years and identifies the specific economic loss to the business and why
     the employer believed the employee had access to the property and may have been
     involved in the incident leading to the loss.
  Another exception applies to prospective employees if the purpose of the polygraph is to
  protect: facilities, materials or operations having a significant impact on the health or safety
  of the state; currency; negotiable securities; precious commodities; armored car services;
  security personnel; or for someone who will manufacture, distribute or dispense a controlled
  substance (for a prospective employee who will be directly involved or a current employee
  who has access and in connection with an investigation). Such polygraphs must be
  administered by a licensed examiner, intern or someone exempt from licensing, and the
  examination results cannot be the sole basis for any adverse employment action taken.
  Retaliation against persons who complain about violations of this law is also prohibited.
  Nevada requires posting of a notice about the law.

  Caution: Polygraph legislation is complex. In addition to any applicable state law
  requirements, employers should ensure they are in compliance with federal law.

Reference Requests


  Protection for Employers
  A Nevada employee is immune from civil liability if, at the request of the employee, it
  discloses to a prospective employer information regarding the ability of the employee to do
  the job, the employee’s diligence, skill or reliability in doing the job or any illegal or
  wrongful act committed by the employee. Immunity will not exist if the employer acts with
  malice or ill will, discloses information it does not believe is accurate, discloses information
  it has no reasonable basis for believing is accurate, recklessly, intentionally or deliberately
  discloses inaccurate or misleading information or discloses information in violation of some
  law.

Sick Leave


  No Nevada statute requires employers to provide paid sick leave or to pay for accrued paid
  sick leave at termination.
  Caution: If sick leave is provided, employers should ensure that it is provided on a non-
  discriminatory basis and in accordance with established policy and practice.

Smoking


  Use of Lawful Products Off the Premises
  It is unlawful for a Nevada employer to refuse to hire, discharge, or discriminate against any
  person because that individual engages in the lawful use of any product off the employer’s
  premises and during non-working hours, provided such use does not adversely affect safety
  or job performance.

Termination Procedures


  Paychecks
  Discharged employees must be paid their final wages immediately upon termination.
  Employees who quit or resign should be paid within seven days or by the next regular
  payday, whichever is sooner.

  Service Letters
  A Nevada employer must give service letters to any former employee who worked for it for
  more than 60 days and demands such a statement. Service letters must state the truthful
  reasons for the discharge and any meritorious services rendered by the former employee.
  Employers are obligated to give only one such statement to an employee.

Unemployment Compensation
  Extensive laws cover this area in Nevada. Contact the Nevada Labor Commission at
  http://labor.state.nv.us/ for further information.

  Unemployment Insurance
  The maximum weekly unemployment insurance benefit is $301.00. However, 13 weeks of
  UI/extended unemployment benefits are available through 2002.

  Unemployment Insurance Contribution Rate
  The standard unemployment insurance contribution rate for new employers remains at 3
  percent during 2002. Rates for experience-rated employers range from 0.25 percent to 5.4
  percent.
Vacations


   Payment at Termination
   No Nevada statute requires employers to provide paid vacation or to pay for accrued vacation
   at termination. However, the state may so require by case law or regulatory interpretation.

   Caution: If paid vacation leave is provided, employers should ensure that it is provided on a
   non-discriminatory basis and in accordance with established policy and practice.

Volunteer Firefighting and Rescue Activities
   Nevada employers cannot discharge or threaten to discharge employees because of their
   service as a volunteer firefighter, search and rescue unit member, sheriff’s reserve or civil air
   patrol member. Such involvement must be disclosed to the employer. For search and rescue
   activities, the employer must let the employee know as soon as possible if the employer
   chooses not to allow participation in such activities during working hours.

Wages and Hours


   Paydays
   A Nevada employer must pay wages semi-monthly or more often. An employer must set
   regular paydays and post notice of the same in at least two conspicuous places. An employer
   and employee may agree to payment at other times but this cannot be imposed on an
   employee.

