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					                  DRAFT FOR REVIEW
        Send comments to Sue Beckwith sue@beckwith.com by August 22




                         St. Louis Connects!

Strategic Plan for Community Technology in the St. Louis Area


                               J u ly , 2 0 0 2




    A Project of the St. Louis Brownbag Technology Collaborative


                           With support from:
                     America Connects Consortium
                United States Department of Education
                  St. Louis Development Corporation
              St. Louis Community Information Network
                  St. Louis County – The MET Center
                     Organizations Represented in the Strategic Planning Process

The Brownbag Technology Collaborative would like to thank the following organizations for sending
representatives to participate in development of this strategic plan.


Bi-State Development Agency                                 Provident Counseling

Blue Martini Software                                       RegionWise

ByteWorks                                                   Shiloh Education Center

Catholic Charities                                          Small Business Works
City of St. Louis Community Information Network             Soulard Homeowners Association

City of St. Louis – Controller’s Office                     St Louis Independent Media Center

College of Engineering, University of Missouri              St Louis Planning & Urban Design Agency
Computer Village                                            St Louis Regional Jobs Initiative - East-West Gateway

Computers For Education                                     St. Louis Community College-Forest Park

EduTech Connect - Harris-Stowe State College                St. Louis Community Information Network
Enterprise Foundation                                       St. Louis Core

Fathers Support Center                                      St. Louis County Executive Office

FPSE Youth Alliance                                         St. Louis Public Library

Have Laptop Will Travel and Grace Hill Settlement House     St. Louis Public School Foundation

Herbert Hoover Boys and Girls Club                          St. Louis Public Schools

Hi-Tech Charities                                           St. Louis Public Schools Office of Comm. Education

Jimtek Consultants                                          St. Louis Public Schools Tech Education

Keys for Networking Inc.                                    The Youth and Family Center

Mathews-Dickey                                              University of Missouri-St. Louis
Metropolitan Education and Training (MET) Center            Urban League Met. of St. Louis

Mother's Way Career Counseling/OIC of the Midwest           Vision for Children at Risk

Neighborhood Technical Assistance Center - East St. Louis   Wellston Loop Community Development Corporation
Southhampton Neighborhood Web Coordinator                   Wesley House Assoc.

University of Illinois/ Prairienet                          Yellowbrick Technologies




July, 2002           St. Louis Area Plan for Community Technology (Review version 8)                      2
                                  St. Louis Connects!
             Strategic Plan for Community Technology in the St. Louis Area


                                                                Table of Contents

  Organizations Represented in the Strategic Planning Process .................................................................. 2
  Introduction ............................................................................................................................................... 4
  What is Community Technology? ............................................................................................................ 4
  Plan Development Process ........................................................................................................................ 5
     September 20, 2001 St. Louis Hosts America Connects Meeting ........................................................ 5
     April 9, 2002 St. Louis Connects Planning Session.............................................................................. 5
     May 23, 2002 St. Louis Connects Planning Session............................................................................. 5
     St. Louis Connects Strategic Planning Timeline................................................................................... 7

  Vision ........................................................................................................................................................ 8
  Goals ......................................................................................................................................................... 8
     A.      Access: Provide access to the Internet and emerging technologies. ............................................ 8
     B.      Content: Provide useful and relevant content and services. ......................................................... 8
     C.      Education: Provide education about the technology and use technology for education. ............. 8
     D.      Workforce Development: Provide workforce development and career opportunities. ................ 8

  Priority Strategies to Achieve Goals ......................................................................................................... 9
  Priority Objectives to Achieve Goals ........................................................................................................ 9
  Strategic Alignment ................................................................................................................................ 10
  Accomplishing Specific Objectives ........................................................................................................ 11
     Objective #1 Volunteer clearinghouse ............................................................................................... 11
     Objective #2 Clearinghouse for computer hardware and software .................................................... 14
     Objective #3 Internet access in homes and the community ............................................................... 16
     Objective #4 Directory of community technology services ................................................................ 19
     Objective #5 Distribute educational technology resources ................................................................. 22

  Outreach .................................................................................................................................................. 25
  Current Activities .................................................................................................................................... 25
  Conclusion .............................................................................................................................................. 25




July, 2002                St. Louis Area Plan for Community Technology (Review version 8)                                                                3
                                  St. Louis Connects!
             Strategic Plan for Community Technology in the St. Louis Area


Introduction
This strategic plan presents a blueprint for community technology work in the St. Louis area for the next
two years. The St. Louis Brownbag Technology Collaborative has developed this plan with input from
more than 60 individuals representing local social services organizations, schools, colleges, universities,
businesses, and governments.

