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Friday_ December 7_ 2007

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					Friday, December 7, 2007
7:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.        Registration Open
                             6th Floor Convention Center
8:00 a.m. – 2:00 p.m.        Exhibits Open
                             Ballroom 6B
8:00 a.m. – 10:15 p.m.       Breakout Sessions
10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.      General Session II
                             Ballroom 6A
12:00 p.m. – 1:00 p.m.       Raffle Drawings
                             Exhibit Hall, Ballroom B
1:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.        Breakout Sessions
4:45 p.m. – 5:45 p.m.        Town Hall Meetings
                             Room 602 and Room 603
6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m.        Dinner with Friends
                             Sign-up in Welcome Room 601
8:00 p.m. – 11:00 p.m.       Friday Night at the Movies
                             Seattle Sheraton, Aspen Room

Friday Highlights
General Session II
10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m.
Ballroom 6A
Gail C. Christopher, D.N., Vice President for Programs, W.K. Kellogg Foundation
A Fair Health Movement to End Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities
Dr. Gail Christopher, as vice president for programs at the W.K. Kellogg Foundation, is
responsible for leadership, capacity building and fostering collaboration and teamwork in
the development and implementation of programming. She is nationally recognized for
her pioneering work to infuse holistic health and diversity concepts into public sector
programs and policy discourse. In 1996, she was elected as a fellow of the National
Academy of Public Administration. In 2007, she received the Leadership Award from the
Health Brain Trust of the Congressional Black Caucus. She is the author or co-author of
three books, a monthly column in the Federal Times, and more than 250 articles,
presentations, and publications. National print and broadcast media credits include The
Washington Post, Los Angeles Times, Dallas Times, National Journal, Essence, ―Good
Morning America,‖ ―The Oprah Winfrey Show,‖ NPR, and documentaries on PBS and
CBS. She holds a doctor of naprapathy from the Chicago National College of Naprapathy
and completed advanced study in the interdisciplinary Ph.D. program in holistic health
and clinical nutrition at the Union for Experimenting Colleges and Universities at Union
Graduate School of Cincinnati.

John Lancaster, Executive Director, National Council on Independent Living
The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities: What It Means to
You, What You Should Do
John A. Lancaster serves as the Executive Director of the National Council on
Independent Living. NCIL is the oldest Disability grassroots organization run by and for
people with disabilities. NCIL advances the independent living philosophy and advocates
for the full integration and participation of people with disabilities in society. Mr.
Lancaster is a native of the Hamburg, New York. He graduated from the University of
Notre Dame in 1967 with a B.A. in the General Program of Liberal Studies. As a Second
Lieutenant in the United States Marine Corps, he commanded an infantry platoon in
combat during the Vietnam War earning a Purple Heart and Bronze Star in 1968.
Following military service, he returned to Notre Dame for a law degree. Since 1974, he
has worked as a civil rights attorney working on issues related to the integration and
empowerment of people with disabilities. He has served in government from 1981–1987
for Governor Harry Hughes of Maryland as the Director of the Office for Individuals
with Disabilities and again from 1991–2000 with the President‘s Committee on
Employment of People with Disabilities. From 2000–2004, he worked in Vietnam as an
advocate for improved civil rights and employment opportunities for people with
disabilities.

Treasures and Trinkets Raffle for TASH
During the conference we will be having a raffle! Get your tickets at the on-site
Registration Desk located in the 6th Floor Lobby. Raffle items are on display in the
Exhibit Hall during exhibit hours.

The drawing will be held on Friday, December 7 in the Exhibit Hall between 12:00 p.m.
and 1:00 p.m. All winners must pickup their items no later than 2:00 p.m. that day in the
Exhibit Hall.

Town Hall Meeting I
4:45p.m. – 5:45 p.m.
K-01 602
Turning the Corner: Progress Toward the Elimination of Aversives, Restraint and
Seclusion
Aversives, restraint, and seclusion are not a program; they are a program failure. Because
they violate basic standards of humane treatment, they tend to become entrenched in
hidden-away settings beyond the spotlight of community and family awareness. TASH
has made it a priority to break this cycle of silence and eliminate the use of coercive
interventions through a three-pronged effort involving: 1) making this threat visible; 2)
doing the research to show that aversives, restraint and seclusion are not legitimate
―evidence-based practices‖ and 3) sharing winning strategies for bringing this research
into practice through IEPs, behavior support plans, and their legal enforcement. Success
in these areas will be used to drive policy and legislative change. This Town Hall will
introduce three outstanding examples of these efforts: Isabelle Zehnder, winner of the
2006 TASH Award for Excellence in Public Service, shows what one parent can do to
bring hidden stories to light; Jennifer Clarke, Esq. (for PILCOP); Fredda Brown, Chris
Oliva, and Donna Gilles (for TASH) give a preview of their ground-breaking project to
establish the legal and scientific foundations of our advocacy; and Douglas Loeffler and
Curt Sytsma, Esq. will receive the 2007 TASH Award for Leadership in Legal Advocacy
for a unique and energizing due process victory involving aversives and restraint.
Discussion and participation are welcome!
Town Hall Meeting II
4:45 p.m. – 5:45 p.m.
K-02 603
Creating a Voice: Equity and Access for People of Color with Disabilities
Wanda J. Blanchett, University of Colorado, Denver; Michael Brown, Arc of Hunterdon
County, New Jersey; Allen Crocker, Childrens Hospital, Institute for Community
Inclusion, Boston; Ralph W. Edwards, Massachusetts Department of Mental Retardation,
Boston, MA
The combination of disability and race has a negative compounding impact on the lives
of individuals of color. Research findings report excessive incidence and prevalence of
disabilities, over-representation in special education, high dropout rates from school, low
levels of employment, negative health outcomes, and other factors contributing to poor
quality of life experiences. The ―Town Meeting‖ brings together individuals with
disabilities, family members, researchers and managers, educators and employers, and
policy-makers to discuss the data and describe best practices to improve quality of life
experiences for people of color with disabilities.

Dinner with Friends
6:30 p.m. – 8:00 p.m
Seattle Sheraton Lobby
Sign up in the Welcome Room 601
Connect with other conference participants for dinner and a movie. Our Seattle host
committee has come up with a great idea to make you feel right at home in Seattle.
Choose where you would like to eat and your host will escort you to the restaurant along
with 10 others. The groups will be no larger than about 10 and will go to a variety of
types of eateries (range of cost, too) and all within walking distance or a very short cab
ride. Who knows who will be sitting at your table! For more information ask the staff in
the Welcome Room.

Friday Night at the Movies
Sponsored by the Seattle Convention and Visitors Bureau
8:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m.
Seattle Sheraton, Aspen Room
After your dinner, join us for a pair of documentary films: Dan Habib‘s Including
Samuel and Alice Elliott‘s Body and Soul: Diana & Kathy, co-winners of the TASH
2007 Positive Image Award!
“Including Samuel” Dan Habib‘s documentary film Including Samuel
(www.includingsamuel.com) examines the educational and social inclusion of youth with
disabilities. The film is built on the efforts of Habib and his family to include Samuel, 7,
in all facets of school and community. Including Samuel also features four other families
with varied inclusion experiences, plus interviews with dozens of teachers, young people,
parents and disability rights experts. Dan Habib has been the photography editor of the
Concord (NH) Monitor newspaper since 1995, where he was a staff photographer from
1988–1992. In 2006, he was named the national Photography Editor of the Year for
papers under 100,000 circulations. His freelance work has appeared in numerous
publications, including Time, Newsweek, Yankee, Life, Boston Magazine, Mother Jones
and the New York Times.
“Body and Soul: Diana & Kathy” When Diana Braun and Kathy Conour approached
Alice Elliott and asked her to make a documentary about them, no one knew where it
would lead. For five years, the Academy Award-nominated director has been following
them, recording their unique friendship and activism. The film chronicles their humor and
passion as they navigate ―the system.‖ They search to reconnect with Diana‘s mother,
travel to Washington, D.C. to lobby, and attempt to change Medicaid rules. Each journey
is filled with adventure and risk. Body & Soul: Diana & Kathy is the story of a profound,
creative friendship and about making a difference.

SESSION F                     8:00 a.m. – 9:00 a.m.
SESSION G                     8:00 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.

