AP World Syllabus Powerpoint - AP WORLD HISTORY August 2007 by goodbaby

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									         AP WORLD HISTORY
            August 2009
• Welcome to the 2009-2010 school year!
  Congratulations on choosing AP World
  History, a demanding yet exciting course which
  emphasizes the development of non-western
  human society. This is a college level class in
  which you will be expected to do extensive
  outside reading, detailed writing assignments,
  and independent research.
           AP Related Issues
• AP course grades are weighted to reflect a greater level
  of achievement in terms of GPA and rigor in course
  work. This means grade of a C in an AP class is
  equivalent to a B in a regular class due to weighted
  grades.
• This class is designed to help you pass the AP World
  History test given in May. You may be able to receive
  college credit for passing the AP WH test, however each
  university makes their own determination or what score
  to accept in lieu of college course work. Colleges do
  look carefully at transcripts. Taking AP classes and
  attempting to pass the test rank very high for admissions
  consideration, especially at competitive institutions.
              AP Related Issues
• Many religious and cultural values will be explored; however
  no particular view will be favored over the others. AP World
  History reflects a global perspective of history, and the content
  will not exceed 30% Western History. Study will focus not on
  facts, but rather overarching themes throughout human
  society.
• The course imposes a heavy reading and writing load
  throughout the year, and the demands on the students are
  equivalent to a full-year introductory college course. Students
  and Parents should expect that there is some work/reading to
  be done almost each school night, and study time should be
  planned for various assignments. Students also need to
  understand that it is always required to read the chapters that
  are covered in class. Failure to read will lead to poor
  results in the class and on the AP exam!
       Course Textbook and
           Resources
• Our textbook this year will be:
• Stearns, Peter N. et al. World Civilizations:
  The Global Experience. 4th ed. AP Version.
  New York: Pearson Longman, 2005.
  Textbook
• Students are encouraged to access
  additional resources online at
• http://wps.ablongman.com/long_stearns_w
  cap_4
   AP World History Themes
• *Interaction between humans and the
  environment
  – Demography and disease
  – Migration
  – Patterns of settlement
  – Technology
  AP World History Themes
• *Development and interaction of
  cultures
  – Religions
  – Belief systems, philosophies, and ideologies
  – Science and technology
  – The arts and architecture
   AP World History Themes
• *State- building, expansion, and
  conflict
  – Political structures and forms of governance
  – Empires
  – Nations and nationalism
  – Revolts and revolutions
  – Regional, trans- regional and global structures
    and organizations
   AP World History Themes
• *Creation, expansion, and interaction of
  economic systems
  – Agriculture and pastoral production
  – Trade and commerce
  – Labor systems
  – Industrialization
  – Capitalism and Socialism
  AP World History Themes
• *Development and transformation of
  social structures
  – Gender roles and relations
  – Family and Kinship
  – Racial and ethnic constructions
  – Social and economic classes.
        Historical Thinking Skills
• Historical analysis requires familiarity with a great deal of
  information about the past - names, dates, facts, events, and
  the like. Without reliable and detailed information about the
  past, historical thinking is not possible.
• Yet historical analysis involves much more than the compilation
  of data about the past. It calls also for distinctive reasoning
  skills. History is not a simple effort to collect information but
  rather a sophisticated quest for meaning about the past. This
  quest involves a rigorous and fair-minded analysis of
  documents and other sources of information about the past. It
  calls for individuals who respect all relevant historical evidence
  and reasoning- not just those elements that support a preferred
  or preconceived position. The quest for historical meaning
  entails the cultivation of six distinct but also interrelated and
  overlapping intellectual skills:
       Historical Thinking Skills
• * Analysis: Historical thinking depends on the
  ability to understand and evaluate evidence
  about the past (including written documents as
  well as archaeological artifacts, oral traditions,
  works of art and other primary sources). It
  involves the capacity to extract useful
  information and draw appropriate conclusions
  from historical evidence while also
  understanding that evidence in its context,
  recognizing its limitations, and assessing the
  point of view that reflects it.
