Guinea Bissau - Rural Development Institutional Support by uoy85953

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									                AFRICAN DEVELOPMENT BANK GROUP




                             GUINEA-BISSAU

    RURAL DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT PROJECT
                        (PAIDR)

                          SAP N°: P-GW-AB0-001
                          Grant N°: 2100155000153




                   PROJECT COMPLETION REPORT




Agriculture and Agro-Industry Department (OSAN)     January 2008
                                          TABLE OF CONTENTS


ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS ........................................................................... ii
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ...................................................................................................iii
BASIC PROJECT DATA ...................................................................................................... vi
 PROJECT LOGICAL FRAMEWORK MATRIX .......................................................... x
I INTRODUCTION ............................................................................................................. 1
II. PROJECT OBJECTIVES AND FORMULATION .................................................... 1
   2.1 Objectives ....................................................................................................1
   2.2 Formulation .................................................................................................2
III. PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION .................................................................................. 2
   3.1 Grant Effectiveness and Project Start-up ....................................................2
   3.2 Modifications ..............................................................................................3
   3.3 Implementation Schedule............................................................................4
   3.4 Reporting .....................................................................................................5
   3.5 Procurement.................................................................................................5
   3.6 Project Cost, Financing Sources and Disbursements..................................6
IV PROJECT PERFORMANCE ....................................................................................... 7
   4.1 Operational Performance.............................................................................7
     4.1.1 Institution Building...............................................................................7
     4.1.2 Training ................................................................................................9
     4.1.3 Project Management...........................................................................11
   4.2 Project Institutional Performance..............................................................12
   4.3 Performance of Service Providers.............................................................12
   4.4 Economic Performance .............................................................................13
V SOCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT ..................................................... 13
   5.1 Social and Institutional Impact..................................................................13
   5.2 Impact on Women’s Advancement...........................................................13
   5.3 Impact on the Environment .......................................................................14
VI PROJECT VIABILITY AND SUSTAINABILITY .................................................. 14
VII PERFORMANCE OF THE BANK AND THE BORROWER........................... 15
   7.1 Bank’ Performance....................................................................................15
   7.2 Borrower’s Performance ...........................................................................15
VIII      OVERALL PERFORMANCE AND RATING ................................................. 16
IX CONCLUSIONS, LESSONS LEARNT AND RECOMMENDATIONS 16
   9.1 Conclusions ...............................................................................................16
   9.2 Lessons Learnt...........................................................................................16
   9.3 Recommendations .....................................................................................17
                                         LIST OF TABLES

                                                                                                  Page

Table 3.1      Project Implementation Schedule                                                         5
Table 3.2      Costs at Appraisal and Actual Project Expenditure by Financing
               Source and Currency Type (in UA million)                                                6
Table 3.3      Estimated and Actual Expenditure by Component (in UA million)                           6
Table 3.4      Trend of Actual TAF/ADF Disbursement in UA 1000                                         7
Table 7.1      Trend of the Government’s Contributions to the National Counterpart Fund
               (in CFAF million)                                                                     15


                                        LIST OF ANNEXES
                                                                                              No. of
                                                                                              Pages

Annex 1         Geographical Map of Guinea Bissau                                                      1
Annex 2         Schedule of Estimated Expenditure by Component and Financing Source at
                  Appraisal                                                                            1
Annex 2.1       Expenditure Breakdown by Financing Source and Currency Type                            1
Annex 2.2       Expenditure Schedule by Component and by Year (UA million)                             1
Annex 2.3       Expenditure Schedule by Financing Source                                               1
Annex 3         Actual Expenditure by Component and Financing Source
Annex 3.1       Trend of Actual Expenditure by Year and Component in UA million                        1
Annex 3.2       Actual Financing Sources by Currency Type in CFAF                                      1
Annex 4         Trend of Actual Disbursement by Financing Source                                       1
Annex 4.1       Actual ADF/TAF Disbursement Schedule in UA                                             1
Annex 4.2       Trend of Actual Disbursements by Year and Financing Source in
                UA million
Annex 5         Summary of Training Activities Conducted Under the PAIDR                               2
Annex 6         Actual Distribution Plan of Material and Equipment                                     1
Annex 7         List and Assignment of Goods Provided by the PAIDR (Actual and
                at Closure)                                                                            3
Annex 8         Draft Organization Chart of the MADR                                                   1
Annex 9         Overall Performance and Ratings                                                        4
Annex 10        Performance of Service Providers                                                       1
Annex 11        List and Cost of Ongoing or Recently Completed Projects
                (since 2004) by Donor in the Agricultural Sector                                       1
Annex 12        Matrix of Recommendations and Follow-up Measures                                       2
Annex 13        List of Documents Consulted                                                            1


This report was prepared by Mr. Mamadou Lamine KANE, Agricultural Economist in OSAN.2 and a
consultant specialized in Institutional Development, following their mission to Guinea-Bissau from 13 to
26 September 2007. Further information on this document may be obtained from the authors of the
report or from Mr. D. KEITA, Acting Division Manager, OSAN.2 (Ext. 2086) or from Mr. Aly ABOU-
SABAA, Director OSAN (Ext.: 2037).
____________________________________________________________________________
                                         FISCAL YEAR

                                    1 January – 31 December

                            CURRENCIES AND MEASURES

                                 Currency Unit: CFA Francs (CFAF)

                      At Appraisal (February 2001)              At Completion (2006)
      UA 1            CFAF 916.06                               749.2


                       Trend of Annual Average Exchange Rate

  Year         2000         2001           2002        2003    2004           2005             2006
CFAF/UA      895.2        918.4          934.6       850.4    771.8          747.9     749.2
                                  ii


               ACRONYMS AND ABBREVIATIONS

ADB      African Development Bank
ADF      African Development Fund
AMAE     Women’s Associations for Economic Activities
ANAG     National Association of Guinea-Bissau Farmers
BAO      Bank of West Africa
CFAF     Currency of the African Financial Community
DAF      Directorate of Administration and Finance
DEA      Directorate of Agricultural Statistics
DER      Rural Engineering Division
DGAPAP   Directorate-General of Plant and Animal Production
DGF      Directorate-General of Forestry
DGPA     Directorate-General of Agricultural Planning (ex-GAPLA)
DPV      Plant Protection Division
GM       Office of the Minister
IMS      Information Management System
INPA     National Agricultural Research Institute
LPDA     Agricultural Development Policy Letter
MADR     Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development
MDG      Millennium Development Goals
NGO      Non-Governmental Organization
PAIDR    Rural Development Institutional Support Project
PMT      Project Management Team
PRESAR   Agricultural and Rural Sector Rehabilitation Project
SAPe     Animal Production Support Service
SAPr     Producer Support Service
SAPV     Plant Production Support Service
SDC      Documentation and Communication Service
SESP     Studies and Policy Monitoring Service
SFCE     Société Française de Commerce Extérieur [French
TAF      Technical Assistance Fund
UA       Unit of Account
                                              iii



                                EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

1.         Introduction. The Rural Development Institutional Support Project (PAIDR) was
in keeping with the Guinea-Bissau Government’s policy aimed at reducing the institutional
constraints to promoting competitive, sustainable and equitable agricultural and rural
development across the country. This project was designed to support the Government’s
drive to build the institutional capacity of the Administration and Non-Governmental
Organizations (NGOs) responsible for rural development.

2.          Project Objectives and Formulation. The project’s sector goal was to reduce
poverty especially in rural areas. Its specific objective was to contribute to building the
institutional capacity of the Administration and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs)
with a view to improving the services provided to rural dwellers. The principal expected
outcomes were: (i) institutional capacity of the key services of the Ministry of Agriculture
and Rural Development (MADR) strengthened; (ii) training of 205 MADR professional staff
and 110 heads of NGOs, while improving their service delivery; (iii) preparation and
implementation of an administrative procedures and regulations manual, as well as an
administration and organizational communication manual.

3.          Project Implementation. The grant became effective on 23 March 2002, 5
months behind the estimated schedule and 6 months after the date of signature. This delay
was due to administrative delays by the Borrower in fulfilling some of the grant agreement
conditions, as well as the Bank’s relatively long delay in approving them. Project activities
only started up on 1 January 2003, about 6 months after the effective date and 15 months
after the date the agreement was signed. Start-up difficulties were related to the project
management team’s unfamiliarity with implementation procedures in 2002 and 2003. The
initial project implementation period was 3 years, but it was implemented in 3 years and 5
months or a time overrun of about 5 months. This delay is acceptable if account is taken of
the six months taken by the Government to replace the first training expert who resigned in
February for personal reasons. In line with Paragraph 5.6.1 of the Appraisal Report and
according to the specifications set out for the technical assistants, all the reports were
prepared within the prescribed timeframes and properly archived by the project management
unit, were consistent with related Bank Guidelines, and contained information that explained
the project’s progress and permitted an assessment of its outcomes. The project management
team complied with all the procurement provisions, submitting them for the Bank’s no-
objection prior to the launching of bidding and award of the related contracts. Project cost at
appraisal was estimated at UA 1.38 million comprising UA 1.10 million from the TAF grant
(i.e. 80% of the project cost) and UA 0.28 million for the Government’s counterpart funds (or
the remaining 20%). Actual expenses under the project amounted to UA 1.16 million
comprising UA 1.099 million on the ADF grant (or 99.9% of the estimated amount) and the
UA 0.064 million equivalent of the national counterpart funds (representing 22.8% of the
estimated amount).

4.         Project Performance. Operational Performance. The organization chart, the
organic law and implementing texts for the restructuring of the Ministry of Agriculture and
Rural Development (MADR) were prepared and validated in a participatory manner
(completion level: 100%); the training plan for MADR professional staff and the NGOs was
prepared and implemented following ADB approval (completion level: 100%); the MADR’s
central and regional structures were provided with the planned equipment and material, in
                                              iv


accordance with ADB rules and procedures (completion level: 100%); the training sessions
organized benefited 589 staff (457 from the MADR and 132 from NGOs) including 133
women, making 23% of the total, out of an initial objective of 10% (completion level: 187%
of the initial objective, and 114% of the revised objective); 29 training sessions were
organized in Guinea Bissau for 544 staff (completion level: 138% of the initial objective and
100% of the revised objective); 14 training sessions abroad were organized for 26 trainees
(completion level: 58% of the initial objective and 152% of the revised objective); finally,
study tours in the sub-region were conducted for 19 technicians (completion level: 17% of the
initial objective, and 100% of the revised objective).

            Institutional Performance: Pursuant to the provisions of the Memorandum of
Understanding signed on 21 September 2001, a Project Management Team (EGP) and
Steering Committee in charge of project implementation were put in place. Although the
management team was effective in implementing the project, especially since 2004, the
Steering Committee was never operational. The project’s financial implementation rate was
84%, because of the Government’s low national counterpart fund contribution (22%); as for
the Bank, it disbursed 99.9%. In terms of disbursement of the ADF/TAF grant, the project’s
financial performance was highly satisfactory. For its financial management, in keeping with
the provisions of the Memorandum of Understanding, a special account No. 003489010016
was opened for the project in the Bank of West Africa (BAO) and was operated under two
signatures, those of the coordinator and the accountant. The accounts of all project financial
years were audited. The 2003 and 2004 financial years were audited in March 2005, the audit
of the 2005 financial year was conducted in March 2006, and that of the 2006 financial year
in May 2007. Regarding activity monitoring, information collected and processed by the
Project Management Unit provided a good database on the main activities conducted under
the project and led to a better understanding of its progress.

            Performance of Service Providers: In all, about twenty foreign and national
service providers took part in the implementation of project activities including three
suppliers, three project technical assistants and over ten consulting trainers. Overall, the
various services were satisfactory and met the expectations of the beneficiaries and the
specifications duly assigned to the service providers.

5.         Social and Environmental Impacts. In terms of gender promotion, 23% of those
who benefited from training courses were women compared to an initial objective of 10%.
The project did not have any negative environmental impact.

6.          Project Viability and Sustainability. The participatory approach used by the
PAIDR is a viability factor. It created greater involvement of the main beneficiaries in the
project’s implementation and a better match between beneficiary needs and project objectives
and activities. However, the sustainability of project actions will depend on the Government’s
capacity not only to make sure that outreach services operate so as to ensure workers take full
advantage of the training received, but also to defray recurrent expenses for equipment
provided under the project, and adopt and implement the restructuring plan drawn up in the
context of the project.

7.         Performance of the Bank and the Borrower. The Bank’s intervention was not
only timely given the project’s goal of reducing poverty, but it was satisfactory from the
standpoints of the regularity and relevance of the recommendations made by the supervision
missions, the reasonable timeframes for no-objection and disbursement, compared to the
                                                v


overall achievements which were positive and effective; however, support for the grant’s
entry into force was slow, instructions regarding preparation of the administrative and
financial procedures manual at project start-up were not given and the supervision missions
did not include an institutional organization expert. The Government, for its part, did not
honour its commitment to pay the national counterpart project funds, although it fulfilled all
the other conditions precedent to the project’s effectiveness.

8.          Overall Performance. The project’s overall performance was satisfactory, with
an average rating of 3 out of 4 marks, that is, an overall satisfaction rate of 75%, detailed as
follows: (i) implementation performance, 3.5 out of 4; (ii) Bank performance, 3 out of 4; (iii)
performance of outcomes, 2.5 out of 4.

9.          Conclusions, Lessons Learnt and Recommendations: Project implementation
was satisfactory overall. The project’s physical implementation rate and the grant’s financial
execution were 100% and 99.9%, respectively. According to the project beneficiaries,
activities for training staff of the Administration and NGOs and for providing the MADR
structures with more adequate working materials and resources, were positive albeit
insufficient. However, the fact that the organization chart and the project’s organic law
prepared in the context of the project were not adopted and applied, and because the
Government failed to pay national counterpart funds, could wipe out the PAIDR’s
achievements, and are indicators that the Government performed poorly.