 F-01 G-01                     303
Topic: Perspectives on Disability
Level of Information: B. Theory concepts and practices: Innovations and advancements
Why Do “They” Do “That”? Stories and a First-Person Account of How Autism can
be Diagnosed Based on Very Little Understanding of What Autism Is
Linda Rammler and Jacob Pratt, Rammler & Wood, Consultants, LLC, Middlefield, CT
Appearances can be deceiving! Although DSM-IV ―kinda sorta‖ describes what some
―scientists‖ think they see in autism, faulty assumptions underlying the diagnosis result in
poor ―treatment‖ decisions. From a first person and attentive observer‘s perspective, we
offer a helpful approach (supported by current research on the human brain) explaining
what‘s really going on AND providing ideas about necessary accommodations for the
Movement, Anxiety,Communication, and Sensory challenges experienced by individuals
with an autism label in the so-called ―neurotypical world.‖

 F-02 G-02                    304
Topic: Friendships and Family Relationships: Considerations and Opportunities
Level of Information: C. Research findings
Beyond High School: Friendships Formed Fifteen Years Later
April Regester and George Singer, University of California, Santa Barbara
This presentation documents friendships that were formed in the early 1990‘s at three
high schools in the greater Santa Barbara, California area. The friendships between
students with and without developmental disabilities were formed as a result of structured
interventions with support of teachers and administrators. Through the use of archival
documents, photos and participant interviews, this study will tell their story in order to
demonstrate the benefits of inclusive education and peer supports for all students.

 F-03                        305
Topic: Philosophy of Inclusion
Level of Information: A. Theory concepts and practices: Introductory
The Cultural Shift From Special Education to General Education: Planning the
Journey
Donna Gilles, University of Florida; Michael McSheehan, University of New Hampshire
When families change their children‘s education from self-contained classrooms to
general education settings, they may perceive a decrease in their comfort level with
school staff. The shift to general education mimics the cultural shift that occurs when
traveling to a different country. It takes knowledge of the cultural values, language, rules,
etc. to ensure a positive experience. In the context of cultural shift, the presenters will
discuss issues in changing placement, and will provide tools to maintain successful
collaboration.

 F-05 G-05                    401
Topic: Education Assessment
Level of Information: A. Theory concepts and practices: Introductory
Literacy for Students With Significant Intellectual Disabilities: Alternate Standards,
Assessments and Curriculum
Steven R. Lyon and Naomi Zigmond, The University of Pittsburgh, Pittsburgh, PA;
Donna Lehr, Boston University
This session will present and discuss the development of alternate achievement standards,
assessments and curriculum progressions in literacy for students with significant
intellectual disabilities. The Pennsylvania Alternate System of Assessment was
developed as a system of alternate performance standards organized into a progression
designed to provide access and relevance for students across a range of grade and
conceptual levels. The session will feature an overview of the assessment and aggregate
statewide data. presentation and discussion of a literacy progression, sample assessment
items and curricular strategies for developing literacy.

 F-06                          602
Topic: Educational Interventions for Students With the Most Significant Cognitive and
Sensory Disabilities
Level of Information: C. Research findings
Teaching Communicative Gestures to Children With Deaf-Blindness Through
Adapted Prelinguistic Milieu Teaching (PMT)
Susan Bashinski, University of Kansas
This session will present methodology and results of a research study that focused on
teaching communicative gestures with children who have deaf-blindness. Prelinguistic
milieu teaching (PMT) techniques were adapted for implementation, and provided to 11
children who had deaf-blindness and suspected intellectual disability. All children
communicated at nonsymbolic levels and at very low rates at the study‘s inception. Every
child demonstrated an increased rate of initiated communication during the intervention
phase of this study (i.e., multiple baseline across participant design).

 F-07                       603
Topic: Legal and Public Policy Issues
Level of Information: A. Theory concepts and practices: Introductory
Least Restrictive Environment: Battling Misconceptions
Keith Hyatt, Western Washington University, Bellingham, WA; John Filler, University of
Nevada; Yaoying Xu, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA
The concept of Least Restrictive Environment (LRE) has been one of the six guiding
principles of special education law. However, it remains contentious issue with some
arguing that the LRE is the general education classroom for all children and others
claiming that LRE is different for different children. The purpose of this presentation is to
provide a clear and coherent explanation of the concept of LRE and make the case that
there is not a different LRE for different children.

 F-08 G-08                     604
Topic: Preventive Approaches to Challenging Behavior
Level of Information: C. Research findings
Effectiveness of Teacher-Driven Behavior Interventions: The Prevent-Teach-
Reinforce Model
Rose Iovannone and Carie English, University of South Florida, Tampa, FL; Kelly
Wilson and Patricia Oliver, University of Colorado at Denver, Denver, CO
This presentation will give educational personnel and families a description of a
prescriptive yet easily replicable positive behavior intervention research project being
conducted with 200 school-based teams. The presentation will show data results
highlighting the intervention effectiveness and will promote discussion on factors
impacting success including fidelity of implementation, teacher characteristics, and
school qualities. Participants attending the session will learn steps of a standardized
process, view case examples, and obtain teacher-friendly materials that have been proven
useful to school teams.

 F-09 G-09                    605
Topic: Communication and Social Interactions: What Works.
Level of Information: B. Theory concepts and practices: Innovations and advancements
The (Not-So) Gentle Art of Influence
Shauna Roman, Networks for Training and Development, Inc., Philadelphia, PA
Are you often referred to as bossy, a pushover, or a little bit of both? How do you
approach difficult situations where you want to ―manipulate‖ things to go in a certain
direction? During this interactive and fun session, you will discover your own influence
style and become more aware of how your influence style impacts others. The Gentle Art
of Influence will explore ways of being more effective in your various roles!

 F-10 G-10                    606
Topic: Communication and Social Interactions: What Works.
Level of Information: B. Theory concepts and practices: Innovations and advancements
Rhythm, Relationship, and Communication in Autism: Dynamic Approaches to
Supporting Individuals With Autism
Anne Donnellan, Jodi Robledo and Martha Leary, University of San Diego, Autism
Institute, San Diego, CA
This presentation will discuss the interconnection between rhythm, relationship,
communication and autism. People with autism often communicate in unique, very
personal ways that are more difficult to relate to and understand. Differences in the way
people are able to use their bodies and focus their attention may lead a person to believe
that a person does not communicate and does not desire relationship. This presentation
will describe ways to listen to people, no matter how unconventional their ways may be.

 F-11                         607
Topic: Communication and Social Interactions: What Works.
Level of Information: E. Discussion of a controversial issue
Shifting Attitudes of Related Service Providers: A Disability Studies and Critical
Pedagogy Approach
Ann Nevin, Florida International University & Arizona State University, Miami, FL;
Robin Smith, SUNY New Paltz, New Paltz, NY
The participants will explore using disability and critical pedagogy perspectives so that
professionals can adopt competence oriented and collaborative attitudes and behaviors
with regard to persons with disabilities. Options for outreach to related service providers
will be identified.

 F-13                         609
Topic: Preparation of Personnel
Changing the Way We Think: Influencing Pre-service School Psychologists With
Person-Centered Plans
Carol Ann Davis and Elizabeth West, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
The use of person -entered planning (PCP) for students with severe disabilities has been
considered best practice for many years, yet in many states few graduate programs train
their students to conduct or participate in these meetings. This study examined the
conceptual changes of pre-service school psychologists who participated or facilitated a
person-centered plan for a student with severe disabilities.

 F-14                          610
Topic: Post Secondary Education
Next Stop-Life: Age-Appropriate Learning Environments for Adults 18 Through 22
Vickie Mitchell, Stetson & Associates, Inc., Houston, TX
Participants will learn how one district developed age-appropriate learning environments
for students with intellectual disabilities, ages 18 through 22. The program was designed
to resemble life after public school with increased parent involvement, transportation
training, agency partnerships, employment, volunteer work, and post-secondary
education. It is a ―service and not a school‖; there are ―no bells or yellow buses.‖ The
student‘s instructional day is designed according to the post-school goals of the student
and their family.

 F-15                        611
Topic: Community Living
Level of Information: A. Theory concepts and practices: Introductory
Dreams Come True
Tami Davis, Everyone’s Gifts, Port Angeles, WA
Inclusion means different things to different people. My experience of inclusion has
helped my dreams come true. This workshop is for everyone. The setting is the
community at large, wherever people with diabilities need it. I will encourage others to
make inclusion part of their lives and communities by showing how to do so by example.

 F-17                           613
Topic: Advocacy and self-advocacy
Level of Information: D. Service delivery models
In Pursuit of Cultural Competency: Our Organizational Journey
Bonny Johannson amd Brigitta Amor, Developmental Disabilities Resource Centre,
Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Calgary is growing rapidly and is becoming more and more international. We, at DDRC,
want to be prepared to meet the needs of individuals and families in an open, responsive,
and culturally respectful manner. We are also building bridges with Calgary‘s growing
aboriginal community. We recognize cultural competency as a pursuit and not an end
result. Our efforts are in the areas of: cultural awareness, cultural knowledge, cultural
skill, cultural encounters, employment equity, service equity, governance and policy, and
anti-discriminatory policies and practice

 F-19 G19                     615
Topic: Employment Supports
Level of Information: D. Service delivery models
Customized Employment: One Agency’s Move to Better Outcome
Steve Blanks and Karen Lee, SEEC, Silver Spring, MD
This presentation will walk the participants through the process SEEC of Silver Spring,
Maryland went through to determine what variables were stopping them from helping
people achieve community employment outcomes. The participants will also learn about
the strategic and tactical changes SEEC made to increase employment outcomes. Primary
concepts to be discussed will be customized employment, person centered planning and
organizational change. Participants will leave with tools to assist their organization
increase employment outcomes for people with significant support needs.