   Historical Thinking Skills
• * Argumentation: Historical thinking
  depends on the ability to construct
  plausible arguments on the basis of all the
  relevant historical evidence as well as the
  capacity to understand and evaluate the
  arguments of others fairly in light of all
  available evidence.
   Historical Thinking Skills
• * Chronological Reasoning: Historical
  thinking depends on the ability to
  recognize patterns of change and
  continuity through time, to address
  questions of causation, and to compare
  and evaluate alternative models of
  periodization.
      Historical Thinking Skills
• * Interpretation: Historical thinking depends
  on the ability to analyze the roles played by
  multiple causes of historical developments, to
  recognize that different witnesses from different
  communities have articulated multiple
  perspectives on historical experiences, and to
  understand and evaluate diverse interpretations
  of the past through examination of their
  evidence, reasoning, contexts, points of view,
  and frames of reference.
   Historical Thinking Skills
• * Contextualization: Historical thinking
  depends on the ability to connect local
  developments with broader processes, to
  understand the various ways that global
  processes have influenced the
  development of individual societies, and to
  assess the similarities and differences
  between historical processes in different
  chronological and geographical contexts.
    Historical Thinking Skills
• * Comparison: Historical thinking
  depends on the ability to compare the
  similarities and differences in historical
  developments among and between
  societies in order to understand the
  experiences of individual peoples and
  societies in relevant context.
   Historical Thinking Skills
• * Synthesis: Historical thinking depends
  on the ability to construct plausible
  historical narratives and create persuasive
  understandings of the past by drawing
  resourcefully on relevant primary sources
  and secondary works while acknowledging
  them in appropriate fashion.
           Course Activities
• A) Multiple Choice Tests (25%)
  – Multiple Choice Tests will be designed to simulate the
    AP Test. They will be timed and AP grading will be
    used. There will be 5 choices and wrong answers will
    be deducted a ¼ point of the total score. Tests will be
    cumulative to try and build up and retain knowledge
    from earlier chapters. Tests will be scored on a curve
    using the AP 5 point scale. It is important to realize
    tests will cover assigned readings, not lecture topics.
    Reading needs to be finished over the weekend
    before we discuss the chapter. Failure to read will
    significantly lower your grade!
               Course Activities
• B) Essays (25%)
  – Essays will include three types; Document Based Questions
    (DBQ), Change over Time (COT), Comparative (COMP)
    writings. Essays will be written both outside of class and
    timed essays written during class. Essay packets will be
    assigned to do at home for each unit, these will include all 3
    types of essays, peer reviews and one graded rewrite. Take
    home essays need to be typed and are due at the end of
    each unit. We will analyze primary sources, outside
    readings, oral histories, maps, charts and visuals (art,
    architecture, and political cartoons). This primary source
    analysis will help you directly with the tasks required for the
    Document-Based Question (DBQ) essay on the exam, but
    the daily use of historical materials also will help you practice
    using evidence to make plausible arguments. You also will
    become expert at identifying point of view, context, and bias
    in these sources. Essays will be scored using the AP 9 point
    rubric scale.
          Course Activities
• C) Final (20%)
  – Each semester will conclude with a
    cumulative final. Students will have an
    opportunity to show what they have learned
    over the entirety of the course, and should
    understand like a college course, finals have
    a significant impact on their grade.
          Course Activities
• D) Assignment Packets (15%)
  – Assignment packets are due each Friday for
    the assigned reading. They include note
    cards, timeline, maps and analysis from the
    week. Students wit a high level of
    performance will be given the choice of doing
    an alternative activity, such as a historical
    inquiry.
          Course Activities
• E) Projects (5%)
  – Both group and individual projects will be
    assigned to help review the course material.
  – After the AP Test in May, enrichment projects
    will also be assigned.