            The principal lessons learnt are: (i) ensuring the involvement of the project’s
steering committee’s members is key to their motivation if the project is to be adequately
supervised; (ii) the need for a suitable procedures manual and the need to build the capacity
of the project management team members at the start-up of any project speeds up
implementation of project activities and facilitates auditing of accounts thereof; (iii) a regular
audit of accounts not later than 6 months following the end of every financial year, and
careful Bank reviews of the reports written by the external auditors could contribute to a
better management of project accounts; (iv) minimizing the Government’s cash contribution
to the benefit of contributions in kind could prevent bottlenecks in project implementation
when the Government fails to deliver; (v) provision for support measures required to
capitalize on and sustain actions launched in the context of any institution building project,
and for implementation of a mechanism to monitor-evaluate project impacts are prerequisites
to ensure sustainability and to enable an assessment of their social and economic impacts.
Therefore, it is recommended to:

            Guinea-Bissau to: (i) pay the balance of the national counterpart funds needed to
settle salary arrears owed to national staff, and to maintain the material goods provided under
the project; (ii) adopt and see to the application of the draft organic law, as well as its
implementing texts prepared under the PAIDR; (iii) take stock annually of the equipment and
material provided by the PAIDR and ensure that they are maintained regularly; and (iv)
prepare procedures and PAIDR impact indicators and takes measures to monitor them.

          The Bank to: (i) instruct the Government to settle the national counterpart funds
and adopt and apply the provisions of the organic law restructuring the Ministry; and (ii)
ensure monitoring and capitalization of the PAIDR’s achievements under the supervision of
the implementation of the Agricultural and Rural Sector Rehabilitation Project (PRESAR)
                                                        vi


                                         BASIC PROJECT DATA
PRELIMINARY DATA
1.             Country                       :        Republic of Guinea-Bissau
2.             Project Name                  :        Rural Development Institutional Support
3.             Project Number                :        P-GW-ABO-001
3.             Grant No. (ADB)               :        2100155000153
4.             Borrower                      :        Government of Guinea-Bissau
5.             Beneficiary                   :        Administration and NGOs in charge of
                                                      rural development
6.             Executing Agency              :        Ministry of Agriculture and Rural
                                                      Development
A.             ADF GRANT DATA1
                     Items                          At Appraisal                 Actual at Completion
    1.     Amount (UA million)                      1.100                        1.099
    2.     Date Approved                            May 2001                     14 June 2001
    3.     Date Signed                              May to July                  21 September 2001
    4.     Date of Effectiveness                    Sept. to Oct 2001            23 March 2002

B.             PROJECT DATA                                     Estimate at             Actual Fig.
                                                                Appraisal
1.             Total Cost (UA million):                         1.38                    1.163
2.             Financing Plan (UA million)
                               Estimates at Appraisal               Actual Figures at Completion      Slippage
Financing Sources         F.E.        Local           Total        F.E.       Local        Total
                                    Currency                                 Currency
ADF/TAF                   0.91         0.19           1.10        1.099        0.19        1.099        + 0.001
Government                0.00         0.28           0.28        0.00        0.064        0.064        + 0.216
Total                     0.91         0.47           1.38        1.099       0.064        1.16         + 0.22

3.             Effective date of first disbursement                     :       14 May 2003
4.             Effective date of last disbursement                      :       10 April 2007
5.             Start-up of Project implementation activities            :       1January 2003
6.             Project implementation completion date                   :       6 June 2006

C.             PERFORMANCE INDICATORS

1              Financial balance                               :       0.1%
2.             Time overrun/underrun
               -       Slippage on effectiveness                       :       + 4 months, 23 days
               -       Slippage on start-up of activities      :       + 13 months
               -       Slippage on completion date             :       +17 months, 6 days
               -       Slippage on last disbursement           :       + 15 months 10 days
               -       Number of extensions of deadline
                       for last disbursement                   :       2
3.             Project implementation status                   :       Completed
4.             List of verifiable indicators and completion levels (expressed in %)

1
    This concerns a grant financed with resources of the Fund
                                                   vii



              -       Organization chart, organic law and implementing texts for the
                      restructuring of the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development
                      (MADR) prepared and validated in a participatory manner (completion
                      level: 100 %);

              -       Training plan for staff of the MADR and NGOs prepared and implemented
                      following ADB approval (completion level: 100 %);

              -       Central and regional structures of the MADR provided with the planned
                      equipment and material, in accordance with ADB rules and procedures
                      (completion level: 100%);

              -       Training sessions organized for 589 staff (457 from the MADR and 132
                      from NGOs) including 133 women or 23% of the total for an initial
                      objective of 10% (completion level: 187% of the initial objective and
                      114% of the revised objective);

              -       29 training sessions in Guinea-Bissau, for 544 staff (completion level:
                      138% of the initial objective and 100% of the revised objective);

              -       14 training courses abroad organized for 26 trainees (completion level:
                      58% of the initial objective and 152% of the revised objective); and

              -       5 study tours in the sub-region for 19 technicians (completion level: 17%
                      of the initial objective and 100% of the revised objective);

                                                         Unsatisfactory   Average    Satisfactory
5.   Institutional Performance                                                             x

6.   Performance of suppliers                            Unsatisfactory   Average    Satisfactory
     Société Française de Commerce Européen (S.F.C.E)                                      x
     MENCOR LDA IMPORT ET EXPORT                                                           x
     INFORGEST Lda.                                                                        x

7.   Consultants (trainers)                              Unsatisfactory   Average    Satisfactory
     SETYM INTERNATIONAL                                                                   x
     APRODEL                                                                               x
     Other individual consultants (20 in number)                                           x

8.   Technical assistants of BDPA                        Unsatisfactory   Average    Satisfactory
     Training expert                                                                       x
     Expert in administrative organization                                                 x
     Legal expert                                                           X
                                                               viii


          D.           MISSIONS

                   Number                                                                                     Number of staff/days
   Nature of                                                       Number of          Composition of
                      of              Date of Missions                                                       effectively allocated to
    Mission                                                         Persons             Missions
                   Missions                                                                                  the project in the field
Appraisal             1       05-14/02/01                                 1       Agro-economist                          10
Portfolio Review      1       05-18/05/02                                 1       Fisheries expert                         2
                                                                                  Agro-economist                          10
                              24/11 to 4/12/02                            2
                                                                                  Fisheries expert                         1
                                                                                  Fisheries expert                         1
                                                                          2
                              13 to 26/8/03 and 4 to 12/9/03                      Agro-economist                           8
                              5 to 16/4/04                                1       Agro-economist                           5
                                                                                  Agro-economist                           3
                              4 to 12/11/04                               3       Agricultural Economist                   6
                                                                                  Fisheries expert                         1
Supervisions          9
                                                                                  Agricultural Economist                   5
                              10 to 27/1/05                               2
                                                                                  Livestock expert                         1
                              10 to 19/6/05                               1       Fisheries expert                         2
                                                                                  Fisheries expert                         3
                                                                          2
                              22/1 to 10/02/06 and 15 to 27/1/06                  Financial Analyst                       4
                                                                                  Agricultural Economist                   5
                              15 to 27/12/06                              1
                                                                                  Procurement Specialist                   2
                              12-18/3/06                                  1       Disbursement Specialist                  2
                                                 S/total                                                                  59
                                                                                  Rural Economist                         11
PCR Preparation       1       13 to 26/9/07                               2       Consulting Institutional
                                                                                  Development Specialist                  14
                                                 S/total                                                                  25
                                                 Total                                                                    96

          E.           ADB DISBURSEMENTS

          1.           Slippage on grant effectiveness                :        12 months 17 days

          2.           Trend of Grant Amount in UA million

               Amount at          Amount         Actual amount         Amount        Disbursement rate       Unutilized
               appraisal         cancelled                            disbursed                               balance
                 1.10                0                 1.10             1.099               99.9               0.001
                                                         ix


          F.      MAIN CONTRACTS

                                                                                       Amounts
                                                              Reference and Contract            Implementation
           Description               Service Providers                                 in CFAF
                                                                 Signature Dates                  Status (%)
                                                                                        million
Provision of technical assistance                        ICB No. 01/2003;
services                             BDPA                05/September/2003             224.993       100
                                                         ICB No. 02/2003-Lot 1;
Provision of rolling stock           S.F.C.E.            02/June/2004                  192.809       100
                                                         ICB nº 02/2003-Lot 2;
Provision of office furniture        MENCOR Lda          02/June/2004                   20.632       100
Provision of IT material and                             ICB nº 01/2004-Lot 1;
office equipment                     INFORGEST Lda       11/November/2004               37.073       100
Provision of generator sets, air                         ICB nº 01/2004-Lot 2;
conditioners and fans                S.F.C.E.            22/November/2004               43.226       100
Provision of training courses
abroad for technicians of the        SETYM               ICB nº 02/2004;
MADR                                 INTERNATIONAL       11/November/2004               55.239       100
Provision of services for auditing
accounts of the 2003 and 2004        AMAICO
financial years                      INTERNATIONAL       ICB nº 3/2004; 10/02/2005      9.734        100
                                                                                        x


                                                                      PROJECT
                                                             LOGICAL FRAMEWORK MATRIX

              Narrative Summary        Objectively Verifiable Indicators                                                    Means of Verification        Assumptions
                                       Estimates at appraisal           Outputs
              Contribute to poverty    Level of improvement of Improvement of the productivity rate in the                  Findings of the survey on    The Government provides
              reduction, especially    productivity in the agricultural agricultural sector and better rural incomes        project impacts on the       adequate working means to
Sector Goal   in the rural areas.      sector and higher rural                                                              living conditions and        the    producer    supervision
                                       incomes.                                                                             incomes of grassroots        structures.    The resources
                                                                        Organization and management capacity level of       organizations.               earmarked under the project
                                       Level of organizational and grassroots organizations.                                                             were handed over to the
                                       management capacity building                                                                                      structures concerned.
                                       of grassroots organizations.
              Contribute          to   The key services of the Level of the services offered by staff of the                Follow-up survey of the      Capacity of the Government to
              building           the   Administration are equipped, Administration and NGOs.                                direct beneficiaries.        provide the structures with
              institutional capacity   their staff trained and the                                                                                       operational resources.   The
              of the Administration    Ministry     of     Agriculture                                                      Survey of grassroots         means provided for operations
Project       and              Non-    restructured. The skills of the                                                      organizations backed by      are not adequate.
Objectives    Governmental             NGOs are strengthened.                                                               the     direct    project
              Organizations with a                                                                                          beneficiaries.               The      impact      monitoring
              view to improving                                                                                                                          mechanism is put in place.
              the services made                                                                                                                          The monitoring mechanism is
              available to the rural                                                                                                                     strengthened      within     the
              populations.                                                                                                                               framework of the PRESAR
                                                                                                                                                         project       and       through
                                                                                                                                                         coordination      of     various
                                                                                                                                                         ongoing agricultural sector
                                                                                                                                                         projects.
              Put in place an          Prepare and implement a         Organization chart and organic law for the           Activity reports.            The organic law is adopted
              organizational           procedures and administrative   restructuring of the MADR prepared and validated                                  and      applied     by      the
              administration and       procedures manual.              in a participatory manner (implementation rate:      Government Completion        Government. This law is yet
              communication                                            100%)                                                Report                       to be applied, although the
              system.                  Prepare and implement an                                                                                          Government        has      made
                                       administration          and     8 Implementing texts in the form of bills prepared   Specific report of the       commitments.
                                       organizational communication    and endorsed (implementation rate: 100%)             technical        assistant
                                       system manual.                                                                       responsible    for     the
                                                                                                                            administrative
                                                                                             xi

            Narrative Summary         Objectively Verifiable Indicators                                                           Means of Verification        Assumptions
                                      Estimates at appraisal          Outputs
                                                                                                                                  organization component.
            Provide the MADR          Strengthen      the     technical    - Central and regional structures of the MADR          Quarterly and annual         The      Government     plans
Outcomes/   with the material         capacity     of      the       key   provided with the projected equipment and              activity reports.            adequate means to ensure that
Actions     means needed for its      departments of the Ministry of       materials, in keeping with ADB rules and                                            equipment and materials are in
            smooth running.           Agriculture       and        Rural   procedures (implementation rate: 100%);                Government     completion    proper working order. This
                                      Development (MADR) by                                                                       report.                      recommendation is yet to be
                                      providing them with vehicles,                                                                                            applied.
                                      motorbikes, office hardware
                                      and    software       such      as
                                      computers,         photocopiers,
                                      generator sets, etc.
            Upgrade the skills of     Draw      up       a      training   - Programme to train staff of the MADR and             Quarterly and       annual
            the staff of the          programme.                           NGOs prepared and implemented following ADB            activity reports.
            Administration and                                             approval (completion level: 100%);
            NGOs with a view to       Train 315 staff including 205         589 staff trained (457 from the MADR and 132          Government     completion
            improving          the    professional staff of the            from NGOs) including 133 women or 23% of the           report.
            services they provide.    Administration and 110 heads         total for an initial objective of 10%
                                      of NGOs, including 10%               (implementation rate: 187% of the initial objective    Special report by the
                                      women.                               and 114% of the revised objective);                    technical assistant in
                                                                           - 29 training sessions in Guinea Bissau, for 544       charge of the training
                                      Organize 21 training sessions        staff (completion level: 138% of initial objective     component.
                                      in Guinea- Bissau                    and 100% of the revised objective);
                                                                           - 14 training courses abroad organized for 26
                                                                           trainees (completion level: 58% of the initial
                                      Organize 45 short trips for          objective and 152% of the revised objective); and
                                      scholarship holders.                 - 5 study tours in the sub-region for 19 technicians
                                                                           (completion level: 17% of the initial objective and
                                                                           100% of the revised objective);
                                      Organize 29 study tours
Resources   - Institution building-   UA 0.86 million                      UA 0.67 million                                        Government’s completion
            - Training                                                                                                            report.
            - Project management      UA 0.24 million                      UA 0.27 million                                        Audit    reports    ADB
                                      UA 0.28 million                      UA 0.22 million                                        disbursement table.
            Total
                                      1.38                                 1.16
I.         INTRODUCTION

1.1        The Rural Development Institutional Support Project (PAIDR), the subject of this
completion report, is in line with the Government of Guinea Bissau’s policy aimed at
reducing the institutional constraints on the promotion of competitive, sustainable and
equitable agricultural and rural development in all the country’s regions.