 F-20                       616
Topic: Employment Supports
Level of Information: A. Theory concepts and practices: Introductory
Logan Olson’s Self Employment Journey to Logan Magazine
Laurie Olson and Logan Olson, Logan Magazine, Spokane, WA
Logan Magazine began in 2004 with Logan Olson and her mother Laurie. In 2001, at age
sixteen, Logan sustained a brain injury. After a long hospital stay and rehabilitation,
Logan arrived home to face the day-to-day process of recovery. Logan and Laurie
quickly began a quest for knowledge seeking out advice and encouragement to assist
Logan with daily life. Information was difficult to find. That‘s when the dream of Logan
Magazine began. Come listen to their journey to self-employment.

 F-21 G-21                  617
Topic: Curriculum & Instruction
Level of Information: B. Theory concepts and practices: Innovations and advancements
Including Students With Significant Disabilities Through Schoolwide Universal
Design
Elizabeth Keefe, University of New Mexico; Renee Salazar Garcia, Brian Hendrix,
Trindo Martinez and Cris Mancuso, John Adams Middle School, Albuquerque, NM
A major challenge facing the educators and administrators in inclusive schools is
implementing universal design schoolwide in order to provide meaningful instruction to
students with significant disabilities in general education classrooms. This presentation
will focus on the lessons learned by educators in an inclusive middle school as they
redesign instruction to meet the needs of ALL students. This skill-building session will
help you learn how universal design can be implemented at the middle school level to
benefit of all students.

 F-22                           618
Topic: Curriculum & Instruction
Level of Information: D. Service delivery models
An Overview of a Four-Step Process for Accessing the General Curriculum
Michael Burdge, University of Kentucky
Effective instruction must be delivered before students can be validly assessed for school
accountability according to the specifications of No Child Left Behind and IDEA. This
session presents an overview of a four-step process which examines instruction on grade
level curriculum and then guides teachers through adapting instruction so that students of
differing ability levels, learning styles, and communication characteristics can have
meaningful access to the curriculum.

 F-23                          619
Topic: Curriculum & Instruction
Level of Information: A. Theory concepts and practices: Introductory
Overcoming Challenges in Implementing Inclusion Programs in a Small Rural
School District
L.Vanessa Brody, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ
This presentation will share the experiences of a new inclusion facilitator who is working
within a small rural school district to create a district-wide inclusion program for all
students. Facilitators and barriers influencing implementation will be highlighted along
with how the barriers were addressed. Personal experiences of what worked and was
learned will also be shared in addition to data collected, stories and video about
individual students‘ inclusive program experiences and strategies used to make it
successful.

SESSION G:                    9:15 a.m. – 10:15 a.m.

 G-03                       305
Topic: Philosophy of Inclusion
Level of Information: C. Research findings
The Multi-District Group: An Example of Across-District Networking and
Collaboration for Educational Change
Tara McLaughlin and Diane Ryndak, University of Florida; Vicky Barnitt and Stan
Weser, Florida Inclusion Network, FL
The Multi-District group is a professional group to support district-wide systemic change
resulting in the inclusion of all students with disabilities, including those with significant
disabilities. The findings from a qualitative study on the group suggest that discussing
issues in an across-district format encourages learning, sharing, and problem-solving.
Learning about this group may provide a model or inspiration for other states, districts
and/or professionals to create similar systems to improve education for all students.

 G-06                        602
Topic: Educational Interventions for Students With the Most Significant Cognitive and
Sensory Disabilities
Level of Information: A. Theory concepts and practices: Introductory
Transition Portfolios: A Strategy for Facilitating Smooth Transitions
Robin Greenfield, University of Idaho; Maryann Demchak, University of Nevada-Reno
This session will provide guidelines for developing transition portfolios to facilitate
smooth transitions to new educational settings for students with disabilities. A variety of
sample portfolios and DVD examples will be shared with session participants.

 G-07                         603
Topic: Legal and Public Policy Issues
Preparing Advocates to Assist Families in Securing FAPE as Alternative to Due
Process
Denise Marshall, The Council of Parent Attorneys and Advocates, Inc. (COPAA),
Towson, MD; Barbara Wheeler, The Center for Disability Studies and Community
Inclusion at the University of Southern California University Center for Excellence, Los
Angeles, CA
Discussion of the development of a 230-hr course/practicum to prepare Special Education
Advocates to assist families with IEP‘s and secure rights under the law; a practice
supported by IDEA which encourages resolution of conflicts before due process, when
possible.

 G-11                         607
Topic: Communication and Social Interactions: What Works.
Level of Information: B. Theory concepts and practices: Innovations and advancements
Let’s Have a “Real” Conversation!
Darlene Hanson, WAPADH, Whittier, CA
This session will discuss how to move from having an interview with a person who uses
an alternate mode of communication, to having a ―real‖ conversation. We will discuss
our roles as a conversation partner. IMPROV is one way we are teaching ourselves to be
different communication partners. We will explore our own styles of communication and
practice using IMPROV, resulting in different conversations for the person who uses the
alternate mode of communication.

 G-12                       608
Topic: Preparation of Personnel
Facilitating Inclusive Education: Role of the Consulting Teacher/Technical
Assistant
Carol Quirk, Maryland Coalition for Inclusive Education, Inc., Hanover, MD
This session is for district staff (consulting teachers, instructional support teachers,
special education coordinators, etc.), who help in schools that include students with
disabilities. When schools request help because a student is challenging, it is adults who
need assistance. Roles and relationships between special and general educators can be
difficult. Differences in personality, teaching style, and knowledge base can impede a
collaborative relationship. There may not be a common vision for student priorities or
adult responsibilities. Participants will discuss the challenge presented to their role and
brainstorm strategies to be effective with a school team.

 G-13                          609
Topic: Preparation of Personnel
Level of Information: B. Theory concepts and practices: Innovations and advancements
Teaching Them to Fly: A Job-Embedded Model for Professional Development 0n
Inclusion
Joan Nicoll-Senft, Central Connecticut State University, New Britain, CT; Kathy
Whitbread, University of Connecticut Center of Excellence in Developmental
Disabilities, Farmington, CT; Anne Louise Thompson, Connecticut State Department of
Education, Hartford, CT
This presentation will provide an overview of the Connecticut Coaches Academy, a state
funded initiative to train professionals to educate students with disabilities in general
education settings. Curriculum, mentoring, demonstration lessons and portfolio
development will be highlighted. Impact data on the Connecticut Coaches Academy
including data from a participant survey and student outcome data will also be presented.
Lessons learned over the past two years of developing and implementing this project will
also be shared.

 G-14                         610
Topic: Post Secondary Education
Level of Information: B. Theory concepts and practices: Innovations and advancements
Career and Community Studies: Liberal Learning for Youth With Intellectual
Disabilities
Rick Blumberg, Rebecca Daley and Jerry Petroff, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ
This presentation will address innovative opportunities for young adults to prepare for
careers and adult life through participation in college programs. Representatives from the
Career and Community Studies Program at the College of New Jersey will discuss the
coursework, activities and supports they are offering for young adults with Intellectual
Disabilities on their campus. The importance of Liberal Learning will be discussed.
Examples of coursework and assessment methods will be provided.

 G-15                       611
Topic: Community Living
Level of Information: D. Service delivery models
Living in Your Communities Safely
Cherie Tessier, Robert Wardell and Mike Raymond, Olympia, WA
Pas-Port will help the audience understand the right to hire and fire resolved problems
with workers and their employees, to be able to live in their own home with the support
they need, and also to be safe.

 G-16                         612
Topic: Advocacy and self-advocacy
Level of Information: B. Theory concepts and practices: Innovations and advancements
Persuade, Motivate And Inspire – Storytelling for Change
Carolyn Waterfall, Portland Community College, Portland, OR
Leadership experts agree that the ability to inspire a shared vision is one of the most
important skills a leader can possess. A well-crafted story can inspire a shared vision and
persuade and motivate in a way cold facts can‘t. This workshop will guide you through
the development of your own inspirational story that will engage diverse listeners, build
trust, and enhance your action plan.

 G-17                          613
Topic: Advocacy and self-advocacy
Level of Information: D. Service delivery models
Successes/Challenges in Underserved/Un-served Communities Multicultural
Outreach, Survival Services, Senior Services
Jose Martinez, Nancy Meltzer and Rebecca Kell, The Arc of King County, Seattle, WA
A panel discussion regarding the successes and challenges facing families from ethnic
and refugee communities, persons with developmental disabilities who are either
homeless or at risk of homelessness, and older family caregivers. Families and
individuals will share their stories and describe what they have experienced in order to
begin to address what has worked well and the challenges we still face.

