Curriculum Vitae Paolucci - CURRICULUM VITAE by gabyion

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									                           CURRICULUM VITAE
                           Peter Leonard Paolucci

GENERAL INFORMATION
Office                                                   Home
York University                                          11 Raiford Street
328 Calumet College                                      Aurora, ON, L4G 6J2
4700 Keele Street                                        Home: 905-727-9396
Toronto, ON, M3J 1P3                                     Cell: 416-898-6342
Office: 416-736-2100 x33846
paolucci@yorku.ca

Title: Special Assistant Professor, Coordinator, Professional Writing Program
Born: Sioux Lookout, ON, Sunday, August 24, 1952
Citizenship: Canadian

OVERVIEW-PROFILE

         B.A. (Manitoba 1975), M.A. (Manitoba 1977), Ph.D. (York 2000). Specializations and
interests are: Shakespeare and the Renaissance, electronic texts (XML markup and editing) the
history and development of English prose through style and stylistics, horror fiction and film
(vampires, witchcraft, ghost stories, and lycanthropy), Bram Stoker's Dracula, Victorian poetry
literature (prose and fiction), technology and teaching, computer applications in literary
scholarship and editorial work, popular culture, Canadian studies (prose, fiction, and music),
faculty support work through pedagogy and technology, software / website usability testing, HCI
(Human Computer Interaction), theory and practice of Interface Design, Project Management,
and faculty support work (training and development).

         Other areas of expertise include: administrative experience with budgets, human
resources (recruitment and management), project management, disciplinary hearings, program
planning, organizational development, the development of strategic alliances and partnerships
between the educational and private sectors, high levels of technical expertise. I pioneered York
University's first videoconferenced courses in the mid 1980's and initiated electronic classrooms
in the mid-1980's (4 years before WWW). I have particularly strong programming and
instruction expertise in HTML, XHTML, XML, XSL, JavaScript, Unix (Client and
Administrator), E-commerce, Internet (basics, intermediate, advanced), Interface design,
Usability testing, Universal Design, Web Accessibility Standards, and networking security and
some knowledge of PHP, ASP, Perl, and search engine taxonomies and their methods of
harvesting, filtering, storing, and serving data. I am fluent on PC, MAC and UNIX platforms.
I have strong expertise in proposal-writing and budgets for government and private R & D grants
in online learning and I have knowledge of audit procedures on these kinds of projects. I have
had funding success with Industry Canada, CITO, and Canarie through Learn Ontario (Ryerson
and Centennial College).
                                                                               Paolucci         2


EDUCATION

        Ph.D. English Literature, 2000 (York University) Minor Field: Renaissance. Major
        Field: Victorian and Modern. Dissertation: Re-Reading the Vampire from John
        Polidori to Anne Rice: Structures of Impossibility Among Three Narrative Variations
        in the Vampiric Tradition. Professor Christopher Innes, supervisor.

        M.A. English Literature, 1977 (University Of Manitoba). Thesis: The Poetry of
        Edward, Lord Herbert Of Cherbury examines the biographical, literary and
        philosophical factors that shaped Herbert's constantly shifting aesthetics. Professor
        Kenneth J. Hughes, supervisor.

        B.A. (English Literature/Classical Philosophy), 1973 (University of Manitoba)
        with supporting studies in Classical Literature, Latin, Psychology, Architecture,
        Engineering, and some computer science.


     CERTIFICATIONS

            1996: Java Applets for Beginners (Computer Training, York University)
            1995: Web Page Design (Computer Training, York University)
            1995: Internet Competency (Computer Training, York University)
            1963 and 1964: Pianoforte Performance (Trinity College, England)




EMPLOYMENT HISTORY
 CURRENT POSITIONS
     Since 2005 (July 1) -   Special Assistant Professor, Department of English, York
                             University.
     Since 2000 –
                    Founder and Director of Learn Canada (http://www.learncanada.org).
                    As part of a consortium of Internet-based training and educational
                    companies under one umbrella, Learn Canada is dedicated to
                    advancement of all digitally based teaching and learning. We are a full
                    solution provider for online teaching and learning needs in education and
                    training.

                    Comprised of humanist-oriented academics with high levels of
                    technological expertise and aptitude, Learn Canada employs and partners
                    with university and community college faculty, primary and high school
                    teachers, technical trainers, web and database programmers, instructional
                    designers, information architects and other specialists, for the primary
                    purpose of developing sound pedagogy for the delivery of digital
                    content.

                    We teach programmers how to design usable interfaces and we are
                    specialists in usability testing and in the technological and project
                    management processes in making webpages comply with the World
                                                                             Paolucci      3


                   Wide Web Consortium's WAI (Web Accessibility Initiative) in the form
                   of Accessibility Guidelines. We also teach educators how to modernize
                   as well as humanize technology in their teaching, and we conduct
                   workshops showing faculty how and why students cheat.

   Since 1994 -
                   Part time technical instructor and course/curriculum designer of Seneca
                   webmaster program (http://webmaster.senecac.on.ca/rootweb/staff.html)
                   and many courses in the MCW series: 803 (Web Page Design Level I),
                   805 (Web Page Design Level II), 816 (Web Page Design Level III), 804
                   JavaScript Level 1), 812 (JavaScript level II), 821 (Ecommerce I), 825
                   Ecommerce II), 827 (Designing Information for the WWW), 813 (XML
                   level I) and 814 (XML level II). I am currently teaching Project
                   Management for web designers, but I have taught, and continue to teach,
                   HTML, XHTML, JavaScript. XML, CSS, client management, interface
                   design/HCI. Contact: Robin Richardson, Program Coordinator,
                   Computer Studies, 416-491-5050 ext.7273, 905-475-0906. Room: 144
                   Markham Campus. Robin.Richardson@senecac.on.ca.

   Since 1995 -
                   Web designer, technical writer, business and web-marketing consultant.
                   Clients either currently include, or have included:

                           Dark Horse Consulting (http://www.darkhorse.to/)
                           Eamon Hoey (http://www.hoeyassociates.ca/)
                           Entertainment Source (http://www.entertainmentsource.ca/)
                           HPU Rehab (http://www.hpurehab.com/)
                           Nevada Learning Series (www.nlearnseries.com)
                           Resource Management Canada (http://www.rmc-canada.com/)
                           Team Industrial (http://www.teamindustrial.com/)
                           TSS Wound Care (http://www.tsswoundcare.com/)
                           Venture Steel (http://www.venturesteel.com/)
                           Wilrep (http://www.wilrep.com/)
                           Wind-Net Computer Solutions (http://www.windnetcs.com/)

PREVIOUS POSITIONS

   2000 (May) – 2002 (April)
                 Director/Directeur Centre des technologies de l'enseignement
                 (Educational Technologies Centre, Glendon College). Glendon is a
                 trilingual (English, French, and Spanish) liberal arts college with diverse
                 pedagogical and technological needs. The purpose of the center was to
                 nurture and support faculty in the sound pedagogical application of
                 technology to teaching, and to assist them in the procurement of R&D
                 funding on projects that integrated teaching and technology. Motivating
                 and advising faculty members about research and development funding
                 and software choices in the development and design of online education
                 was part of the work. I was also responsible, however, for assisting in
                 institution-wide strategic planning for technological and pedagogical
                 development, and, on behalf of Glendon, for seeking out, nurturing, and
                                                                           Paolucci       4


                maximizing the benefits of symbiotic partnerships with other post-
                secondary educational institutions and with private sector partners.

1999 (Sept) – 2000 (March)
               Director, Learn Ontario/L'Ontario apprend. Learn Ontario/L'Ontario
               apprend no longer exists, but it was originally partnered with the Ontario
               Government, Ryerson Polytechnic University, and The Bell Center for
               Creative Communication at Centennial College. Learn Ontario helped
               Canadian post-secondary institutions integrate technology into their
               teaching by creating financial, intellectual, and technological
               opportunities for the co-operative development of learnware. Learn
               Ontario was no longer operational after March 31, 2000.

1982 - 2005     Contract Faculty, York University.
                Extensive teaching experience at the university level in nine different
                academic disciplines within English Literature, Humanities, Social
                Science, Canadian Studies, History, Popular Music and Culture,
                Technology, Canadian Corporate Development, Communication in
                Organizations, Essay Writing, Business case studies, Writing and
                Composition, and Critical Skills for Kinesiology majors.

1995 - 2003
                Technical trainer (contract) for Unix and web design for The Institute for
                Computer Studies/CDI, Ryerson Polytechnic, Centennial College,
                PrimeTech, Bank of Montreal.