   Minimum Wage
   The general Nevada minimum wage is $5.15. Subminimum wage may no longer be paid to
   employees below age 17.

   Withholding or Docking Pay
   Employers may make payroll deductions with written authorization of the employee. If an
   employer withholds payment for the purpose of deposit in a savings program, the employer
   shall deposit the monies in the savings account within 5 days of wage payment.

   An employer may not require an employee to rebate, refund, or return any part of wages,
   salary or compensation paid. An employer may not require an employee to work without
   wages for a training period. Employers may not deduct the cost of uniforms or the cost of
   cleaning uniforms from an employee’s wage.
  Garnishment
  No employer can refuse to hire, discharge or penalize a person due to a garnishment or an
  income withholding order.

  In Nevada, the maximum amount that can be garnished is the lesser of:
  1. 25% of an employee’s disposable earnings or
  2. The amount by which disposable earnings exceed 30 hours times the federal minimum
     wage rate. This rises to 50% for child support withholding orders.
  Direct Deposit
  An employer may not use direct deposit unless the employee gives written consent.

  Living Wage
  A number of local governments (e.g. cities, towns, counties, school districts, etc.) have
  enacted laws known as “Living Wage” ordinances. These laws, although not always
  imposing the same types of requirements, typically mandate that any entity contracting or
  doing business with the local government or getting a tax abatement from the local
  government must pay its employees a set wage. The ordinances are typically called Living
  Wage ordinances because the set wage rate is typically much higher than the applicable
  minimum wage, thus better allowing the employees to live on the wage.

  No local governments in Nevada have adopted a living wage ordinance as of January 1,
  2003. However, this area of law is developing rapidly. For more information, including
  recent developments, see www.livingwage.com.

Workers’ Compensation
  Extensive laws cover this area in Nevada. Contact the Employment Security Division of the
  Nevada State Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation at
  www.detr.state.nv.us/nerc/ for further information.



Pre-Employment Inquiry Guide
  To access this guide, go to http://detr.state.nv.us/nerc/nerc_preemp.htm

Required Posters
  Listed below are the current listings for government agencies from which required posters
  can be obtained. Posters frequently can be obtained free of charge. Poster requirements may
  change from time to time, and employers should check to assure up to date compliance.

  Required Federal Posters
       Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) Minimum Wage
       Family Medical Leave Act (FMLA)
       Job Safety and Health Protection – Occupational Safety and Health
       Equal Employment Opportunity Act
       Migrant and Seasonal Agricultural Worker Protection Act (MSPA)
       Notice to Work with Disabilities (FLSA, SCA, and Walsh-Healey Act)
       Employee Polygraph Protection Act (EPPA)

These posters can be accessed at the Department of Labor website:

http://www.dol.gov/osbp/sbrefa/poster/main.htm

Required Nevada Posters and Contacts

   Nevada Prohibits Discrimination in the Nevada Department of Employment, Training
    Workplace                              & Rehabilitation
                                           Equal Rights Commission
                                           1515 E. Tropicana, Suite 590
                                           Las Vegas, NV 89119
                                           702-486-7161
                                           www.detr.state.nv.us/nerc

   Lie Detector                             Nevada State Labor Commission
   Wage & Hour Laws                         1445 Hot Springs Rd., Suite 109
                                             Carson City, NV 89706
                                             702-687-4850
                                             www.labor.state.nv.us



   Workers’ Compensation                    State Industrial Insurance System
                                             515 E. Musser St.
                                             Carson City, NV 89714
                                             775-886-1000
                                             dirweb.state.nv.us/iirs.htm



   Unemployment Insurance                   Employment Security
                                             500 E. Third St.
                                             Carson City, NV 89713-00030
                                             775-687-4540
                                             www.detr.state.nv.us/uicont/uicont_uitax.htm
   Safety & Health           Nevada Dept. of Business & Industry
   Emergency Phone Numbers   Industrial Relations Division
                              400 West King Street, Suite 400
                              Carson City, NV 89703
                              775-684-7260
                              www.dirweb.state.nv.us

				
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