ONSITE WASTEWATER TREATMENT

Document Sample
ONSITE WASTEWATER TREATMENT Powered By Docstoc
					ONSITE WASTEWATER TREATMENT 

A GUIDE FOR ELECTED GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS AND 
   CITY AND COUNTY GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES 
                  IN UTAH




                   April 2006 
                      ONSITE WASTEWATER TREATMENT 
   A GUIDE FOR ELECTED GOVERNMENT OFFICIALS AND CITY AND 
               COUNTY GOVERNMENT EMPLOYEES 


              WHAT IS AN ONSITE WASTEWATER TREATMENT SYSTEM? 

Any private sewage system used to collect, treat and disperse wastewater from individual 
dwellings, businesses or small communities and service areas may be termed an onsite 
wastewater system or a decentralized system. An onsite wastewater system is also referred to as 
a septic system, septic tank, private sewage system or individual sewage treatment system. 

Onsite wastewater systems are designed to treat water that becomes polluted by our day to day 
activities. If polluted water (wastewater) enters water courses, it can cause public health and 
environmental problems. When an onsite wastewater system does not treat wastewater or 
facilitate its dispersal away from where people may be exposed to it, we say that the system has 
failed. If people are exposed to untreated wastewater, their health may be threatened. 



                                 WHAT ARE POLLUTANTS? 

Pollutants are substances that enter an environment in amounts that disturb the natural balance of 
the system, resulting in adverse impacts on that system or on public health. 

Some Typical Pollutants Include: 

   §  Disease­causing agents or organisms (viruses, bacteria, parasites) 

   §  Organic Materials 

           o  The decomposition of these substances depletes the oxygen in water, creating 
              conditions harmful to the environment and public health. 

   §  Excessive nutrients (nitrogen, phosphorus) 

   §  Toxic compounds 

           o  For example, nitrate in drinking water that is used to make formula for infants 
              may cause blue­baby syndrome (methemoglobinemia). Livestock can also suffer 
              health impacts from drinking water high in nitrate. Nitrate is a compound (NO3 ­ ) 
              that contains nitrogen and three oxygens that can come from the decomposition of 
              organic material in waste. It is found in some fertilizers. 

Improperly managed, these pollutants can enter our water supplies, resulting in water quality 
degradation. Pollutants also have adverse aesthetic, social, and economic impacts, such as 
causing a community’s workforce to be indisposed by illness. Illness can then affect a family’s


                                                                                                    2 
earning ability and social well being. Pollutants can also affect property values. Some may create 
odor and other nuisance­related conditions. 



                     TREATMENT IS THE REMOVAL OF POLLUTANTS 

Pollutants removed by onsite wastewater treatment processes include: 

   §  Disease­causing organisms 

           o  They are filtered out and destroyed in the soil as the wastewater is distributed 
              through the perforated pipes or chambers buried in the ground. 

   §  Organic materials 

           o  A large part of the organic pollutants are removed when the system functions 
              properly. 

   §  Excessive nutrients 

           o  Phosphorus removal helps prevent or reduce algae blooms (eutrophication) in 
              surface waters. 

           o  Typically, only part of the nitrogen in wastewater is removed in onsite treatment 
              systems. 
Treatment Includes Dispersing the Water 
   §  Wastewater is dispersed into the soil through perforated pipes or similar mechanisms in 
      trenches. Dispersal facilitates biological decomposition of pollutants. 
   §  The dispersed water goes into the soil, eventually recharging the ground water and adding 
      to the base flow for surface water. This contributes to water conservation in the 
      watershed. 
Soil Properties are Important to Treatment 

Deep, well drained soils are ideally suited to provide the necessary treatment of contaminated 
wastewater. As the wastewater flows through the soil, solid particles are filtered out and organic 
matter and nutrients are consumed or transformed by the microorganisms that live in the soil and 
by various chemical reactions. 

Soils with rapid infiltration characteristics such as sand, gravel, and fractured rocks allow too 
little time for: 

   §  Destruction of disease­causing organisms 

   §  Organic material decomposition 

   §  Contaminants to cling to the surface of soil particles (especially clay minerals)


                                                                                                     3 
Soils with slow infiltration characteristics such as clays, bedrock and hardpans accept wastewater 
relatively slowly. In such soils, an overloaded or improperly designed on­site wastewater system 
could cause wastewater to pond on the ground surface, with potential exposure to the public. 



