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					Greater Rochester
Health Foundation
    Childhood Overweight
              &
   Obesity Prevention Grant

          Webster Central School District
 Schlegel Road & State Road Elementary Schools
A Matter of Worldly Proportions
Obesity… A Growing Problem in America
           Experts say that…
Exercise is Miracle-Gro for the Brain!
         The Impact of Physical Activity and Obesity on
       Academic Achievement Among Elementary Students
                          Version 1.1: Mar 30, 2007 3:06 pm GMT-5
                                         Jimmy Byrd

Problem Statement:
         This study compared the effect of physical activity and obesity on academic
   achievement and was based on the premise that the health of a child has an effect
   on his or her ability to learn and to achieve academically.

   National Center for Educational Statistics' Early Childhood Longitudinal Study
   (Third Grade)

   Participants: 12,607 Third grade students

   The results indicated that the Body Mass Index (BMI) of students, as well as the
   opportunity for physical activity within the school day affected the students'
   performance in both reading and mathematics achievement.

   “…obese students performed below their more physically active counterparts
   regarding academic achievement.”
  Examining the Link between Youth Body Mass Index
              and Student Achievement
           Eric Eide; Brigham Young University - Department of Economics
               Mark H. Showalter; Brigham Young University - General
                                     July 2007


Problem Statement:
  Explore the association between student BMI and academic
  achievement.

  Participants: 2,017 families provided data on 2,908
  children/adolescents aged 5-18 years

  Preliminary estimates suggest that children whose BMI is in
  the tails of the distribution have lower test scores than
  students who are not in the tails of the BMI distribution.
What would a giraffe look like if it
  lived in the United States?
       Weapons of Mass Destruction
   On any given day:
    – Only 14-17% of school children eat the recommended servings of fruit and
      vegetables.

   Of young people ages 6-17, 75% eat too much total fat, and 84% eat too much
   saturated fat.

   About 12% of students report skipping breakfast

Serving Sizes and Choices                             INACTIVITY


                                    Combined
                                      With


1980                        Now
                      The GRHF’s Goal
The GRHF’s goal is to reduce the prevalence of overweight
  and obese, as measured by Body Mass Index (BMI), from
  15% to 5% of Monroe County children ages 2-10 by 2017.




Increase Physical
                                           Advance Policy &
Activity & Improve
                                           Practice Solutions
Nutrition
                                                                Execute a Community
                     Engage the Clinical                        Communications
                     Community                                  Campaign
             Our Goal
    The goal of the Healthy Choice
Challenge is to develop planned
sequential instruction and sustainable
environmental change that promotes
lifelong physical activity, nutrition
education, and family education including
collaboration and the use of community
resources to reduce childhood obesity as
measured by Body Mass Index (BMI) by
2% each year at State and Schlegel
Elementary schools.
 Sustaining Environmental Change to Combat Childhood Obesity
                           Education and
                      Professional Development


      K – 12                                       School and Staff
Wellness Connection                                  Commitment




                                                        Community
Family Connection
                                                        Connection




     Nutrition and Food Service        Evaluation and Assessment
          Why Us?         Why Now?
         Schlegel Road’s Current State

Title I school:
  Between 18%-20% students receive free or
  reduced lunch

Student Body Composition as measured by BMI:
  3% of students are considered underweight
  68% of students are considered healthy weight
  12% of students are considered at risk/overweight
  17% of students are considered obese
Three Critical Areas of Focus

        Awareness
      Implementation
        Evaluation
               Implementation:
Education and Professional Development

Staff nutrition and physical activity professional
development through Wegmans EWLW and other
partnerships.
Physical Education Staff development on the use
of various equipment and implementation of
programming.
Educational Resources:
    CDC School Health Index, MyPyramid.gov,
    Food Guide Pyramid Program, TEAM Nutrition,
    Physical Best, FitnessGram Training, SPARK.
               Implementation:
    Building a Culture Change
Completion of CDC School Health Index
Use of non-food reward systems
Non-food birthday celebrations
Opportunities for classroom movement breaks
during the school day
Use of front doors for recess to increase steps
Afterschool SPARK physical activity program
Use of MyPyramid nutrition curriculum in
Physical Education
     Center for Disease Control (CDC):
        School Health Index (SHI)
    The School Health Index (SHI): Self-Assessment & Planning
Guide was developed by CDC in partnership with school
administrators and staff, school health experts, parents, and national
nongovernmental health and education agencies for the purpose of;

Enabling schools to identify strengths and weaknesses of health and
safety policies and programs,

Enabling schools to develop an action plan for improving student
health, which can be incorporated into the School Improvement
Plan, and

Engaging teachers, parents, students, and the community in
promoting health-enhancing behaviors and better health.