1995 (Sept) – 1998 (April)
               Coordinator for Teaching and Technology (The Centre for the Support of
               Teaching, York University). Designed and delivered an extensive
               program of university-wide, faculty-based instruction in the pedagogy of
               online and digital teaching-learning through the Centre for the Support of
               Teaching routinely consulted with university faculty on sound
               pedagogical application of digital technologies in the classroom, assisted
               faculty in developing best practices in online teaching and learning,
               researched best practices in online teaching and learning and used that
               material to assist faculty, developed use of digital/convergent
               technologies in teaching designed and implemented training programs,
               covering: software, law data bases, video /satellite /desktop
               conferencing, Java, JavaScript, and HTML. During 1997-1998, sixteen
               or the CST's forty-six workshops (35%) were designed and offered by
               me. I also managed the CST listserv, re-designed and maintained the
               CST website, and served as an individual consultant for more than
               twenty-four faculty members each academic year. I worked atteh CST
               under the CST directorships of Professors Penelope Doob/John Dwyer
               and Steve Mason/James Brown.
                                                                              Paolucci       5


2001 (Fall)
                   Contract Instructor Centennial College: History of Twentieth Century
                   General Studies (now numbered as GS-200).


1980 - 1985
                   Manager of the teaching division of The Music Shoppe 8172 Yonge
                   Street, Thornhill (now non-operational). I supervised a staff of thirty
                   music teachers, and designed and implemented the music instruction
                   curriculum (1985). I also had oversight of all corresponding hiring,
                   advertising, and accounting systems.

1979 - 1985
                   Assistant store sales manager and manager of acoustic guitars division.
                   at The Music Shoppe 8172 Yonge Street, Thornhill. My responsibilities
                   included motivation and supervisions of a sales staff of eight, routinely
                   attend buyer shows in Chicago and Los Angeles to purchase acoustic
                   guitars, handle legal work such as credit, collections, and court
                   attendance related individual musicians and companies who did not pay
                   their bills.
Since 1968 -
                   Professional musician (bass guitar, acoustic guitar, banjo, and piano).
                   Performed professionally for more than 35 years in Blues, R & B,
                   Country, and mainstream pop in the cities of Winnipeg, Calgary, and
                   Toronto. Toured (what felt like) every seedy bar, grill, and tavern in
                   western Canada for three years (1975 – 1978) and never saved a nickel!
                   Currently playing music by Eagles, CSY&N, and others in a four-piece,
                   acoustic band. We donate all our earnings to various charities.


FACULTY TEACHER AND TRAINER
(See elsewhere in this CV too)

2001 (Jan) - 2003 (March)

                   Director, editor-in-chief, manage, co-designer, co-author, and instructor
                   of Digital Architecture: Imaginative Pedagogy for Educators currently
                   housed at http://137.122.150.70. The co-authors are Derek Allard,
                   Professors Dalton Kehoe, John Dwyer, and Mr. Dave McInnes. The
                   material was also translated into French. This electronic resource was
                   developed out of a $145,000 Canarie Grant (No 59), obtained by my
                   company, Learn Canada in partnership with the University of Ottawa,
                   consequently, the resource is also owned in partnership with The
                   University of Ottawa. Digital Architecture is used by The University of
                   Ottawa (in French and English), Glendon College, Universite de
                   Montreal (en français and in English), Chataqua/Faculte de Medecine,
                   College de Sainte-Boniface, The University of Alberta (Faculte de Saint-
                   Jean), and Centre National de Formation en Sante. The resource is now
                   under the supervision of The University of Ottawa's Teaching and
                   Learning Support Services (TLSS), 120 University, Room 109, Ottawa,
                   ON, K1N, 6N5. Contact: Dr. Christian Blanchette
                                                                           Paolucci       6


                 (blanchette@uOttawa.ca or 613-562-5300), Director of Teaching and
                 Learning Support Services. A table of contents is attached in the
                 Appendix.


2000 (Jan-Apr)
                 Co-designer, co-author, and instructor of IDNM Instructional Design for
                 New Media, an internationally-recognized online course that assists
                 university and community college faculty in transforming traditional
                 course materials into online learnware. Developed by Learn Ontario
                 where I was a director and offered at Ryerson Polytechnic University
                 and Centennial College. Learn Ontario was dismantled in March 2000.

1998 (Jul 8)
                 The Teacher as Presenter. For the CST, with Prof. John Dwyer. Three
                 back-to-back sessions: Large Lectures and Conference Presentations,
                 The Pedagogy of Videoconferencing, and Videotaping your Presentation.

1998 (Jul 6)
                 Transferring Your Teaching Skills: Teachers Make the Best Business
                 Consultatnts. With Prof John Dwyer, for the CST.

1998 (Jun 10)
                 Critical Skills on the Internet. For the CST.

1998 (Feb 5)
                 What's Next? Leading Edge Technologies for Teaching. For the
                 CST.


1997 (Dec 4) and 1998 (Feb 26)
               Using the Library and the Internet in Research Assigmments. For the
               CST.

1997 (Sept 25 and Oct 9)
               Computer Conferencing with First Class (Advanced). For the CST.


1993 - 1996
                 Critical Skills Coordinator (Founders College). Collaborated with a
                 group of highly motivated writing instructors and liaised with more than
                 one hundred York faculty to improve instructional skills and to facilitate
                 "best practices" in course design, task sequencing, and other pedagogical
                 tools for developing critical thinking in our students. My work in this
                 area was recently extended into the Fundamentals of Learning course
                 (FND 0100), which I taught in the context of my job as Stong's
                 Academic Advisor (2003-2007). See "Pedagogical Innovations" below.
                                                                                                     Paolucci          7



HONOURS AND AWARDS

                    2002 (March)
                           One of York's most popular professors in Maclean's Guide to Canadian
                           Universities.

                    1995 (June 17)
                           York Wide University Teaching Award (SCOTL) for excellence in
                           teaching.


PROFESSIONAL CONTRIBUTION AND STANDING
          Publications
          Articles (Refereed)
                    2003 (November)
                    "Should Online Course Design Meet Accessibility Standards?" Educational
                    Technology & Society 7(1): 6-11.


          Reviews
                    As an executive Peer-Reviewer1 for The Journal of Educational Technology &
                    Society since 2000 I routinely review articles and books for publication. ETS is
                    ISSN: 1436-4522 (online) and 1176-3647 (print). The Journal of Educational
                    Technology & Society is included in the Thomson Scientific Social Sciences
                    Citation Index (SSCI) with an impact factor of 0.267 according to Thomson
                    Scientific 2005 Journal Citations Report. Contact Professor Kinshuk2

                    2006 (December)
                    Review of paper no. 657i "Diffusion of free/open source software as innovation:
                    A case study of METU."

                    2006 (September)
                    Review of paper no. 594i: "Work Value Orientations of Students At University Of
                    Primorska."

                    2006 (December)
                    Review of paper no. 582i: "Alleviating the Tutor Load in Learning Networks"

                    2006 (26 February)
                    Review of paper no. 495i: "IRT-Item Response Theory Assessment &
                    Enhancement for an Adaptive Teaching Assessment System."

1
 See http://www.ifets.info/others/reviewers.php or http://www.ifets.info/others/
2
 Associate Professor Kinshuk (kinshuk@ieee.org) Director, Advanced Learning Technologies Research Centre
http://is-alt.massey.ac.nz/ Editor, Journal of Educational Technology & Society http://ifets.ieee.org/periodical/, Chair,
IEEE Technical Committee on Learning Technology, ACM SIGCHI New Zealand, Information Systems Dept.,
Massey Univ., Private Bag 11-222, Palmerston North, New Zealand: http://infosys.massey.ac.nz/~kinshuk
                                                                Paolucci          8



2005 (June 2)
Review of paper no. 401i: "A Web-Based Synchronous Collaborative Review
Tool through an Assessment of On-line Collaboration: A Case Study of an On-
line Graduate Course."

2005 (Feb 15)
Review of paper no. 325r1: "Problems and Issues In Integrating Computer
Technologies in Education: Turkish Experience."

2004 (Nov 8)
Review of paper no. 318i: The Tablet PC for Faculty: A Pilot Project

2004 (July 29)
Review of paper no. 285i: Clarification of The Terminology Used in the Field of
Virtual Learning

2004 (May 8)
Peer review of paper no. 249i: Using Blended Strategies in Teacher Training: A
Case Study

2004 (March)
Peer reviewer for three papers submitted to the ICALT (International Conference
on Advanced Learning Technologies) 2004 conference, Aug 30 – Sept 1 in
Joensuu, Finland. Conference paper no. 315: A Web-based Tool for Building and
Accessing Learning Objects and Online Courses, conference paper no. 329:
Fundamental Analysis of Emotion Model for Designing Virtual Learning
Companions, and conference paper no. 356: Emotional and Motivational ITS
Architecture.

2003 (Oct 6 - 17)
Designed and moderated an ETS discussion forum entitled: "Should Online
Course Design Meet Accessibility Standards?" Refereed. Summation on October
16-17, 2003 is available at:
http://ifets.ieee.org/discussions/discuss_october2003.html


2003 (December)
Peer review of paper no. 249: Design Strategies to Support Online Collaborative
Learning for Professional Development.

2003 (July)
Book review of Designing Information Spaces: The Social Navigation Approach,
by Kristina Höök, David Benyon and Alan Munro, Eds. Published by Spinger-
Verlag London/Berlin/Heidelberg, 2003. [ISBN 1-85233-661-7]. The review is
available online at http://ifets.ieee.org/periodical/6_4/index.html or in
Educational Technology and Society Vol. 6, No. 3, July 2003. Special Issue on
"Digital Contents for Education" pp: 166-168.