1.2         Indeed, Guinea Bissau is primarily an agricultural country with significant a
significant, albeit relatively untapped potential in terms of natural resources. The main
institutional constraints identified concern: (i) the weak capacity to define sector priorities, to
monitor and coordinate actions carried out in the sector; (ii) shortage of qualified human
resources and adequate physical resources; (iii) virtual inexistence of administrative regulations
and organizational procedures; and (iv) weakness of the support-advisory mechanism to
promote producer organizations. Accordingly, after the adoption of the Agricultural Policy
Letter, the Bank Group backed the Government of Guinea-Bissau’s drive to address this major
constraint by initiating a project to build the institutional capacities of the Administration and
non-governmental organizations (NGOs) responsible for in rural development, with a view to
contributing sustainably to the country’s agricultural development.

1.3         The project’s sector goal is in keeping with the Government’s macro-economic
policy which targets poverty reduction especially in rural areas, better food security and the
attainment of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). It is also consistent with the Bank
Group’s operations strategy which gives priority to poverty reduction through institutional
capacity building in favour of agriculture, Guinea Bissau’s lead economic activity and source of
its economic growth. The project covers the whole country and the direct beneficiaries are
services supervised by the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MADR) and NGOs
involved in rural areas.

1.4        This completion report was prepared following a mission to Guinea-Bissau
involving discussions with all stakeholders engaged in the project’s implementation and
consultation of all the documentation available on the project’s formulation and
implementation. In keeping with the Bank’s current format, it is structured as follows:

           -       Project Objectives and Formulation
           -       Project Implementation
           -       Project Performance
           -       Social and Environmental Impacts
           -       Project Viability and Sustainability
           -       Performance of the Bank and Borrower
           -       Overall Performance and Rating
           -       Conclusions, Lessons Learnt and Recommendations

II.        PROJECT OBJECTIVES AND FORMULATION

2.1        Objectives

2.1.1      The project’s sector goal was to reduce poverty especially in rural areas where the
poverty rate is the highest, according to studies available. Its specific objective was to help
build the institutional capacity of the Administration and the Non-Governmental
Organizations (NGOs) with a view to improving service delivery to rural dwellers.
                                               2



2.1.2       The main expected outcomes are: (i) institutional capacity building of the key
services of the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Development (MADR); (ii) training of 205
professional staff of the MADR and 110 heads of NGOs and improving their service
delivery; and (iii) preparation and application of a procedures and administrative regulations
manual and an administration and organizational communications system manual.

2.1.3       To attain such an objective and achieve the expected outcomes, the following
three project components were implemented: (i) institutional capacity building; (ii) training;
and (iii) project management.

2.2        Formulation

2.2.1        The project’s formulation process was initiated following submission of a financing
request by the Government of the Republic of Guinea-Bissau to the Bank Group, when the
armed conflict came to a halt in 1999; the purpose of the request was to address persistent
institutional constraints compounded by the conflict in question, which started in 1998 and
which was an obstacle to the country’s agricultural development. The Bank’s response to the
request was positive and it fielded a preparation and appraisal mission to Guinea-Bissau from 5
to 14 February 2001. Subsequent to that mission, the project’s appraisal report was prepared in
April 2001 and approved by the Bank’s Board of Directors on 14th June 2001, following which,
the grant agreement was signed on 21 September 2001.

2.2.2       In order to ensure satisfactory implementation of the project and guarantee its
ownership by the direct beneficiaries, the project was prepared and appraised with the
involvement and active participation of all stakeholders, the Government, top officials from
the Ministry of Agriculture, development partners resident in the country, some heads of
NGOs and representatives of farmer organizations. The contributions of these lead players
were collected at meetings held during the appraisal mission and taken into account in the
project’s formulation. Thus, according to the appraisal report analysis and based on the
discussions held during the preparation of this completion report, the equipment and training
needs of the beneficiaries and structures were identified following consultations with the
principal interlocutors met during the appraisal mission. Furthermore, the appraisal report
recommended that the same participatory approach be used during implementation of the
main project actions especially the institutional framework reforms, the provision of
equipment and training of the beneficiaries. With regard to the institutional reforms, the
project document advised on making best use during their implementation, of the findings of
the study to restructure the Ministry which was underway at the time of the appraisal mission,
with the technical and financial assistance of the FAO.

III.       PROJECT IMPLEMENTATION

3.1         Grant Effectiveness and Project Start-up

3.1.1        Grant Effectiveness. The grant entered into force on 23rd March 2002, or 5
months behind the estimated schedule and 6 months after the date of signature, on 21st
September 2001. This can be explained not only by the Borrower’s administrative delays in
meeting some of the grant conditions, but also the Bank’s relatively long delay in approving
them. Indeed, out of the 7 conditions precedent to grant effectiveness, the Borrower was able
to fulfil 4 very rapidly culminating in the signing of orders by the Ministry of Agriculture on
                                                3


23rd October 2001; these conditions concern: (i) appointment of the coordinator and
accountant whose qualifications were to have been previously judged acceptable by the Fund;
(ii) secondment to the project of staff including an administrative assistant, a secretary and
two drivers; (iii) provision of evidence to the Fund that a project steering committee had been
established comprising the staff proposed in the appraisal report; and (iv) submission of
evidence that a special project account has been opened in the Bank. However, it took the
Bank about 4 months to approve these orders and its no-objection was given only on 20th
February 2002. Conversely, the other conditions were met well behind schedule by the
Borrower (5 to 6 months after signature) following several reminders from the Bank; these
concerned: (i) proof that adequate offices has been made available to the project management
team (order of 21st December 2001, approved by the ADB on 20th February 2002); (ii)
undertaking to send to the ADF, the new organization chart and organic text of the Ministry
of Agriculture, after the restructuring study which was in progress with the assistance of the
FAO, at the time of project formulation (order of 13th March 2002, approved by the ADB on
21st May 2002); and (iii) the undertaking to submit to the ADF for prior approval any new
appointment made within the framework of the project (order of 21st February 2002,
approved by the ADB on 22nd April 2002).

3.1.2       Project Start-up. Project activities started only on 1st January 2003, about 6
months behind the actual effectiveness date, 15 months after the date the grant agreement was
signed, and 13 months after the date given in the appraisal report for start-up of activities.
Problems at start-up were due to the project management’s team unfamiliarity with project
implementation procedures; at project start-up, team members were not made conversant with
Bank administrative and financial rules, and procedures for disbursement, goods and services
procurement and accounts management. Therefore, despite the official start-up of activities,
no operational activity was conducted during the course of 2003; it took the management
team virtually 9 months to recruit technical assistants (the final version of the technical
assistance contract was signed only on 9 December 2003). Yet, technical assistants are the
drivers of activities, particularly the preparation and implementation of the training
programmes and regulatory texts for the Ministry’s restructuring, and assist in the
procurement and distribution of equipment and material to the central and deconcentrated
structures of the Ministry of Agriculture.

3.2        Modifications

             From project formulation, to effectiveness and implementation, no modification
was made to its design, either to its components, or its activities and outcomes. The only
amendments made, not related to its design, concerned an adaptation of the activity schedule
the mechanism for which was provided for in the appraisal report and which had been
previously approved by the Bank: (i) a decrease by 1 month of the time set for each of the
three technical assistants in order to match the available financial package, which had been
affected by an almost 15% depreciation of the UA in relation to the rate at project appraisal,
with the financial bid of BDPA, the technical assistance firm; (ii) an update of the equipment
distribution plan as presented in Annex 6 of the appraisal report consistent with the
requirements identified by the management team and the demands for restructuring which
meant providing more equipment to the regional departments; and (iii) downward revision of
the initial objectives for training abroad in the overall training plan prepared under the project
and adopted by the ADB.
                                               4



3.3        Implementation Schedule

3.3.1       The initial project implementation period was 3 years, but it was implemented in 3
years and 5 months, 5 months behind schedule. This delay is acceptable, if account is taken
of the 6 month delay in replacing the first training expert who resigned in February 2005, for
personal reasons. An analysis of the implementation schedule reveals that all the activities
planned in the appraisal report were implemented, with the exception of the production of the
document on administrative standards and procedures which were to serve as a basis for
project management. The fact that this administrative and financial procedures manual failed
to appear was pointed out for the first time in the first external audit report prepared in March
2005. However, since the project was to end in December 2005 and that meanwhile the
project team had acquired a better understanding of the procedures thanks to support from the
supervision mission, and through the mission sent to the Bank’s headquarters for
familiarization with procedures, the new project coordinator only appointed on 4 March
2004, did not think it necessary to commission such a manual which should normally have
been ready as of the first year of the project’s implementation.

3.3.2        The implementation schedule below shows that the project was actually
completed in June 2006, compared to an estimated completion date in December 2004 in the
appraisal report, i.e. a difference of 18 months partly due to the delay of about a year in the
start-up of project activities. If the 13-month delay were to be deducted from the start-up
delay, the following were the activities behind schedule: (i) preparation of bidding
documents, launching of bids and award of contracts, especially for the recruitment of
technical assistants (5-month delay) with all its implications (7 months delay) for the
recruitment of the technical assistants; (ii) implementation of the training programme (12
months delay) resulting from its late start-up and the time taken to replace the first technical
assistant); (iii) introduction of the administrative and communication organization system for
the departments of the Ministry (20 months delay, because of the late start and the
participatory approach adopted). Despite these delays in the internal planning of activities, it
can be concluded that the overall schedule was complied with since the completion date was
extended only by 6 months.
                                                   5

                                             Table 3.1
                                  Project Implementation Schedule

Activities/Actions                         Appraisal Dates            Actual Dates           Difference
                                                                                             in months

Establishment of the project management    Oct. /Nov. 2001            23 October 2001            0
team
Start-up of activities                     Oct. /Nov. 2001            1er January 2003         + 13
Recruitment of technical assistants        April 2002                 9 December 2003          + 20
Preparation of bidding documents for       Nov. 2001 to April 2002    March to October         + 18
goods and services                                                    2003
Preparation of the annual programme        May to July 2002           January-February          +7
                                                                      2003
Preparation of the training programme      July-September 2002        February to April         +7
                                                                      2003
Preparation of the document on             July Sept. 2002            Pending                    -
administrative standards and procedures
Implementation of the training programme   Oct. 2002 to May 2004      Sept. 2004 to June       + 25
                                                                      2006
Establishment of the administrative        Oct. 2002 to March 2003    August          to       + 33
restructuring and communication system                                December 2005
of the Ministry’s services
Audit of accounts                          May 2002 to January 2005   March 2005        to     + 16
                                                                      May 2007
Project completion                         December 2004              June 2006                + 18

3.4         Reporting

            Consistent with paragraph 5.6.1 of the appraisal report and the specifications for
the technical assistants, the project team in cooperation with the latter, produced the
following reports throughout the project duration (three years and six months): 3 activity
programmes and annual budgets, 14 quarterly activity reports, 3 annual activity reports,
specific final reports and reports on the status of work carried out by the technical assistance
in accordance with their mandate (administrative restructuring, training and business law),
plans for training staff and for distributing equipment and material. All these documents
were sent to the Bank for comments. All reports remain properly archived by the project
management unit and produced according to schedule, in keeping with the related Bank
guidelines; they contain data permitting a good of the project’s conduct and an assessment of
its outcomes. Furthermore, three audit reports were prepared. The 2003 and 2004 financial
years were audited in March 2005, that of 2005, was audited in March 2006, and the 2006
financial year was audited in May 2007. The audit of the 2003 financial year fell well behind
schedule because of the Bank’s low disbursement rate in 2003 (2.4%).

3.5         Procurement

           Section 6.02 of Article VI of the Grant Agreement on the rules of procedures for
the procurement of goods, works and services stipulates that: (i) the contract for the provision
of vehicles and motorbikes, as well as that of equipment were to be awarded by international
competitive bidding; and (ii) contracts for the provision of goods available locally, such as
office materials and consumables were to be procured through revolving funds by national
shopping. Regarding the procurement of services, Section 6.03. of Article VI mentioned
above stipulates that: (i) services for technical assistance, auditing, as well as training abroad,
                                                        6


  were to be procured through competitive bidding based on a short list; and (ii) training locally
  was to be awarded on the basis of direct negotiation. Following discussions with the project
  management team and upon review of the documentation available, the completion mission
  noted that all the provisions were complied with by the project management team and
  submitted to the Bank for no-objection procedure prior to the launch and award of the related
  contracts.

  3.6          Project Cost, Financing Sources and Disbursement

  3.6.1       Project Costs and Financing Sources. Project cost at appraisal was estimated at
  UA 1.38 million comprising UA 1.10 million of the TAF grant (or 80% of the project cost)
  and UA 0.28 million of the Government’s counterpart funds (representing the remaining
  20%). The actual project expenses amounted to UA 1.16 million including UA 1.099 out of
  the ADF grant (or 99.9% of the estimates), and 0.064 UA equivalent of the national
  counterpart funds (or about 22% of the estimates). The Table below summarizes the
  estimated and actual project costs by financing source at appraisal and upon completion of
  the project.

                                               Table 3.2
        Costs at Appraisal and Actual Project Expenses by Financing Source and Currency Type
                                            (in UA million)

                          Estimates at Appraisal            Actual Figures upon Completion      Difference
Financing Sources
                      F.E.         L.C.        Total          F.E.         L.C.     Total
ADF/TAF               0.91         0.19          1.10        1.099         0.19     1.099        + 0.001
Government            0.00         0.28          0.28        0.00         0.064     0.064        + 0.216
Total                 0.91         0.47          1.38        1.099        0.064      1.16        + 0.22

  3.6.2    A comparison of the budget approved at appraisal and the actual expenses by
  component are shown in the Table below.