             Course Activities
• F) Portfolios (5%)
  – Students are required to keep their tests, essays,
    warm ups, and assignment packets in a portfolio for
    each unit. These will be due at the end of each unit
    and should be kept throughout the course as they
    are very helpful in reviewing information for the
    exam.
          Course Activities
• G) Participation (5%)
  – Students are expected to participate at a high
    level in an AP class, both in answering
    questions and volunteering information for
    discussions. Students will be given warm-up
    questions at the start of class with thesis
    statements, and turn these in at the end of
    each week.
                   Course Outline
• Unit I Technological and Environmental
  Transformations (8000 B.C.E. - 600 B.C.E.) 1 week
  – From Human Prehistory to Early Civilizations (Chapter 1)
     Big Idea 1 Locating world history in the environment and time.
     Big Idea 2 Developing agriculture and technology.
     Big Idea 3 Basic features of early civilizations: Mesopotamia, Egypt,
       Indus, Shang; Mesoamerican and Andean.
  Major Comparisons and Snapshots
     Compare societies and cultures that include cities with pastoral and
      nomadic societies.
     Compare the political and social structures of two early civilizations
      using any two of the following: Mesopotamia, Egypt, Indus Valley,
      Shang dynasty, and Mesoamerica and Andean South America.
         Unit II Organization and
    Reorganization of Human Societies
      (600 B.C.E. - 600 C.E.) 4 weeks
•   Classical Civilizations in China, India and the Mediterranean (Chapters 2-4)
•   Decline of the Classical Period (Chapter 5)
     – Big Idea 1. Major Belief Systems: Hinduism, Buddhism, Judaism, Christianity,
       Confucianism, and Daoism; polytheism and shamanism.
     – Big Idea 2. Classical civilizations: Greece, Rome, China, and India including migrations of
       the Huns, Germanic tribes.
     – Big Idea 3. Interregional networks by 600 CE and spread of belief systems.
•   Major Comparisons and Snapshots
     – Compare major religious and philosophical systems including some underlying similarities
       in cementing a social hierarchy. e.g., Hinduism contrasted with Confucianism.
     – Compare the role of women in different belief systems-Buddhism, Christianity,
       Confucianism, and Hinduism.
     – Understand how and why the collapse of empire was more severe in western Europe than
       it was in the eastern Mediterranean or in China.
     – Compare the caste system to other systems of social inequality devised by early and
       Classical civilizations, including slavery.
     – Compare the development of traditions and institutions in major civilizations, e.g., Indian,
       Chinese, and Greek.
     – Describe interregional trading systems, e.g., the Indian Ocean trade.
            Unit III Regional and Trans-
               Regional Interactions
             (600C.E. - 1450) 7 weeks
•   I) The Spread of Islam and Civilization in Africa (Chapters 6-8)
•   II) Civilization in Europe and America (Chapters 9-11)
•   III) Spread of Chinese Civilization and a Changing World Balance (Chapters 13-15)
     –   Big Idea 1. The Islamic World, the Crusades, and Schism in Christianity
     –   Big Idea 2. Silk Road trade networks, Chinese model and urbanization
     –   Big Idea 3. Compare European and Japanese feudalism, Vikings
     –   Big Idea 4. Mongols across Eurasia and urban destruction in Southwest Asia, Black Death
     –   Big Idea 5. Compare Bantu and Polynesian migrations, Great Zimbabwe and Mayan
     –   empires and urbanization; Aztec and Incan empires and urbanization
     –   Big Idea 6. Ming Treasure Ships and Indian Ocean trade networks (Swahili coast)
•   Major Comparisons and Snapshots
     – Compare Japanese and European feudalism.
     – Compare developments in political and social institutions in both eastern and western
       Europe.
     – Analyze the role and function of cities in major societies Compare Islam and Christianity.
     – Analyze gender systems and changes, such as the impact of Islam Compare Aztec Empire
       and Inca Empire.
     – Compare European and sub-Saharan African contacts with the Islamic world.
