Four Stages of Teaching - PowerPoint

Document Sample
Four Stages of Teaching - PowerPoint Powered By Docstoc
					         Four Stages of
           Teaching
Fantasy
Survival
Mastery
Impact




Ryan, Kevin. (1986). The Induction of New Teachers. Bloomington, Ind.: Phi Delta Kappa.
        Make a Word
First, make as many small words
 as you can with the letters in your
 envelope. List your words on
 paper.
Now, use all of the letters in your
 envelope to make a word or
 phrase.
Be prepared to tell the group
 what your word or phrase is and
 what it has to do with classroom
 management.
               What’s Your Teaching
                 Effectiveness?
      Place a T or F next to the statements below.
      1. It is more efficient to have students pass their papers across the aisles rather than up
       the rows.
      2. Scatter questions throughout the lesson or chapter rather than at the end.
      3. An assignment should be posted and in a consistent location before the students enter
       class.
      4. To increase assignment completion, give structured, precise assignments.
      5. The number of students in a group is determined by the size of your class.
      6. Begin each day or period by taking roll as quickly and as efficiently as possible.
      7. Praise students when they do well, Memorize words of praise to use in class.
      8, An excellent way for a new teacher to get the attention of the class is to flick the lights.
      9. Beginning teachers are better off using general rules.
      10. The number one problem in classrooms is discipline.
      11. Procedures have no penalties or rewards.
      12. To increase student learning and achievement, increase the amount of time the
       student is working.
      13. The number of questions on a test is governed by the number of objectives taught.
      14. Use norm-referenced tests to check for mastery.
      15. Research states that people who are hesitant to learn or do not want to learn tend to
       sit at the back of the classroom.
      16. There is more evidence validating mastery learning than for any other aspect of
       education.
      17. A grade book should have a minimum of three lines per student.
      18. Lesson plans and assessment should be written at the same time.
      19. There is no nobility in being better than someone else; there is nobility in being
       better than you were yesterday.
      20. Rules and consequences should be posted in classrooms.

    Http://www.glavac.com
        The Effective Teacher

An effective teacher has positive
 expectations for student success.
An effective teacher is a good
 classroom manager.
An effective teacher knows how
 to design lessons for student
 mastery.

 Wong, Harry and Rosemary Wong. (1998). The First Days of School. Harry
 K. Wong Publications, Inc. Mountain View, Ca.
     A School Could Be Effective
         Instantly If………..
 Every student found work on the
  board when he walked into the
  classroom and started to work
  without waiting for the bell to
  ring.
 Was disciplined and was taught
  procedures for how things are
  done in school.
 Had a teacher who practiced
  positive expectations.
Wong, Harry and Rosemary Wong. (1998). The First Days of School. Harry K. Wong
Publications, Inc. Mountain View, Ca.
  Classroom Dilemmas
Western Drama
Head in the Sand
Keep the Little Devils Busy
The Collective Bargainer
The Wizard of Oz
The Price is Right
 Classroom Management
In groups, define classroom
 management.
Select a recorder to write your
 definition on chart paper.
 Classroom Management
The process of managing
 materials, processes and students
 so that instruction can be
 facilitated.
       Characteristics of
   Well-Managed Classrooms

High level of student
 involvement with work
Clear student expectations
Relatively little wasted time,
 confusion, or disruption
Work-oriented, but relaxed and
 pleasant climate

Wong, Harry and Rosemary Wong. (1998). The First Days of School. Harry K.
Wong Publications, Inc. Mountain View, Ca.
 Basic Student
Responsibilities
 Discipline Vs. Procedures
                   Procedures
 Discipline        concern how
  concerns how      things are done.
  students behave. Procedures have
 Discipline has    no penalties or
  rewards and       rewards
  punishments. Procedures +
                    routine=structure
        *Most behavior problems in the
         classroom are the result of the
      teacher not showing students how to
               follow procedures.