                 ROLES AND RESPONSIBILITES OF ELECTED OFFICIALS 

Elected officials find themselves in the difficult position of needing to develop regulations to 
protect the public health and environment while representing the concerns and aspirations of the 
people. These two views, unfortunately, are not always compatible. It is therefore crucial that 
elected officials have correct, scientific information upon which to base their decisions. 

Elected officials have to make health, welfare and safety decisions concerning: 

   §  Development planning and zoning in their community and individual’s property rights 

   §  Their community’s wastewater management needs 

   §  The adequacy of the existing legal authority and the need to work to improve or change 
      existing regulations 

   §  Nomination/appointments of members to the local public health board in their county or 
      district 

   §  Resource use and allocation for programs or services in their community 

   §  Staff skills and training as needed 



                              WHAT’S HAPPENING IN UTAH? 

Why is Onsite Wastewater Treatment Important in Utah? 

   §  Utah is experiencing rapid population growth. 

   §  Housing development has grown into areas where sewer service is either impractical or 
      too costly. 

   §  There are limited areas of suitable soil for conventional (septic tank/drainfield) 
      wastewater systems. 

   §  The ground water table can be high, particularly in low valley areas. Weber County has 
      areas experiencing this problem. 

   §  There are areas of shallow bedrock in Uintah County, Kane County, Washington County, 
      and in other areas.



                                                                                                 4 
   §  Developers and prospective home owners want to use their property despite site 
      limitations for conventional treatment systems. 

Onsite Wastewater Systems Available Under the Current Regulations 

The Conventional System 

The conventional onsite wastewater treatment system used in Utah is the septic tank with leach 
fields (Figure 1). This system is made up of two parts. Wastewater from the home flows into a 
1000­2000 gallon septic tank buried in the ground. The tank is water tight and provides enough 
retention time for dense solids to settle to the bottom while grease and other low density 
materials float to the top. The wastewater, with most of the solids removed, flows out of the tank 
into perforated pipes or chambers buried in trenches in the ground. The acceptable location, 
design and installation of conventional systems are directed by both state rule (Administrative 
Rule R317­4) and local regulations. The state rules prescribe the minimum requirements. For a 
conventional system to be installed in Utah, the proposed site must meet: 

   §  Required minimum lot sizes 

   §  Soil requirements 

   §  Ground water depth requirements 

Current Alternatives 

Where site and soil conditions are unsuitable for the conventional septic tank with a leach field 
or where a higher level of treatment is required, alternative onsite wastewater systems are used. 
Some counties including Uintah, Washington, Utah, and Weber counties have allowed the use of 
these more complex systems. The alternative systems currently approved by state rule for use in 
Utah are the: 

   §  Earth fill system 

           o  The earth fill system may be used in areas with either fast­ or slow­percolating 
              soils. Earth fill may be added to naturally existing soil to accommodate proper 
              installation of the drain field if the settled fill material meets technical criteria. 

   §  At grade system 

           o  An at grade system is used for sites with soils too shallow to install a 
              conventional system. Earth fill is added to the site, and the bottom of the 
              infiltration trench is placed at the pre­fill ground surface.




                                                                                                        5 
                                                                        1 
            Figure 1:  A conventional onsite wastewater treatment system 


     §  Mound system 

            o  Mound systems are used in Utah to facilitate onsite treatment on shallow soil over 
               creviced or porous bedrock or where there is a high seasonal water table. A 
               mound system is a pressure­dosed infiltration system in a sand fill that is elevated 
               above the natural soil surface. 

The Proposed Packed Bed Media Systems Alternatives 

Utah’s onsite wastewater rules for alternative systems are presently being reviewed and 
undergoing public comment. Among the proposed changes is the addition of packed bed media 
systems to the list of alternative systems approved for use in Utah. These systems direct 
wastewater through porous “media” such as a bed of sand, gravel, or peat or through fabric. 
Microorganisms grow on the sand, the fabric fibers, etc. and decompose the organic material in 


1 
 Olson, K, B. Chard, D. Malchow, and D. Hickman. Small Community Wastewater Solutions: A Guide to Making 
Treatment, Management, and Financing Decisions. BU­07734­S, College of Natural Resources and Extension 
Service, University of Minnesota, St. Paul, MN.