 G-18                       614
Topic: Advocacy and self-advocacy
Level of Information: E. Discussion of a controversial issue
The Parent as an Advocate in the Medical Insurance Context
Marla Kraus, Special Needs Advocate for Parents, Santa Monica, CA
Obtaining medical insurance authorization or reimbursement for specialized services
such as therapy or medical equipment is not always a simple process. This presentation
will show you how to more easily maze through your medical insurance policy and get
much needed benefits authorized or paid.

 G-20                       616
Topic: Curriculum & Instruction
Level of Information: A. Theory concepts and practices: Introductory
Promoting Greater Independence Through Self-management and Self-directed
Learning
Kathryn Peckham-Hardin and Amy Hanreddy, California State University, Northridge,
CA
Self-management is an instructional strategy that teaches individuals of all ages how to
self-monitor, self-evaluate and self-reinforce their behavior. Through this process,
individuals gain greater independence in completing a variety of typical activities and
routines throughout their day. Self-management strategies can also be used to help
individuals self monitor and reinforce positive behaviors. This session will provide
practical strategies in how to promote independence and behavioral control through the
use of self-management/self-directed learning strategies.

 G-22                         618
Topic: Curriculum & Instruction
Level of Information: A. Theory concepts and practices: Introductory
Understanding the Standards: Step One
Deborah Taub, ILSSA–UK, Lexington, KY
Access to grade level content is necessary for a variety of reasons: to facilitate inclusion,
to meet NCLB and IDEA requirements, and to provide equal opportunity in education.
Yet, connecting students to the curriculum can be a challenge. This session gives
participants hands-on practice with step one of the Stepwise Process — deconstructing
standards into the essence and level of cognitive complexity necessary to demonstrate
learning. If we fully understand standard expectations, then it is possible to provide
accommodations and modifications.

 G-23                          619
Topic: Curriculum & Instruction
Level of Information: B. Theory concepts and practices: Innovations and advancements
Creating Quality Inclusive Out-of-Time Programs for Children With Disabilities
Mary Shea and Jill Chambers, Kids Included Together, San Diego, CA
Child and youth development professionals charged with delivering quality out-of-school
time programs struggle to comply with legal mandates while feeling overwhelmed with
high ratios, staff turnover, and lack of support and resources. Most can not imagine they
are being asked to welcome and support children and youth with disabilities in their
programs. This workshop will address barriers to inclusion in out-of-school time
programs and suggest strategies that will build their capacity to welcome all children
while facilitating real organizational change.

 G-24                        620
Topic: Curriculum & Instruction
Level of Information: A. Theory concepts and practices: Introductory
Meaningful Participation: Tools For Individual Student Planning
Marny Helfrich, Barb Gruber, Maryland Coalition for Inclusive Education, Hanover,
MD
Planning for meaningful and successful inclusion begins well before the student enters
the classroom and continues throughout the year. This presentation describes a
comprehensive individual student planning process that has been used to create
successful inclusive educational experiences for students with significant disabilities of a
variety of ages. The planning tools, collaborative teaming approaches, and strategies for
overcoming common challenges are highlighted through case studies and discussion.
 G-25                         Exhibit Hall
Topic: Exhibitor Spotlight
Automating Employee Scheduling and HR for Service Providers
Bob Brand, CEO, ComVida Corporation, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada
ComVida‘s presentation will focus on the benefits of automating two very important
functions within a service providers‘ employee management area. The topics to be
covered under Human Resources will be the advantages of Web-based applications, the
ability to share employee information, and empowering management with information.
The discussion surrounding Staff Scheduling will cover the advantages of Web-based
applications; scheduling staff based on both real time information and within an
organizations‘ specific requirements, such as employment or business rules, employee
qualifications, availability, skills and seniority. In addition, how employee self-service
functionality creates efficiencies for providers and the ease to electronically transfer pay
information to your payroll system.

SESSION H                      1:00 p.m. – 2:00 p.m.
SESSION H/I                    1:00 p.m. – 3:15 p.m.

 H-01                           303
Topic: Perspectives on Disability
Level of Information: E. Discussion of a controversial issue
The Right to Risk: A Film About Disability and Risk
Janet Strolle, Scott Palm and Karina Briscoe, Service Alternatives, Inc., Everett, WA
Right to Risk is a beautiful documentary that follows eight individuals with disabilities
who raft 225 miles down the Colorado River through the Grand Canyon. This exquisite
film, which aired on KCTS in November, 2006, was produced by Kathleen Jo Ryan and
John Ryan. Service Alternatives was proud to be a sponsor of the film, which uses the
rafting trip as a metaphor for discussing disability, and the right of individuals with
disabilities to take risks within our society. This film and the post-film discussion will
challenge us to think about how society supports or fails to support risk in the lives of its
citizens with disabilities.

 H-02                         304
Topic: Friendships and Family Relationships: Considerations and Opportunities
Level of Information: C. Research findings
Fostering Autonomy, Relatedness and Competence as Foundations for Self-
Determination
Hyun-jeong Cho, University of Kansas
This presentation combines a self-determination orientation with an awareness of the
importance of family and other loving, supportive relationships to coping with the
various problems posed by life, from my perspective of having made the transition from a
person without a disability to one who is totally blind.

 H-03                        305
Topic: Restructuring for Inclusive Schools
Level of Information: D. Service delivery models
Becoming an Inclusive School: A Systematic Approach to Change
Barb Gruber and Marny Helfrich, Maryland Coalition for Inclusive Education, Hanover,
MD
What does it take to create schools that work for all children, including those with
significant disabilities? Restructuring the way services are provided so that all children
learn in general education classrooms in their neighborhood schools involves on-going
planning, training, and reflection. Case studies of elementary schools that have engaged
in a multi-year process of building-based change, including self-assessment, action
planning, and professional development, will be shared. Lessons learned, barriers
overcame, and applications to the secondary level will be discussed.

 H-04                         310
Topic: Determining My Future: Person-Centered Planning
Level of Information: D. Service delivery models
Self-Determination in Inyo-Mono Counties, California: Findings of a Six-Year Pilot
Project
Michal Clark, Kern Regional Center, Bakersfield, CA; Russell Rankin, Developmental
Disabilities Area Board 12, California State Council on Developmental Disabilities,
Inyo, Mono, Riverside, San Bernardino Counties, CA
This session will present a description of the Self-Determination Pilot implemented by
Kern Regional Center in California, a discussion of our findings following six years of
implementation, and recommendations for future expansion in California with transition
in 2008 to Self-Directed Services funded by CMS. The Kern pilot has attempted to
maximize choices and options and minimize bureaucratic red tape. Each participant
works with an Independent Broker and Financial Management Service and controls
funding determined in Person Centered Planning.

 H-05                          401
Topic: Education Assessment
Level of Information: A. Theory concepts and practices: Introductory
Improving Educational Outcomes Through Alternate Assessment
Karen Hager, University of Kentucky
This presentation will address the importance of designing effective alternate assessments
to meaningfully include all students, including those with significant cognitive
disabilities, in educational accountability systems. The components of an alternate
assessment system designed to measure independent performance of academic skills that
are embedded in naturally occurring routines in natural settings will be described, along
with their rationale. Components of this system designed to encourage use of effective
instructional practices will be explained.

 H-06                        602
Topic: Educational Interventions for Students With the Most Significant Cognitive and
Sensory Disabilities
Level of Information: C. Research findings
Facts, Factors and Fantasies of Post-Secondary School Life “Youth and Family
Perspectives”
Jerry Petroff, The College of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ
There is a current emphasis on educating all our children within a framework that reflects
high expectations, achieving minimum standards and access to the core curriculum.
Educational systems and programs based on this premise suggest that there will be no
student left behind. However, to what extent are youth with complicated educational
challenges, specifically those that have diminished or diverse sensory systems, benefiting
from this current construction of public education? This session will report the
descriptive results of a study engaging youth and family perspectives regarding post-
secondary school life. Themes from the study will be used as a framework for discussion
toward building a consensus of emerging practices that lead youth to successful adult life.

 H-07 I-07                    603
Topic: Legal and Public Policy Issues
Level of Information: E. Discussion of a controversial issue
Ashley’s Treatment: Legal Findings and Advocacy Perspectives
David Carlson, Washington Protection and Advocacy System, Seattle, WA
Find out what advocates, families, and disability rights attorneys have to say about
―Ashley‘s Treatment.‖ See whether or not the laws to protect Ashley‘s human rights were
followed when she was given hormone therapy and had surgery to stop her growth and
sexual development. A panel of self-advocates, parents and disability attorneys from
Washington State will present. They will talk about what ―Ashley‘s Treatment‖ says
about value, inclusion, choice and civil and human rights for people with disabilities.