Wong, Harry and Rosemary Wong. (1998). The First Days of School. Harry K. Wong Publications, Inc.
Mountain View, Ca.
      Explain Procedures
     Rehearse Procedures
     Reinforce Procedures

Every time a procedure needs to
 be corrected:
1. REMIND the class of the
 procedures.
2. Have the class EXPERIENCE
 the procedure.
 Wong, Harry and Rosemary Wong. (1998). The First Days of School.
 Harry K. Wong Publications, Inc. Mountain View, Ca.
 Examples of Procedures
 Coming to attention                               How to respond when
 How to turn work in                                class discussion is over
 Where to find an                                  How to sharpen your
  assignment                                         pencil
 When a paper is due                               How to line up
 How to enter the                                  How to collect work
  classroom                                         End of class dismissal
 What to do when you                               How to ask for help
  are through with your                             Group work
  work                                              Changing activities
 Listening to/responding                           Moving about the room
  to questions
 Indicating whether you
  understand
    Wong, Harry and Rosemary Wong. (1998). The First Days of School. Harry K. Wong Publications, Inc.
    Mountain View, Ca.
 Procedure for Quieting a
          Class
1. Freeze
2. Turn and face me; pay
 attention and keep your eyes on
 me.
3. Be ready for instructions. I
 will have something.
4. Wait for students to comply
 before stating what to do next.


Wong, Harry and Rosemary Wong. (1998). The First Days of School. Harry K.
Wong Publications, Inc. Mountain View, Ca.
   Five Ways to Manage a
          Class
Clearly define classroom procedures and
 routines.
Teach students classroom procedures
 and routines, and practice them
 consistently.
Monitor student behavior. Show
 students that their work and behavior is
 important to you.
Handle inappropriate behavior promptly
 and consistently.
Plan ahead
     (Proper Planning Prevents Poor Performance)


  Wong, Harry and Rosemary Wong. (1998). The First Days of School. Harry K. Wong Publications, Inc.
  Mountain View, Ca.
 The In-Charge Teacher
         Image
Get eye contact. Say, “Look at
 my eyes.”
Maintain eye contact when
 listening.
Scan the room.
Give the “stare.”
Get close (proximity control)
Use a strong voice.
  Feury, Carol. (1994). Discipline Strategies for the Bored, Belligerent and
  Ballistic in Your Classroom. Sanddollar Publications. 1-800-330-3459
       The 47 Second Prompt:
         When Your Stare
           Doesn’t Work
Get physically close. Stand next
 to the student. Bend down and
 look directly into his eyes.
Place your hand on his desk.
Whisper in a calm voice what
 you expect the student to do.
Say nothing. Let him “feel” your
 instruction.
Say thank you, and walk away.
 Feury, Carol. (1994). Discipline Strategies for the Bored, Belligerent and Ballistic in Your
 Classroom. Sanddollar Publications. 1-800-330-3459
 Four Kinds of Time at School
Allocated time-total time when
 learning and instruction take place
Instructional time-the amount of time
 a teacher can be observed instructing
Engaged time-the amount of time
 students are involved or engaged in a
 task
Academic learning time-the amount of
 time the teacher can PROVE or
 DEMONSTRATE that the students
 have learned the content or have
 mastered the skill.

 Wong, Harry and Rosemary Wong. (1998). The First Days of School. Harry K. Wong
 Publications, Inc. Mountain View, Ca.
       Learner States
Mornings find learners more
 interested in detailed, complex
 work.
Afternoons find learners more
 interested in global and physical
 work.
  Six Brain-Based Fundamentals

Disruptions are a normal part of
 living. It is easier for you to
 adapt, than to try to change the
 world to meet your point of view.
The classroom is a learning
 environment. The optimal
 learning state is high challenge,
 low threat.
Students are basically good.
 They rarely wake up thinking and
 plotting of ways to get the
 teacher.
Adapted from Learning with the Brain in Mind by Eric Jensen.
Six Brain-Based Fundamentals