             Unit IV Global Interactions
                (1450 - 1750) 6 weeks
•   I)   The World Economy and Transformation of the West (Chapters 16-17)
•   II) The Rise of Russia and Early Latin America (Chapters 18-19)
•   III) Africa and Asian Transitions (Chapters 20-22)
     –   Big Idea 1. “Southernization” in Western Europe and the Scientific Revolution and
     –   Renaissance; Change-Reformation and Counter Reformation.
     –   Big Idea 2. Encounters and Exchange: Reconquista, Portuguese in Morocco, West Africa,
     –   Spanish in the Americas.
     –   Big Idea 3. Encounters and Exchange: Portuguese in Indian Ocean trade networks,
     –   Manila galleons and the Ming Silver Trade.
     –   Big Idea 4. Labor Systems in the Atlantic World—The Africanization of the Americas
     –   (slave trade, plantation economies, resistance to slavery); Labor systems in the
     –   Russian Empire and resistance to serfdom.
     –   Big Idea 5. Expansion of Global Economy and Absolutism: Ottoman, Safavid,
     –   Mughal, Bourbons, Tokugawa, and Romanov.
     –   Big Idea 6. Effects of the Atlantic Slave Trade on demography in West Africa, resistance
     –   to the Atlantic slave trade, and expansion of Islam in sub-Saharan Africa.
•   Major Comparisons and Snapshots
     –   Analyze imperial systems: European monarchy compared with a land-based Asian empire.
     –   Compare coercive labor systems: slavery and other coercive labor systems in the Americas.
     –   Understand the development of empire (ie., general empire building in Asia, Africa, and Europe).
     –   Compare Russia's interaction with the West with the interaction of one of the following (Ottoman Empire,
         China, Tokugawa Japan, Mughal India) with the West.
    Unit V Industrialization and Global
     Integration (1750 - 1914) 5 weeks
•   I)   The World Economy and Transformation of the West (Chapters 16-17)
•   II) The Rise of Russia and Early Latin America (Chapters 18-19)
•   III) Africa and Asian Transitions (Chapters 20-22)
     –   Big Idea 1. “Southernization” in Western Europe and the Scientific Revolution and
     –   Renaissance; Change-Reformation and Counter Reformation.
     –   Big Idea 2. Encounters and Exchange: Reconquista, Portuguese in Morocco, West Africa,
     –   Spanish in the Americas.
     –   Big Idea 3. Encounters and Exchange: Portuguese in Indian Ocean trade networks,
     –   Manila galleons and the Ming Silver Trade.
     –   Big Idea 4. Labor Systems in the Atlantic World—The Africanization of the Americas
     –   (slave trade, plantation economies, resistance to slavery); Labor systems in the
     –   Russian Empire and resistance to serfdom.
     –   Big Idea 5. Expansion of Global Economy and Absolutism: Ottoman, Safavid,
     –   Mughal, Bourbons, Tokugawa, and Romanov.
     –   Big Idea 6. Effects of the Atlantic Slave Trade on demography in West Africa, resistance
     –   to the Atlantic slave trade, and expansion of Islam in sub-Saharan Africa.
•   Major Comparisons and Snapshots
     –   Compare the causes and early phases of the Industrial Revolution in western Europe and Japan.
     –   Compare the Haitian and French Revolutions.
     –   Compare reaction to foreign domination in the Ottoman Empire, China, India, and Japan.
     –   Compare nationalism, e.g., China and Japan, Cuba and the Philippines, Egypt and Nigeria.
     –   Compare forms of Western intervention in Latin America and in Africa.
     –   Compare the roles and conditions of women in the upper/middle classes with peasantry/working class in
         western Europe.
Unit VI Global Fragmentations and
  Realignment (1914 - Present)
            7 weeks
•   I) Challenges of European Dominance (Chapters 28-30)
•   II) End of European World Order and the Cold War (Chapters 31-32)
•   III) Nation Building and Globalization (Chapters 33-36)
     –   Big Idea 1. World War I, Total War, and Reactions to the 14 Points.