2003 (May )
                                                                          Paolucci         9


         Review of http://pirate.shu.edu/~devlinrb/indexport.html (Seton Hall University
         College of Education and Human Services Portfolio Handbook for Students).

         2003 (July)
         Review of Creating an Electronic Portfolio vol 6 issue 3 - Special Issue on
         "Developing Creativity and Broad Mental Outlook in the Computer Age," 89-90.
                            [
         2000 (July)
         Critical review of website "Math Goodies" for Educational Technology &
         Society (Journal of International Forum of Educational Technology & Society
         and IEEE Learning Technology Task Force), Vol. 3, No. 3, July 2000. Special
         Issue on "On-line Collaborative Learning Environments," pp: 528-531 or
         available online at:
         http://ifets.ieee.org/periodical/vol_3_2000/math_goodies_2.html


Conference Presentations

         2005 (June 6)
         Weekend with Dracula (Toronto) moderator, (Symposium of the Transylvanian,
         Society of Dracula, University of Toronto, June 2005)
         [http://www.ucs.mun.ca/~emiller/tsd_gallery.html] sponsored by support from
         the Osborne Collection of Early Children's Books and the Merril Collection of
         Science Fiction, both of the Toronto Public Library. 2:00-3:30 Panel Discussion:
         Today’s fictional vampire: tiger or pussy-cat? Chair: Peter Paolucci (York
         University, Toronto). Panelists: Chelsea Quinn Yarbro (novelist, Berkeley CA),
         Nancy Baker (novelist, Toronto), Anne Fraser (library technician, U of Toronto),
         Norma Rowen (York University), Robert Knowlton (independent scholar,
         Toronto), Suzy McKee Charnas (novelist)

         2006 (June 8,)
         Keynote speaker (Why Students Cheat) and applied workshop (How Students
         Cheat) at the "Stepping Into Your Future" conference for all the community
         colleges of southwestern Ontario. Sponsored by Lambton College, in Sarnia,
         Ontario. Refereed.


         2004 (June 17)
         WHY diVeRSItY IS IMPOSSIBLE with our current learning technologies for the
         STLHE (Society of Teaching and Learning in Higher Education) for the
         conference entitled: "Experiencing the Richness of the University Mosaic : from
         Diversity to Individuality" hosted by the University of Ottawa. Archived at
         http://www.yorku.ca/paolucci/stlhe/ and at
         http://www.uottawa.ca/services/tlss/stlhe2004/pages/concurrent/1_16a.htm.
         Refereed.

         2004 (June 3)
         UNDESIRABLE SYNERGY: Academic Dishonesty and The Tyranny Of
         Conformity, delivered to The Region of Southwest Ontario Community Colleges
         Summer Teaching Workshops in Ridgetown, Ontario.
                                                                                                          Paolucci    10



                       2004 (April 1)
                       UNDESIRABLE SYNERGY: Academic Dishonesty and The Tyranny Of
                       Conformity for Niagara College, Welland Campus.

                       2003 (Feb 17 – 18)
                       Invited speaker: Digital Architecture: Imaginative Pedagogy for Educators.
                       SAEA - Service d’appui à l’enseignement et à l’apprentissage, TLSS - Teaching
                       and Learning Support Service, The University of Ottawa.


                       2003 (May 1)
                       Invited speaker and workshop leader. Basic Videoconferencing and The
                       Pedagogy of Videoconferencing for Field Work. Sixteenth Annual TSS
                       (Teaching Support Services) / University of Guelph. Conference title: "New
                       Teaching Tools and Learning Environments.3" Refereed.


                       2003 (Jan 24)
                       Invited speaker: Digital Architecture: Imaginative Pedagogy for Educators.
                       SAEA - Service d’appui à l’enseignement et à l’apprentissage, TLSS - Teaching
                       and Learning Support Service, The University of Ottawa.

                       2002 (May 15)
                       Speaker. First Annual Forum on Teaching and Learning, Carleton / University of
                       Ottawa. The Failure of educators to humanize learning: Plagiarism,
                       discrimination and accessibility as cultural problems in online Learning.

                       2000 (Oct 3-4)
                       Canadian National E-Learning Workshop (Canarie). The Metropolitan Hotel
                       Toronto, Ontario. Synchronous and Asynchronous Learning in Synergy.
                       (http://www.canarie.ca/conferences/elearning2000/presentations.html). With Dr.
                       Christian Blanchette. Refereed.

                       1998 (Saturday, January 24)
                       OCULA (Ontario college and university library association ) Session #403. 8:30
                       am - 11:00 am. Partnerships on Campus. Speakers: Michele Beaudoin, Director
                       learning Resource Centres/Open Learning Centres, Georgian College; John S.
                       Clouston, Chief Librarian, Cardinal Carter Library, University of Western
                       Ontario; Dorothy Fitzgerald, Director, Health Sciences Library & Computing
                       Services, McMaster University; Marjorie Hale, Librarian, Library Resource
                       Centre, King Campus, Seneca College; Dr. Peter Paolucci, Co-ordinator for
                       Teaching & Technology, York University.
                       (http://www.accessola.com/ocula/site/showPage.cgi?page=past/promo.html).
                       What happens when two small libraries join forces? What are the pros and cons
                       of managing both the library and computing services? How can bibliographic
                       instruction be enhanced by being part of a curriculum delivery team and linking
                       the Library Resource Centre with the Open Learning Centre? What happens
                       when the Library "pays" for faculty input to collection development? Does team

3
    See either http://www.tss.uoguelph.ca/tli/tli03/tlikey.html or http://www.tss.uoguelph.ca/tli/tli03/tlires.html
                                                                           Paolucci     11


         teaching work? What are the Faculty perceptions of partnerships with librarians?
         You will find out all of this and have time for questions, comments, and other
         shared experiences from colleagues at this session. Convenor: Suzanne O'Neill,
         Fanshawe College. Refereed.

         1996 (June)
         Invited speaker at the 51st Canadian Congress of Librarians [CACUL, or
         Canadian Association of University Librarians] in, in Halifax, Nova Scotia. Best
         practices in website interface design (adapted for librarians). Refereed.

         1995 and 1996 (February)
         Co-Chair of York University's Active Learning Through Technology.


Research Support

         Since 2005 (July) -
         Faculty of Arts, York University startup grant $6000 for The Shakespeare XML
         Project (http://www.shakespearexml.ca/). This experiment explores practical
         alternatives to the TEI's guidelines for a deep-tagging XML architecture for
         literary texts. Through the development of our own data architecture and
         schema, our experimental electronic editions of Hamlet and Midsummer Night's
         Dream will be compatible with the WAI standards and with the emerging
         paradigm shift of Web 2.0 technologies (blogs, del.icio.us, wikis, flickr,
         folksonomies / tag clouds, Akamaization, RSS, Plazoo, permalinks, mashups,
         AJAX, SOAP, XMLHttpRequest, Bebo / Facebook, emokoo, babelgum, Plinkd,
         Flkzor, Day Tripper, Mugshot, etc). Our scholarly editions will be
         interdisciplinary, allowing annotations from history, cinema, art, philosophy,
         theology and other areas of scholarly research. It now looks like a book will also
         emerge from the research, the working title of which is: (Re)Theorizing The
         Shakespearean Editor in a (Brave?) New World: The Quiet Revolution of Web
         2.0 and Its Impact on Editing and the Electronic Text.

         2000-2003
         Recipient and project manager of $145,000 federal grant (Canarie No. 529), to
         develop an online course on the pedagogy of videoconferencing in high
         bandwidth (dark fiber) environments (May, 2000 – May 2003). In partnership
         with the $3M+ University of Ottawa project, and a half dozen scholars including
         Professors Dalton Kehoe and John Dwyer from York. The resource is now used
         by the University of Ottawa (http://137.122.150.70/) in conjunction with 3M
         scholars and a number of other partners. The full title is: Digital architecture:
         Imaginative pedagogy for a new generation: The Theory and practice of
         instructional design for teachers and trainers. The resource has eleven modules:
         a history of distance learning; the political economy of distance education;
         internet basics, digitization and digital media, asynchronous communication,
         synchronous communication, research methods, using database in your teaching,
         discipline specific issues, community and culture, and project management.
         The resource is bilingual (French and EN). My company, Learn Canada,
         oversaw the design, implementation, testing, and completion of the project. The
         resource has also been translated into French.
                                                                              Paolucci      12




Work in Progress

          (Re)Theorizing The Shakespearean Editor in a (Brave?) New World: The Quiet
          Revolution of Web 2.0 and Its Impact on Editing and the Electronic Text.
                           [Miranda]
                           … O braue new world …
                           [Prospero]
                           'Tis new to thee.
                           (The Tempest, F1: TNL 2159 and 2161)


          The arrival of Web 2.0 has been, to borrow a Bob Dylan phrase, a slow train
          comin'; it seemed to sneak up, stealthily at first, but so relentlessly and
          incrementally that it now "suddenly" looms large; its presence can no longer go
          unnoticed or ignored. Like Miranda, the field of academic scholarship has seen
          only symptomatic bits and pieces of this brave new Web 2.0 world, not really
          grasping the implications of what this world means in its entirety; it is a world
          that to others, as Prospero meticulously notes, is not new in itself, only new to us.