The best discipline is the kind no
 one notices. Where the attention
 goes, the energy flows.
Discipline problems should be
 feedback to the teacher. Most
 come from the right-brain/limbic
 system. Left-brained lectures,
 and discussions of the rules
 rarely work.
Prevention solves 95% of
 discipline problems.
 Adapted from Learning with the Brain in Mind by Eric Jensen.
Expect improvement,
   not perfection
                Brain Stem Area
Responsible for:
     Social conformity
     Territoriality
     Mating rituals
     Deception
     Ritualistic display
     Dominance, “top dog” behaviors
     Social rituals

 Adapted from Learning with the Brain in Mind by Eric Jensen.
                      Mid-Brain Area
Responsible for:
       Attention and sleep
       Social bonding and attachments
       Hormones
       Sense of space and location
       Emotions, both positive and
        negative
       Immediate expressiveness
       Long-term memory

Adapted from Learning with the Brain in Mind by Eric
Jensen.
                                      Cortex
Responsible for:
       Thinking, reflection, consciousness
       Some processing of emotions
       Problem-solving, computation
       Language, writing, drawing
       Long-range planning, forecasting
       Visualizing, envisioning
       Reading, translating, composing,
        creativity

Adapted from Learning with the Brain in Mind by Eric Jensen.
    Anatomy of Discipline
When behavior is coming from
 the brain stem area, noticing is
 important.
      Notice the student’s actions and
       body language.
      Objectively tell the student what
       you see and hear.
      This will lead to his/her self-
       awareness.

Bailey, Becky.(2000). Brain Smart Discipline. Www.bbailey.com
   Anatomy of Discipline
When behavior is coming from
 the limbic system, the emotional
 part of the brain, empathy is
 important
    Mirror back to the student what
     you believe he/she is thinking and
     feeling.
    Paraphrase their words.

 Bailey, Becky.(2000). Brain Smart Discipline. Www.bbailey.com
    Anatomy of Discipline
When students are functioning in
 the cortex, or “thinking” part of
 the brain, the teacher can
 facilitate problem-solving. The
 goal is to get students here, away
 from the brain stem, or emotional
 area!
      Talk about another way the student
       could have handled the problem.
      Have the student tell you what
       he/she will do next time this
       situation occurs.
Bailey, Becky.(2000). Brain Smart Discipline. Www.bbailey.com
 Learner-Centered or Not?
 You have been given an
  envelope, which contains slips of
  paper that describe classroom
  environments. Your task is to
  take each slip of paper and place
  it into one of two categories:
  positive, possible reason for
  concern.

Kohn, Alfie. (1996) with contributions by Sylvia Kendzior, Harvey Daniels, Rheta Devries, and Jim
Beane
        Classroom Management Tips
 Have an agenda on the board every day. Include the materials students need
  for the day.
 Have a jumpstart/bellringer ready for the students when they walk in the
  classroom.
 Have materials ready for the lesson.
 Have extra materials available for students who don’t bring theirs to class. Let
  their be no excuse for not working.
 Maintain a quick pace during the lesson.
 Plan a variety of activities to get the concept across to the students.
 Remember that the attention span of students is no longer than two plus their
  age. They should not be kept on focused instruction longer than fifteen
  minutes.
 Instruction should be like a roller coaster---focused and diffused, focused and
  diffused.
 Diffusion activities are light activities that allow students to process the content
  that has been taught. Diffusion activities should last two to five minutes.
 Tell students what to expect before a transition. Tell them exactly what to do.
 Time transitions.
 Plan more activities for right-brained students. They are usually the behavior
  problems.
 Remember that over 90% of your students are visual learners. They need to be
  able to look at what you are teaching. Not being able to do so can cause
  frustration.
       Classroom Management Tips