This plan will be distributed widely throughout the St. Louis area and will serve as a focal point upon
which community technology will grow and flourish in the St. Louis area. We will use this plan to
encourage financial and policy support of community technology efforts in the St. Louis area.

This is a hybrid strategic and implementation plan. Overall strategies and implementation action items
are combined in one document.. The Brownbag Technology Collaborative believes that by combining a
description of priority strategies with specific plans for achievement of objectives, we will have clearer
direction and readers of this plan will have a better understanding of our intentions.

We wish to recognize the members of the St. Louis Connects planning team for their dedication to
ensuring the success of this planning process.

                                   St. Louis Connects Planning Team

                 Shawn D’Abreu           Herbert Hoover Boys and Girls Club,
                 Don Holt                Computer Village
                 Sonya Pelli             St. Louis Community Information Network
                 Joe Frank               St. Louis Community Information Network
                 Robin Wiseman           Provident Counseling/ Cyber Community Center
                 Herman Noah             The Youth and Family Center
                 Barbara Grothe          RegionWise
                 Rev. J.D. Clark         Shiloh Adult and Children’s Basic Education Center
                 Dr. Avril Weathers      Computer Village



What is Community Technology?
Community technology is the general term used to describe projects for increasing access to computer
and computer-related technology, such as the Internet in low-income communities.

Community technology centers (CTCs) are public labs where people in low-income communities can go
to learn to use technology and gain access to enhanced opportunities in their jobs and schools.

The community technology concept originated in 1990 when the Playing to Win Network was founded by
Antonia Stone, a former public school teacher who during the early 1980s had started a computer
technology center in the basement of a housing development in Harlem. Since then it has grown on scope
and number. There are over 650 community technology centers in the U.S. and Canada and many more
in other parts of the world.

July, 2002        St. Louis Area Plan for Community Technology (Review version 8)                     4
Plan Development Process
The process for development of the Strategic Plan involved three key community meetings, held in the
September 2001 and April and May of 2002. The strategic planning process is called St. Louis Connects.
A planning team of representatives of local community organizations and the Brownbag Technology
Collaborative planned the meetings with national support from the America Connects Consortium.

September 20, 2001 St. Louis Hosts America Connects Meeting
In August of 2001, the America Connects Consortium selected St. Louis as a host city in the national
effort to increase collaboration and understanding of community technology. On September 20, 2001, a
group of thirty-seven (37) representatives of St. Louis area community technology organizations and
others interested in community technology gathered to discuss the current state of community technology
in the St. Louis area. The meeting was a great success. The vision and goals in this plan are based
directly on the input from that meeting. As a result of that meeting, the group decided to pursue
development of a Strategic Plan for Community Technology in the St. Louis area.

Because of the strength of the Brownbag Technology Collaborative, America Connects agreed to
unprecedented support for follow-up meetings in 2002. With national support in hand, the Brownbag
Technology Collaborative embarked on a strategic planning process. This plan is the culmination of that
process.


April 9, 2002 St. Louis Connects Planning Session
The purpose of the April 9th meeting was two-fold:
       To develop objectives based on the goals articulated at the September 2001 meeting.
       To collect basic data about area CTCs to develop a database of local CTC resources.

Forty-two (42) attendees worked in small groups with a facilitator from the planning team to develop
objectives in support of the goals. Evaluations were very favorable; 97% of the evaluation receive
indicated that participants felt that their time had been well spent.

The outcomes of the meeting were complete inventories of the CTCs with representatives in attendance
and a list of objectives that relate to the goals and vision of STL Connects.


May 23, 2002 St. Louis Connects Planning Session
The purpose of the May 23rd planning session was:
       To develop specific strategies based on the priority objectives articulated at the April 9th session
        as refined by the St. Louis connects planning team,
       To generate positive energy toward development and accomplishment of the strategic plan, and
       To understand the value of sustainability planning and learn to develop a sustainability plan.

For this planning session, the America Connects Consortium brought in Mr. George Gundrey of
CompuMentor from San Francisco and Ms. Ana Sisnett, the Executive Director of Austin Free-Net to
share their expertise in St. Louis.

The meeting was a full day of activities for the forty-two (42) attendees. The morning session was for
community technology centers and non-profits using or interested in using community technology in their

July, 2002        St. Louis Area Plan for Community Technology (Review version 8)                      5
programs. Business and policy representatives were invited to join the group for the afternoon session that
focused on developing strategies for the strategic plan.