 H-09                         605
Topic: Communication and Social Interactions: What Works.
Level of Information: A. Theory concepts and practices: Introductory
Structures of Communication in Practice
Carrie Raabe, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, AZ; John McDermott, Institute for
Human Development, NAU, Flagstaff, AZ
Communication is a dynamic exercise in which people exchange thoughts and feelings.
The exchange of thoughts and feelings from one person to another takes practice. The
practice of communication includes: (1) situational awareness, (2) appropriate affect, (3)
active listening, and (4) feedback. There is importance in the practice of communication.
The social implications of effective communication are a sense of self efficacy and a
bolstering of esteem. The ecological implications of effective communication are that it
qualifies thoughts and feelings.

 H-10 I-10                  606
Topic: Communication and Social Interactions: What Works.
Level of Information: A. Theory concepts and practices: Introductory
Social Skills in Children With Autism: What Does the Research Tell Us?
Peishi Wang, Queens College, City University of New York, Flushing, NY; Anne Spillane,
National University, Costa Mesa, CA
The purpose of this presentation is to provide an overview of existing strategies on
improving social skills in children with autism that are supported by empirical evidence
and reported in peer reviewed journals. Gaps in research will be identified and its
implications for teachers and families will be discussed.

 H-11 I-11                     607
Topic: Communication and Social Interactions: What Works.
Level of Information: B. Theory concepts and practices: Innovations and advancements
Finding & Funding AT/AAC: Seeing MANY Ways to Get What You Need
Rosa McAllister, Arcadia University, Glenside, PA and Networks for Training and
Development, Inc., Valley Forge, PA; Beth McKeown and Shauna Roman, Networks for
Training and Development, Inc. Valley Forge, PA; Jessica Stover, Communication
Mentors’ Network of Northcentral PA, Sunbury, PA
The #1 issue in AT/AAC is access and awareness — knowing what‘s out there, where to
find it, how much it costs, alternative strategies and equipment, ways to try things out
before purchasing, and sources of funding to help… all to find the best ―fit‖ for you and
your life. Come explore some of what‘s available (high tech, lo tech, and no tech), while
also learning more about traditional and some not-so-traditional resources to help get
what you really need!

 H-12 I-12                    607
New Challenges for Autism Advocacy: Now that we’ve got the visibility, where’s the
vision?
Pat Amos, Autism Support and Advocacy in PA (ASAP); Anne Donnellan, University of
San Diego; Don Cardinal, Chapman University: Darlene Hanson, Hanson Community
Services; Martha Leary, Urban Farmer
Lately, there has been a great deal of media attention given to the subject of people with
autism. Unfortunately, that attention (and the fundraising that frequently goes with it) has
often served to perpetuate stereotypes and misinformation. People with autism remain
among the most segregated and the most endangered by the use of aversives and restraint.
How can we advance a positive rethinking of the lives and possibilities of people with
autism that is based on a presumption of intellect and self-determination, rather than on
the narrow perception of a collection of ―behaviors‖ that need to be controlled or fixed?
This Learning Community will seek ways for our autism advocacy community to avoid
becoming a victim of its own media ―success.‖

 H-13                         609
Topic: Preparation of Personnel
Level of Information: B. Theory concepts and practices: Innovations and advancements
Professional Development in Autism Center: Lessons Learned and Future
Directions
Ilene Schwartz and RinaMarie Leon-Guerrero, University of Washington, Seattle, WA
The Professional Development in Autism Center provides training and support for school
districts, families and communities to ensure that students with ASD have access to high
quality, evidence-based educational services. In five years, the center has provided
training to over 150 school districts. This presentation will discuss what we‘ve learned
about effective components and limitations of training and where that knowledge has led
us toward providing training at district and state levels.

 H-14                           610
Topic: Post Secondary Education
Level of Information: B. Theory concepts and practices: Innovations and advancements
DREAM: An Inclusive Postsecondary Program Model for Students With
Intellectual Disabilities
Susan Onaitis, Arlene Stinson and Lydia Walegir, Mercer County Communiy College, NJ
Our presentation focuses on the development and implementation of a successful
postsecondary college experience for students with Down Syndrome and other
intellectual disabilities. Presentation participants will learn about the seven key elements
of program development. Participants will receive a customized program development
packet and program evaluation data. Through sharing the individual progress of the first
eight students in Mercer County Community College‘s DREAM program, attendees will
experience program success, challenges and important lessons learned.

 H-15 I-15                    611
Topic: Community Living
Level of Information: D. Service delivery models
No Groups, No Programs, No Buildings…NO KIDDING! – KFI’s Strategies and
Stories
James Meehan and Gail Fanjoy, KFI, Millinocket, ME
While supported living, supported employment and community inclusion have become
the benchmarks of success, adult service organizations and educators responsible for
transition planning have struggled to realize these outcomes for people with disabilities.
KFI‘s presenters will take you through its pivotal moments, explaining how we rejected
our traditional roots and reinvented ourselves, detailing the dramatic changes in the
organization, the individuals we support, and the communities where we live by
providing services in NO GROUPS, NO PROGAMS, and NO BUILDINGS.

 H-16                          612
Topic: Advocacy and self-advocacy
Level of Information: E. Discussion of a controversial issue
The Trials and Tribulations Being an Expert Witness
Linda Lengyel and Beverley Evans, Duquesne University, Pittsburgh, PA
This session will be a lively discussion regarding the challenges and solutions present in
providing expert testimony. Interactive activities will be used to discuss 1) types of data
that are essential, 2) the processes for collecting that data, 3) the do‘s and don‘ts of
testimony and 4) the political pitfalls of being an ―expert.‖ This session targets anyone
who has or may provide expert testimony as well as persons who may need an expert to
testify on their behalf.

 H-17 I-17                  613
Topic: Advocacy and self-advocacy
Level of Information: E. Discussion of a controversial issue
All in the Family: From Parental to Self-Advocacy
Ralph Savarese, Grinnell College, Grinnell, Iowa/Midwest; Emily Savarese, University
of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa/Midwest; D.J. Savarese, Grinnell Middle School, Grinnell,
Iowa/Midwest
Part personal narrative, part practical advice, this presentation by 15-year-old Autist D.J.
Savarese and his parents, Ralph and Emily, highlights D.J.‘s journey from an isolated,
non-communicative foster child to a powerful disability rights advocate. Hear D.J.‘s
hopes, fears, and dreams; discover how his parents argued for and facilitated his
meaningful participation in regular education; and see the accommodations he used to
acquire the literacy skills with which he now promotes self-determination and inclusion
for all.

 H-18                         614
Topic: Advocacy and self-advocacy
Level of Information: B. Theory concepts and practices: Innovations and advancements
Supporting Parents With Cognitive Delays: What Child Welfare Workers Need to
Know
Kathy Ballard, IUPUI, Indianapolis, IN
This session will discuss a home-based program which provides support to parents with
cognitive delays who are involved in the child welfare system in Indiana. Session will
explore issues related to advocacy on behalf of families, strategies for teaching parenting
skills and education of child welfare workers regarding cognitive disabilities.

 H-19                         615
Topic: Employment Supports
Level of Information: B. Theory concepts and practices: Innovations and advancements
Creating a Culture of Employment: Philadelphia’s Vision for Employment 2010
Michael McAllister, Networks for Training and Development, Inc., Valley Forge, PA;
Kathy Sykes, City of Philadelphia, Department of Behavioral Health/Mental Retardation
Services, Philadelphia, PA
This session will describe the multiple strategies used, the challenges encountered, and
the individual outcomes achieved as Philadelphia has moved from the development of an
initial vision to the reality of what it takes to achieve a culture of employment for all
people with developmental disabilities. The focus of the presentation will be on concrete
practices, lessons learned and specific projects that have increased the number of people
working in integrated employment since the inception of this initiative in September
2006.

 H-20                        616
Topic: Employment Supports
Level of Information: B. Theory concepts and practices: Innovations and advancements
Creating Real Economic Impact and Access to Assets for People with Disabilities
Johnette Hartnett, National Disability Institute, Washington, DC; Richard Keeling, IRS-
Stakeholder Partnerships, Education and Communication (SPEC), Atlanta, GA; Megan
O’Neil, World Institute on Disability, Oakland, CA
The Real Economic Impact (REI) Tour is a national initiative spearheaded by National
Disability Institute (NDI) and the Stakeholder Partnerships, Education and
Communication (SPEC) Department of the Internal Revenue Service (IRS), which
focuses on providing tax awareness and education, free tax preparation assistance, and
financial literacy to persons with disabilities. Formerly known as TaxFacts+ campaign,
the REI Tour is designed to provide Americans with disabilities with insight, tools, and
resources to improve their lives through financial education, training, and counseling.