Contributions to the Profession
     Conference Organization
          Co-organized the first ever -- and the second -- campus-wide Teaching and
          Learning With Technology Week at York University (in 1996 with Dr. John
          Dwyer, in 1997 with Dr. James Brown)

     Consultancies
          2007 (Feb 16)
          Videoconferencing expert and consultant for the faculties of Dentistry and
          Medicine offered through the Faculty, Staff, & Community Development Office,
          University of Western Ontario
          (www.schulich.uwo.ca/facdev/documents/Spring2007Calendar.pdf)

          Since 2007 (Jan) -
          Member of the Editorial and Technical Advisory Board of Open Source
          Shakespeare: An Experiment in Literary Technology.
          (http://opensourceshakespeare.com/). Contact: Eric Johnson.

          2005 (Jan 31, Feb 1, 2, 3, 7, 10)
          Project Management Trainer (PMBOK standard) for the Ministry of Government
          Services, Government of Ontario. The Technical Training Room, 180 Dundas
          St., 5th floor, Toronto. Contact: Bert.Umbertinesi@mbs.gov.on.ca.

          2003 (Feb 6 and 7)
          Accessibility Consultant, Government of Ontario. Training Government of
          Ontario workers how to convert online PDF forms into W3 accessible-compliant
          XHTML strict. Technical and work flow/organizational issues.
                                                                 Paolucci      13


2003 (Nov 26)
Videoconferencing expert and consultant for the faculties of Dentistry and
Medicine at the University of Western Ontario
www.schulich.uwo.ca/Postgrad-
Medicine/Committee/2003/November_2003_Agenda.pdf

2001-2002
Videoconferencing expert and consultant for Osgoode's Master's degree in
Internet law Professional Development Program (see
http://www.law.yorku.ca/pdp/). Osgoode Professional Development, Osgoode
Hall Law School of York University, 1 Dundas Street West Suite 2602, P.O. Box
42, Toronto, ON Canada M5G 1Z3. Tel: 416.597.9724

2000
Asynchronous communication (First Class) Consultant for The First Cedaw
(Committee on the Elimination of Discrimination against Women) Impact Study
Final Report, Released during the Twenty-Third Session of the CEDAW
Committee, New York, June 2000, by Marilou McPhedran, Susan Bazilli, Moana
Erickson, Andrew Byrnes, With an Introduction by, Andrew Byrnes and Jane
Connors, Published By The Centre For Feminist Research, York University And
The International Women’s Rights Project.

1998 (Jan – Jun)
Lecturer and advisor for faculty and students in Schulich School of Business
Internet Research 601, a required course for the MBA.

1997 (Fall)
Invited member of the International Curriculum Committee that established the
technical and pedagogical requirements for certification in the IPW (Institute of
Professional Webmasters) program. The program was renamed in 1998
(http://www.internetnews.com/dev-news/article.php/35901) as the Association of
Professional Webmasters (http://www.a-w-p.org/). Our task was to establish
standards and define equivalencies between professional certification in Novell
(CNE: Master Certified Novell Engineer), Microsoft (MCSE), community
colleges, and university computer science departments (B.A. and B.Sc.). In other
words we had to design a curriculum that would meet both academic and
industry standards. "The Association is managed by a Board of Directors that
includes representatives from Ernst and Young, IBM, Open Market, Netstar
Interactive, The Cohen Group, Microsoft Canada, mbanx, AT&T, Onyx
Interactive, Informix, Novell, Apple Canada, Canoe, WebTV, Oracle, Netscape,
CIBC, Mentors Inc., and Athabasca University."


1994
Videoconferencing expert and consultant for York's Environmental Studies and
the British Columbia government's Ministry of the Environment. Overseen by
Professors Peter Homenuk and Dalton Kehoe, Environmental Studies.

Also, see my work at Glendon College, the Centre for the Support of Teaching,
for Kinesiology, for Founders College, and several other universities.
                                                                          Paolucci    14


MEMBERSHIP IN PROFESSIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

           Since Jan 2007
                  Member: Text Analysis Developer's Alliance (hosted at McMaster
                  University)

           Since 2006 (October ) -
                  Member, TEI Electronic Text Encoding Initiative
                  (http://www.tei-c.org/Members/2006-Victoria/mm39.xml)


           2005-2006
                  Member, STLHE

           Since 2004 -
                  Member, Humanist Discussion Group, Centre for Computing in the
                  Humanities, King's College London.

           Since 2005 (Winter)
                  Member of the Transylvanian Society of Dracula, Canadian Chapter.

           1999-2001
                  Founding member and coordinator of volunteers for SIP (The Society of
                  Internet Professionals -- http://www.sipgroup.org/) and
                  (www.sipgroup.org/president/sipcommittees.ppt) , now merged with and
                  Accredited Internet Professionals (AIP). Contact: Max Haroon. 7321
                  Victoria Park Avenue, Suite 301, Markham, ON, L3R 2Z8, CANADA

           Since 1992 -
                  Member, Shakespeare Listserv discussion forum.


                               TEACHING

Undergraduate

           2007-2008
           Teaching in this academic year will include Shakespeare (EN 3190), Major
           Authors (EN 1100), and Victorian Ghost Stories (EN 4256).

           2006-2007
           Teaching in this academic year includes Major Authors (EN 1100), Writing
           Strategies for Non-Fiction (WRIT 1310), and Horror and Terror (EN 2210).

           W 07           EN 2210: Horror and Terror
           FW 06-07       EN 1100: Major Authors
           SU 06          EN 4181: Renaissance Poetry
           F 06           WRIT 1310: Writing Strategies for Non-Fiction
                                                              Paolucci   15


W 06        EN 2210: Horror and Terror
F 05        WRIT 1310: Writing Strategies for Non-Fiction
W 05        EN 2210: Horror and Terror
FW 04-05    WRIT 1400B: Critical Thinking, Reading, and Writing
FW 04-05    EN 3190B: Shakespeare
F 04        WRIT 1310: Writing Strategies for Non-Fiction
F 04        EN 2210: Horror and Terror
SU 04       HUMA 1780: Stories in Diverse Media
SU 04       ESL (ENGSL) 1450: Thinking About Contemporary Canada
W 04        WRIT 1310: Writing Strategies for Non-Fiction
FW 03-04    EN 1520: Literary Texts and Approaches (Glendon)
FW 03-04    EN 1200D: Introduction to Literary Genre
FW 03-04    EN 3190B: Shakespeare

SU 03       ITEC 3132: Designing User Interfaces
SU 03       Writing Instructor: Writing Programs (Atkinson)
SU 03       HUM1720: Roots of Western Civilization (1500-1900)
W 03        HUM1720: Roots of Western Civilization (1500 - 1900) Internet
W 03        ITEC 3132: Designing User Interfaces

FW 02-03    Writing Instructor: Centre for Academic Writing
FW 02-03    Writing Instructor: Writing Programs (Atkinson)
FW 02 -03   EN 1200: Introduction to Literary Genre
FW 02-03    EN 1200: Introduction to Literary Genre

F 02        AK/ENSL 1450 (x-listed HUM1745):
            Thinking About Contemporary Canada
SU 02       Writing Instructor: Writing Programs: Atkinson
SU 02       ITEC 3132: Designing User Interfaces
SU 02       EN 4285: Advanced Seminar in Shakespeare
W 02        Writing Instructor: Centre for Academic Writing
W 02        Hum 1720: Roots of Western Civilization (1500 - 1900) Internet

FW 01-02    EN 1200D: Introduction to Literary Genre

SU 01       HIST 3100B: Intellectual History of the West (Internet)
SU 01       Writing Workshop Instructor
W 01        HUM 1790Q: Business Culture & Tradition (Internet)
W 01        HUMA 1720: Roots of Western Civilization

FW 00-01    KINE 1000: Foundations of Kinesiology & Health Science
            (Team Lecturer/Writing Instructor)

SU 00       ENGL 1400: Critical Thinking Reading & Writing (ESL)
W 00        HUMA 1790: Business, Culture & Tradition (Internet)

FW99-00     KINE 1000: Foundations of Kinesiology & Health Science
            (Team Lecturer/Writing Instructor)
FW 99-00    HUMA 1750: Roots of Western Culture

SU 99       SOSC 3720: Canadian Problems (Internet)
                                                                                                  Paolucci        16


                   SU 99               HUMA 1750A: Roots of Western Culture

                   FW 98-99            HUMA 1750A: Roots of Western Civilization (Modern)
                   SU 98               HUMA 1790: Business, Culture, Tradition
                   FW 97-98            HUMA 1650: The Networked Imagination
                   FW 97-98            EN 3190: Shakespeare
                   SU 97               HUMA 1790: Business, Culture, Tradition
                   FW 96-97            HUMA 3200: Reinventing Culture in the Computer Age