The morning workshop topic was CTC Sustainability presented by Mr. Gundrey . In this workshop, St.
Louis community technology representatives learned what sustainability is and were able to practice
developing a sustainability plan. Mr. Gundrey provided templates and handouts so that people could take
the work back to their organizations and use the templates to develop plans of their own. Feedback
results were very positive.

The after lunch keynote address was given by Ana Sisnett, Executive Director of Austin Free-Net. Ms.
Sisnett spoke about her experiences with strategic planning addressing the challenges and emphasizing
the benefits. She talked about the need to address issues of race and class in our work and the importance
of including those we serve on our boards of directors and in our planning groups. Participants listened
intently and asked many questions. One participant said in her feedback that Ana’s presentation gave her
hope for community technology in St. Louis. Ms. Sisnett’s keynote showed St. Louis participants that
strategic planning doesn’t have to overwhelming and that, even it feels that way, it is clearly worth it.

The afternoon session was the core work session part of the day. Although it only lasted an hour and a
half, the strategic planning portion was extremely productive. Don Holt, of Computer Village of St.
Louis introduced the session that required participants to work in small groups to develop specific
strategies for the five (5) priority objectives. The priority objectives had been previously selected by the
planning team from the list of sixty-two (62) objectives identified at the April 9th planning session.

The results of the May 23 planning session were outstanding. Attendees developed specific strategies and
shared ideas for achieving each of the priority objectives.

The May 23rd session was the last in the 2002 St. Louis Connects series and provided the groundwork for
this Strategic Plan for Community Technology.




July, 2002        St. Louis Area Plan for Community Technology (Review version 8)                      6
St. Louis Connects Strategic Planning Timeline

  July 2001

  The America Connects Consortium begins supporting regional
  meetings in major US cities about community technology.

  St. Louis is accepted to host a regional meeting.

        August 2001

        Brownbag Technology Collaborative hold retreat to plan what
        steps it will take to achieve its vision.

              September 20, 2001
              St. Louis regional meeting #1

              What are our goals for community technology?

              Representatives of community technology organizations and others interested in
              community technology met in St. Louis to discuss the current state of community
              technology in the St. Louis area. The group of 37 listed and discussed their goals
              and strategies and agreed to hold a follow up meeting in 2002 to take the next
              steps to develop a plan for community technology for the St. Louis area.

                     January – March, 2002

                     The STLConnects planning team analyzed the information from the initial meeting.
                     They summarized this information and crafted a draft vision and goal statement. A
                     second meeting of all community technology representatives will be held on April 9,
                     2002 to review the draft vision and goal statement, develop an inventory of
                     community technology services, and develop objectives to support the goals.

                             April 9, 2002

                             St. Louis Regional Meeting #2

                             What are our objectives for community technology?

                             Community technology leaders and interested community leaders meet to
                             determine what community technology looks like in the St. Louis area and to
                             describe our objectives for the next two (2) years.

                                   May 23, 2002

                                   St. Louis Regional Meeting #2

                                   What are our strategies to meet our goals and objectives for community
                                   technology?

                                   Meeting with business leaders, policy makers, and community technology
                                   leaders. Forty-two (42) participants determined what strategies we will use
                                   to reach our goals for community technology in the St. Louis area.


July, 2002        St. Louis Area Plan for Community Technology (Review version 8)                          7
Vision
    All people in the greater St. Louis metropolitan area are able to use technology to improve the quality
    of life for themselves and their families. There is universal access to technology education that
    provides for long-term employment, lifelong learning, civic participation, and genuine empowerment
    to affect change.




Goals
A. Access: Provide access to the Internet and emerging technologies.
         Coordinated effort for high bandwidth availability in public places and all neighborhoods
         Support computer access in homes; best if net-connected computers
         Support computer access in schools; make Internet access available in all school districts
         Provide technical assistance
         Provide infrastructure: regional Bells, Internet Service Providers, Cable
         Provide neighborhood-based public access through community technology centers
         Refurbish and recycle computers

B. Content: Provide useful and relevant content and services.
         Useful, relevant content
         Online information for people
         Regional content
         Equal access to knowledge
         Help people resolve issues that would keep them from earning a living wage
         Career awareness content

C. Education: Provide education about the technology; support the use of technology for
   education.
         Trained staff and volunteers
         Meet the comprehensive needs of children
         Match education to the children or other people who wish to be educated
         Ensure that literacy issues are addressed
         Use appropriate technology; teach concepts
         Training for seniors and other specific groups (e.g. teens)
         Seek out opportunities to train people to be trainers

D. Workforce Development: Provide workforce development and career opportunities.
         Teach computer skills so that people acquire knowledge and get jobs; employment readiness
         Equal access to skills
         Help people resolve issues that would keep them from earning a living wage




July, 2002         St. Louis Area Plan for Community Technology (Review version 8)                      8
Priority Strategies to Achieve Goals

   Conduct an education campaign to educate area business and political leaders about community
    technology.