                                            Table 3.3
                    Estimated and Actual Expenses by Component (in UA million)

  Components                               Budget at Appraisal          Actual Expenses      Slippage + or -)
  A. Institution Building                         0.86                       0.67                  0.19
  B. Training                                     0.24                       0.27                 -0.03
  C. Project Management                           0.28                       0.22                  0.07
  TOTAL                                           1.38                       1.16                  0.22

  3.6.3      The training component was financed entirely with ADF resources, the overrun on
  the approved budget was due in part to the UA’s 15% depreciation against the Euro and the
  CFA Franc between April 2001, and the effective project implementation period. Failure to
  disburse the national counterpart funds is the main reason for the project’s overall cost
  underrun and underrun on the “Institutional Strengthening” and “Project Management”
  components, which, according to the financing plan, were to be financed partly with the
  national counterpart funds. The Tables of Annexes 2 and 3 show respectively, the estimated
  expenditure schedule at appraisal by component and by year, as well as the actual
  expenditure situation by year and by component.
                                               7


3.6.4      Disbursement. Project funds were disbursed under a working programme and
annual budget previously approved by the Government and the ADF/TAF. The trend of
actual disbursements by year is shown in the Table below.

                                          Table 3.4
                      Trend of Actual TAF/ADF disbursements in UA 1000

Year                                 2003        2004         2005         2006       April 2007
Annual Disbursements                 23.8        251.0        703.7        107.9        12.5
Cumulative Disbursements             23.8        274.8        983.2       1 086.4      1 098.9
Disbursement Rate (%)                 2.1        25.0          89.3         98.8        99.9
Annual Disbursements estimated       780          390          210
at Appraisal                        (2001)      (2002)       (2003)

3.6.5       The low 2.1% disbursement rate of 2003 is the result of difficulties encountered at
the start-up of project activities, especially unfamiliarity with the procedures for requesting
disbursement, preparing and launching bids, and delay in recruiting technical assistants. It is
worth pointing out that the cumulative estimated disbursement rates set out in the appraisal
report were as follows: year 1: 61.8%; year 2: 89%; and year 3: 100%. However, the
estimated disbursement rate retained for the first year in the appraisal report seems unrealistic
and over-estimated because account was not taken of the difficulties arising from using the
participatory approach for the project and anchoring the training plan in the Ministry’s
restructuring programme, which is a prerequisite for it.

IV           PROJECT PEFORMANCE

4.1          Operational Performance

             The physical implementation status of each component is described briefly
hereafter:

4.1.1        Institution Building

4.1.1.1    This component comprised: (i) providing the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural
Development (MADR) with technical assistance for preparing a detailed training programme,
the Ministry’s organic law as well as related implementing texts; and (ii) providing the
various services of the MADR with office equipment, IT and transport equipment.

Technical Assistance

4.1.1.2     The appraisal report planned on providing the project with three technical
assistants: a training specialist for 18 months, a legal expert for 3 months and an
administrative organization expert for 7 months. A technical assistance contract was signed
on 9th December 2003 with the BDPA consulting engineering firm for a calendar period of
19 months for the services of a training expert (17 months), an administrative organization
expert (6 months) and a legal expert (2 months). The one month decrease in the schedule for
each of the experts was approved by the Bank prior to signature of the contract and can be
explained by the level of the financial bid submitted by the award winning firm and the
almost 15% depreciation in the UA against the Euro and the CFA Franc between the period
of project appraisal (April 2001) and that of bid submission (October 2003). At the end of
the project, the 25 person/months of experts’ contractual services had been implemented, but
                                               8


adjusted slightly by transferring one month of the legal expert’s term to that of the
organization expert allowing the latter more time to examine the problems arising from the
application of the organic law. However, there was a time overrun in respect of the technical
assistants’ services (27 months instead of the initially planned 19 months), primarily because
of the 6+ months delay in replacing the first training expert who resigned for personal reasons
after working for 12 months. This delay among other things, explains the extension of the
project’s completion date by 6 months.

4.1.1.3    The outcomes are satisfactory and in conformity with the terms of reference of the
technical assistants (appended to the appraisal report), with the exception of the
Government’s failure to adopt the texts prepared and apply them. Indeed, the draft organic
law organizing and restructuring the Ministry and a new organization chart were prepared
and validated on a participatory and iterative basis involving the top officials of the MADR,
both at central and regional levels. This proposal in the form of a bill was subsequently
submitted to the Supervisory Ministry by the Project Managers to be tabled at the Council of
Ministers. The bill focuses on the coordination of the Ministry’s actions through the creation
of a General Secretariat at central level and the institutionalization of a Regional Directorate
of Agriculture and Rural Development and their implications on the transfer thereto, of some
of the powers of the Directorates-General. Concurrently with the validation process of the
draft organic law, 8 implementing texts were prepared in the form of draft orders. Each of
these details the duties of the various organs of the restructured Ministry, as well as their
system of administration and communications organization. All these texts make up the
manual of the administrative regulations and procedures for the functioning of the Ministry of
Agriculture and Rural Development.

4.1.1.4     Although these texts were not adopted by the Government, they began to be
implemented between September and December 2004, through the appointments to certain
positions such as: Secretary-General, Director Generals, Department Heads, Division
Managers, Regional Directors, Regional Department Heads (cf. MADR organization chart
proposal in Annex 8). This situation persisted until the change of government subsequent to
which the new Minister of Agriculture proposed a new organization chart which was adopted
by the Council of Ministers in the third quarter of 2006, but which was virtually the same as
that in force before the PAIDR.

4.1.15      By adopting the chart, the Government wiped out the achievements of the
participatory process used to prepare the regulatory texts for the Ministry’s restructuring thus
undermining the sustainability of the capacity building actions carried out under the project.
One of the reasons was the reluctance of certain managers and staff in some of the Central
Directorates to support the principle of strengthening the coordination capacity of the
regional directorates in charge of agriculture, especially the directorate responsible for
forests, and to a lesser extent those responsible for plant protection and livestock. In order to
ensure the sustainability of the capacity building actions, it is imperative that the Government
adopts the texts prepared in the context of the PAIDR, even it means updating them within
the framework of a select committee established in the Ministry.

Supply of Equipment, Office Material and Furniture

4.1.1.6     All equipment and vehicles planned were procured in accordance with ADB rules
and procedures and awarded in keeping with the distribution plan of the appraisal report,
taking into account the most needy central and regional departments in the MADR at the time
                                                9


of the project’s implementation. Distribution by structure was carried out by the project
coordinator in collaboration with the MADR’s management board. Outputs overshot
estimates in terms of the quantity of equipment and materials distributed (cf. the Actual
Distribution Plan in Annex 6).
4.1.1.7    All goods bought in the context of the project meet the material capacity building
needs of the various departments of the MADR, are well-appreciated by the beneficiaries and
most are used to full capacity even though they are still not sufficient. However, the
completion mission noted that the Government’s failure to pay its counterpart share affected
the smooth operation and maintenance of some equipment such as the generator sets, the
photocopiers and transport equipment, particularly in regions with only a shoestring operating
budget.
4.1.2      Training
4.1.2.1     The project’s training component was very important because of the shortage of
human resources in all departments of the MADR and NGOs in rural areas. According to the
appraisal report, 315 staff were to be trained, including 205 professional staff of the
Administration and 110 heads of NGOs among other things, in policy formulation, modern
administration techniques, project preparation, monitoring and management, information
technology and secretarial duties, local planning and financial management of local
authorities, as well as in the modern techniques of production, preservation, quality control
and agricultural produce processing.
4.1.2.2     The overall implementation rate of this component was satisfactory since the
initial objective was exceeded. Indeed, at the end of the project, a total of 589 people were
trained (that is an implementation rate of 187% against the initial estimates and 114% against
the revised and final training plan approved by the Bank) including 133 women (or about
23% of the total trained for an initial objective of 10%). A breakdown of the number trained
according to type of institution, reveals that 457 staff of the MADR administration were
trained (implementation rate: 223% against the initial objective and 114% against the revised
plan); 132 staff of NGOs were trained (120% and 113% respectively against the initial and
revised objectives).
4.1.2.3    A breakdown of the training sessions by training location (Guinea-Bissau, abroad,
study tours in the sub-region) shows various situations in comparison with the appraisal
report estimates (cf. Annex 5: Summary of Training Sessions Organized within the
Framework of the PAIDR).
4.1.2.4     In Guinea-Bissau, 544 technicians and personnel including 23% of women
benefited from 29 training sessions instead of the 21 initially projected (138%), in the field of
statistics, project monitoring, surveys, financial management and accounting, plant and
animal health control, fruit production and market gardening techniques, preservation and
processing of agricultural produce, small-holder farming management and training of
trainers.
4.1.2.5     26 professional staff and technicians were trained abroad (out of the 45
scholarships projected or 58% of the initial estimates) including 19% of women who
followed 14 training courses in Benin, Cameroon, Senegal, Morocco and France, in important
fields such as agricultural policy analysis, auditing and internal control, quality and standards,
and producer organization.
                                               10


4.1.2.6    Five (5) study tours were organized in Senegal (out of the 29 initially planned),
for the benefit of 19 officers including 3 women, in areas such as research, plant protection,
forestry and agricultural development organization at regional level.

4.1.2.7     Priority was given to training in the country than to training abroad. In fact,
following the 15% depreciation of the UA against the Euro during project implementation
and the high cost of study tours abroad, the final training plan adopted by the Government
and approved by the ADB, at the start of the project’s training activities, revised considerably
downwards the number of training sessions and visits abroad. The financial balance obtained
from this readjustment made it possible to increase the number of staff trained and the topics
selected at national level, which explains the higher than estimated national implementation
rates mentioned earlier. Concerning this approved plan, the implementation rates for the
training sessions in the country, abroad and study tours stand at 100%. On the whole, outputs
were therefore in keeping with the training plan approved by the ADB.

4.1.2.8    The main MADR structures which benefited from the training sessions are:
Inspection Services; SIG Division; CONACILSS, Producer Support Service; Human
Resource Division; Agricultural Statistics Service; Research/Policy Monitoring Service;
Forestry Directorate-General; Livestock Support Service; Plant Protection Division; Rural
Engineering Division, Agricultural Planning Directorate-General; Directorate-General for
Agro-Pastoral Production Support; Documentation Division; Regional Control Services;
Regional Studies and Statistics Services; Central and Regional Administrative and Financial
Services; Regional Agricultural Directorates, Regional Extension Services.

4.1.2.9    The NGO and other institutions to benefit from the training sessions were: INPA,
INITA, ANAG (National Association of Guinea-Bissau Farmers); AMAE (Economic
Activity Women’s Associations); APALCOF (Bafata); APRODEL (Bafata); DIVUTEC ;
COAJOQ (Cacheu); LVIA (Oio); Coopérative Sintchã LALI (Gabú); CIENCIA VIVA
(Quínara) ; ADPP(Oio); KAFO (Oio); SAHEL 21 (Bafata); GUIARROZ(Bafata); ETAD
(Bafata); ADACC(Biombo); UPA (Cacheu); ESPERANÇA FALCÃO(Gabu); AJASP
SORI(Gabu) ; RA(Quínara); ADS (Quínara); BODJAR (Biombo); ADISS (Gabu); ADIC
NAFAYA (Gabu); Esperança Mãe (Gabu), Guiné Verde; FEDACC (Tombali); Gare
Batoden (Gabu); Union des Associations de Cubucaré [Union of Cubucaré Associations]
(Tombali); Ca-Auylin-din (Gabu); AJOSAP (Bolama); PNPP, UPC, Biombo Producer
Associations (Biombo).

4.1.2.10 The methodology adopted for the formulation and implementation of the training
plan can be summarised as follows (i) inventory of the training needs, through questionnaires
filled by over 300 professional staff of the MADR and NGOs; (ii) discussions with the
different managers of the MADR structures; (iii) identification of training topics in line with
the positions and functions of the new organization chart; (iv) identification of persons to be
trained based on the criteria of age, competence and gender; (v) identification of
organizations or resource persons likely to give training courses; (vi) preparation of the
specifications for the trainers and selection of the latter on the basis of their bids; (vii)
nominative selection of the persons to be trained on the basis of their CVs and their
occupation in the said field of training and their signed undertaking to work for at least 2
years in their structure of origin, in keeping with the appraisal report and the provisions of the
grant agreement; (viii) implementation and monitoring of the training courses; and (ix)
evaluation of the results of each training module by the beneficiaries. It is worth noting that
despite the signing of the undertaking by the beneficiaries of the training courses, most of the
                                             11


regional managers and managing directories were assigned to other positions during the
course of 2006; however, most of the technicians and professional staff (who are
departmental heads) working in the capital and regions are still serving in the original
positions.
4.1.2.11 A review of the results of the training courses by those trained revealed that
overall, the courses were well appreciated by the beneficiaries and were rated on average 4
out of 5. Similarly, according to the beneficiaries met by the completion mission both in the
Administration and the NGOs, these courses were also well appreciated and helped to build
their capacity for analysis, management and monitoring, and enhanced their efficiency in the
conduct of their daily tasks and improved their service delivery to the target groups they
assist; however, concerning this latter aspect, failure to implement the supporting training
measures prevented most of the beneficiaries from putting into practice in the grassroots
organizations the training received, except in the fields of forestry and to a lesser extent,
micro-planning and processing of agricultural products. It must also be mentioned that some
of the professional staff trained by the project were later assigned to positions other than
those for which the capacity building needs were urgent.
4.1.3      Project Management
4.1.3.1     In keeping with the appraisal report and the provisions of the Memorandum of
Understanding signed on 21 September 2001, a Project Management Team (EGP) was set up
within the MADR’s Study and Planning Bureau (GAPLA) and was commissioned to manage
the project. This team comprised a coordinator, assisted by an accountant, an administrative
assistant, a secretary and two drivers. Following a notice for applications, the Government
appointed a national coordinator and project accountant by decision of the Minister of
Agriculture, on 23 October 2001; these appointments were approved by the ADB on 20
February 2002. The Steering Committee was to be responsible for the supervision of actions,
the review and adoption of the annual activity programme and annual budget, as well as for
the adoption of the project activity reports and financial statements. In accordance with the
provisions of the Memorandum of Understanding, members of the Committee were in fact
appointed by ministerial order and their appointments approved by the ADB on 20 February
2002. Nonetheless, the Committee was hardly ever operational and, in all, convened only 4
meetings throughout the project duration, although the appraisal report had scheduled one
meeting every quarter. The reasons for this shortcoming stem from: (i) failure to pay
members travelling allowances, thereby demotivating them; and (ii) institutional instability
leading to frequent transfers of Committee members to other positions. However, despite the
failure to convene formal meetings, most of the Steering Committee members were involved
in the project’s implementation either through the approval process of the training plan and
organic law or participation in training sessions.
4.1.3.2     On the whole, the Project Management Team accomplished its mission
satisfactorily although there was some delay in the implementation of activities at project
start-up because of unfamiliarity with ADB rules and procedures. Project management
improved thanks to efforts made accordingly, especially the unfailing support of the
agricultural sector project portfolio officer, the ADB supervision missions, as well as the
conduct of a familiarization mission for the Project Management Team to the ADB offices in
Tunis. The Completion Mission noticed that throughout project duration, quarterly activity
reports were produced regularly at the due dates (making a total of 14), that the Bank’s half-
yearly supervision missions were regular (9 in all) and the recommendations made by these
missions made it possible to considerably improve the project’s operational performance.
                                               12