 H-21                         617
Topic: Curriculum & Instruction
Level of Information: A. Theory concepts and practices: Introductory
Developing Natural Supports: The Journey of Eight Wisconsin Middle and High
Schools
Erik Carter, Beth Swedeen and Colleen Kurkowski, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Waisman Center, Madison, WI
This presentation covers the journey beginning steps of eight schools as they form teams;
work collaboratively with youth with and without disabilities, school staff and
community businesses to develop natural supports in their school and community.
Attendees will receive a front row seat to the roadblocks, revelations and creative
approaches that arise when a group of people set out to positively change attitudes
towards and increase opportunities for youth with disabilities in their communities.

 H-22                        618
Topic: Curriculum & Instruction
Level of Information: D. Service delivery models
Outcomes of Instruction: Step Two of Process for Accessing the General
Curriculum
Jean Clayton, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY
Access to grade level content is necessary for a variety of reasons: to facilitate inclusion,
to meet NCLB and IDEA requirements, and to provide equal opportunity in education.
Yet, connecting students to the curriculum can be a challenge. This session examines the
second step from the Stepwise Process focusing on further dissecting the standards in the
context of a general education lesson, as well as how to determine and prioritize if
necessary the outcomes of the learning.

 H-23                        619
Topic: Curriculum & Instruction
Using Peers to Teach Students With Significant Cognitive Disabilities Vocabulary in
Science
Fred Spooner, Diane Browder and Vicki Knight, University of North Carolina at
Charlotte, NC
NCLB and IDEA requires that all students demonstrate progress in science and other
content areas. However, research on the efficacy of providing academic support to
students with significant cognitive disabilities in the area of science is still in its infancy.
The purpose of this presentation will be to describe the benefits of training peers to use
the constant time delay procedure as a strategy to improve peer attitudes and vocabulary
acquisition and comprehension for students with significant cognitive disabilities.

 H-24 I-24                     620
Topic: Curriculum & Instruction
Level of Information: A. Theory concepts and practices: Introductory
Low Tech Communication Aids and Curricular Adaptations That Promote
Successful Inclusion
Polly Fernhout and Amy Meek, Los Angeles Unified School District, Los Angeles, CA
Low-tech AAC devices can help students with significant disabilities maintain
conversational topics with same aged peers and increase social interactions in inclusive
settings. Conversation books containing photos, pictures, objects, or symbols paired with
age appropriate and meaningful statements that promote reciprocal interactions has been
one effective strategy used to address the area of need. The purpose of this session is to
share information about planning, creating, and implementing the use of conversation
books as a means to assist students with significant disabilities to have increased
opportunities to address social relationship and specific communication needs while
interacting with same aged peers. The adaptation process for students with significant
disabilities requires planning, collaboration with general education, and prioritizing
learning outcomes with educational teams. In order to adapt the grade level curriculum
for students with significant disabilities, it is necessary to start with grade level content
standards and follow a collaborative process that works to keep the learning expectations
high and personally meaningful. Our presentation will provide a practical approach to
adapting grade level curriculum and include several examples. The use of technology for
students with significant disabilities will also be highlighted.

 H-25                          Exhibit Hall
Topic: Exhibitor Spotlight
OASDI (Old-Age Pension, Survivors, Disability Insurance) Programs
Monique Ford, Social Security Administration, Seattle, WA
In the 1930s there were not any safety nets for the elderly within society. Many men and
women were faced with poverty in old age. Therefore, in 1935 Franklin D. Roosevelt
signed the Social Security Act of 1935 lifting many elderly out of poverty. Today, there
are only about 11 percent of older people living in poverty. Since that time, Social
Security has expanded into many different types of programs such as survivor‘s benefits
and disability benefits, and automatic cost-of-living adjustments because of the changing
needs in society. Please visit our Website at www.socialsecurity.gov or call 1-(800) 772-
1213. You can learn much more about OASDI and Supplemental Security Income
programs.

SESSION I                      2:15 p.m. – 3:15 pm
SESSION I/J                    2:15 p.m. – 4:30 pm

 I-01                       303
Topic: Perspectives on Disability
Level of Information: E. Discussion of a controversial issue
Cognitive Versus Neural Disability in Autism
Sue Rubin, Whittier College, Whittier, CA
Without an effective means of communication, non-verbal people with autism have
traditionally been viewed as cognitively disabled. With access to communication many of
them have shown this assumption to be false. In the experience of one such person,
however, autism involves other types of neural disabilities that affect the mental
landscape in which she lives, and contribute to her often presenting as a person with
cognitive disabilities. Sue Rubin, an adult with autism, discusses her thinking processes.

 I-02 J-02                      304
Topic: Friendships and Family Relationships: Considerations and Opportunities
Level of Information: D. Service delivery models
“Power of Youth” A Leadership Training Model for Students With and Without
Disabilities
Wendy Christiansen and Michele Lehoski, Washington PAVE, Tacoma, WA
The Community Inclusion Program (CIP) offers educational meetings for individuals
with disabilities, families, friends, neighbors and community members. A key component
is to provide a nurturing environment where students of all abilities can come together at
meetings to learn about friendships, relationship building, networking and have fun. The
Youth Leadership Training model for students of all abilities addresses the following
skills, diversity and people first language, disability awareness, communication skills,
relationship building and community involvement. The Youth Leaders work together on
community projects, conference presentations, mentoring and disability awareness. The
structure and participatory activities will be part of the workshop.

 I-03 J-03                    305
Topic: Philosophy of Inclusion
Level of Information: D. Service delivery models
LRE, Response to Intervention and Restructuring to Include and Support ALL
Students
Dona Meinders, LRE Resources Project-WestEd, Sacramento, CA; Ann Halvorsen,
California State University, East Bay; Mary Wrenn, Berkeley Unified School District,
Berkeley, CA; Linda Lee, San Francisco USD, San Francisco, CA
Whole school inclusive reform examples where services have been restructured and
delivered to address all students‘ needs will be presented, with self-assessment site-based
tools for guiding and evaluating the effects of integrating elements such as RTI and
specialized services. Problem-solving activities will be facilitated with participant groups,
to examine existing structures, and to consider alternatives which utilize general and
special education resources in innovative ways that improve student learning outcomes.

 I-04                       310
Topic: Determining My Future: Person-Centered Planning
Level of Information: C. Research findings
Deal or No Deal: Realizing Choices, Options, and Outcomes
Martin Agran, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY; Keith Storey, Touro University,
Vallejo, CA; James Martin, University of Oklahoma
Teaching choice making — particularly, for individuals with significant disabilities — is
essential in transition programs. However, it remains unclear when students transition
into supported employment the kinds of choices they make and if those choices are
supported. This panel will discuss the findings of a study on this issue and its
implications.

 I-05                        401
Topic: Education Assessment
Level of Information: B. Theory concepts and practices: Innovations and advancements
Meaningful Evaluation: The Contextual Assessment Process
Sharon Lynch and Paula Adams, Sam Houston State University, Huntsville, TX
IDEA 2004 requires an individual evaluation for persons receiving special education
services. This presentation demonstrates a collaborative evaluation process that examines
opportunities, strengths, and supports within the environment. Areas that are addressed in
contextual evaluation include opportunities for interaction, choices, relationships,
academic abilities, independent living, and communication skills. This process relies on
observation, archival information, and collaboration among the team, rather than
standardized testing. A protocol for collecting this information will be included.

 I-06                         602
Topic: Advocacy and self-advocacy
Level of Information: C. Research findings
Bereavement Experience of Adults With Developmental Disabilities: Bereavement
Counselor Perceptions
Mary Ann Clute, Eastern Washington University, Cheney, WA
What is the bereavement experience for adults with developmental disabilities? Data
from qualitative interviews with bereavement counselors providing grief therapy to adults
with developmental disabilities is analyzed using grounded theory methodology. Two
themes, disconnection and potential for growth, emerge from the data. The cycle of
disconnection reflects histories of unrecognized losses and continued ―protection‖ from
illness and death. Growth was noted when these adults were supported, listened to and
helped to discover unique ways to express the emotions of grief.

 I-08 J-08                    604
Topic: Preventive Approaches to Challenging Behavior
Level of Information: C. Research findings
Training Paraeducators to Promote Augmentative Communication With Students
Who Have Significant Disabilities
Mary Anna Bingham, Fred Spooner and Diane Browder, University of North Carolina at
Charlotte
The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of training paraeducators on (a)
prompting student use of augmentative communication (AAC) systems, (b) responding to
student requests, (c) student use of AAC, and (d) student problem behavior via a series of
multiple probe designs. Three paraeducators and three students participated. All
paraeducators increased the number of times they prompted student use of AAC and
responded to student requests. All students increased use of AAC and exhibited fewer
problem behaviors.