                                                                                                            6 
the water flowing through the system. Packed media systems will enable more difficult sites to 
be developed. 

   The packed media process is considered secondary treatment and relies on a septic tank to 
   remove solids from the raw wastewater. Design regulations for these systems will probably 
   have many similarities to those for current alternatives including minimum flows based on 
   the number of bedrooms in the home, depth to the seasonal high ground water table, soil 
   physical properties and separation distances of the filter discharge from water resources. Four 
   different types of packed bed media systems are proposed: 

   §  Intermittent sand filters 

           o  The surface of a sand bed is intermittently dosed with wastewater leaving the 
              septic tank (septic effluent) that percolates in a single pass through the sand to the 
              bottom of the filter. Organic matter is decomposed and disease­casing agents are 
              destroyed by microorganisms living in films on the sand. 

   §  Recirculating sand filters 

           o  The recirculating sand filter is similar to the intermittent sand filter but most of 
              the filtrate flows back to a recirculation tank that receives effluent from the septic 
              tank. The recirculation tank is high in organic matter and low in oxygen, an 
              environment ideal for bacteria that convert nitrate to harmless nitrogen gas (a 
              process called denitrification). The nitrogen gas is released to the atmosphere. 
              These filters are particularly good for treating wastewater where nitrate must be 
              removed to protect the quality of ground water or other water resources. 

   §  Recirculating gravel filters 

           o  Washed gravel, 0.06­0.2 inch in diameter, in beds 36 inches deep, provide 
              surfaces for the establishment of microbial films that treat the wastewater in 
              recirculating gravel filter systems. The relatively large pore spaces in these filters 
              allow good air exchange so that the system is mostly oxygenated. Denitrification 
              may remove a significant part of the nitrogen in the wastewater because the 
              treated wastewater is circulated back to a recirculation tank. 

   §  Textile filter systems 

           o  The textile medium has a complex fiber surface that offers an extremely large 
              surface area for microbial attachment. Its porosity allows for good water and air 
              movement. This aerobic condition is ideal for microorganisms that break down 
              the organics in the liquid and for conversion of ammonia to nitrate. The textile 
              bed filter provides benefits similar to the recirculating sand filter but requires less 
              land area and simplifies installation and maintenance.




                                                                                                     7 
   §  Peat filter systems 

           o  Peat is partially decayed plant material. The natural water retaining ability of peat 
              allows for a very long residence time for the wastewater within the filter. The 
              treatment of the wastewater is achieved by a combination of physical, chemical 
              and biological interactions between the wastewater and the media 

Treated water leaving the packed bed systems can be collected into a separate pump basin and 
pressure dosed to a typical leach field through small diameter pipes or through drip irrigation or 
dispersed into the soil using a conventional gravel­filled gravity­flow trench or bed. 

The sizes and costs of conventional, alternative and proposed systems vary considerably 
depending on the amount of wastewater to be treated and the site conditions. Local health 
departments and other onsite wastewater treatment professionals can help provide these kinds of 
information. 

Utah’s Legal and Institutional Structure 

The Utah Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Water Quality 
The regulation of water quality and the control of nonpoint pollution of water resources are 
under the jurisdiction of the Utah Division of Water Quality. As part of this responsibility this 
agency oversees onsite wastewater treatment and disposal programs in the state. Their 
responsibilities include:

   ·  Development and implementation of the Utah onsite wastewater systems rules

   ·  Operation of a licensing and certification program for onsite wastewater system designers

   ·  Development and implementation of watershed Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) 
      plans that may include provisions influencing onsite wastewater treatment practices

   ·  Providing technology selection guidance for treatment technologies that will perform in 
      the types of soil and sites within the climatic conditions found within Utah

   ·  Granting approval to local health departments to permit the installation of alternative 
      wastewater treatment systems 

Local Boards of Health 

The local board of health has the authority to oversee a broad range of public health protection 
programs including environmental health. The board of health oversees the development of rules, 
policies and procedures used by the local health department to minimize the risks to public 
health that may arise from the misapplication or failure of onsite wastewater systems.