                   FW 94-95            SOSC 2830: Music & Society
                   FW 94-5             EN 3190: Shakespeare
                   FW 94-5             SOSC 3311: Communication in Organizations

                   FW 94-95            HUMA 1740: Roots of Modern Canada
                   FW 94-95            SOSC 2830: Music & Society
                   FW 94-95            EN 1520: The Literary Text (Glendon)
                   FW 94-95            Stong College Tutorial 1990: The Gothic Tradition
                   FW 94-5             SOSC 3311: Communication in Organizations
                   FW 94-5             EN 3190: Shakespeare
                   FW 94-5             SOSC 2830: Music & Society

                   SU 94               Writing Workshop
                   SU 94               Writing/Case Study Instructor
                   SU 94               EN 3190: Shakespeare & His Contemporaries

                   FW 93-94            EN 2510: Literary Traditions (Glendon)
                   FW 93-94            EN 1400: Critical Thinking Reading & Writing
                   FW 93-94            SOSC 2830: Music & Society
                   FW 93/94            Stong College Tutorial: The Gothic Tradition

                   FW 93-4             EN 3190: Shakespeare
                   FW 92-3             SOSC 1225: The Corporation in Canada4
                   FW 92-3             SOSC 1220: The Corporation in Canada
                   FW 92-3             SOSC 2830: Music & Society
                   FW 92-93            Writing Instructor: Writing Workshop (x 3 appointments)
                   FW 92-93            Stong College Tutorial 1990: The Gothic Tradition
                   FW 92-93            EN 1100: Major Authors

                   SU 93               Writing Workshop
                   SU 93               EN 4050: The Renaissance Epic
                   W 93                HUMA1750B: Roots Of Western Civilization (Contemporary)

                   SU 92               EN 3450: Shakespeare & His Contemporaries
                   SU 92               Writing Workshop
                   SU 92               EN 2410: Introduction to Literature & Criticism

                   FW 91-92            SOSC 2830: Music & Society
                   FW 91-92            Writing Workshop

4
 This was an experimental course taught with Prof. Dalton Kehoe. The idea was to see if pre-recorded lectures and an
asynchronous delivery mode made any difference over more traditionally conducted courses.
                                                          Paolucci   17


FW 91-92   EN 1100: Major Authors (x 3 appointments)
FW 91-92   SC Tutorial 1990: The Gothic Tradition

SU 91      SOSC 3840: Social Issues Through the Arts
SU 91      EN 1400: Critical Thinking Reading & Writing
SU 91      Writing Workshop

FW 90-91   HUMA 1130: The Renaissance
FW 90-91   HUMA 1740: The Roots of Canadian Culture
FW 90-91   SOSC 1220: The Corporation in Canada
FW 90-91   SOSC 2830: Music & Society
FW 90/91   Writing Workshop
FW 90/91   EN 1100: Major Authors(x 2 appointments)
FW 90/91   Stong College Tutorial 1990: The Gothic Tradition

WS 90      EN 1100: Major Authors
SU 90      EN 3450: Shakespeare & His Contemporaries

FW 89-90   SOSC 1220: The Corporation in Canada
FW 89-90   SOSC 2830: Music & Society

FW 89-90   EN 1100: Major Authors (x 3 appointments)
FW 89-90   Stong College Tutorial 1990: The Gothic Tradition

SU 89      SOSC 2500: Foundations of Social Science

FW 88-89   HUMA 1740: Roots of Canadian Culture
FW 88-89   SOSC 3311: Communication in Organizations
FW 88-89   SOSC 1220: The Corporation in Canada
FW 88-89   SOSC 2830: Music & Society
FW 88-89   EN 2510: Literary Traditions (Glendon)
FW 88-89   EN 1100: Major Authors
FW 88-89   Stong College Tutorial 1990: The Gothic Tradition

FW 87-88   HUMA 1200A: The Canadian Experience
FW 87-88   SOSC 1220: The Corporation in Canada
FW 87-88   SOSC 2830: Music & Society
FW 87-88   EN 1100: Major Authors (x 2 appointments)
FW 87-88   Stong College Tutorial 1990: The Gothic Tradition

WS 87      HUMA 1200A: The Canadian Experience
FW 86-87   HUMA 1200B: The Canadian Experience
FW 86-87   SOSC 2830: Music & Society
FW 86-87   Stong College Tutorial 1990: The Gothic Tradition

FW 85-86   SOSC 2830: Music & Society
FW 85-86   Stong College Tutorial 1990: The Gothic Tradition

FW 84-85   Stong College Tutorial 1990: The Gothic Tradition

FW 83-84   Stong College Tutorial 1990: The Gothic Tradition
                                                                                            Paolucci       18


                 FW 83-84         EN 3190: Shakespeare

                 FW 82-83         EN 319: Shakespeare
                 FW 81-82         EN 247: The Novel

                 FW 80-81         EN 247: The Novel
                 FW 79-80         HUMA 120: Canadian Folk Culture
                 FW 78-79         HUMA 120: Canadian Folk Culture


Other Teaching-Related Activities
        Pedagogical Innovations
                 Since mid-1990s -
                        See "Consultancies" for my consulting work on the pedagogical
                        implications of videoconferencing and concerning the increase in
                        plagiarism.

                 1993-1996
                        I designed and delivered "Smashing the C+ Barrier" a study-skills
                        improvement workshop series for 3rd and 4th year students. I
                        participated regularly in the summers for Brian Poser's bridging course
                        entitled "Returning to Study" for students returning after having been on
                        probation.

                 1995 –
                          Developed "The Exam Game," a unique way to capitalize on student
                          synergy in studying. This activity was used with great success by 1997
                          SCOTL award-winning teacher, Trevor Holmes.

                 1994
                          Wrote the first revision of the Critical Skills Manual for First Year
                          Kinesiology Students under the guidance of Prof Carol Wilson,
                          Kinesiology.


        Instructional Materials Developed5
                                  * denotes developed for the Centre for the Support of Teaching
                                  ** denotes developed for Centre des technologies de l'enseignement (Glendon)
                                  ***denotes developed for York's Computer Training Facility

                 2000             Security and Other Course Design Issues in Lotus Notes**
                 1999             Using Perl and CGI in Course Design
                 1999             The Impact of Commercialization on Search Engines and
                                  Academic Research
                 1998             "Low End" Technology (Word Processors, Power Point) for
                                   Dissertation Writing*
                 1998             Using JavaScript (I and II)

5
 Note: these resources accompanied workshops that I delivered. Items are listed here, rather than under
Employment History: Faculty Teacher and Trainer.
                                                                   Paolucci     19


     1998           Critical Thinking for the Internet*
     1998 (Jul)     Introducing Windows 98*
     1998           A Taxonomy of Search Engines
                    (http://www.learncanada.org/e2nginez/)
     1998            Advanced HTML Design for Faculty*
     1998            Power Point in Office 98 for Faculty*
     1998 (Jun)      Advanced JavaScript for Faculty*
     1998            Information Architecture and Data Layering**
     1998-2000      MS Front Page for Web Design*
     1997-2000      Exploring JavaScript for the Electronic Classroom (Intermediate
                    and Advanced)* with Ian Lumb
     1997           Videotaping Your Teaching* for CST and Osgoode Law School
                    (with Dr. John Dwyer)
     1997            Computer Conferencing Theory and Practice, Using Codec,
                     Satellite and IP addressing technologies*
     1995-1997      Finding, Documenting, and Evaluating Information on the
                    Internet for Academics*
     1997           Multimedia Training and Teaching*
     1997           Using Java (Beginner Level)
     1996           Videoconferencing on the Net: CuSeeMe*

     {1996, 1998    Publishing and Site Promotion on the Web
     2000}

     1996           Convergent Technologies*
     1996           Professional Development and Technology*
     1996 / 1997    Using Presentation Programs Effectively*

     {1995, 1998    Using Search Engines Effectively*
     2003}


     1995          Using Listservs in the Classroom and on the Internet *
     1995          Using Power Point
     1994-1997     Web Page Design for Faculty*, Using HTML in Course Design*
     1993          Videoconferencing for Productivity
     1993          Computer-Mediated Learning
     1992-1995     Internet World Tour for York's now defunct Computer Training
                   Centre under the direction of Mr. Ian Taylor
     1993-4        Internet World Tour Training Manual***

     {1992
     {1996
     {2000
     {2001}         Website Design by HTML*** / **


Teaching Awards
     SCOTL Award for Excellence in teaching, 1995.
                                                                          Paolucci         20


Other
        1997 –
                 Oversight, nomination, and preparation of the file for Professor Dalton
                 Kehoe's successful nomination for the 1997 SCOTL award for
                 excellence in teaching.
                                                                         Paolucci       21




                              SERVICE

University Service
 Since 2007 (Jan) -
       Committee member of DACC (Dean's Advising Committee on Computing).
       Scrutiny and assessment of departmental computer plans for faculty of arts,
       assist departments with their computer plans, advise on planning and future
       computing needs to support faculty in their teaching and research.

 Since 2007 (Jan) -
       Coordinator, Professional Writing Program, York University.