4.2        Institutional Performance of the Project

4.2.1       The project’s financial implementation rate was 84%, because of the
Government’s poor counterpart fund contribution (22%), conversely the Bank accounted for
99.9%. In terms of the disbursement of the ADF/TAF grant, the project’s performance was
highly satisfactory. Indeed, as at 10 April 2007, date of last disbursement, the undisbursed
balance was only UA 1,136.32, representing a financial balance rate of 0.1%. The
disbursement rate at the project’s initial closing date (31 December 2005) was 89%, and that
at the end of the first extension of the deadline for last disbursement (30 June 2006), was
98.8%.

4.2.2       In compliance with the terms of the Memorandum of Understanding, for the
purposes of the project’s financial management, a special account n° 003489010016 was
opened in the Bank of West Africa (BAO) operated on the basis of two signatures: the
coordinator and the accountant. Accounts of all financial years were audited. The audit
reports were produced in May 2005, for the 2003 and 2004 financial years, in March 2006,
for the 2005 financial year and in May 2007 for the 2006 financial year. In addition, with
regard to the recommendations of the audit reports, certain measures were taken by the
project management team to improve the project’s financial management. These include
ceilings for cash payments and spot checks on accounts. Those not implemented concerned
for the most part, the administrative and financial procedures manual which should have been
prepared as of the start of the project but which failed to appear because of diverging
interpretations of some Bank procedures as opposed to those applied by the external auditor.

4.2.3        Concerning activity monitoring, information collected and processed by the
project management unit provided a good database on the main activities conducted under the
project and led to a better understanding of its progress. Data was available on the following:
(i) the training courses: number of beneficiaries per structure; venues, dates and number of
training days; training profile and positions occupied by the trainees, trainer profiles; cost and
content of each training module; assessments of the beneficiaries of each training module,
etc.; (ii) the equipment and materials assigned: distribution according to recipient, status of
the equipment assigned in 2006 and 2007; concerning preparation of the restructuring plan:
number of sensitization sessions in relation to the participatory process.

4.3        Performance of Service Providers

4.3.1       Performance of Suppliers. Under the project, contracts were signed with the
following three suppliers: (i) Société Française de Commerce Européen (SFCE), for the
supply of vehicles, generator sets and air conditioners; (ii) MENCOR LDA Import and
export, for the provision of office furniture; and (iii) INFORGEST LDA, for the supply of
office equipment. According to the completion mission, all the suppliers performed
satisfactorily, in terms of contractual deadlines, quality and working order of the equipment
and material provided, working relations with the project team and the technical and financial
capacity of their companies. However, INFORGEST LDA, a company under Guinea-Bissau
law established in Bissau, provided satisfactory services overall, but its deadlines and
financial capacity all received rather average marks. Indeed, this firm fell 3 months behind
schedule in delivering office equipment, especially mechanical typewriters, which, according
to the firm, are difficult to find in the market; its financial capacity has also been relatively
poor.
                                               13



4.3.2       Performance of the Consultants. The consultants who moderated the various
training modules programmed in the context of the project were: (i) SETYM International,
for training abroad; (ii) APRODEL and more than about ten individual consultants for
training sessions at local level. The various courses were satisfactory and met the
expectations of the beneficiaries and were consistent with the specifications given to the
various facilitators of the courses. A review of the reports on the training sessions revealed
that, in terms of marks, those who received training rated the sessions on average 4 out of 5
reflective of their degree of satisfaction.

4.3.3      Performance of the Technical Assistants. Overall, the services of the 2 experts:
training and administrative organization were satisfactory thus contributing to the project’s
positive outcomes.        However, the administrative organization expert was rated
unsatisfactorily for his work, although his professional level was good. The legal expert’s
work was considered average; moreover, the time allowed him to carry out his duties was
reduced to one month from the initially planned two; the extra month was assigned to the
administrative organization expert.

4.4        Economic Performance

           The likely economic impacts of the project are those concerning the sector goals
which aim at improving productivity. For the time being, the project has not shown any
measurable economic impacts. However, on the assumption that the NGOs will have more
resources and that the Government will provide the regional departments and outreach
structures with the appropriate operating means, improved services resulting from enhanced
professional capacity, would mean a better understanding of production techniques, greater
input supply and produce marketing and better organization of producer associations. This
would lead to greater production and thus to an increase in incomes and better living
conditions of the farmer and to a decline in poverty.

V          SOCIAL AND ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT

5.1        Social and Institutional Impact

             All project outputs have effectively contributed to building the MADR’s
institutional capacity, from the standpoints of professional competence, definition of roles
and functions, as well as the physical capacity of the Ministry of Agriculture and Rural
Development. Some outputs even represented social enhancement and an opening to the
modern and outside world, to information technology and to the French language. By and
large, institutional capacity building is likely to have the following social impacts if these are
followed by supporting measures aimed at more efficient producer organizations through
production, organization and management capacity building and better living conditions of
the farmers and better production conditions for grassroots organizations.

5.2        Impact on Women’s Advancement

           The project’s impact women’s advancement will be measured mainly through the
training courses given. Indeed, 23% of the beneficiaries of the training programmes were
women for an initial objective of 10%, according to the appraisal report. The training
modules which targeted women are the following, in terms of beneficiary percentage: (i)
                                               14


agricultural produce processing and managing of smallholder farms: 33%; (ii) further training
of the outreach workers in market gardening techniques: 36%; (iii) office IT training: 52%;
(iv) the French language: 38%; and (v) secretarial courses (45%). It is worth pointing out
that the last three are directly applied and have made it possible to improve women’s service
delivery. Conversely, most of those in which they were trained such as market gardening and
produce processing, carried out mostly by women, will not impact on them as a target group
unless the training received is put into practice. During data collection in the field, some
beneficiaries who were trained in the areas mentioned above have made it known that they
have started applying what they learnt among the target groups; however, the mission is of
the opinion that these were isolated cases that cannot be generalized, nor be decisive in terms
of impact, at least not for the time being.

5.3        Environmental Impact

            An institutional support project is classified under category III, and the activities
carried out have no negative environmental impacts, either on the conservation or
regeneration of natural resources. However, some of the training sessions could have
positive environmental impacts if they are effectively applied by the beneficiary trainees. In
particular, training sessions and study tours organized for officers working at regional level
and who are in direct contact with grassroots populations: (i) legislative instruments for
controlling natural resources and simple techniques for managing productive community
forests, and for use by forest workers; (ii) rational use of chemical products for plant health
inspectors; and (iii) legislative and technical instruments for use by veterinary inspectors to
inspect meat and fish. However, without project impact monitoring indicators, it is difficult
to determine the environmental impacts of the above-mentioned training sessions.

VI         PROJECT VIABILITY AND SUSTAINABILITY

            The participatory approach used by the PAIDR is a viability factor. It led to
greater involvement of the lead beneficiaries in the project’s implementation and a proper
match of their needs with project objectives and activities, from the standpoints of
institutional support, particularly the contents of the training modules, the equipment
assignment plan, the regulatory texts for the restructuring of the Ministry, as well as the
proposed new organization chart.         However, sustainability of project outputs is not
guaranteed for the following reasons: (i) some MADR officers trained under the project were
transferred with the approval of the Government, despite their signed undertaking; (ii) failure
to provide counsellors, outreach officers and other technicians with the required means to
make the most of the training received to contribute to an improvement of the production
conditions of the grassroots farmer organizations; (iii) the Government’s inability to meet
recurrent charges to run the equipment provided by the project, especially the photocopiers,
the generator sets, 4x4 vehicles, motorbikes; (iv) the Government’s failure to adopt and apply
the regulatory texts restructuring the Ministry; and (v) the insufficiency of the equipment
provided and the training courses given in relation to the demand and the requirements of the
various MADR departments and the NGOs. The sustainability of project actions will
therefore depend on the Government’s capacity to appropriately address the constraints
identified, with or without the help of development partners, and on the measures which will
be taken during the implementation of the Agricultural Sector and Rural Development Project
(PRESAR) and other ongoing projects with a view to consolidating and capitalizing on the
PAIDR’s achievements.
                                              15


VII          PERFORMANCES OF THE BANK AND THE BORROWER

7.1          Performance of the Bank

            The Bank Group’s financial participation in this project’s implementation was
timely because it aimed at backing the Government of Guinea-Bissau’s policy to reduce
poverty in rural areas, through institutional capacity building of the support structures in
charge of rural area development. It was also efficient given the overall positive results
obtained and the satisfactory assessment of the beneficiaries. Except for problems of delay in
the grant’s effectiveness and at project start-up, due among other things to the late
organization of the mission for familiarization with Bank procedures and failure to prepare
the procedures manual, the Bank’s support was satisfactory generally, from the points of
view of the disbursement time which averaged 1 month, the no-objection time, and the
regularity of project supervision missions. A review of the aides mémoires shows that 9
supervision missions were organized, in other words an average of 2 missions a year over the
project’s duration. The number of staff/days actually devoted to the project by the Bank’s
experts is estimated at 59, or an average of 6 to 7 staff/days of field missions. Given the type
of project, the composition of the said missions in terms of profile, would have been more
appropriate if they had comprised an institutional organization specialist. However,
application of the missions’ recommendations and the long-term contacts between the project
team on the one hand, and the officers in charge of the agricultural sector portfolio and
disbursement, on the other, helped improve to a considerable extent, the project’s efficacy
especially as of 2004, when the project reached full development.

7.2          Performance of the Borrower

7.2.1      The Government honoured its undertaking to monitor the project and provide
premises for the headquarters of the project management unit. However, the undertaking to
pay the national counterpart funds was not respected. Indeed, to date, the Government has
paid (at the time of the mission in September 2007) only CFAF 49.05 million out of the
CFAF 251.33 million or nearly 20% owed to the project.

                                         Table 7.1
   Trend of Government Contributions to the National Counterpart Funds (in CFAF million)

Items                               2003           2004       2005         2006         Total
Institutional Support                8.5           16.16      12.13        5.79         42.58
Project Management                  0.58            2.04       2.55        1.29          6.47
Total                               9.08           18.2       14.69        7.08         49.05

7.2.2      For the project management component, the Government was to pay the salary of
staff seconded to the project by the Ministry. For the institutional support component it was
to defray the cost of running the equipment and materials assigned, as well as the rent for
offices made available to the project. In addition, it must be noted that the amounts
earmarked in the public investment programmes for paying inter alia allowances and salary
supplements to project staff, were never disbursed. In 2004 they stood at CFAF 5 million, in
2005 CFAF 25 million and in 2006 CFAF 28.77 million.
                                               16


VIII       OVERALL PERFORMANCE AND RATING
            The overall performance evaluation tables in Annex 9 show that the project’s
general performance was satisfactory, with an average rating of 3 out of 4 or a total
satisfaction rate of 75%, broken down as follows: (i) implementation performance was
satisfactory, with a rating of 3.5 out of 4, or an implementation satisfaction rate of 87.5%; (ii)
the Bank’s performance was also satisfactory, with a rating of 3 out of 4, or a satisfaction rate
of 75%; and lastly (iii) the outcome performance was also satisfactory on the whole with a
rating of 2.5 out of 4, or an outcome satisfaction rate of 62.5%.
IX         CONCLUSIONS, LESSONS LEARNT AND RECOMMENDATIONS
9.1        Conclusions
           Project implementation was highly satisfactory overall. The project’s physical
implementation and grant’s financial implementation rates were 100% and 99.9%,
respectively. Activities to train officers of the Administration and the NGOs and to provide
the MADR departments with more appropriate working instruments were highly appreciated
by the project beneficiaries even though they were deemed insufficient. However, failure to
adopt and apply the organization chart and project organic law prepared in the context of the
project and failure to pay the national counterpart funds are factors that could wipe out the
PAIDR’s achievements, and are indicators that the Government performed poorly.
9.2        Lessons Learnt
           The following lessons can be learnt from the project’s implementation:
           (i)     Members of the project steering committee must be provided with
                   travelling allowances or fees with a view to motivating them into taking
                   part in meetings and assuming more effectively their role and
                   responsibilities of guiding, monitoring and approving project activities;
           (ii)    Providing at project start-up, a suitable and simplified procedures manual
                   to build the capacity of the key staff (especially the coordinator,
                   accountant and procurement officer) to understand administrative and
                   financial procedures (disbursement, goods and services procurement,
                   accounts management), contributes to a faster implementation of project
                   activities and an easier auditing of accounts;
           (iii)   Regular audit of accounts not later than 6 months after the end of every
                   financial year and prompt remarks from the Bank on the reports of the
                   external auditors (sometimes there are contradictions between the
                   recommendations of the external auditors and some procedures instructed
                   by the Bank) will enable a better management of project accounts;
           (iv)    Reducing the Government’s monetary share and increasing its
                   contributions in kind (pay project staff salaries, rent for the premises
                   assigned, remuneration for monitoring functions and for participation by
                   the central and deconcentrated services in the project’s implementation,
                   contribution of the beneficiary participation in the form of community
                   participation) would prevent project implementation delays due to the
                   Government’s failure to honour its commitments.
                                        17


      (v)     Support measures aimed at capitalizing on, and sustaining actions initiated
              in the context of any institution building project, and introducing a
              mechanism for monitoring and evaluating project impacts are prerequisites
              for ensuring the sustainability of the actions and for determining their
              social and economic impacts.