                                                                                                     8 
Local Health Departments 

There are 12 local health departments that encompass the 29 counties in Utah. Six health 
departments serve a single county. Others serve from two to six counties. Local health 
departments issue permits for the installation of onsite wastewater systems for individual homes 
or domestic flows of less than 5000 gallons per day. Their activities may include: 

   §  Administering a permitting program for onsite systems 

   §  Managing or overseeing the monitoring and maintenance of systems 

   §  Implementing corrective action programs for failing systems 

   §  Facilitating appeals and variances 

   §  Offering inspections of onsite systems during real estate transactions 

   §  Developing a public education and outreach program 

   §  Working with county attorneys to enforce regulations 



          MANAGEMENT OF ONSITE WASTEWATER TREATMENT SYSTEMS 

Utah onsite wastewater system regulations in force up to the year 2006 placed the responsibility 
for management of onsite wastewater systems on the homeowner. Homeowners have been 
responsible for keeping records and cleaning and maintaining their septic tank and leach field 
system. Many failures of treatment systems have been related to the homeowner’s lack of record 
keeping, lack of understanding of the importance of proper maintenance of the system, and/or the 
lack of will to deal with the wastewater system. 

Local government officers and staff may find considerable public health protection and 
wastewater management cost control advantages in implementing the concepts of management 
(i.e., centralized management) of onsite wastewater treatment systems. 

Changes in regulations, including those anticipated to be in force in late 2006, are anticipated to 
place greater emphasis on the complex interactions between soil physical properties, waste 
characteristics, biological processes, physical processes, chemical processes and climatic 
conditions in onsite wastewater treatment system design and operation. They will probably focus 
on system performance to regulate onsite systems. Performance requirements establish specific 
and measurable standards necessary to achieve the required level of public health and 
environmental protection. Performance­based system management allows for the use of a wider 
range of technologies but requires well trained personnel to design, install, operate and maintain 
the technology applied. Performance standards are often based on relative risk to valued 
resources:




                                                                                                  9 
     §  Simple systems installed at low densities farther away from valued resources ® lower 
        management intensity 

     §  Complex systems installed at high densities near valued resources ® managed more 
        intensively 

New regulations will make provisions for placing the management of conventional and 
alternative onsite wastewater systems within the jurisdiction of the local health department. 
Management systems may include: 

     §  A responsible management entity overseen by the local health department. 

     §  A contract service provider overseen by the local health department. 

     §  A management district, which is a body politic, created by the county for the purpose of 
        operation, maintenance, repair and monitoring of onsite systems. 
The United States Environmental Protection Agency’s Management Guidelines 
The United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has promulgated management 
           2 
guidelines  for onsite wastewater systems. The guidelines contain a set of management 
approaches that rely on coordinating the responsibilities and actions of the regulatory authority, 
the management entity, service providers, and system owners. These approaches, presented as 
five model management programs, are structured to address an increasing need for more 
comprehensive management as the sensitivity of the environment, the number and density of 
system installations, and the degree of system complexity increases. The five­model 
management program suggested in the guidelines describes program elements ranging from 
planning and record keeping to operation and maintenance needs. The management program’s 
responsibilities increase progressively from Model Program I through Model Program V, 
reflecting not only the increased level of management activities needed to achieve more stringent 
water quality and public health goals, but also the increased capability required to properly 
manage larger numbers of more complex technologies in more vulnerable watersheds. 
The EPA’s suggested management models are: 
       Management Model I ­ “Homeowner Awareness” specifies appropriate program 
elements and activities where treatment systems are owned and operated by the individual 
homeowner in areas of low environmental sensitivity. This program is adequate where treatment 
technologies are limited to conventional systems that require little owner attention. The 
regulatory authority mails maintenance reminders to owners to ensure timely maintenance. 
         Management Model II ­ “Maintenance Contracts” specifies program elements and 
activities where more complex designs are employed to enhance the capacity of conventional 
systems to accept and treat wastewater. Due to treatment complexity, contracts with qualified 
technicians are suggested to ensure proper and timely maintenance. 