   Encourage and facilitate the active involvement of business leaders and other community leaders in
    community technology efforts.

   Strengthen the Brownbag Technology Collaborative to ensure that regional funds are spent most
    effectively and to facilitate ongoing collaboration among the community technology organizations
    serving the St. Louis area.

   Develop an active outreach campaign to inform the community as a whole about community
    technology services that are available.

   Coordinate with workforce and economic development agencies to find ways to leverage local
    community technology and workforce development resources.

   Develop specific biannual work plans for community technology in the St. Louis area.

   Enhance overall credibility of St. Louis area community technology organizations and efforts.




Priority Objectives to Achieve Goals

These five (5) objectives were selected from the sixty-one (61) objectives developed at the April 9
regional community technology strategic planning meeting. These objectives form the core of this 2002-
2004. With adequate funding and project management, each of these objectives will become a project
with its own strategies, outcomes, and funding requirements.

1. Establish a volunteer clearinghouse for community technology related work in the St. Louis area.

2. Establish a clearinghouse for computer hardware and software.

3. Provide more low-cost or no-cost Internet access in the home and in the community.

4. Provide a directory of services, especially classes and public labs that are available.

5. Acquire and distribute educational technology curriculum, software and web-based resources.




July, 2002        St. Louis Area Plan for Community Technology (Review version 8)                     9
Strategic Alignment




                                                            Strategies

                 Goals
                                                            Objectives


Each priority strategy and objective is aligned with one or more goals. The strategies that we will employ
to accomplish our goals are naturally broader in scope than the specific objectives. The overall alignment
between the goals, strategies and objectives will ensure that we remain on track; we will continuously
review each of our priority strategies as we implement each priority objective.

For example, as we implement priority objective #2 as a project, clearinghouse for computer hardware
and software, we will review each of the priority strategies and ensure that we work with the business
community to develop the computer hardware and software clearinghouse, we inform the community as a
whole about the existence and usefulness of the clearinghouse, we make sure that all partners are aware of
the clearinghouse and understand its function, we work with and inform workforce development agencies
about the clearinghouse so that they may use it for the benefit of their constituents and customers.

The next section of this plan describes the detailed plans and specific strategies that we will employ to
achieve each priority objective.




July, 2002        St. Louis Area Plan for Community Technology (Review version 8)                      10
Accomplishing Specific Objectives
This section describes our plans for accomplishment of each priority objective in detail. For each
priority objective, we have included an examination of key elements required for success. This section
will give the reader a clear and more complete understanding of what we intend to accomplish.


The Brownbag Technology Collaborative believes that these accomplishment of these objectives will
leverage our efforts and contribute significantly to attainment of our goals for community technology in
the St. Louis area.




Objective #1 Volunteer clearinghouse

Establish a volunteer clearinghouse for community technology related work in the St. Louis area.


Relationship to Goals
The volunteer clearinghouse, in its first phase, is most closely aligned with the Access goal. Certainly
volunteers will contribute to our achievement of all goals. However, the initial focus will be on making
sure that the labs are up and running well, basic computer classes have trainers, people who receive home
computers through our programs have all that they need to access the Internet and that outreach in the
community about the labs is effective.



                                                                             Goal Areas

                                                                   Access

                                                                   Education
       Volunteer Clearinghouse
                                                                   Content

                                                                   Workforce Development




Expected outcomes: What does success look like?

1. There will a single point of contact: one agency/organization to organize and coordinate volunteers
    for community technology centers (CTCs).



July, 2002            St. Louis Area Plan for Community Technology (Review version 8)                11
2. CTCs will have the volunteers they need. CTCs will be able to draw upon a source of ready and able
    volunteers for training, technical assistance, web development and other technology related work.

3. Potential volunteers will have a single point of contact where they can discover volunteering
    opportunities. They will see the job description and the time requirements and select opportunities
    that fit their needs.


