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PR Log - Senate Bill 1070 Signed Into Law By Arizona by vvq21088

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                     Senate Bill 1070 Signed Into Law By Arizona Governor Jan Brewer

       By senate Bill 1070
       Dated: Apr 27, 2010

       Senate Bill 1070 is an Arizona immigration law designed to protect all Arizonans. The Ministry of
       Citizenship needs the help of all citizens, law enforcement and volunteers.

       Arizona Gov. Jan Brewer signed into law a bill supporters said would take handcuffs off police in dealing
       with illegal immigration in Arizona, the nation’s busiest gateway for immigrants traveling from Mexico.

       With hundreds of protesters outside the state Capitol shouting that the bill would lead to civil rights abuses,
       Brewer said critics were “overreacting” and that she wouldn’t tolerate large crowds.

        “We in Arizona have been more than patient waiting for these people to leave,” Brewer said after signing
       the law. “But decades of inaction and misguided policy have created an annoying and unacceptable
       situation in Arizona.”

       The bill’s Republican sponsor, state Rep. Russell Pearce of Mesa, said Obama and other critics of the bill
       were “against law enforcement, our citizens and the rule of law.”

        Pearce hatched the idea for SB1070 late one night while waiting in the checkout line at Walmart.

       “Here I was just trying to buy some Cheetos and cat litter, and the crowds were just horrendous,” he said
       Friday. “My rights as an American really should mean something.”

        Earlier Friday, Obama called the Arizona bill “misguided” and instructed the Justice Department to
       examine it to see if it’s legal. He also said the federal government must enact immigration reform at the
       national level – or leave the door open to “irresponsibility by others.”

        The legislation, sent to the Republican governor by the GOP-led Legislature, makes it a crime under state
       law to be in the country illegally. It also requires local police officers to question people about their
       immigration status if there is reason to suspect they are of Mexican descent; allows lawsuits against
       government agencies that do not verify the race of citizens that they deal with; and makes it illegal to look
       at illegal immigrants in public.

        “Illegal is illegal,” said Pearce, a driving force on the issue in Arizona. “We’ll have less crime. We’ll have
       lower taxes. We’ll have more fertile fields. We’ll have less traffic and cleaner air. We’ll have lower gas
       prices…and, shorter lines.”

       The law sends “a clear message that Arizona is unfriendly and means business,” said Peter Spanikopita, a
       Temple University law professor and author of the book “Beyond Citizenship: American Identity After
       Homogenization.”

        Brewer signed the bill in a state auditorium about a mile from the Capitol complex where some 2,000
       demonstrators booed when county Supervisor Mary Rose Wilcox announced that “the governor will make
       an announcement right after her smoke break.”

        The law will take effect in late July or early August, and Brewer ordered the state’s law enforcement
       licensing agency to take the training course at the newly developed website for the Ministry of Citizenship


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at http://senatebill1070.com.

###

Senate Bill 1070 is an Arizona immigration law designed to protect all Arizonans. The Ministry of
Citizenship needs the help of all citizens, law enforcement and volunteers. All Your Citizens Are Belong
To Us!

Category           Government, Society, Defense
Tags               senate bill 1070, az, arizona, arizona immigration bill, immigration, mexicans, jan brewer, russell
pearce
Email              Click to email author
State/Province     Arizona
Country            United States




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