 2006 (Fall) – 2007 (Winter)
       Member, Professional Writing Program search/hiring committee, under Profs.
       Carol Poster/ Julia Creet.

 Since 2005 (Sept) -
       Department of English Computer Coordinator. Creating the department's
       computing plan by assessing current inventories and infrastructure, and their
       condition; projecting faculty's future needs. Consulting with, and advising
       faculty on computing issues related to teaching and research. Hire and oversee
       workstudy student to support department's computing needs. Developing mid-
       and long- terms plans for teaching with technology.

 2003 (Aug) – 2007 (Jan) and 1995 (July) – 1998 (June)
       Academic Advisor Stong College, York University. Originally administered
       twenty-two college (degree-credit) courses, including hiring, disciplinary
       hearings, curriculum development and oversight, faculty recruitment, and
       teaching evaluation and assessment until 1998. Created and maintained
       professional development programs for instructors, counseled and advised
       undergraduate students on improving academic performance, study strategies,
       career paths and personal problems. After 1998 the course administration
       component disappeared from the job description. The current iteration of
       Academic Advisor includes programming fall orientation for 850+ students,
       year-round programming events in the cultural/intellectual life of college,
       planning, managing, and delivering a student academic help workshop series,
       oversight, updating and maintenance of the college's website, server log analysis
       and reporting, and supporting the college's web-based databases; oversight of
       seventeen work study students who have been developing online student
       resources for the past four years (located at
       (http://www.yorku.ca/stong/academic/peer_advising/online_resources.html),
       sitting on various committees for routinely occurring disciplinary hearings,
       awards, College hirings, and advisor to SCSG (Stong College Student
       Government). Contributing fellow of Stong College since first joining in 1984.
                                                                         Paolucci     22


 Since 2003 (October)
       Executive member of the Canada-Maghreb Centre (356 Stong), providing advice
       to the Centre on academic conferences and publications, oversight and
       development of the Centre's online XML-based database of its library and
       collections (http://www.arts.yorku.ca/french/cmc/Bibliotheque/index.php), and
       routinely providing expertise on the Centre's technical and strategic development.

 Since 2004
       Faculty Advisor, EUSA (EN Undergraduate Students Association),
       (http://www.yorku.ca/eusa/). Resurrected EUSA after it had been dormant for
       quite some time. Assisted in re-drafting their constitution and getting it
       approved. Helped students to organize and promote themselves. Acted as design
       and technical consultant for their website.



Extra-University/Community Service

       Since 2006 (Fall) -
       Volunteer, Alzheimer Support Group, Aurora Resthaven. Contact: Beth Nuttall
       (905-727-1939).

       2006
       Educational consultant for Or Hadash Synagogue. Consultant in the design,
       implementation, assessment, and oversight of Jewish education program.
       Contact Mark Klady () or Cantor Marty Steinhouse (Or Hadash Synagogue
       17665 Leslie Street Unit 14, Newmarket Ontario L3Y 3E3. 905-898-2220
       info@orhadash.org).

       2002 – 2005
       Summers (June - Aug). AYSC (Aurora Youth Soccer Club) coach: girl's soccer.



Date C.V. Prepared

       1/25/2007
                                                                Paolucci   23




                                APPENDIX



Table of Contents for Digital Architecture




Version 4.0 July 15, 2002
Digital Architecture is the intellectual property of Learn Canada, The
University of Ottawa and the Canadian Federal Government (Canarie).

General Editors
Derek Allard (BA, MES) and Peter Paolucci (PhD)
                                                                                            Paolucci       24




       Much of today's technical training and pedagogical support for educators emerges from very specific
proprietary platforms such as WebCT, First Class, or Lotus Notes Quick Place. These training
environments or "tools," hold the promise of quick and/or easy results with little or no technical expertise
required, except in the Learnware platform itself. The focus of the pedagogy, therefore, tends to develop
mostly within the confines of what the Learnware's user interface can accomplish. Moreover, while
importing data into these environments is always easy, extracting data that has been created by these
specific platforms is highly problematic, and sometimes impossible.

          Digital Architecture is based on an entirely different set of premises. First, it is not a Learnware
tool and the pedagogy does not emerge from any specific Learnware. Instead, the content is based on open
standards and cross-platform design, so regardless of the current environment in which you are working, or
the environment to which or from which your institution migrates, your design will be consciously
constructed with a keen awareness of the pros and cons of using proprietary versus open standard solutions.
Second, Digital Architecture can be deployed in two versatile ways: either as theory that is applied, or as
practice that reaches out for theory just when it is needed. Educators will also have opportunities, if they
are so inclined, to acquire enough technical expertise in web-based languages (HTML, JavaScript, XML) to
speak intelligently to design teams and programmers about what they want.

          Digital Architecture (DA) is a new way of conceptualizing online content design that integrates ID
(Instructional Design), HCI (Human Computer Interaction), database design, project management,
communication theory, and the humanist disciplines of history, psychology, cultural studies, and political
economy. The course is based on the idea that there are eleven core areas of expertise that need to be
thoroughly understood if your online course is to be pedagogically sound. From these eleven areas, your
own course design can be improved, and even your institution's own particular Learnware platform can be
objectively evaluated and powerfully extended beyond its own inherent limitations.

          Funded by Canarie, and conceived and developed by Learn Canada and the University of Ottawa,
DA is not only a course (theory and applied), it is also a consulting and research service offered by the
Learn Canada consortium. Learn Canada is dedicated to advancement of all digitally based teaching and
learning through its consulting and research services. Comprised of humanist-oriented academics with high
levels of technological expertise and aptitude, Learn Canada employs and partners with university and
community college faculty, school teachers, technical trainers, web, graphics, and database programmers,
and other specialists for the primary purpose of developing sound pedagogy for the delivery of digital
content. Learn Canada is a private, for-profit company, wholly owned and operated by Megalooch Inc.
(Ontario Corporation #630123). Our expertise concentrates on digital education and training in the
academic, industrial, professional and corporate sectors. Learn Canada-AIC supports teaching and learning
through: research, development, writing, programming, hosting, consulting, and          evaluating learnware.
We can also help you to do these things for yourself. We build strategic alliances between universities,
community colleges, training institutions, industry and corporations. Finally, we help to locate and obtain
funding for the development of online learnware and oversee these projects through to their Digital
Architecture is the intellectual property of Canarie, The University of Ottawa, and Learn Canada.

The Content
Module 1: From Correspondence to the Internet
The learning objective of this module is to acquaint the educator with the historical evolution of distance
learning from the 18th century to now, and to survey the emergence of the profession of distance education.
What is Distance Education? How has it been defined historically, how is it currently being defined? Is
there a meaningful way to sort through the bewildering number of terms that describe the phenomenon of
remote learning (distance education, autonomous learning, self-directed learning, etc). Is there any
difference in these definitions? What are the issues as correspondence and in-class courses are transformed
into online content, and why or why not? How are issues of faculty IP (Intellectual Property) shaping the
evolution of DE? Finally, how do these developments impact the pedagogy of online teaching and
learning?
                                                                                              Paolucci   25



TOC (Table of Contents) Module 1

THE PROBLEM OF DEFINITION
CORRESPONDENCE
INDEPENDENT LEARNING
THE INDUSTRIAL-SCIENTIFIC MODEL
THE QUALITY MOVEMENT IN DISTANCE EDUCATION
TECHNOLOGY-BASED TEACHING AND LEARNING
THE ISSUE OF FACULTY WORKLOAD
INSTITUTIONAL CONSIDERATIONS
i. the imperative of leadership and commitment
ii. planning and implementation
iii. organization and process
iv. cost
DEPARTMENTAL AND FACULTY CONSIDERATIONS
i. performing your own environmental scan
ii. reconstructing teaching and learning
iii. defining new learning outcomes
iv. intellectual property, copyright and the new technology
SUMMARY
GLOSSARY
APPENDIX I: HISTORICAL SCHEMA OF POSTSECONDARY EDUCATION
APPENDIX II: AN INSTITUTIONAL AND INDIVIDUAL CHECK LIST FOR DEALING WITH THE
COPYRIGHT OF DIGITAL MATERIALS
QUESTIONS FOR CONSIDERATION

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Module 2: The Political Economy of Distance Education
This module explores the current financial crises in the education industry, and examines the impact of
consequent growth strategies on researchers and educators (funding, IP, copyright, universities in
competition, winning and losing stakeholders). Does the learnware shape the pedagogy or vice versa or
both? Should educational institutions develop and market their own learnware? This module also explores
the role of student demand (consumerism), the advantages of large amounts of financial capital and human
resources, and the intrusion of government and profit-driven corporations into the educational sector. Who
are the world educational leaders and how did they achieve their status? What battles are ahead, who stands
to win, and who stands to lose? As online education becomes increasingly globalized with larger and larger
consortia of public and private sector partners, how can smaller institutions survive, and how can online
content assist in that survival?