Initial steps to accomplish this objective

1. Determine whether the St. Louis Community Information Network can be the nucleus of this project.

2. Develop a project plan. Identify costs, timeline and personnel needs.

3. Research existing volunteer clearinghouses in the St. Louis area and in the U.S. Start with the
    Mentoring Institute http://www.tmistl.org/aboutus.html , United Way, Volunteer Match
    http://volunteermatch.org/ .

4. Design the process and forms for CTCs seeking volunteers.

5. Design the process and forms for volunteers seeking opportunities.

6. Identify test groups: Create job descriptions for volunteers based on criteria developed by test group
    of CTCs. Create volunteer applications from a test group of volunteers.

7. Identify volunteer management issues and find ways to address them. Identify ways to continuously
    improve the volunteer experience for all parties.

8. Identify policy requirements with regard to volunteers and volunteer management. Will trainers be
    screened? How will we handle a poorly performing volunteer? How will we recognize excellent
    volunteers?

9. Find an expert in volunteer management to help us with this project.



Outreach: How will we tell the community about it?

   List project web site in all search engines.

   Attract local media to specific stories about the project.

   Get links to the project web site from area sites including: regionwise.org, United Way, RCGA
    (Regional Commerce and Growth Association), Independent Media Center (stlimc.org), 2004, and
    many others




July, 2002         St. Louis Area Plan for Community Technology (Review version 8)                   12
   Develop a mailing list and send either email or paper mail at least quarterly. Include Metropolis,
    churches, neighborhood associations, Urban League Block Units, SLACO (St. Louis Association of
    Community Organizations).



How will we know if we succeed?
We will continuously evaluate the effectiveness volunteer clearinghouse. Some indicators of success are:

    -    Volunteer satisfaction

    -    Number of volunteers available compared to need (Do CTCs have the volunteers they need?)

    -    Number of CTCs jobs available compared to volunteer applications (Do potential volunteers find
         desirable opportunities?)

How will we fund this project?

   Seek funding from local grant-making and philanthropic organizations interested in supporting
    community technology and local volunteerism.

   Seek funding from national organizations interested in funding volunteerism.

Who is willing to work on this project?



        Jill Thompson       Vision for Children at Risk      Jsthompson@visionforchildren.org
        Herman Noah         The Youth and Family Center      Herman@theyouthandfamilycenter.org
        Robin Wiseman       Provident Counseling             Ruawise@aol.com




July, 2002         St. Louis Area Plan for Community Technology (Review version 8)                   13
Objective #2 Clearinghouse for computer hardware and software

Establish a clearinghouse for computer hardware and software for the purpose of exchanging used
and useful computers between those who have them and those who need them.



Relationship to Goals
The clearinghouse for computer and hardware is most closely aligned with the Access goal. Anytime
anyone has access to a computer there is some affect on our other goal areas. This objective focuses on
getting more computers into homes and labs for people who have not previously had access to technology
including the Internet.



                                                                           Goal Areas

                                                                 Access

                                                                 Education
         Clearinghouse for
       Hardware and Software                                     Content

                                                                 Workforce Development




Expected outcomes: What does success look like?

1. People who need computers at home will be able to get one that meets their needs.

2. People who have computers they no longer use will be able to put them to use in the St. Louis
    community.

Initial steps to accomplish this objective

1. Determine who will take lead responsibility for this project.

2. Develop a project plan. Identify any costs, timeline or personnel needs.

3. What business or entity could provide the services required for the clearinghouse?

4. Find examples: recycle.org, Washington University’s in-kind donation program, and others.

5. List server might operate that service – community college might be able to set it up and maintain the
    list. Might require staff to monitor. CIN might be able to provide an intern or to staff it.

6. Develop policies and procedures.

July, 2002        St. Louis Area Plan for Community Technology (Review version 8)                  14
7. Identify any potential legal issues.

Outreach: How will we tell the community about it?

   List project web site in all search engines.

   Attract local media to specific stories about the project.

   Get links to the project web site from area sites including: regionwise.org, United Way, RCGA
    (Regional Commerce and Growth Association), Independent Media Center (stlimc.org), 2004, and
    many others

   Develop a mailing list and send either email or paper mail at least quarterly. Include Metropolis,
    churches, neighborhood associations, Urban League Block Units, SLACO (St. Louis Association of
    Community Organizations).