9.3   Recommendations

      The following recommendations are formulated for the Government:

      (i)     Settles the balance of the national counterpart funds to pay national staff
              salary arrears, and maintain the physical goods provided under the project;

      (ii)    Adopts and ensures application of the draft organic law, as well as its
              implementing texts prepared within the framework of the PAIDR and if
              need be, holds preliminary discussions within a select committee, without
              compromising on the need to coordinate the MADR’s actions at regional
              and central levels;

      (iii)   Carries out an annual inventory of the equipment and material provided by
              the PAIDR and ensures that they are regularly maintained; and

      (iv)    Prepares procedures and indicators of the PAIDR’s impacts and takes
              measures to monitor them.
ANNEXES
                                                  ANNEX 1
           REPUBLIC OF GUINEA-BISSAU
RURAL DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT PROJECT

              MAP OF GUINEA BISSAU
                                                                                                           ANNEX 2

                      REPUBLIC OF GUINEA-BISSAU
           RURAL DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT PROJECT

   COSTS, ESTIMATED EXPENDITURE SCHEDULE BY COMPONENT AND BY
                  FINANCING SOURCE AT APPRAISAL

                                      Annex 2.1
             Expenditure Breakdown by Financing Source and Currency Type

                                      CFA MILLION                               UA MILLION                   %

   Sources                         L.C.                                            L.C.
                       F.E.                       Total           F.E.                           Total
   ADF/TAF            830.38       175.61        1005.99          0.91             0.19          1.10        80
   GVT                 0.00        251.33        251.33           0.00             0.28          0.28        20

   TOTAL              830.38       426.94        1257.32          0.91             0.47          1.38       100
Source: Project Appraisal Report

                                           Annex 2.2
                  Expenditure Schedule by Component and by Year (UA million)

  Components                                         2002                2003             2004           Total
  A   Institutional Building                         0.59                0.19             0.08           0.86
  B      Training                                    0.05                0.13             0.06           0.24
  C      Project Management                          0.14                0.07             0.07           0.28
         TOTAL                                       0.78                0.39             0.21           1.38
Source: Project Appraisal Report

                                           Annex 2.3
                      Expenditure Schedule by Financing Source (UA million)

  Sources                                 2002             2003                 2004               Total
  ADF/TAF                                 0.68             0.30                 0.12               1.10
  Government                              0.10             0.09                 0.09               0.28
  TOTAL                                   0.78             0.39                 0.21               1.38
Source: Project Appraisal Report
                                                                                      ANNEX 3

                         REPUBLIC OF GUINEA-BISSAU
              RURAL DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT PROJECT

          ACTUAL EXPENDITURE BY COMPONENT AND FINANCING SOURCE


                                         Annex 3.1
              Trend of Actual Expenditure by Year and Component in UA million

           Components             2 003         2 004   2 005         2 006   2 007         Total
 A. Institution Building           0.01          0.23    0.34          0.08      -          0.67
 B. Training                         -           0.00    0.19          0.08      -          0.27
 C. Project Management             0.02          0.04    0.11          0.04    0.01         0.22
 Total                             0.04          0.27    0.64          0.20    0.01         1.16
Source: Project Management Unit

                                           Annex 3.2
                     Actual Financing Sources by Type of Currency in CFAF

              Sources                F.E.                   L.C.                 Total
    ADF/TAF                       536 900 162           318 533 500           855 433 661
    Government                         0                 49 051 670            49 051 670
    Total                         536 900 162           367 585 170           904 485 332
Source: Project Management Unit
                                                                                   ANNEX 4

                         REPUBLIC OF GUINEA-BISSAU
              RURAL DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT PROJECT

             TREND OF ACTUAL DISBURSEMENTS BY FINANCING SOURCE


                                           Annex 4.1
                      Chronology of Actual ADF/TAF Disbursements in UA

                                                      Cumulative Amount
     Value Date             Amount Disbursed              Disbursed          Undisbursed Balance
                                                             0,00               1 100 000,00
     14/05/2003                   23 789.09               23 789.09             1 076 210.91
     18/03/2004                   71 860.90               95 649.99             1 004 350.01
     04/06/2004                   42 528.42               138 178.41             961 821.59
     17/06/2004                   29 061.48               167 239.89             932 760.11
     06/08/2004                   25 978.98               193 218.87             906 781.13
     06/08/2004                   24 277.28               217 496.15             882 503.85
     30/09/2004                   57 303.73               274 799.88             825 200.12
     10/01/2005                   202 258.71              477 058.59             622 941.41
     27/01/2005                   86 274.95               563 333.54             536 666.46
     04/03/2005                   44 220.48               607 554.02             492 445.98
     20/05/2005                   72 480.64               680 034.66             419 965.34
     06/06/2005                   49 985.40               730 020.06             369 979.94
     27/06/2005                   42 048.18               772 068.24             327 931.76
     30/09/2005                   34 904.50               806 972.74             293 027.26
     25/11/2005                   106 935.39              913 908.13             186 091.87
     28/11/2005                   29 742.71               943 650.84             156 349.16
     30/12/2005                   34 855.38               978 506.22             121 493.78
     10/01/2006                    4 694.02               983 200.24             116 799.76
     31/05/2006                   29 860.51              1 013 060.75             86 939.25
     31/05/2006                   73 327.72              1 086 388.47             13 611.53
     10/04/2007                   12 476.21              1 098 864.68              1 135.32
Source: Project Management Unit

                                         Annex 4.2
          Trend of Actual Disbursements by Year and Financing Source in UA million

 Sources             2003          2004        2005          2006         2007        Total
 ADF/TAF             0.02          0.25        0.70          0.11         0.01        1.10
 Government          0.01          0.02        0.02          0.01           -         0.06
 Total               0.04          0.27        0.72          0.12         0.01        1.16
Source: Project Management Unit
                                                                                                                                                                ANNEX 5
                                                                                                                                                               Page 1 of 2

                                                                REPUBLIC OF GUINEA-BISSAU
                                                    RURAL DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT PROJECT
                                                 SUMMARY OF TRAINING ACTIVITIES CONDUCTED UNDER THE PAIDR

                                                                                                        Duration                                Number of Trainees
No.                              Training Title                          Location                        (days)           Date           Total Men Women MADR NGO Observations
                                     Local
1     Project Monitoring Methods                                         Bissau                           20        29-09 to 22-10-04     6    6    0      6      -
2     Retraining in Statistics                                           Bissau                           35        23-11 to 31-12-04     4    4    0      4      -
      Retraining of Field Workers in Surveys and Statistics Data
 3    Collection                                                         Coli / Quebo                      7         14 to 20-02-05       26   23    3    26      -
 4    Financing Management and Accounting                                Bissau                             5        17 to 24-05-05       14   11    3    14      -
 5    Further Training of Veterinary Inspectors                          Bissau                             5        13 to 17-06-05       10    6    4    10      -
 6    Office IT Training (1st session)                                   UNINET Péfine / Bissau            84       08-06 to 02-09-05     36   17   19    36      -
 7    Training in English                                                NELC / Bissau                    112        July to Dec 05       15   13    2    11     4
 8    Information Technology for RD in Bafatá                            CENFA / Bafatá                    66                              8    6    2     8      -
 9    Information Technology for RD in Gabú                              Cansala Multiservices / Gabú               26-09 to 12-01-06     10    8    2     7     3
10    French Language Training                                           CCFBG / Bissau                   20        10-10 to 09-11-05     39   24   15    32      7
11    Retraining of Plant Health Inspectors                              DSPV / Bissau                     5         03 to 07-10-05       17   14    3    17      -
12    Extension Techniques (1st Session)                                 Gabú                              5         03 to 07-10-05       18   13    5    14      4
13    Extension Techniques (2nd Session)                                 Gabú                              5         17 to 21-10-05       19   15    4    10      9
14    Training of Trainers (1st Session)                                 Gabú                              3         09 to 11-11-05       24   22    2    10     14
15    Training of Trainers (2nd Session)                                 Gabú                              3         16 to 18-11-05       17   15    2     9     8
16    Monitoring and Evaluation                                          Bafatá                            4        30-11 to 03-12-05     25   22    3    13     12
17    Office IT Training (2nd Session)                                   SOS Social Centre in Bissau      84       Nov. 05 to March 06    21   16    5    10     11
      Further Training for Extension Workers: Flower Production          Coli Horti-Fruit Growing
18    Techniques and Management of Small Holders                         Centre Quebo                     10        24-10 to 02-11-05     22   14   8     10     12
      Retraining of Extension Workers: Agricultural Produce Processing   Plant Protection Division in
19    and Management of Small Holders                                    Bissau                           10         05 to 14-12-05       27   18   9     14     13
      Retraining of Extension Workers: Fruit Production Techniques and
20    Management of Smallholder Farms                                    CIFAP / Bula                     10         12 to 21-12-05       24   21   3     11     13
21    Archiving Techniques and Document Management                       DSDC/MADR in Bissau              5          19 to 23-12-05       11    5   6     11      -
                                                                         Plant Protection Division in
22 Retraining of Forest Workers (1st Session)                            Bissau                            9         15 to 23-12-05       24   23   1     24      -
                                                                                                                                                             ANNEX 5
                                                                                                                                                            Page 2 of 2

                                                                     Plant Protection Division in
23   Retraining of Forest Workers (2nd Session)                      Bissau                                9       16 to 24-01-06    24    22     2    24       -
24   Project Design and Preparation                                  SOS Social Centre in Bissau           6       20 to 25-02-06    22    19     3    19       3
25   Secretarial Courses                                             DSDC/MADR in Bissau                   8     24-04 to 03-05-06   20    11     9    20       -
26   Methodology for Local Development Plan Preparation              Gabú                                  4       11 to 14-04-06    23    19     4    13      10
27   French Language Training (2nd session)                          CCFBG / Bissau                       20     24-04 to 19-05-06   15    10     5    15       -
28   Development of a Professional Agricultural Organization (OPA)   SOS Social Centre in Bissau           5       19 to 23-06-06    19    18     1    10       9
29   Utilization of Statistics Software                              Bissau                               5     28-06 to 04-07-2006   4     4     -     4       -
                                                                                                    Total of Local Training Sessions 544   419   125   412     132
                                  Abroad
1    Organization of Producers                                       Ouidah / Benin                      28     21-02 to 18-03-05    3      2     1    3        -
2    Agricultural Policy Analysis                                    Yaounde/Limbé / Cameroon            14      04 to 15-04-05      2      2     0    2        -
3    Training Plan: From Needs Analysis to Action Monitoring         La Rochelle / France                21      09 to 27-05-05      1      1     0    1        -
4    Audit and Internal Control                                      La Rochelle / France                21      09 to 27-05-05      1      1     0    1        -
5    Quality, Standards and Agricultural Produce Exporting           La Rochelle / France                21     27-06 to 15-07-05    2      2     0    2        -
6    SIG: a Decision-Making Assistance Instrument                    La Rochelle / France                28     27-06 to 22-07-05    2      2     0    2        -
7    Management Control and Management Chart                         La Rochelle / France                21     18-07 to 05-08-05    2      2     0    2        -
8    Human Resources at the Management Centre                        La Rochelle / France                35     19-09 to 21-10-05    2      1     1    2        -
9    Mediation and Consultation                                      La Rochelle / France                21     17-10 to 04-11-05    2      2     0    2        -
     Public Accounting and Administrative and Financial Management
10   of Projects                                                     Lisbon / Portugal                   28     17-04 to 05-05-06    3      1     2    3
11   Operational Planning and Project Control                        Casablanca / Morocco                14      08 to 19-05-06      1      1     0    1
12   Programming in Visual Basics                                    Lisbon / Portugal                   21     22-05 to 07-06-06    2      2     0    2
     Definition and Establishment of Monitoring and Evaluation
13   Systems                                                         Casablanca / Morocco              21      22-05 to 09-06-06     1     1      0    1
14   ORBUS                                                           Dakar / Senegal                   14       19 to 30-06-06       2     1      1    2
                                                                                               Total of Training Sessions Abroad     26    21     5    26       0
                        Study Tours in the Sub-region
1    Regional Managers of the MADR (1st session)                     Ziguinchor / Senegal                 5     19 to 24 March 06    5      5     0    5        -
2    Technicians of the Forestry Directorate General                 Dakar / Senegal                      5     19 to 24 March 06    3      3     0    3        -
3    Regional Managers of the MADR (2nd session)                     Kolda / Senegal                      5      17 to 22 April 06   4      2     2    4        -
     Plant Health Inspection Workers – Directorate of the PV
4    Department                                                      Dakar / Senegal                      4     19 to 23 April 06    2     2      0    2        -
5    Directors of the INPA Centres                                   Dakar / Senegal                      5     24-06 to 01-07-06    5     4      1    5
                                                                                                              Total of Study Tours   19    16     3    19       0