 Pick your battles. Does the benefit outweigh the battle?
 Decorate your room. Students learn a great deal from what is on the wall.
 Plan time for students to interact with one another. They actually learn more
  from their peers than they do from their teacher.
 Tell the students what you are going to teach, teach it, then tell them what
  you taught. This method incorporates both right and left-brained learning
  styles.
 Put yourself in the position of your students. Would you want to be a part of
  this lesson?
 Keep the students busy. Plan more than they can do during class.
 Always have extra activities planned for those who finish early.
 Maintain a formal/structured atmosphere. When the environment is lax,
  students will push their limits.
 Let the students know what you expect in terms of behavior before starting
  an activity.
 Present material in a way students can relate to. If the presentation is boring,
  they won’t pay attention.
 Expect improvement, not perfection.
 Remember that each day is a new start.
 What’s Missing?
       Discipline Strategies
 “Give Me Five”-Eyes on speaker, hands free, be still, be quiet, listen.
 1-2-3-Tell students that when you want them to follow instructions, you will
  raise fingers to get them to comply. One finger means they need to get
  started. Two fingers means that they had better get going. Three fingers
  means they have a consequence coming.
 I want, I need, I expect-Sometimes students do not follow instructions the
  first time they are given. Start out by saying, “I want you to….” Then, move
  to “I need you to……” Lastly, in a very firm voice, say, “I expect you to…”
  (Lee Canter(
 Broken record-When students fail to follow instructions, in a monotone
  voice, keep repeating your instruction until they follow through.
 STAR-Smile, take a deep breath, and relax. (Becky Bailey)
 Check-In-Sometimes when we give directions and students don’t comply,
  we need to check to see if they understood us. If they did understand, and
  are just not doing as you requested, you could lose your temper. This
  procedure helps us answer questions without getting hooked into the old
  repeating and reminding routine. Follow this order of statements:
     What did I ask you to do?
     Did you understand what I said?
     Were my instructions clear?
     Tell me in your own words what you heard me say. (Robert Mckenzie)
          Discipline Strategies
 The cut-off technique- is an effective method to use when children try to hook
  us into arguing, debating, bargaining, or compromising our limits. As the name
  implies, the technique ends the interaction by specifying a consequence if the
  action continues. When students try to engage you in this situation, try saying,
  “We’re through talking about it. If you keep on then, (state the consequence. Or,
  say, “Discussion time is over. You can do what you were asked or (state the
  consequence). “Now make your choice.” (Robert Mckenzie)
 Fogging-Agree with the student, then change the student. For example, say,
  “Boy, I wish I had a million dollars!” The student will look at you like you have
  lost your mind, and will usually turn around and walk back to their sear.
 Diminishing quota-Sometimes students do things repeatedly without even
  realizing what they are doing. One example of this is needing your attention all
  of the time, or talking out without permission. An example of a diminishing
  quota might be to put a yellow sticky on the student’s desk and keep a tally of the
  times he engages in the behavior. When he gets to an agreed upon number, then
  you will administer a consequence. Or you can engage the student in a bartering
  situation. Ask him how many times today he is going to need to speak without
  permission. Agree on a reasonable number of times he can do it without a
  consequence. Upon the next time, he will receive a consequence.
 Hot Box-Never discipline the whole class from the front of the room where you
  stand to teach, from behind your desk, or from the doorway. These are places in
  your classroom that need to be associated with positive feelings. Have a hot box.
  You can physically make a box on the floor with red tape, or it can be imaginary.
  Tell your students that this is your hot box, and when you stand here, this means
  that you expect them to stop, and listen to what you have to say because they are
  not following instructions. Over time, all you should have to do is move to stand
  in the hot box, and students will automatically get quiet. The best discipline is
  that in which nothing is said. (Eric Jensen)
          Sum It Up
On chart paper, list your key
 learnings for today.
Share with the whole group.
 Discipline is
     about
relationships,
 not magical
  solutions.
   Becky Bailey
 Successful people
prepare themselves
for their work. That
  is why they are
     successful.
         Harry Wong
The person who
 does the work
is the only one
  who learns.
       Harry Wong

				
DOCUMENT INFO