 I-09                          605
Topic: Communication and Social Interactions: What Works.
Level of Information: A. Theory concepts and practices: Introductory
Making the Connection: A Guide for Facilitating Peer Relationships in Children
Angela Baldwin and Jennifer Bates, Cerebral Palsy of New Jersey, Ewing, NJ
Cerebral Palsy of New Jersey‘s Family Support Department provides inclusive activities
for children with all types of developmental disabilities through two programs; Bridges
Project and Parents‘ Night Out. Both programs take place in the community and offer
direct support services. The main goal of each program is to assist kids with disabilities in
making social connections with their non-disabled and disabled peers. This presentation
will demonstrate how to make these connections using our SOUP model: Support,
Opportunity, Understanding and Perseverance.

 I-13                         609
Topic: Preparation of Personnel
Level of Information: B. Theory concepts and practices: Innovations and advancements
A Dual Credential Program: Preparing General and Special Education Teachers for
Inclusive Education
Jacki Anderson, California State University East Bay, Hayward, CA
California State University East Bay‘s special and general education faculty and program
graduates will describe its unique teacher preparation process and the advantages of their
concurrent, dual Education Specialist and Multiple Subject (general education) credential
program to prepare highly qualified educators for inclusive schools.

 I-14                         610
Topic: Post Secondary Education
Level of Information: D. Service delivery models
Creating Access to Postsecondary Education for Students With Intellectual
Disabilities
Debra Hart, University of Massachusetts Boston, Boston, MA
This presentation will profile eight inclusive dual enrollment postsecondary education
partnerships for students with intellectual disabilities. Common themes and lessons
learned across all eight partnerships will be identified. Tools and tips will be shared
including a checklist of promising practices, a sample of student schedules, a menu of
professional development topics, and evaluation strategies and instruments.

 I-16 J-16                  612
Topic: Advocacy and self-advocacy
Level of Information: B. Theory concepts and practices: Innovations and advancements
I Sure Wish I’d Said Something: Learning to Challenge Oppressive, Discriminatory
Behavior
Robin Smith, SUNY-New Paltz, New Paltz, NY; Mara Sapon-Shevin, Syracuse University
How often do you hear someone say something offensive ... and struggle to know what to
do or say? We all want to do ―the right thing‖ but sometimes we just don‘t know what
that is! Come learn how to be a successful ally to people with disabilities, particularly in
the face of oppressive comments and jokes. Explore the ways in which handicapism is
related to racism, sexism, classism, homophobia and other forms of oppression. A highly
interactive workshop!

 I-18                         614
Topic: Advocacy and self-advocacy
Level of Information: B. Theory concepts and practices: Innovations and advancements
Becoming Citizens: Family Life and the Politics of Disability*
Kathi Whittaker and Nancy Meltzer, Seattle Family Network, Seattle, WA
The Becoming Citizens project gathered stories of Seattle families raising children with
disabilities, post WW II. These parent advocates created their own programs and schools.
In 1971 their efforts culminated in Education For All, a Washington State Bill, a model
for Education For All Handicapped Children Act 1975. This art project book explores the
relationships among disability, family life, citizenship, and art. Presenters will show
images and share this social history to: teach, heal, celebrate families, and inspire
advocacy for future generations. *(Schwartzenberg, S. 2005; Seattle: UW Press)

 I-19                        615
Topic: Employment Supports
Level of Information: D. Service delivery models
King County Inter-Systems Collaboration With Schools: Realizing Employment
Opportunities for All
Kelley Faulkner and Cheryl Green, King County Developmental Disabilities Division,
Seattle, WA
King County spearheaded two projects engaging systems partners toward the same goal:
all students with developmental disabilities will leave school with a job. ―King County
School-to-Work‖ offers students supported employment services, benefits planning, and
systems navigation. ―Best Practices in Transition‖ offers schools and providers technical
assistance, training and opportunities to share information, resources, and best practices.
The goal remains: all students, regardless of the disability they experience, will have
opportunities to envision and experience initial steps on their career path.

 I-20                         616
Topic: Determining My Future: Person-Centered Planning
Reach For Your Dreams… Celebrate Abilities… Self-Employment Works for Me!
Dylan Kuehl, DK Arts, Olympia, WA
As the owner of his own visual and performing arts company, DK Arts, Dylan writes,
―Having Down Syndrome doesn‘t limit my artwork, I just show my expression of being
that unique.‖ Come be inspired by the amazing accomplishments and talents of Dylan
Kuehl. He is a proud and fearless self-advocate and international award winning artist
and poet from Olympia, Washington. His presentation will dazzle you with a mix of art,
poetry, dance and personality.
 I-21 J-21                    617
Topic: Curriculum & Instruction
Level of Information: A. Theory concepts and practices: Introductory
Therapy Consultation in Educational Settings: A Six Stage Model and Training
Module
Diana Roberts, Regional and Statewide Services for Students with Orthopedic
Impairments, Douglas ESD, Roseburg, OR
Special education related services are most effective when provided as an integrated part
of the naturally-occurring routines and activities of the child‘s school day. In contrast to
the traditional model of ―pull-out‖ therapy, occupational and physical therapists are
increasingly called upon to provide consultation to school staff, but often lack the skills
to do so comfortably. A Six-Stage Model for school therapy consultation and a DVD/CD
training module for use with therapy staff will be presented.

 I-22                          618
Topic: Curriculum & Instruction
Level of Information: D. Service delivery models
Step Three of a Four-Step Process for Accessing the General Curriculum
Anne Denham, University of Kentucky
Step Three: Access to grade level content is necessary for a variety of reasons: to
facilitate inclusion, to meet NCLB and IDEA requirements, and to provide equal
opportunity in education. Yet, connecting students to the curriculum can be a challenge.
This session examines the third step from the Stepwise Process looking at general
education activities, identifying the barriers that exist keeping the student from learning,
and identifying supports needed to overcome those barriers.

 I-23 J-23                    619
Topic: Curriculum & Instruction
Level of Information: C. Research findings
Math and Science for Secondary Students With Significant Disabilities: Linking to
Standards
Katherine Trela and Bree Jimenez, University of North Carolina at Charlotte; Ginevra
Courtade, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV, Diane Browder
Findings from a study using story-based math lessons and inquiry-based science lessons
with secondary students with significant cognitive disabilities will be presented.
Preliminary results show an increase in student engagement in instruction and
understanding basic concepts addressed in typical secondary courses such as geometry,
algebra, chemistry, and earth science. This session will contribute to understanding how
to access secondary general education math and science curriculum and support
individual learning needs of students with significant disabilities.

SESSION J:                             3:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.

 J-04                      310
Topic: Post Secondary Education
ACCESS: The Inclusive College Service
Pat Fratange and Ann Atkins, Onondaga Community Living in collaboration with
Syracuse University Continuing Education University College, Syracuse, NY
Onondaga Community Living listened to people about their interest in higher education
— people who transitioned out of high school, were institutionalized and never had
formal education, were adults who never had the opportunity to take college level classes,
and many who had alternate communication skills. After months of thinking together
with the perspective students and their families, a university was approached about
working in collaboration with OCL to make this a reality for people with significant
needs. The dream was registering for typical college classes of their choice and taking
classes along side of all other typical college students. OCL now supports six students
with a variety of needs with 1:1 support in taking ordinary college level classes according
to each of their interests. OCL will share a bit about the service, what we have learned
and struggle with, and the stories of the students.

 J-07                         603
Topic: Legal and Public Policy Issues
Using Restraints With Restraint: The Impact of IDEA 2004 on Behavioral
Interventions
Douglas Loeffler and Curt Systma
IDEA 2004 requires educational programs be based on peer-reviewed research ‗to the
extent practicable‘. This requirement fundamentally alters public schools‘ ability to
utilize programs incorporating seclusion or physical restraint. The effect of this change
on behavioral approaches should not be under-estimated.

 J-09                         605
Topic: Communication and Social Interactions: What Works.
Level of Information: A. Theory concepts and practices: Introductory
Early Childhood/Early Elementary Social and Play Strategies
Judith Terpstra and Ron Tamura, Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, CT
This presentation is intended for special educators or general educators who teach in
inclusion settings or are working to prepare children with disabilities into inclusion
settings at the early childhood or early elementary levels. Multiple strategies for
increasing social and play skills will be presented along with research regarding
strategies.

 J-10                       606
Topic: Communication and Social Interactions: What Works.
Level of Information: C. Research findings
Parent Participation When Your Child Has a Disability: Conclusions From Action
Research
Loui Lord Nelson, Reliable Alliance in Special Education, Inc., Indianapolis, IN
How do parents of children with disabilities participate in schools? How do different
schools work to engage parents of children with disabilities outside of disability policy
requirements? If schools want to improve the participation of these parents, how do they
do it? Come hear how parents of children with disabilities and education professionals
used Action Research to tackle these three questions. Their responses might surprise you.
 J-11                          607
Topic: Communication and Social Interactions: What Works.
Level of Information: B. Theory concepts and practices: Innovations and advancements
Leaving the World of Silence
Tracy Thresher and Harvey Lavoy, Communtiy Developmental Services, Barre, VT
I am Tracy Thresher and I want to share my thoughts on having a voice. Most people take
their ability to speak for granted, I take my inability to speak quite seriously — I live with
it everyday. I will show people how a silent autistic man was first introduced to typing to
communicate and how that changed my life and will show how reading my typing out
loud is helping me to learn to speak. I will first read my presentation out loud to the
audience and then be happy to answers questions.