                                                                                                                      Grand Total 589      456   133   457     132
                                                                                                                                                                                                     ANNEX 6
                                                                            REPUBLIC OF GUINEA-BISSAU
                                                                RURAL DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT PROJECT
                                                               ACTUAL DISTRIBUTION PLAN OF MATERIAL AND EQUIPMENT
                                                                  CENTRAL DIRECTORATES                                                                        REGIONAL DIRECTORATES

                                                            D.G.A.P.A.P                     D.G.P.A.
               DESCRIPTION        PAIDR   GM   SAPV   SA Pr.    SAPe.     DER   DPV   SDC    DEA       SESP   DGF   DAF   INPA   Bolama   Bissau   Quínara   Biombo   Gabu   Bafata   Cacheu   Oio     Tombali   TOTAL

               Office Materials

Office                              5     3             2         10       4           2                             1             2        2        2         2                                                  35

Office Chair                        5     3             2         10       4           2                             1             2        2        2         2                                                  35

Metal Cupboard                      2     2             1         4        2           2                2            1             2        2        2         2                                                  24

Set of Shelves                      1                                      2           3                1                          2        2        2         2                                                  15

Sofa and Table Set                        1                                                                                                                                                                        1

Meeting Table                                                     1                                                                                                                                                1

Chairs for Meeting Rooms                                          15                                                                                                                                              15

                  Equipment

Generator Set - 15 kva                                                                                                     1                1                                  1        1      1         1         6

Portable Generator Set - 4 kva                                                         1                                                                                                                           1

Double Cabin Vehicle (4 x 4)        2     2                                                             1                  1                         1                                  1      1         1        10

125 CC Motorbike                                                                               1        1      1                   1        1        1         1       1       1        1      1         1        12

Moped                                     1     1       1         1                            2               1     2             1        2        1         1       1       1        1      1         1        19

Bicycle                                                                                                                            4        4        4         4       4       4        4      4         4        36

               Office Equipment

Large Photocopier                   1                                                                                                                                                                              1

Small Photocopier                         1                       1        1           1                                   2       1        1                  1                                         1        10

Computer                            5     3     1       1         2                    1       2                           1       1        1        1         1       1       1        1      1         1        25

UPS                                 5     3     1       1         2                    1       2                           1       1        1        1         1       1       1        1      1         1        25

Printer                             5     3     1       1         2                    1       2                           1       1        1        1         1       1       1        1      1         1        25

Fax Machine                         1     1                                                                                        1                 1         1       1       1        1      1         1        10

Manual Typewriter                               1                 1        1                                         1             1        1        1         1       1       1        1      1         1        13

Electric Typewriter                                                              1                                   1                                                                                             2

Air-conditioner                     4     2             1         2        1           2                                                                                                                          12

Fan                                                                                                                                1        3        1         1       1       1        1      1         1        11
                                                                                                                                          ANNEX 7
                                                                                                                                         Page 1 of 3
                                           REPUBLIC OF GUINEA-BISSAU
                                RURAL DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT PROJECT

      LIST AND ASSIGNMENT OF GOODS PROVIDED BY THE PROJECT (DURING AND AT CLOSURE)

                                                                                                                                   Current
                                                         Date of                                                     Current     Status (End
Equipment/mat/material          Type       Quantity                        Assignment        Status on Completion
                                                       Procurement                                                  Assignment   September
                                                                                                                                    2007)
                                                                       PAIDR                        Good                            Good
                                                                       PAIDR                        Good            DAF (1)       Average
                                                                       GM                           Good            DSAP (1)        Good
                                                                       GAPLA                        Good            DSER (1)        Good
                           TOYOTA Double
                                                                       INPA                         Good                            Good
                               cabin         10
                              Vehicles                                 General Secretariat          Good            Bafata RD       Good
                                                                       Tombali RD                   Good                          Average
                                                                       Quinara RD                   Poor                            Poor
 Transport Equipment                                  September 2004   Cacheu RD                    Good                          Average
                                                                       Oio RD                      Average                          Poor
                         YAMAHA 125                                    SESP, SEA, DGF, and
                         Motorbike           12                        the 9 RDs                    Good
                                                                       GM, SAPV, SAE,
                                                                       SAP, DEA (2), DGF,
                                                                       DAF (2), Bissau RD
                         Moped Peugeot       19                        (2) and 8 RD                                              14/19 Poor
                         Bicycle             36                        9 RD (4)                     Poor                            Poor
                                                                                                                           ANNEX 7
                                                                                                                          Page 2 of 3

                                                                      PAIDR (5), GM (3),
                                                                      SAP (2), SAE(10),
                                                                      DER (4), SDC (2),
Office Materials      Desk and Chairs       35        09/June/2004    DAF (1), Bolamam
                                                                      RD (2), Bissau RD
                                                                      (2), Quinara RD (2),
                                                                      Biombo RD (2)          Good                  Good
                                                                      PAIDR (2), GM (2),
                                                                      SAP (1), SAE(4),
                                                                      DER (2), SDC (2),
                                                                      SESP (2), DAF (1),
                      Metal Cupboard        24
                                                                      Bolama RD (2),
                                                                      Bissau RD (2), RD
                                                                      Quinara (2), DR
                                                                      Biombo (2)             Good                  Good
                                                                      PAIDR (1), DER (2),
                                                                      SDC (3), SESP (1),
                                                                      Bolama RD (2),
                          Shelves           15
                                                                      Bissau RD (2), RD
                                                                      Quinara (2), Biombo
                                                                      RD (2)                                       Good
                                                                                                    Secretary of
                   Sofa and Table Set             1                   General Secretariat    Good   State          Good
                   Meeting Table                  1                   SAE                    Good                  Good
                   Chairs for the Meeting
                   Room                          15                   SAE                    Good                  Good
                                                                      INPA, Bissau RD,
                                                                      Bafata RD, Cacheu
  Equipment                                           26/April/2005   RD, Oio RD,
                   15 Kva Generator Set           6                   Tombali                Good                  Good
                   4 KVa Generator Set            1                   DGPA                   Good   GAPLA          Good
                                                                                                          ANNEX 7
                                                                                                         Page 3 of 3

                   Large Photocopier      1                 PAIDR                         GAPLA   Good
                                                            GM, SAE, DER,
Office Equipment                            31/January/2005 SDC, INPA (2),
                                                            Bolama RD Bissau,
                                                            RD Biombo, RD
                   Small Photocopier     10                 Tombali                Good           Good
                                                            PAIDR (5), GM (3),
                                                            DER (1), SAP (1)
                                                            SAE(2), SDC (1),
                                                            SEA (2), INPA (1), 9
                   Computer              25                 RD (9)                 Good           Good
                                                            PAIDR (5), GM (3),
                                                            DER (1), SAP (1)
                                                            SAE(2), SDC (1),
                                                            SEA (2), INPA (1), 9
                   UPS                   25                 RD (9)                 Good           Good
                                                            PAIDR (5), GM (3),
                                                            DER (1), SAP (1)
                                                            SAE(2), SDC (1),
                                                            SEA (2), INPA (1), 9
                   Printer               25                 RD (9)                 Good           Good
                                                            PAIDR (1), GM (1), 8
                   Fax Machine           10                 RD (8)                 Good           Good
                                                            SAPV, SAE, DER,
                   Manual Typewriter     13                 DAF, 9 RD (9)          Good           Good
                   Electric Typewriter    2                 DPV, DAF               Good           Good
                                                             PAIDR (4), GM (2),
                                                             SAP, SAE (2), DER,
                   Air-conditioner       12                  SDC (2)               Good           Good
                                                             8 RD (8), Bissau RD
                   Fan                   11                  (3)                   Good           Good
                                                  ANNEX 8




           REPUBLIC OF GUINEA-BISSAU
RURAL DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT PROJECT

     DRAFT ORGANISATION CHART OF THE MADR
                                                                                                       ANNEX 9
                                                                                                      Page 1 of 4
                      REPUBLIC OF GUINEA-BISSAU
           RURAL DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT PROJECT

                             OVERALL PERFORMANCE AND RATING

                                       Implementation Performance

Component Indicator                    Rating                                Observations
                                       (1 to 4)
1. Adherence to general schedule         2.5      18 months slippage on the initial date planned in the appraisal
                                                  report and 6 months on the effective date of project start-up
2. Adherence to cost schedule             3       The project’s overall financial execution rate is 84%, because of
                                                  the Government’s low level of contribution which stood at only
                                                  22%, whereas the ADF/TAF disbursement rate was 99.9%
3.       Compliance             with      3       All conditions precedent to the grant’s effectiveness were fulfilled:
conditions/covenants                              4 out of 7 were rapidly fulfilled; however, the other 3 were only
                                                  fulfilled 6 months after the signing of the Grant Agreement which
                                                  does not exceed the maximum deadline required by the Bank
                                                  which is 6 months
4. Adequacy of monitoring,               3.5      The technical implementation programme and annual budget, the
evaluation and reporting                          quarterly and annual project status reports, as well as the specific
                                                  report on each of the three project components were prepared
                                                  regularly and submitted to the Bank.
5. Satisfactory Operations               3.5      The project’s overall implementation rate was satisfactory and can
                                                  be estimated at 100%; the training plan was updated at project
                                                  start-up and the initial training objectives abroad were revised
                                                  downwards, because of the related high cost, with the approval of
                                                  the Bank, to the benefit of local training sessions.
Total                                   15.5
Overall assessment of project           3.1       Implementation performance was considered satisfactory,
implementation performance                        with a rating of 3.1 out of 4; however, there was slippage on
                                                  the overall general schedule because of the rather late entry
                                                  into force of the grant and the difficulties encountered at start-
                                                  up of project activities, due to the project’s team unfamiliarity
                                                  with procedures in 2002 and 2003
                                                                                         ANNEX 9
                                                                                         Page 2 of 4
                                   Performance of the Bank
Component Indicators    Rating     Comments
                        (1 to 4)
1. At identification        3      Project objectives were an appropriate response to the weak
                                   institutional capacity of the Administration and the NGOs, noticed
                                   after the armed conflict which the country experience in 1998 and
                                   1999, which hindered implementation of the Government’s
                                   agricultural policy letter in 1997. These objectives were in line
                                   with the country’s strategic orientations to reduce poverty,
                                   especially in rural area and the priorities of the Bank’s
                                   intervention.
2. At project              3       The lead institutional and civil society actors were actively
   preparation                     involved in defining the requirements, activities and strategies of
                                   the three main project components which are training, equipment
                                   and material support and restructuring of the Ministry.
3. At appraisal            3       At appraisal the implementation strategy recommended was
                                   appropriate and based on a participatory and concerted approach
                                   involving all stakeholders; the objectives, components and actions
                                   to implement were also well defined. However, aspects relative to
                                   sustainability of action, to the assessment of output impact and
                                   monitoring were given less attention. The project’s logical
                                   framework matrix was prepared but the objectively verifiable
                                   indicators were not well defined.
4. During supervision      3       The supervision missions were regular, an average of 2 a year
                                   throughout project duration; the recommendations made it
                                   possible to improve project implementation efficacy, particularly
                                   as of 2004. Deadlines for disbursement, for processing bidding
                                   documents and for the no-objection procedure were satisfactory.
                                   However, approval of the first documents for the grant’s
                                   effectiveness was slow in coming and so were instructions for the
                                   preparation of the procedures manual; moreover, there was a delay
                                   in organizing the mission for familiarization with Bank
                                   procedures.
Total                     12
Overall Assessment of     3        Bank performance was satisfactory with a rating of 3 out of 4
Bank Performance
                                                                                                ANNEX 9
                                                                                               Page 3 of 4
                                                Project Outcome
N°     Component Indicator       Rating                              Comments
                                 (1 to 4)
1.     1. Relevance and Achievement of Objectives
i)     Macro-economic Policy         3    Actions initiated by the project are consistent with the macro-
                                          economic objectives concerning poverty reduction and the
                                          Millennium Development Goals (MDG)
ii)    Sector Policy                 3    The project is in keeping with the sector policy designed to
                                          improve incomes and living conditions of rural dwellers,
                                          food and nutritional self-sufficiency
iii)   Physical          Outputs   2.5    100% implementation rate against the objectives revised at
       (including production)             project start-up; but low in terms of training abroad against
                                          the initial objectives set out in the appraisal report. Failure
                                          by the Government to adopt and apply the decree
                                          restructuring the Ministry even though it was prepared in a
                                          participatory and iterative manner.
iv)    Financial Component          2     This is an institutional support project that does not generate
                                          any direct financial profit, but is a prerequisite for initiation.
v)     Poverty Reduction             2    The project’s results will bring about poverty reduction only
                                          if specific measures are taken by the Government for
                                          capitalization of training actions towards direct support to
                                          producers so as to improve their living conditions and their
                                          incomes
vi)    Environment                 2.5    Classified under category III, the project had no negative
                                          impacts on the environment and on natural resource
                                          protection. In some cases training received by the trainees in
                                          rural development support may have some effects on
                                          environmental protection, although no support measures
                                          were planned to profit from them and no monitoring
                                          indicator available or applied to assess the environment.
vii)   Private            Sector   2.5    The project sub-contracted most of its activities to private
       Development                        service suppliers; however, the cost of interventions at
                                          national level was low (suppliers, trainers)
2.     Institutional Development
i)     Institutional Framework       3    Institution building was achieved through: the hardware and
                                          equipment provided to the Ministry’s central and regional
                                          structures which needed them greatly; however, the
                                          professional capacity building plan for staff involved in rural
                                          areas is yet to be implemented and so is the restructuring plan
                                          which is already available.
ii)    Financial            and     2     There was no administrative and financial procedures
       Management                         manual; however, the project accounts were audited.
       Information      Systems
       including Audit Systems
iii)   Transfer of Technology      2.5    Possible through support from technical assistants to staff, as
                                          well as skills enhancement from the training given to staff of
                                          the Administration and NGOs.
       Staffing by Qualified        3     The profiles of staff seconded to the project match the
       Persons                            positions occupied and the activities conducted.
                                                                                                    ANNEX 9
                                                                                                   Page 4 of 4
 3.    Sustainability
 i)    Continued            Borrower      2     There is patent motivation and resolve on the part of Guinea-
       Commitment                               Bissau to preserve the project’s achievements; but no
                                                concrete action has yet been taken by the Government to put
                                                into practice this political will; in particular, the equipment
                                                provided was not maintained, support measures to make the
                                                most of the training received were not implemented and the
                                                texts restructuring the Ministry were not applied, although
                                                they were prepared in a participatory manner.
 ii)   Environmental Policy               2.5   This will depend on measures designed to protect the
                                                environment to be taken in the context of a support strategy
                                                implemented to take advantage of the project’s actions
iii)   Institutional Framework            2     Sustainability of the institutional framework will depend on
                                                the political will to draw on the related actions backed by the
                                                project.
 iv)   Technical Viability and Staff      1.7   Although the project is technically viable, its sustainability
       Supervision                              will depend on the capacity of the Government to provide the
                                                supervision structures with minimum operating means to
                                                monitor producer outreach activities.
 v)    Financial Viability including      1.5   The Government’s capacity to defray recurrent operating
       the cost recovery system                 expenses for the equipment provided is poor
Vi)    Economic Viability                 2     The economic effects will depend on the consequences of
                                                better producer incomes, if the workers trained and equipped
                                                in the context of the project are provided with the necessary
                                                means to directly supervise the producers.
Vii) Environmental Viability              2.5   No negative environmental impacts are expected of the
                                                project although no specific environmental protection of
                                                natural resources or regeneration measures were taken.
Viii) Operation and Maintenance           1.5   Subject to the implementation of support measures for better
      Facilitation (availability of             maintenance of the equipment provided.
      recurrent funding, foreign
      exchange       spare       parts,
      workshop facilities, etc.)
 4. Internal rate of return               2     This is an institutional project without a direct internal rate of
                                                return is expected
                Total                     40
  Overall Assessment of Outcome           2,5
                                                Performance of outcomes was satisfactory with a rating
                                                equal to 2.5 out of 4
                                                                                                                              ANNEX 10