2 
 US Environmental Protection Agency. 2003. Voluntary National Guidelines for Management of Onsite and 
Clustered (Decentralized) Wastewater Treatment Systems. EPA 832­B­03­001. USEPA, Office of Water, Office of 
Research and Development, Washington, DC.


                                                                                                          10 
        Management Model III ­ “Operating Permits” specifies program elements and activities 
where sustained performance of treatment systems is critical to protect public health and water 
quality. Limited­term operating permits are issued to owners and are renewable for another term 
if the owners demonstrate that their system is in compliance with the terms and conditions of the 
permit. Performance–based designs can be used in programs with management controls at this 
level. 
        Management Model IV ­ “Responsible Management Entity (RME) Operation and 
Maintenance” specifies program elements and activities where frequent and highly reliable 
operation and maintenance of decentralized systems is required to ensure water protection in 
sensitive environments. With this model, the operating permit is issued to an RME instead of the 
property owner to provide the needed assurance that the appropriate maintenance is performed. 
         Management Model V – “RME Ownership” specifies that the program elements and 
activities for treatment systems are owned, operated, and maintained by the RME, which 
removes the property owner from responsibility for the system. This program is analogous to 
central sewerage and provides the greatest assurance of system performance in the most sensitive 
of environments. 
Management programs across the nation use parts of these models but add to them to make their 
system work within their institutions. Management under the auspices of most Utah local health 
departments approximates Management Model I. Tooele, Utah, Wasatch, and Weber Counties 
are in various stages of implementing or planning to implement Model III. 


                       PLANNING AND ZONING CONSIDERATIONS 

Most homes in rural and many suburban areas depend upon a septic system for treatment and 
disposal of their household wastewater. In these areas, the value of land is often directly related 
to its ability to accommodate a properly functioning onsite wastewater treatment system. Onsite 
wastewater system use has such significant impacts on water resources, property value, public 
health and environmental quality that considerations for their use should be integrated into 
community and county land use planning. Zoning ordinances should reflect wastewater 
management plans including the potential for the use of onsite systems and the density of these 
systems that is acceptable. 
Some areas have been considered not developable because the soil and site conditions are not 
suitable for the installation and use of conventional onsite systems. In such areas, the limitations 
on the use of the conventional systems have acted as a de facto form of zoning. Zoning may need 
to be updated as alternative technologies become acceptable under changing regulations. Land 
not previously suitable for development may become suitable using alternative systems. 
Ground water recharge areas and drinking water resources must be protected under the 1996 
amendments of the Safe Drinking Water Act. To accomplish this protection, the Utah 
Department of Environmental Quality, Division of Drinking Water requires water purveyors to 
conduct source water assessments. An assessment includes conducting an inventory of potential 
sources of contamination in a source water area and determining the susceptibility of the water 
supply to those sources. This information is used to develop plans to protect water quality in the



                                                                                                  11 
area. These plans may recommend limiting the use of onsite systems or improving the 
performance and management of onsite systems within the area. 


                RESOURCES FOR FUNDING, PEOPLE AND INSTITUTIONS 

U.S. EPA Clean Water State Revolving Fund 
The Clean Water State Revolving Fund (CWSRF) is a low­ or no­interest loan program that has 
traditionally financed centralized sewage treatment plants across the nation. Program guidance 
issued in 1997 by EPA emphasized that the fund could be used as a source of support for the 
installation, repair, or upgrading of onsite systems in small towns, rural, and suburban areas. For 
more information contact the Utah Division of Water Quality, Telephone: (801) 538­6146 or 
visit the Division of Water Quality’s website at <http://www.waterquality.utah.gov>. 
U.S. EPA Clean Water Indian Set­Aside Program 
Section 518(c) of the 1987 Amendments to the Clean Water Act established the program and 
authorized EPA to administer grants in cooperation with the Indian Health Service (IHS). This 
partnership maximizes the technical resources available through both agencies to address tribal 
sanitation needs. The ISA Program uses IHS's Sanitation Deficiency System (SDS) to identify 
high priority wastewater projects for funding. For more information, visit 
<www.epa.gov/owm/mab/indian/cwisa.htm> or call 202­564­0621. 
Nonpoint Source Pollution Program 
The Clean Water Act (CWA), section 319 (nonpoint source pollution), funds can support a wide 
range of polluted runoff abatement, including onsite wastewater projects. Authorized under 
section 319 of the federal CWA and financed by federal, state, and local contributions, these 
projects provide cost­share funding for individual and community systems and support broader 
watershed assessment, planning, and management activities. Projects funded in the past have 
included direct cost­share for onsite system repairs and upgrades, assessment of watershed­scale 
onsite system contributions to polluted runoff, regional remediation strategy development, and a 
wide range of other programs dealing with onsite wastewater issues. For more information, visit 
<www.epa.gov/owow/nps/319hfunds.html> or call 202­566­1163. 
U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) 
Rural Development programs provide loans and grants to low/moderate income individuals. 
State Rural Development offices administer the programs. For state office locations, see 
<http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/recd_map.html>. A brief summary of USDA Rural Development 
programs is provided below. 
     Rural Housing Service 
     The Rural Housing Service (RHS) Single­Family Housing Program provides 
     homeownership opportunities to low­ and moderate­income rural Americans through 
     several loan, grant, and loan guarantee programs. The program also makes funding 
     available to individuals to finance vital improvements necessary to make their homes 
     decent, safe, and sanitary.  More information can be found at 
     <http://www.rurdev.usda.gov/rhs/>.