     –   Big Idea 2. Rise of Consumerism and Internationalization of Culture.
     –   Big Idea 3. Depression and Authoritarian Responses.
     –   Big Idea 4. World War II and Forced Migrations.
     –   Big Idea 5. United Nations and Decolonization.
     –   Big Idea 6. Cold War, Imperialism, and the End of the Cold War.
•   Major Comparisons and Snapshots
     –   Compare patterns and results of decolonization in Africa and India.
     –   Pick two revolutions (Russian, Chinese, Cuban, Iranian) and compare their effects on the roles of
         women.
     –   Compare the effects of the World Wars on areas outside of Europe Compare legacies of colonialism and
         patterns of economic development in two of three areas (Africa, Asia, and Latin America).
     –   Analyze the notion of “the West” and “the East” in the context of Cold War ideology.
     –   Compare nationalist ideologies and movements in contrasting European and colonial environments.
     –   Compare the different types of independence struggles.
     –   Compare the impacts of Western consumer society on two civilizations outside of Europe.
     –   Compare high-tech warfare with guerrilla warfare.
     –   Assess different proposals (or models) for economic growth in the developing world and the social and
         political consequences.
                Course Structure
• The course will use the   • All tasks will be graded
  following grade scale;      using the 5 point AP
   –   A:    90 - 100 %       Rubric scale;
   –   B:    80 - 89%          –   5 (Exemplary)     100%
   –   C:    70 - 79%          –   4 (Advanced)       90%
   –   F:     0 - 69%          –   3 (Proficient)     80%
                               –   2 (Basic)          70%
                               –   1 (Below Basic) 60%
                               –   0 (Not turned in)   0%
       Incomplete/Late work
• Students with a verified absence must turn
  in work due and make up any assessment
  on the day they return to class in order to
  receive full credit. Students may make up
  work that is incomplete or below basic until
  the end of each unit for a maximum score
  of 2 (basic; 70%) Don’t have any missing
  assignments, turning something in is much
  better than not turning anything in (60%
  vs. 0%)
Communication and Materials
• Course lectures, assignments, grades and other
  information are available on my website at;
  http://www.teacherweb.com/ca/greatoak/herbst/
• Sign up for my newsflashes to get the latest information
  and updates about AP World History.
• You may also contact me by email:
  kherbst@tvusd.k12.ca.us
• or by voice mail (951)294-6450 x3211
• Students will need a pack of index cards (500), 5
  folders in which to keep their portfolios, and a box of
  colored pencils to use throughout the year
              Course Expectations
• My main class rule is RESPECT.
   – This means respect for me, your peers, and the classroom. No
     putdowns are allowed, even if you’re joking. Keep your hands to
     yourself. Use proper language and keep our room clean.
• Be ready to learn.
   – This means stay in your assigned seat and work quietly. Pay attention
     and don’t use any electronic devices.
• Be Responsible
   – This means come to class and be on time. Make sure you are inside the
     classroom when the bell rings. The school attendance and tardy policy
     will be enforced, and grades can be lowered for missing too much class.
     If you miss class, find out the assignment.
• Do the Right Thing
   – Be honest, have integrity. Do your own work. Stay positive; ask yourself
     how I can do better? Do whatever it takes to get the job done to the best
     of your ability. Don’t take shortcuts.
         Course Expectations
• The following consequences will be applied
  for rule violations;
  –   1st Warning: Verbal
  –   2nd Warning: Classroom Cleanup
  –   3rd Warning; Time Out/Detention
  –   4th Warning; Parent Contact
  –   5th Warning; Office Referral
• You are in an AP class; we work too hard for
  any distractions. If you can’t behave,
  transfer out!
• Please return the signature page and keep the
  syllabus for future reference

• I look forward to having you in class this year.

• If we work together, we can succeed!!!


•Mr. Herbst

								
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