                                           REPUBLIC OF GUINEA-BISSAU
                                RURAL DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT PROJECT

                                           PERFORMANCE OF SERVICE PROVIDERS

                                                                                  Rating: Satisfactory (S) Average (A)
                                                                                           Unsatisfactory (U)
                                                                                                                      Overall
    Name of Service Provider               Type of Service                                                          Rating (S, A,
                                                                                        Working Technical/Financial      U)
                                                                       Deadline Quality
                                                                                        Relations   Capacity

                                                               Suppliers
Société Française de Commerce    Supply of vehicles; generator sets        S            S        S                S       S
Européen (S.F.C.E.)              and air conditioners
MENCOR LDA IMPORT ET
                                                                           S            S        S                S       S
EXPORT                           Supply of office furniture
INFORGEST Lda.                   Supply of office equipment                P            S        S                A       S
                                                         Consultants (trainers)
SETYM INTERNATIONAL              Training abroad                           S            S        S                S       S
APRODEL                          Local training                            S            S        S                S       S
Other Individual Consultants     Local training                            S            S        S                S       S
                                                          Technical Assistants
                                 Training expert                           S           S         S                S       S
                                 Administrative Organization Expert        S           S         U                S       S
BDPA                             Legal Expert                              S           A         S                A       A
                                                                                                                                               ANNEX 11

                                           REPUBLIC OF GUINEA-BISSAU
                                RURAL DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT PROJECT
        LIST AND COST OF ONGOING OR RECENTLY COMPLETED PROJECTS (SINCE 2004) BY DONOR IN THE RURAL SECTOR.
Donor                                                       Project Title                                  Commitments       Implementation Period
FAO                      African Swine Pest Control Support Project (PPA)                                   US$ 234,000       Jan. 2004 – April 2005
                         PSSA Diversification Component: Short Cycle Animal Development Support –
FAO                      TCP/GBS/3001 (D)                                                                  US$ 299,000          Dec. /2004 - 2006
Italy/FAO                Food Crop Product Marketing Re-organization– GSCP/GBS/026/ITA                     US$ 500,000             2002-2005
European Union           Cacheu Food Security Integrated Project -GB                                       500,000 Euro            2004-2006
European Union           Food Insecurity Structural Reduction Project Guinea-Bissau                        500,000 Euro            2004-2006
European Union           Livestock Research and Development Concerted Programme (PROCORDEL)                US$ 242,650             2001-2005
                                                                                      nd
European Union           Pan-African Epizootic Disease Control Programme (PACE) – 2 phase                   Eur 664,613            2004-2007
Portugal                 Quebo Flower-Fruit Growing Project                                                 Eur 991,610            2001-2005
                         Organizational and Technical Capacity Building of Farmer Organizations -
FAO                      TCP/GBS/2906                                                                       US$ 353,200            2004-2006
People’s Rep. of China   Chinese Agricultural Mission (Carantabá Rice Growing Project)                  Yuan 5,100,000 RMB         2003-2006
European Union           Natural Resource Integrated Management Support Project (AGIR)                     Eur 1,500,000           2001-2005
ADB/ADF                  Rural Development Institutional Support Project (PAIDR)                           UA 1,100,000            2003-2006
Fond IBAS                Agriculture and Livestock Development Project (IBAS)                              US$ 498,750             2004-2006
European Union           Structural Control of Food Insecurity in Guinea-Bissau – UE FOOD/2003/057024       Eur 500,000            2006-2008
                         Agricultural Production Systems Strengthening Project in the Oio and Quinara
European Union           Regions– EU FOOD/2005/108-720                                                      Eur 500,000            2006-2008
ADB/ADF                  Projecto de Reabilitação do Sector Agrário e Rural (PRESAR)                       UA 6,500,000            2007-2012
                                                                                                                                   2007-2009
European Union           Food Security Information System Upgrade (SISA)                                   Eur 2,000,000
European Union           Plant Protection Capacity Building Against Plant Pests                            Eur 1,150,000           2007-2009
                                                                                                                                   2008-2011
IFAD                     Rural Rehabilitation and Community Development (PRRDC)                            US$ 7,100,000
                                                                                                                                   2008-2011
Kuwait                   National Rice Production Development Project                                      US$ 4,300,000
Portugal                 Gabu Agro-Silvo-Pastoral Project                                                   Eur 200,000
European Union           Natural Resource Integrated Management Support Project (AGIR-II)                  Eur 1,000,000           2008-2009
                                                                                                                                   2008-2010
European Union           Export Promotion and Diversification - STABEX                                    Eur 984,179.44
Source: GAPL
                                                                                                                                                                                   ANNEXE 12
                                                                                                                                                                                    Page 1 de 2
                                                             REPUBLIC OF GUINEA-BISSAU
                                               RURAL DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT PROJECT (PAIDR)
                                                                COMPLETION REPORT

                                                              RECOMMENDATIONS AND FOLLOW-UP MATRIX
 MAIN FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS                            LESSONS / RECOMMENDATIONS                                            FOLLOW-UP ACTIONS                                RESPONSIBILITY


Project Formulation and Rationale                   Project design inappropriate because of the inability
The project is in keeping with the Guinea-          of the agricultural and rural sector institutions and      The staff trained must be maintained in their functions and
Bissau Government’s strategy which aims at          operators.    Formulation and justification still          structures of origin to permit the practical use of the tools
building the institutional capacity of              current given the prevailing context of food               acquired. The consensual organization chart of the              ADB / Government
Government and grassroots structures with a         shortage and poor capacity of the Ministry of              Ministry and the implementing texts and decrees must be
view to giving impetus to agricultural and rural    Agriculture. Such projects must be extended to             implemented.
development in particular.                          vulnerable countries.


                                                    Although the project team was small (three national        For future projects, ensure that the officers selected for
                                                    officers and one technical assistant) project activities   managing projects have good technical skills in the
                                                    were successfully implemented.           The project       project’s fields, and that applicants selected are well
                                                    coordinator was rigorous and showed a sense of             supervised and supported by the Bank in the conduct of
Project Implementation                              initiative in allocating resources for training,           the activities planned and approved. Ensure also that
                                                    equipment, office material and furniture, as well as       support staff members are of high standard. Technical           ADB / Government
The project was well implemented                    rolling stock. For such a project, the managerial          assistants must be recruited when scheduled and evaluated
                                                    skills of the coordinator and the support staff are        as of the project’s initial months with the backing of the
                                                    deciding factors.                                          Bank to ensure compliance with their terms of reference



Compliance with Grant Conditions and
Covenants                                          Adherence to the schedule is dependent on the rapid
                                                   fulfilment of the conditions precedent to
The Borrower found it difficult to meet four (4)
                                                   effectiveness. It is therefore vital to examine them        Ensure that the monitoring mechanism operates as soon as
of the seven conditions precedent, mainly
                                                   carefully at appraisal, maintain only those that are        the project is approved. If necessary, ask Bank                 ADB / Government
because of the weak capacity of the Ministry of
                                                   indispensable for smooth implementation of the              representations in the country to back the authorities
Agriculture. The conditions were met only six
                                                   project, and to establish a device to monitor their         supervising the project. Make sure that the delegations
(6) months after the signing of the grant.
                                                   fulfilment.                                                 participating in loan and grant agreement negotiations
                                                                                                               comprise project supervision officers.
                                                                                                                                                                  ANNEXE 12
                                                                                                                                                                   Page 2 de 2



Performance Evaluation and Project
Outcome
At project completion, its outcomes were                                                             Adopt and ensure application of the draft organic
                                              Adopt and have the draft organic law and its          law and the implementing texts prepared within the
satisfactory.    The project’s physical       implementation texts prepared within the
implementation rates and the grant’s                                                                framework of the PAIDR. A working group on the
                                              framework of the PAIDR adopted.                       implementation of the new organization chart has
financial implementation rates were
100% and 99.9%, respectively. Actions                                                               been put in place.
implemented under the component to            One of the main reasons for the project’s success
train    professional   staff   of    the     was the participatory approach adopted not only in    Prepare PAIDR impact indicators and evaluation
                                              the design but also in the implementation of the      procedures and take the necessary steps to monitor       Government/ADB
Administration and NGO and to provide
MADR’s structures with more adequate          various activities.                                   them.
operating material means were well
appreciated by the project beneficiaries      The Government performed poorly in its                Capitalize on the results of the PAIDR through the
although they judged them insufficient in     mobilization of counterpart funds because of the      activities of the new Bank-financed PRESAR
terms of quantity. However, failure to        socio-political crisis prevailing in the country at   project.
adopt and apply the organization chart        the time of project implementation. The Bank
and the draft organic law prepared in the     should try to limit the proportion in cash in the     For vulnerable countries, limiting the Government’s
context of the project, and non-payment       Government’s counterpart funds for fragile states.    share in figures and focusing on contributions in
of the national counterpart funds are                                                               kind, would avoid bottlenecks in project
factors that could wipe out the PAIDR’s                                                             implementation caused by the Government’s failure
achievements.                                                                                       to honour its commitments.




Sustainability
The participatory approach used by the         Implementation of support measures needed to
PAIDR is a viability factor. It resulted in    capitalize on and sustain the actions launched by    In the context of the new PRESAR project, whose
greater involvement of the lead                any capacity building project, and the               institutional mechanism was based on the
beneficiaries in the project’s                 implementation of a mechanism for monitoring-        achievements of the PAIDR, particularly in the area
implementation and relevance between           evaluation of project impacts are prerequisites to   of training and capacity building of the structures of    Government
beneficiary requirements and project           ensure the sustainability of actions                 the Ministry, producer organizations and the NGOs,
objectives and activities in terms of                                                               ensure continuity in the long term of the PAIDR’s
institutional support, in particular the                                                            achievements.
contents of the training modules, the
equipment distribution plan and the
restructuring of the Ministry.
                                                                                       ANNEXE 13

                     REPUBLIC OF GUINEA-BISSAU
          RURAL DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTIONAL SUPPORT PROJECT

                        LIST OF DOCUMENTS CONSULTED

-   PAIDR, Financial Audit of Accounts, financial year 2003/2004, AMAICO International, March
    2005;
-   PAIDR, Financial Audit of Accounts, financial year 2005, AMAICO International, March 2006;
-   PAIDR, Financial Audit of Accounts, financial year 2006, AMAICO International, Mai 2005;
-   African Development Fund, Rural Development Institutional Support Project; Republic of Guinea-
    Bissau, April 2001.
-   PAIDR, Government Completion Report; Republic of Guinea-Bissau
-   PAIDR, Annual Report, BDPA, Bissau, February 2005;
-   PAIDR, Detailed Report of the Training Component, BDPA, March 2006;
-   PAIDR, Technical Assistance Final Report, BDPA, March 2006 ;
-   PAIDR, Midterm Implementation Report on Training Abroad, SETYM international Inc,
    September 2005;
-   PAIDR, Final Implementation Report on Training Abroad, SETYM international Inc, November
    2005;
-   PAIDR, Report on the Public Business Law Component, Bissau, BDPA, 18 June 2004;
-   PAIDR, Report on the Status of the Administrative Organization Component, BDPA, February
    2005;
-   Memorandum of Understanding between the Republic of Guinea-Bissau and the African
    Development Fund (Rural Development Institutional Support Project);
-   PAIDR, Quarterly activity reports, January-March 2003, April-June 2003, July –September 2003,
    October-December 2003;
-   PAIDR, Quarterly activity reports, January-March 2004, April-June 2004, July –September 2004,
    October-December 2004;
-   PAIDR, Quarterly activity reports, January-March 2005, April-June 2005, July –September 2005,
    October-December 2005;
-   PAIDR, Quarterly activity reports, January-March 2006, April-June 2006;
-   Nine (9) Bank Supervision Aides mémoires

								
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