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F451 Bookmark Explained

VIEWS: 17 PAGES: 2

									A. Brannon Schwamlein
ENGL7701
Dr. Dail
12 April 2010
                                   Fahrenheit 451: Bookmark


1. Bookmark
   Create a bookmark for a chosen title. On the front side of the bookmark, indicate the title
   and author of the book and a brief plot summary. On the reverse side of the bookmark,
   include color clip art or other forms of illustrations and explanations of key events, people,
   places, etc. in the book. See examples shown in class for models. Explain your reasons for
   your choices included on the bookmark in one typed page that accompanies the bookmark.



   A bookmark? O the irony. Who’d give a bookmark to a to a man who burns books? It’d be

like throwing pearls before swine, right? Wrong, at least not if that fireman was Montag, for

after he meets Clarisse and sees the conviction of Mrs. Blake, the woman who dances within the

flames because she understands that when the last page is burnt, when the fading glow of the

final ember dies so also the last light of a vast wealth of knowledge and human experience will

be snuffed out.


   This is the world Ray Bradbury asks us to enter with eyes wide shut. Like Montag, our eyes

cannot help but be forced open as we read this science-fiction work of genius. In a world so

given to political correctness that they’d rather burn books that learn from opposing viewpoints,

one can only assume that the world in which we live is not too far removed. Thus, my choices

were simply made, for I could not use more impactful words than those Bradbury had already

penned. It is for this reason I chose the image and the quotes I did. They share the theme of the

story, as Montag finally sees firsthand the perils of censorship and the oppression of good intent.
     Finally, the background of inevitable and irrevocable darkness is supposed to simulate the

vision of a burnt page, and the front side of the bookmark contains less creative information, the

spine of the book, if you will. Here, the title, author, and a brief synopsis of the story are found,

but it is left for the reader to challenge chance and dance inside the fire.

								
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