                                                                                                 12 
     Home Repair Loan and Grant Program 
     For very low­income families who own homes in need of repair, the Home Repair Loan 
     and Grant Program offers loans and grants for renovation. Money may be provided, for 
     example, to repair a leaking roof, to replace a wood stove with central heating, or to replace 
     an outhouse and pump with running water, a bathroom, and a waste disposal system. 
     Homeowners, 62 years and older, are eligible for home improvement grants. Other low­ 
     income families and individuals receive loans at a 1 percent interest rate directly from 
     RHS. Loans of up to $20,000 and grants of up to $7,500 are available. Loans are available 
     with repayment schedules for up to 20 years at one percent interest. 
     Rural Utilities Service 
     The Rural Utilities Service <www.usda.gov/rus/water/programs.htm> provides assistance 
     for public or nonprofit entities, including wastewater management districts. Water and 
     waste disposal loans provide assistance to develop water and waste disposal systems in 
     rural areas and towns with a population not in excess of 10,000. The funds are available to 
     public entities such as municipalities, counties, special­purpose districts, Native American 
     tribes, and corporations not operated for profit. The program also guarantees water and 
     waste disposal loans made by banks and other eligible lenders. Water and Waste Disposal 
     Grants can be accessed to reduce water and waste disposal costs to a reasonable level for 
     rural users. Grants can be made for up to 75 percent of eligible project costs in some cases. 
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development 
Community Development Block Grants 
The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) operates the Community 
Development Block Grant (CDBG) program, which provides annual grants to 48 states and 
Puerto Rico. The states and Puerto Rico use the funds to award grants for community 
development to smaller cities and counties. CDBG grants can be used for numerous activities, 
including rehabilitation of residential and nonresidential structures, construction of public 
facilities, and improvements to water and sewer facilities, including onsite systems. The EPA is 
working with HUD to improve access to CDBG funds for treatment system owners by raising 
program awareness, reducing paperwork burdens, and increasing promotional activities in 
eligible areas. More information can be found at <www.hud.gov/cpd/cdbg.html> or by calling 
202­708­1112. 
The National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project 
The National Decentralized Water Resources Capacity Development Project (NDWRCDP) 
funds new projects, enhancement or expansion of existing work, and cooperative ventures with 
other organizations in the onsite/decentralized wastewater treatment field. For more information, 
visit <www.ndwrcdp.org/funding.cfm> or call 510­651­4210.