TOC (Table of Contents) Module 2

INTRODUCTION
THE POLITICIZATION OF DISTANCE AND OPEN LEARNING
TOWARDS A NEW PARADIGM OF FLEXIBLE LEARNING
THE DECLINE AND FALL OF DEDICATED DISTANCE EDUCATION
i. The Industrial Model is Obsolete
ii. Technology-based teaching and learning has changed
iii. The public sector is in retreat
CHARACTERISTICS AND IMPLICATIONS OF THE DUAL MODE SYSTEM
i. Public- private collaborations
ii. The issue of faculty workload
iii. Student support issues
iv. The imperative of research on technology-based teaching
HIGHER EDUCATION IN THE GLOBAL COMMUNITY
                                                                                              Paolucci      26


i. the current state of practice
ii. Where There's a Web There's a Way
iii. The Private Sector in Global Education
RECAP
THE PRAGMATICS OF COPYRIGHT AND IP (Intellectual Property)
Conventional Misconceptions About Competition
New Notions of Competition
GLOSSARY
FURTHER READINGS
Webography
Print
QUESTIONS FOR STUDY AND REVIEW

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Module 3: Under the Hood
It is a remarkable fact that so many students take online courses, and so many educators develop them,
without ever acquiring any basic working knowledge of the toolset they need, and more importantly, of the
networking environment in which they are working. This core module is a basic, lay person's introduction
to the technical workings of the Internet, and its learning objective is to show how knowledge of this
technology can reduce academic dishonesty, and how testing and online assessment can be made more
reliable. This knowledge will also help with research methods. As intimidating as the idea of networking
theory might be, these topics are all treated at a basic level, and will empower participants to talk to their
tech support team intelligently about online content. It is designed for non-technical people and it provides
the necessary essentials of networking, security and background, including the historical origins of the
Internet, Email, TCP/IP and other protocols including FTP and Gopher, security basics including
encryption, LAN's and WAN's including DNS and Routers, web languages, and other relevant topics.

TOC (Table of Contents) Module 3

Historical Introduction
Internet Culture Clash: Gift Economy vs Commercialization
How the Internet Grew
The Need for Standardization
LANS = Local Area Networks and WANS = Wide Area Networks
The Problem of Standardization
TCP/IP and How It Works (The Rules of TCP/IP and Domain names)
Some Corollaries of TCP/IP Part 1 for Teachers and Instructors
CONNECTIVITY
Addressing People and Addressing Machines
1. Authentication
Email Fraud
2. Data Security or Encryption
3. System Security (Network Procedures)
4. Virus Protection
EMAIL BASICS
MUDs and MOOs
Some exercises to try
Understanding Packets, Routers and DNS (Domain Servers)
Ping and Tracert
Gopher, FTP (File Transfer Protocol) and Telnet
WEB LANGUAGES
         HTML, CASCADING STYLE SHEETS, DYNAMIC HTML (DHTML), XML
JavaScript, Perl, CGI, Java
VRML and VRML Browsers
VRML CONTENT CREATION AND REFERENCES
                                                                                              Paolucci       27


PUSH TECHNOLOGY
ADAPTIVE TECHNOLOGIES
           Alternative Keyboards, On-screen Keyboards, Screen Magnifiers, Screen
           Readers, Voice Recognition:
GLOSSARY OF TERMS
ACTIVITIES, FURTHER READINGS, Print, Webography
-------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Module 4: Digital Media and Digitization Processes
Starting with a definition of digital and analogue, and then moving to history and theory of digitization, this
module looks at what digitization is, and how it works in various media such as sound/music, images,
video, and animations. Digital media is at the core of any enhanced online course, and helps educators to
reach different kinds of learners, not only those who are text-based, but auditory, visual and tactile learners.
Some consideration is given to hardware & software needed, acquisition methods available, bandwidth
issues, and media choices for format, storage and delivery. This is not a module that will teach you how to
scan, but it will empower you to choose between when to scan in high or low resolution, and will enable
you to design course environments that are suitable to the access speeds of your students. Some time is also
spent on an overview of authorware (Dreamweaver, Front Page, and so on). The learning objective of this
module, then, is to provide a knowledge base for the comprehension and use of digital media as an
instructional enhancement; much of this material will also be directly relevant to Module 10, Discipline
Specific Issues, where media-enriched environments are discussed. If you already use digital media in your
online work, the module will also encourage you to imagine new solutions that will enhance your content
even more.

TOC (Table of Contents) Module 4

Digital Media and Education
Analog Versus Digital
What Exactly is Digital Media?
How It Works
Images, Audio, Video
THE ADVANTAGES OF DIGITAL MEDIA
Adaptability, Transferability, Ease of Authorship
Encourages a Critical Re-Thinking of Conventional Methods of Publication
THE DISADVANTAGES OF DIGITAL MEDIA
Transferability, Accessibility, Bandwidth, Intimidation
HARDWARE AND SOFTWARE REQUIREMENTS
THE AUTHORING ENVIRONMENT
Removable (Portable) Storage, Fixed Storage, Other Peripherals
Authoring (software), Enhancing Software, Viewers
Stand Alone or Networked Presentation, Connection Speed
Browser Wars
A Brief History of Netscape Navigator versus Microsoft Internet Explorer
NETSCAPE 4.5 ++ : One Industry Standard
CONFIGURING FOR EMAIL
CONFIGURING NETSCAPE FOR NEWSGROUPS:
KEEPING THE CACHE CLEAR
CONFIGURING NETSCAPE FOR FTP
SCREEN REAL ESTATE
MSIE 4.x ++ : Another Industry Standard
OTHER BROWSERS, Special Features
ACTIVITIES
GLOSSARY
FURTHER READINGS
Print
Webography
                                                                                              Paolucci   28



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Module 5: Thinking of Online Content as Asynchronous Human Communication
The learning objective of this module is to encourage educators to build a wish-list of features that they
would like in their discussion forum, and to encourage them to think about the advantages and
disadvantages of building a learning environment within proprietary, bundled software (ex: Web CT) and
open standards solutions. What are the essentials of human communication? Does digitally mediated
asynchronous learning distort, preserve or improve face-to-face communication? How do email, voicemail
and v-mail alter human relationships in the virtual classroom and how can these technologies alter teaching
and learning? Do differences in brand name conferencing software applications have any impact on
pedagogy and on learning curves? What are some of the software options available to use? Are there any
true best practices out there? How can we stimulate discussions while simultaneously ensuring that
threaded discussions have appropriate subject headings that are easy to search?

TOC (Table of Contents) Module 5

Introduction
LISTSERVS
The Mechanics
Two Addresses
Listserv Netiquette
Some Pedagogical Suggestions
Educate your students about netiquette before getting online
THREADED DISCUSSIONS FORUMS AND NEWSGROUPS
USENET or NEWSGROUPS
Censoring Newsgroups, Websites and Other Information
MORE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN USENET AND LISTSERVS:
USER ADVANTAGES in Usenet
USENET through Dedicated Client Software
USENET (General)
USENET through Netscape & MSIE
Some Important Pedagogical Principles
Anonymous & Public Postings
THE WEBSITE AS AN ASYNCHRONOUS TOOL
BRINGING IT ALL TOGETHER
SOME LAST WORDS ON PEDAGOGY
GLOSSARY
ACTIVITIES
FURTHER READINGS
Webography
Print

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Module 6: Thinking of Online Content as Synchronous Communication
To what extent do IRC, text-chat, videoconferencing and other realtime audio/video exchanges alter human
relationships and to what extent do they re-structure the teaching and learning experience? In what ways
are these media the same as face-to-face, and in what ways are they different? What is synchronicity, and
can it really be achieved through videoconferencing? What kinds of videoconferencing technologies are
currently available, and what kind of pedagogy is needed when various participants in a session are each
connected at a different bandwidth and with a different protocol (ISDN vs the internet)? The learning
objectives of this chapter are: a) to provide the educator with a working knowledge of various technologies
and protocols in videoconferencing, and the appropriateness of their uses, b) to suggest some best and
worst practices c) simultaneously to show how this mode of communication is superior to other modes of
communication while challenging the idea that this is a "realtime" method of communication. Educators
                                                                                             Paolucci       29


will also become aware of how communication and culture liberate and limit each other through factors
like camera sightlines and zoom, and other such measures of "visual intimacy."