How will we know if we succeed?
We will continuously evaluate the effectiveness of the hardware and software clearinghouse. Some
indicators of success are:

    -    Customer satisfaction. Are those who provide computers satisfied? Are those who receive
         computers satisfied?

    -    Number of requests for computers compared to supply? (Are there enough computers available
         for all who request one? Are there recipients for all computers offered?)

How will we fund this project?

   Seek funding from local and national grant-making and philanthropic organizations interested in
    supporting community technology and economic development.

Who is willing to work on this project?

        Ralph Pickering          STL Comm College – Forest Park       Rpickering@stlcc.cc.mo.us

        George Jones             FPSE Youth Alliance                  Fpseya@stlouis.missouri.org

        Amanda Keleman           Fathers’ Support Group               Akeleman_2000@yahoo.com




July, 2002         St. Louis Area Plan for Community Technology (Review version 8)                   15
Objective #3 Internet access in homes and the community

Provide more low-cost or no-cost Internet access in the home and in the community.


Relationship to Goals
Internet access is most obviously aligned with our Access goal area. It relates to education in that
students can type papers and conduct research for school projects while generally enhancing reading
skills. Parents can use the Internet to search for jobs and can enhance their job opportunities by learning
to use the computer and the Internet. The affect of increasing low-cost and no-cost Internet access will
be to increase demand for local paid Internet access services and computer purchases.



                                                                           Goal Areas

                                                                 Access

                                                                 Education
             Low-cost or no-cost
               Internet access                                   Content

                                                                 Workforce Development




Expected outcomes: What does success look like?

1. People who have computers at home and are interested in accessing the Internet from their homes will
    be able to do so.

2. (With Objective #2), people who do not have computers at home and are able to access the Internet
    will be able to do so at home or at a community technology center in their neighborhood.


Initial steps to accomplish this objective

1. Determine baseline of Internet penetration in the community. Follow the lead of other cities (e.g.
    Austin, Texas) and conduct a City-sponsored annual survey of all cable customers.

2. Identify policy initiatives needed to maximize cable franchise agreement to community access
    purpose.

3. Establish pilot wireless nodes in access points throughout the city.

4. Develop community mapping to determine if and where synergy exists.


July, 2002          St. Louis Area Plan for Community Technology (Review version 8)                    16
5. Inventory the community technology centers that already exist.

Outreach: How will we tell the community about it?

   Expose students in pilot projects who are active participants to become educated consumers

   Share technology tools as a part of neighborhood stabilization activities.

   Start having neighborhood board meetings at community technology centers.

   Encourage Internet use by non-profits to increase exposure to the potential of the Internet.

   List project web site in all search engines.

   Attract local media to specific stories about Internet access both at home and in CTCs.

   Get links to the web site from area sites including: regionwise.org, United Way, RCGA (Regional
    Commerce and Growth Association), Independent Media Center (stlimc.org), 2004, and many others

   Develop a mailing list and send either email or paper mail at least quarterly. Include Metropolis,
    churches, neighborhood associations, Urban League Block Units, SLACO (St. Louis Association of
    Community Organizations).



How will we know if we succeed?
We will continuously evaluate the effectiveness and usefulness of Internet access. If the City of St. Louis,
in partnership with other local governments and the cable franchise holder will conduct an annual study of
Internet access, then we will be able to use that data to evaluate our success in achieving this objective.

How will we fund this project?

   Corporate and large community agency sponsors. e.g. Five largest institutions give $20,000 each.

   Wireless technology providers give in-kind or cash contributions.

   Stronger partnership with public library to tap into public funding and public access stations.

   Partner with Southwestern Bell.

   Because much of the United States has already placed community technology centers in
    neighborhoods, and there is currently little focus on the so-called “Digital Divide” from Washington,
    it will be difficult to garner funds form national organizations. Funding for Internet access will have
    to come from local and regional sources.

   We will consider a model of Adopt-a-Lab and similar ideas that have had success in other cities.



July, 2002        St. Louis Area Plan for Community Technology (Review version 8)                      17
   Seek funding from local and national grant-making and philanthropic organizations interested in
    supporting community technology and economic development.

Who is willing to work on this project?

        Chris Dornfeld*            City of St. Louis                  Dornfeld@stlouiscity.com
        Dr. Glen Holt*             St. Louis Public Library
        John Kintree               Resident
        Sonya Pelli                St. Louis CIN
        Joe Frank                  St. Louis CIN
        Ruth Sargrenian*           Regionwise
        *TO BE RECRUITED




July, 2002          St. Louis Area Plan for Community Technology (Review version 8)               18
Objective #4 Directory of community technology services

Provide a directory of community technology services, especially classes and public labs.