                                                                                                 13 
           TECHNICAL RESOURCES FOR ONSITE WASTEWATER SYSTEMS 

National Small Flows Clearinghouse (NSFC) 
Funded by grants from the EPA, NSFC helps small communities and individuals solve their 
wastewater problems. Its services include a web site, online discussion groups, a toll­free 
assistance line (800­624­8301), and informative publications. Visit 
<www.nesc.wvu.edu/nsfc/nsfc_index.htm> for more information. 
National Environmental Services Center 
National Environmental Services Center provides technical assistance and information about 
drinking water, wastewater, environmental training, and solid waste management to communities 
serving fewer than 10,000 individuals. Visit <www.nesc.wvu.edu/> for more information. 
US EPA’s Decentralized Onsite Management for Treatment of Domestic Wastes 
This program provides operation and maintenance information for onsite wastewater treatment 
systems and can be downloaded from <www.epa.gov/glnpo/seahome/decent.html>. 
U.S. EPA Municipal Technologies Branch Fact Sheets 
These fact sheets cover different treatment technologies. These fact sheets can be downloaded 
from <www.epa.gov/owm/mtb/mtbfact.htm>. 
The Septic Education Kit 
The Department of Commerce's National Technical Information Service is distributing The 
Septic Education Kit, a toolbox that contains everything needed to organize an education 
program on the care and maintenance of septic systems. This kit can be ordered from 
<www.ocrm.nos.noaa.gov/nerr/septickit>. 
Onsite Wastewater Treatment Systems Manual 
This comprehensive reference manual is designed to provide state and local governments with 
guidance on the planning, design and oversight of onsite systems. This manual is useful for 
onsite wastewater professionals, developers, land planners, and academics. This manual can be 
downloaded from <www.epa.gov/ORD/NRMRL/Pubs/625R00008/625R00008.htm>. 


                MANAGEMENT PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT RESOURCES 

The following is a list of websites and publications available related to wastewater systems and 
initiating and planning a decentralized wastewater management program. 

U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for Onsite and Clustered (Decentralized) Wastewater 
Treatment Systems 
EPA developed this web site to provide tools for communities investigating and implementing 
decentralized management programs. The Web site contains fact sheets, program summaries, 
case studies, links to design and other manuals, and a list of state health department contacts. 
Visit <http://cfpub.epa.gov/owm/septic/home.cfm> and



                                                                                                 14 
<http://cfpub.epa.gov/owm/septic/publications.cfm?sort=date_published&view=doctype_results 
&document_type_id=1> for more information. 
U.S Environmental Protection Agency Community­Based Environmental Protection 

Community­Based Environmental Protection (CBEP) integrates environmental management 
with human needs, considers long­term ecosystem health, and highlights the positive correlations 
between economic prosperity and environmental well­being. Visit 
<www.epa.gov/ecocommunity> for more information. 
The Willard, New Mexico, Project 
Pilot projects in three New Mexico communities demonstrated the benefits of centralized 
management of septic tank systems. The Willard project was jointly funded by the New Mexico 
Clean Water State Revolving Fund and a grant from the Environmental Protection Agency. For 
more information visit < http://www.nmenv.state.nm.us/cpb/cpbtop.html>. 
Choices for Communities: Wastewater Management Options for Rural Areas 
This 17­page document helps guide communities through exploring their wastewater treatment 
options. This document can be downloaded from 
<http://www.ces.ncsu.edu/plymouth/septic/98hoover.html>. 
A Guide to Public Management of Private Septic Systems 
This guide can be used by communities to examine their wastewater treatment options and 
design a unique program that meets their needs. This document can be downloaded from < 
www.cardi.cornell.edu/clgp/septics_index.cfm>. 
A Quick Guide to Small Community Wastewater Treatment Decisions 
When deciding on the right treatment system, the community must have clear goals and specific 
criteria to use in making the decision. This document guides communities through choosing an 
effective and reasonably priced wastewater treatment system. See < 
http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/naturalresources/DD7735.html>. 



                                   ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS 

Production of this pamphlet was supported by Federal Clean Water Act section 319 funds 
administered by the Utah Department of Agriculture and Food through contract 001714 with 
Utah State University Extension Services and by the Utah Water Research Laboratory at Utah 
State University. It was written by Patrick Andrew, Darwin Sorensen, and Judith Sims, staff of 
the Utah Onsite Wastewater Treatment Training Program at the Utah Water Research 
Laboratory. We are grateful to those from both the public and private sectors who reviewed the 
final draft of this document and provided valuable suggestions for improvement. 

Cover: Part of the Utah On­Site Wastewater Treatment Training Program Demonstration Site at 
Utah State University. Part of a leach field, ordinarily below the ground, has been “day lighted” 
for demonstration purposes.



                                                                                                15