TOC (Table of Contents) Module 6

PREAMBLE
A Taxonomy of Videoconferencing Environments and Their Technologies
Introduction
The Front and Back End of Videoconferencing
THREE MODES OF VIDEOCONFERENCING FROM THE FRONT END:
Site, Point and Enterprise Videoconferencing
Point-to-Point and Multi-Point Webcasting or "Desktop webcasting"
Enterprise Videoconferencing
The Physicality of Videoconferencing
HARDWARE
TYPICAL SET-UP FOR SITE-BASED VIDEOCONFERENCING
TYPICAL SET-UP FOR POINT-BASED VIDEOCONFERENCING
THREE MODES OF VIDEOCONFERENCING FROM THE BACK END:
Site, and Point and Enterprise (Integrated) Videoconferencing
PART II: THEORETICAL AND CULTURAL ISSUES
The "Information Rich" Learning Situation
COUNTERSTRIKE AND THE POSSIBILITIES FOR VIDEOCONFERENCING
PART III: PRACTICALITIES
Instructor Class Room Checklist
Presentation Specs for Power Point etc:
Instructor Protocols for Multi-Site Delivery:
SOME SPECIFIC PRINCIPLES
Planning and Preparation, Tips for engaging and preparing students, The "Art" of Videoconferencing, The
Presentation
OTHER MODES OF SYNCHRONOUS COMMUNICATION
INTERNET-BASED AUDIO CONFERENCING AND TELEPHONE CONFERENCING
GLOSSARY, TECHNICALGLOSSARY, FURTHER READINGS
Webography, Print
Desktop Videoconferencing Products
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Module 7: Thinking of Online as a Community and a Culture
This module addresses three main problem areas in online learning, and treats them as cultural problems
that can be both responsive and/or resistant to technological solutions. Those areas are: intellectual
dishonesty (plagiarism), discrimination (sexism, racism, ageism, classism, denial of accessibility needs)
and the peculiar phenomenon whereby students show a reluctance to work together collaboratively in a
formal context, but an eagerness to work cooperatively outside the (real or virtual) classroom. Central to
this module will be the idea of accessibility and the new W3 (World Wide Web) Consortium's Accessibility
standards (Web Content Accessibility Guidelines 1.0) which have developed under the new Web Access
Initiative (WAI). The module argues that the online world automatically becomes a culture, whether the
instructor wants it to or not, and that often educators do not have much control over how that culture
evolves. Yet still, integrity, respect, and acceptance of difference can be instilled or permitted to grow. How
can educators achieve these goals? Should course design take these factors into consideration in design, and
if so, to what extent? Why do some educators think culture and human relationships are the essential part of
online learning, and why do others avoid this dimension entirely? What are the human and educational
costs of cultivating an online culture and what are the costs of not doing so? The learning outcome in this
module is to foster a deeper understanding of how human relationships and culture play an integral role in
learning.

TOC (Table of Contents) Module 7
                                                                                              Paolucci    30


INTRODUCTION
COUNTER CULTURES, SUBCULTURES AND CYBERCULTURES
TEACHING AND THE LOSS OF INTIMACY
DE-HUMANIZING LEARNING
THE CULTURE OF PLAGIARISM
  - Five Factors
PREVENTION AND DETECTION
The Best Non-Technical Solution to Ensure Academic (Dis)Honesty
DISCRIMINATION
Dealing Effectively With Sexism, Racism and Other Kinds of Difference through Inclusivity
ACCESSIBILITY
COLLABORATIVE WORK
Codicil: Overcoming the Culture of Individualism by Win-Win Collaboration
SUMMARY
GLOSSARY
FURTHER READINGS
Webography
Print

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Module 8: Thinking of Online Content as Research Activity
In what ways can your online course accelerate the research skills for your students, and contribute to your
own and others' research? Should a course be set up this way? Are there ethics involved? This module also
compares search engines and conventional library methods of classifying and cataloguing information, and
explores the relationship between research (how to find what you want) and promotion (getting found).
This module, therefore, considers the pervasive influence of both academic and commercial cultures on the
Internet, and shows how new technologies such as bots, agents and spiders need to be used alongside good
old-fashioned judgment and a systematic approach in order to improve search methods. The learning
objective of this module is to make educators aware of how amorphous the information is that is now
available on the Internet, and how problems of non-standardization can interfere in the search and
discovery of good information. The learning outcome also encourages faculty to see how these inherent
problems can become wonderfully useful pedagogical tools.


TOC (Table of Contents) Module 8

INTRODUCTION
THE WILD, WILD WEST
THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN RESEARCH AND PROMOTION
THE COMMERCIALIZATION OF THE ENGINES
AGENTS & CUSTOMIZABLE SEARCHES
DEVELOPING AND HONING SEARCH SKILLS
EVALUATING THE QUALITY OF INFORMATION
ASSIGNMENT DESIGN
AFTERWARD
ACTIVITIES
GLOSSARY
FURTHER READINGS
Webography
Print

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                                                                                              Paolucci      31


Module 9: Thinking of Online Content as Data
What is data? What is a database? Why are databases important? How does digitization impact the power
and effectiveness of databases? How can a course be improved (or worsened) if its students and their
activities are archived and subsequently searched and scrutinized as a database? What technologies can be
used for database storage and retrieval? How can database thinking improve assignments, and how can
database thinking be integrated into how you conceive of your own material? This session shows you how
to re-think your course as a project from two perspectives: first, that of the students and their assignments
by using Excel, and second, by discussing online databases in general, and in particular we shall look
closely at Portals, and the new database-driven language of the web, XML/XSL; we will also look at the
analysis of server logs. Finally, this module makes some distinctions between information (data) and
knowledge, and suggests some ways in which the one can be transformed into the other while
simultaneously showing that it is precisely the failure to transform data into knowledge that underlines
many of our pedagogical problems. The learning objective if this module is to encourage educators to
envision the power and the advantages of designing all online content and participants' activity as though it
were a database.

TOC (Table of Contents) Module 9

INTRODUCTION
MORE ABOUT DATA
USING EXCEL AS A GRADE SHEET
USING HTML TO CREATE A DATA INPUT FORM
USING ACCESS TO CREATE A DATA INPUT FORM
USING MS FRONT PAGE TO CREATE A DATA INPUT FORM
COLD FUSION AND DYNAMIC MODULARITY
INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN IN COLD FUSION: HIERARCHICAL, MODULAR DATA
ANALYZING WEBSITE TRAFFIC: NETWORK AND USAGE DATA
PORTALS & HARRY POTTER'S MAGICAL MIRROR: CUSTOMIZING DATA
INTRODUCING XML: A NEW WAY TO TALK ABOUT DATA
A STUDENT PERSPECTIVE
GLOSSARY
ACTIVITES
Basic Excel Skills
HTML Skills
Front Page Skills
XML Skills
FURTHER READINGS
Webography
Print

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Module 10: Discipline-Specific Issues
This module asks the question whether there are such things as general online design principles that apply
to courses in all subjects, or whether it makes more sense to consider online design from the particular
perspective of the unique needs of a single subject area. Using principles from ID (Instructional design) and
HCI (Human Computer Interface) as a starting point, the module then moves on to its main argument.
Obviously some dialectical thinking is needed here, so the module is divided into three large sections: the
first section discusses the generic features and guiding principles that are essential to all online course
design. The second section categorizes subject areas by the design requirements of their content (i.e.
professional training, memory-based courses, problem-solving courses, etc. etc.). We will also explore
which conditions might be ideal for the use of realtime gaming and VRML immersion as viable teaching
methods. The Third section provides a synopsis of the major philosophical approaches to leaning
(cognitive, hermeneutical etc. etc.). Ultimately, the module asks how, if at all, these three different sets of
principles can be applied together to produce a better-designed course environment or to critique an
existing one. Thus the learning outcome for this module then, is to encourage educators to articulate as
                                                                                              Paolucci     32


clearly as they can, before designing and after completing the design, what their principles are, and then to
determine whether or not these principles were followed, or if they ever could be followed with any
meaningful outcome.

TOC (Table of Contents) Module 10

INTRODUCTION
RECAP
TAXONOMIC ANALYSIS OF LEARNING BEHAVIORS
MAJOR THEORIES
Andragogy: not pedagogy.
Behaviorism
Cognitivism
Cognitive Dissonance Theory
Constructivism
Elaboration Theory
Experiential Learning
Hermeneutics
Project-Based Learning
Summary
GLOSSARY
ACTIVITIES
FURTHER READINGS
Webography
Print

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Module 11: Thinking of Online Content as a Project
This session shows you how to re-think your course or your online material as a project, not only from the
perspective of pedagogy and assignment design, but also from that of creating and managing your own time
and intellectual property. We will explore ways to scrutinize your organizational environment & other
institutions, getting funding, deploying resources, deciding how much to do yourself and how much to sub-
contract, planning, and developing materials in stages. What are some effective (and ineffective) methods
of measuring progress or success? Microsoft Project is also discussed as useful tool in planning and
managing your online development.


TOC (Table of Contents) Module 11

INTRODUCTION
THE INSTRUCTOR-CENTRIC (TEACHING) PERSPECTIVE
ONLINE DESIGN AND DEVELOPMENT
MODES AND METHODS OF DELIVERY
HOW ONLINE CONTENT IS USUALLY DEVELOPED, DESIGNED & DELIVERED
INDUSTRIAL, EGALITARIAN, AND ENTREPRENEURIAL PARADIGMS
DEVELOPMENTAL STIMULII
THE FIVE STAGES OF A PROJECT
Stage I: Preparation
Stage II: Planning
Stage III: Implementation (Design)
Stage IV: Delivery
Stage V: Evaluation
THE STUDENT-CENTRIC (LEARNING) PERSPECTIVE
A Word About Microsoft's Project
A Word About Front Page
                                                                                     Paolucci   33


GLOSSARY
FURTHER READINGS
Webography
Problem-Based/Project-Based Learning (PBL): A Select Bibliography
Problem-Based Learning: An Excerpt from the Maricopa Center for Learning and Instruction
Print

								
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