     There is growing recognition of the relationship between health
and academic performance, and your school’s results from using the
SHI can help you include health promotion activities in your overall
School Improvement Plan.
                                Retrieved on December 05,2008 from https://apps.nccd.cdc.gov/shi/default.aspx
              Schlegel SHI Team
      Theresa Pulos               Maria DeStephano
      Lucy Kaempffe               Dawn Leask
      Joe Kabes                   Tiffany Drum
      Sandy McCabe                Tom Viola
      Martha Verplank             Doreen Gala-Hebert
      Katherine Pazmino           Rich Brown
      Jeremy Slack                Holly Hahn
      Kate Hesla
      Cynthia Bennett
      Janet Gibson

The Schlegel School Health Index Team has worked in
  concert with one another to complete the eight modules of
  the SHI to identify areas of strength and areas in need of
  improvement.

The team has identified areas of improvement and have
  started to create and implement recommendation and
  action steps in an effort to move the school forward in these
  areas.
             SHI Team Focus
Results of the School Health Index (SHI):
  Module Eight: Family and Community Involvement 39%

Recommendations & Action Steps:
 Family Fitness Nights/Winter Weekend
 School Winter Wellness Fair
 Include recipes, exercises, and links to resources in
 the Safari
 NutraKids Section in the Safari
 Work with Cheryl Buckley on food services
 Examine research-based family nutrition education
 programs
Program Road Map
     Fitness Freeway
  SPARK After School Program
                       February, 2009
  SPARK (Sport, Physical Activity, & Recreation for Kids) After
  School has been developed for all out-of-school
  PE physical activity programs. Develop for
  children ages 5-14.

  SPARK After School philosophy:
  Include ALL youth, ALL youth ACTIVE, and ALL
  youth learning to enjoy movement.

* Program specifics are currently being worked on
  and will be shared when completed.
        Healthy Choice Rooms
                  September, 2009

Locker rooms will be transformed into 21st Century
fitness rooms.

Students will have access to these rooms during their
lunch and other times during the day.

The rooms will have various technologies and lifetime
fitness equipment for students to increase the amount of
physical activity they receive each day.

Supervisors will be hired for each room to maintain a
safe and healthy environment.
         Life-time Activities
                  Ongoing

Heart Rate Monitors
Pedometers
GPS Geocaching
Elementary Golf
Project Adventure Equipment
Bowling
Resistance Tubing Bands
Reebok Steps
Pilates & Yoga mats
3-5lb medicine balls
And much more!
        Schlegel Fitness Trail
                 Late Spring, 2009

                  7
                                 8
    6

        Schlegel Fitness Trail
        (805 meters= .5 miles)
5                                9



           4
                            3




                                         1
                                     2
          Hydroponics
   Our students will learn about the
growth cycles of plants and food
through authentic experiences with
local hydroponic growers and
collaboration with Webster Schroeder
and Thomas high school classes.
              Evaluation and Assessment
       The goal of the Healthy Choice Challenge is to develop planned
sequential instruction and sustainable environmental change that promotes
lifelong physical activity, nutrition education, and family education including
collaboration and the use of community resources to reduce childhood
obesity as measured by Body Mass Index (BMI) by 2% each year at State
and Schlegel Elementary schools.


Use of the CDC, School Health Index
Set school physical activity and nutrition goals
FITNESSGRAM and ACTIVITYGRAM data
collection and analysis
BMI collection and analysis
Use data to reevaluate school needs and set
new fitness and nutrition goals for each school
year
           Current Progress
Hallowellness Fair October, 2008
“5-2-1-0/Healthy Hero” Promotion October, 2008
SPARK Coordinators have been hired
SPARK Supervisors have been hired
SPARK Training December, 2008
New Cook Manager hired: Miss Courtney
Partnership with Dr. Cook at STRONG Kids
Wegmans Eat Well Live Well staff program March,
2009
Schlegel Fitness Trail Equipment is in and will be
installed Spring, 2009
Penfield YMCA Partnership for Family Nights in
progress for Spring, 2009
                Putting the pieces together to
 Sustain Environmental Change and Combat Childhood Obesity
                           Education and
                      Professional Development


      K – 12                                       School and Staff
Wellness Connection                                  Commitment




                                                        Community
Family Connection
                                                        Connection




     Nutrition and Food Service        Evaluation and Assessment
      How can I become a
  “HEALTHY HERO” to my child?
Follow the “Healthy Hero” guidelines:
5 fruits and veggies a day
2 hours or less of computer or TV time
1 hour of active play (or more!)
0 sugary drinks (Reach for Milk or Water first!)

Model healthy foods choices
Participate in physical activity with your child
       Links & Resources

BeAHealthyHero.org
Center for Disease Control (CDC)
Greater Rochester Health Foundation
My Pyramid for Kids
SPARK After school Program
Team Nutrition
Wegmans Eat Well Live Well

				
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