Relationship to Goals
The directory of services is most closely aligned with our Content goal area. The idea is to provide an
easy way for people to get information about community technology centers and programs in their
neighborhood. To a lesser extent, the directory will provide a clear picture for the funding community of
the resources available and the areas of greatest need. The directory will contain information about
technology center locations, hours, and classes offered. As with other objectives, the directory of services
also is related to all other goal areas since the information presented in the directory is about access,
education, and workforce development.



                                                                           Goal Areas

                                                                 Access

                                                                 Education
        Directory of community
          technology services                                    Content

                                                                 Workforce Development




Expected outcomes: What does success look like?

1. People who are interested in learning to use a computer and/or the Internet will have an easy, correct,
    and complete source of information about where they can take classes.

2. Community technology centers will be able to refer people (customers) to other centers if their center
    does not have the class in which the person is interested.

3. People who use the centers will be able to see for themselves the other sorts of training offered in the
    St. Louis area.

4. The broader community, including potential funders, will be able to see the resources available and
    the area of greatest need.




July, 2002         St. Louis Area Plan for Community Technology (Review version 8)                          19
Initial steps to accomplish this objective

1. Find and study examples from Regionwise, CompuMentor, Digital Divide Network and others.
    Ensure that we have no duplication of effort.

2. Decide what form the directory will take. Develop for the long term; maintenance of the directory is
    the most important piece.

3. Find a project manager and convene a project team to specify the exact purpose/s and function of the
    directory.

4. The directory of services will be developed in tandem with the good work already being done by area
    organizations such as Regionwise.

5. The Brownbag Technology Collaborative will solicit information about all the public and private
    community technology labs in the St. Louis area.

6. Inventory the existing computer labs and place that information online. Seek out already existing
    systems for this inventory. For example, CompuMentor.org and the DigitalDivideNetwork.org

Outreach: How will we tell the community about it?

   Launch a marketing campaign focusing on neighborhoods where few people have computers and
    Internet access at home.

   Get information included in church bulletins and in radio interviews.

   Create a “buzz” in neighborhoods where there is a lab now. Get people talking, making phone calls,
    place flyers in places where people will see them (library, grocery stores).

   Attract local media to specific stories about Internet access both at home and in CTCs.

   Speakers’ bureau.

   Get links to the web site from area sites including: regionwise.org, United Way, RCGA (Regional
    Commerce and Growth Association), Independent Media Center (stlimc.org), 2004, and many others

   Develop a mailing list and send either email or paper mail at least quarterly. Include Metropolis,
    churches, neighborhood associations, Urban League Block Units, SLACO (St. Louis Association of
    Community Organizations).




July, 2002        St. Louis Area Plan for Community Technology (Review version 8)                    20
How will we know if we succeed?
We will continuously evaluate the effectiveness and usefulness of the directory. If it is an online
directory, we will use an online survey form for ongoing assessment of customer satisfaction. If the form
in print, then we will place a feedback postcard or something similar so that every user of the directory
can offer their thoughts and feedback.

How will we fund this project?

   Consider fee-based advertising in the directory.

   Consider a minimal charge for the directory.

   Corporate and large community agency sponsors.

   Seek funding from local and national grant-making and philanthropic organizations interested in
    supporting community technology and economic development.

Who is willing to work on this project?


        Diane Smoot                 Harris-Stowe State College         Smootd@hssc.edu
        Don Holt                    Computer Village
        Althea Landrum              Have Laptop Will Travel            althealandrum@sbc.global.net
        Clark Rowley                Soulard Neighborhood/CIN           cdrowley@earthlink.net
        J.D. Clark                  Shiloh Education Center            shilohmb@aol.com




July, 2002           St. Louis Area Plan for Community Technology (Review version 8)                  21
Objective #5 Distribute educational technology resources

Acquire and distribute educational technology curriculum, software and web-based resources.


Relationship to Goals
This objective is focused on our education goal area. St. Louis area community technology centers will
increase the use of educational technology. The Brownbag Technology Collaborative will work with
local educators, both K-12 and adult, to develop, apply and distribute curriculum that complements the
education provided by area school districts and community colleges.



                                                                          Goal Areas

                                                                Access

                                                                Education
         Distribute educational
               technology                                       Content

                                                                Workforce Development




Expected outcomes: What does success look like?