 J-13                         609
Topic: Employment Supports
Level of Information: C. Research findings
Predictors for Integrated Employment for Transitioning Students
Jan S. Weiner and Robert Aisawa, California State University, Fullerton, Fullerton, CA;
Steve Zivolich, Integrated Resources Institute, Irvine, CA
Least restrictive environment and community-based teaching that includes on the job
instruction were correlated with integrated employment outcomes for 104 transitioning
students with severe disabilities. The participants of this three-year study included
students with severe disabilities in the Orange County, California, public school system
that exited school at 22 years of age. The variables that predictors of successful integrated
employment at the time of transition were: duration of community-based teaching that
included on-the-job training, and inclusion with typical peers.

 J-14                         610
Topic: Post Secondary Education
Level of Information: B. Theory concepts and practices: Innovations and advancements
Students With Intellectual Disabilities in Postsecondary Education, Considering the
Effects of Culture
Teresa Whelley and Jean Kiyabu, Hawaii State Department of Education, Honolulu, HI
The Knowledge Project in a project that supports young adults in attending postsecondary
education. The evolution of this project will be described from a one day workshop in
2005 through the granting of a contract in June of 2006 from the State Department of
Education and the implementation of supports. Two tracks were followed. One track was
about gathering the resources to support the youth as they entered college. The other
track was about planning for them as they progressed through high school and into
college. Hawaii is a multi cultural community. The most important lessons learned were
those regarding culture. First barriers created due to the cultural context are delineated
and second, strategies to overcome these barriers are described.

 J-15                       611
Topic: Community Living
Level of Information: D. Service delivery models
The Joy of Listening – Spectrum Society: Celebrating Twenty Years of Community
Based Excellence
Aaron Johannes and Ernie Baatz, Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia,
Canada; Shirley Birtwistle and Shirlane Drew
For 20 years, Spectrum Society has represented best-practice concepts in helping folks
with disabilities and their families find flexible, sustainable supports that meet their needs
in community based programs. To meet this goal we‘ve focused on leadership at every
level and on listening to all our stakeholders, rather than trying to tell people what they
need or what they can have.

 J-17                          613
Topic: Advocacy and self-advocacy
Level of Information: E. Discussion of a controversial issue
Children: Warehoused and Abused
Isabelle Zehnder, Coalition Against Institutionalized Child Abuse (CAICA), Vancouver,
WA
The multi-billion dollar troubled child/teen industry emerged in the 90‘s and flourished,
conning desperate parents into hiring teen escort services (legalized kidnappers) to
transport their children, some with disabilities, some with mental health issues, to
facilities inside and outside the US, sometimes for years with virtually no communication
with the outside world — most are unaware it exists. These child-savers are unqualified
to educate or treat children, their methods more dangerous than effective. Many children
are abused, neglected, some have died.

 J-19                        615
Topic: Employment Supports
Level of Information: C. Research findings
The State of the States in Integrated Employment: Current outcomes, practices and
challenges
Heike Boeltzig and John Butterworth, Institute for Community Inclusion/University of
Massachusetts Boston, Boston, MA
This presentation will provide a current snapshot of employment outcomes and practices
from the results of two surveys: one focused on individuals who recently entered
employment with the support of a community rehabilitation provider (CRP) and one
focused on the outcomes, values, and goals of CRPs. The session will address
implications for policy and practice, and engage participants in a discussion of strategies
for supporting change on a CRP and systems level.

 J-20                       616
Topic: Employment Supports
Level of Information: D. Service delivery models
Modernization of the AbilityOne Program (formerly the Javits-Wagner-O’Day
Program)
Denise Perka, NISH, Vienna, VA
The upcoming modernization of the JWOD Act and other strategic initiatives currently
underway at NISH will be discussed. Focus of the session will be on JWOD Act
modernization and disability policy. Attendees at the session will also be updated on
current NISH workforce initiatives, including the establishment of the NISH Institute on
Economic Empowerment for People with Significant Barriers to Employment, NISH
Customized Employment pilot sites, and other programs providing employment options
to the largest workforce of persons with severe disabilities in the USA.

 J-22                         618
Topic: Curriculum & Instruction
Level of Information: D. Service delivery models
Step Four: Embedding IEP Goals and Objectives in Grade-Level, Standards-Based
Instruction
Lou-Ann Land and Anne Denham, University of Kentucky
Access to grade level content is necessary for a variety of reasons: to facilitate inclusion,
to meet NCLB and IDEA requirements, and to provide equal opportunity in education.
Yet, developing standards-based IEPs that enable a child to be involved in and make
progress in the general education curriculum and meet the child‘s other educational needs
is challenging. This session examines the fourth step of the Stepwise Process focusing on
access to curriculum, IEP, and assessment while keeping the IEP individualized.

 J-24                         620
Topic: Curriculum & Instruction
Level of Information: D. Service delivery models
Cortical Visual Impairment: Recognizing Characteristics and Designing
Educational Interventions to Improve Outcomes
Susan Edelman, University of Vermont, Burlington, VT; Diane Kelly, University of
Maryland, College Park, MD
Cortical Visual Impairment (CVI) is the leading cause of visual impairment in children in
the western world. Recognition of characteristic visual behaviors in diagnosed children is
vital for members of their educational or early intervention teams. Presenters representing
CVI teams from four states will share stories, instructional strategies, and adaptive
materials to describe CVI, its characteristics and environmental accommodations to
improve visual functioning in natural routines and learning activities based on the work
of Dr. Christine Roman.

SESSION K                      4:45 p.m. – 5:45 p.m.

 K-01                         602
TOWN HALL MEETING
Turning the Corner: Progress Toward the Elimination of Aversives, Restraint and
Seclusion
Aversives, restraint, and seclusion are not a program; they are a program failure. Because
they violate basic standards of humane treatment, they tend to become entrenched in
hidden-away settings beyond the spotlight of community and family awareness. TASH
has made it a priority to break this cycle of silence and eliminate the use of coercive
interventions through a three-pronged effort involving: 1) making this threat visible; 2)
doing the research to show that aversives, restraint and seclusion are not legitimate
―evidence-based practices‖ and 3) sharing winning strategies for bringing this research
into practice through IEPs, behavior support plans, and their legal enforcement. Success
in these areas will be used to drive policy and legislative change. This Town Hall will
introduce three outstanding examples of these efforts: Isabelle Zehnder, winner of the
2006 TASH Award for Excellence in Public Service, shows what one parent can do to
bring hidden stories to light; Jennifer Clarke, Esq. (for PILCOP); Fredda Brown, Chris
Oliva, and Donna Gilles (for TASH) give a preview of their ground-breaking project to
establish the legal and scientific foundations of our advocacy; and Douglas Loeffler and
Curt Sytsma, Esq. will receive the 2007 TASH Award for Leadership in Legal Advocacy
for a unique and energizing due process victory involving aversives and restraint.
Discussion and participation are welcome!

Leadership in Legal Advocacy
Defending the right of people with disabilities to live free of dangerous and
inhumane interventions.
Douglas Loeffler and Curt Systma, Esq.
Parent Doug Loeffler and Iowa attorney Curt Systma prevailed in a significant Due
Process which argued that seclusion, restraint, and the use of aversive interventions do
not constitute an evidence-based behavior plan for the IEP of Loeffler‘s daughter. Since
winning this Due Process, Loeffler has embarked on a campaign to share his daughter‘s
story in an effort to promote change in school systems nationwide. Sytsma continues to
devote his practice solely to helping children and their families achieve success in the
school system.

 K-02                        603
TOWN HALL MEETING
Creating a Voice: Equity and Access for People of Color With Disabilities
Wanda J. Blanchett, University of Colorado, Denver; Michael Brown, Arc of Hunterdon
County, NJ; Allen Crocker, Childrens Hospital, Institute for Community Inclusion,
Boston, MA; Ralph W. Edwards, Massachusetts Department of Mental Retardation,
Boston, MA
The combination of disability and race has a negative compounding impact on the lives
of individuals of color. Research findings report excessive incidence and prevalence of
disabilities, over-representation in special education, high dropout rates from school, low
levels of employment, negative health outcomes, and other factors contributing to poor
quality of life experiences. The ―Town Meeting‖ brings together individuals with
disabilities, family members, researchers and managers, educators and employers, and
policy-makers to discuss the data and describe best practices to improve quality of life
experiences for people of color with disabilities.

				
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