1. Students are at their expected educational levels measured in terms of an analysis of MAAP
    performance.

2. Enrollment and attendance are at least 75% of capacity after the first year.

3. Demand for classes using educational technology is being met. Waiting lists are short.

4. Completion rates and retention rates are above 50%.

5. Exit surveys indicate satisfaction on the part of the students.

6. Follow up evaluations indicate that the education is useful in the longer term.

7. All centers where classes are offered to children are using some form of educational technology.

8. Workshops are being held to train CTC staff and volunteers in the application of curricula.




July, 2002         St. Louis Area Plan for Community Technology (Review version 8)                 22
Initial steps to accomplish this objective

1. Define the project and identify project team.

2. Identify customers and resources. e.g. PLATO, Emints (education resource Missouri)

3. Check with need. Meet with staff from existing adult education centers. What services do they
    provide? What challenges do they face? Identify ways that community technology centers can work
    with them.

4. Identify open source resources – Source Forge, Red Hat. (Byteworks has done some of this)

5. Identify the software to be used in support of the technology curriculum.

6. Identify the computers to be used to support the curriculum.

7. Identify web-based resources that are supported by the technology and support the curriculum

8. Coordinate the curriculum with that of the school districts and community colleges and other adult
    education centers.

9. Design a process for a software repository and distribution of software and curricula.

Outreach: How will we tell the community about it?

   Create and distribute flyers in neighborhoods and existing community technology centers.

   Build prospect list to develop more personalized communication for mailings and phone calls

   Develop institutional contacts in neighborhoods (i.e. neighborhood councils & block clubs), churches,
    and schools.

   Make a Brownbag Technology Collaborative hints and links page.

   Consider multimedia as special lure that attracts and appeals. Develop media package that will
    support radio, newspaper, and television in the form of press releases, public service announcements,
    and articles.

   Get information included in church bulletins and in radio interviews.

   Get links to the web site from area sites including: St. Louis Community Information Network
    (CIN), regionwise.org, United Way, RCGA (Regional Commerce and Growth Association),
    Independent Media Center (stlimc.org), 2004, and many others




July, 2002          St. Louis Area Plan for Community Technology (Review version 8)                  23
How will we know if we succeed?
We will continuously evaluate the progress on this objective. This is a longer term objective than our
other priority objectives and will require much thought and collaboration. We will succeed when we:
   establish classes at community technology centers that use educational technology for education of
    children and adults,
   have in place a process through which community technology centers can learn about educaiotnal
    technology and its deployment and applications.

How will we fund this project?

   We will keep costs low by using open source resources

   Coordinate funding efforts with corporation/foundation – Find/fund a circuit rider

   Partner with school districts to make community technology centers schooling extensions

   Partner with educational software firms to “pilot”, “test” software in the centers

   Build political relations in order to develop state (and local) funding. (i.e. work on being included in
    the state budget)

   Create a team of educational circuit riders to drum up support among school principles and
    instructional coordinators.

   Develop an income fee-based structure. Require an in-kind relationship with adult clients who would
    volunteer their time and resources in support of the centers.

   Secure grants and develop fundraisers in support of the centers that are employing educational
    technology.

Who is willing to work on this project?


        Chuck Kindleberger        City of St. Louis                   ckindleb@stlouis.missouri.org
        Dr. Avril Weathers        Computer Village                    weathers@umsl.edu




July, 2002        St. Louis Area Plan for Community Technology (Review version 8)                      24
Outreach
<This section will be completed after all comments received. This will include a summary of the
outreach activities in each of the preceding objectives.>




Current Activities
<This section will include projects involving more than one agency. This section will be completed after
summaries of the projects are received. To reviewers: If you have specific collaborative projects to
include in this section, please send a short paragraph about your project to sue@beckwith.com by August
22.>
Department of Education Community Technology Project
    Collaborators:    The Youth and Family Center, St. Louis Community Information Network,
                      Computer Village, Shiloh Education Center, Herbert Hoover Boys and Girls Club,
                      Cornerstone Project
    Description:      Provide computers and Internet access in six (6) community technology centers in
                      the City of St. Louis to support adult and youth education. Three-year program to
                      send in April 2003.
    Funders:          U.S. Department of Education Community Technology program, in kind from all
                      collaborators


Lego Project at Herbert Hoover Boys and Girls Club
Empowerment Zone
<other projects>


Conclusion


<This section will be completed after all comments received.>




July, 2002         St. Louis Area Plan for Community Technology (Review version 8)                 25

				
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