A Century of E‐Mails from An English Sonneteer

Document Sample
A Century of E‐Mails from An English Sonneteer Powered By Docstoc
					 
 

 
           
         A 
           
     Century 
           
         of 
           
     E‐Mails 
           
       from 
           
        An 
     English  
    Sonneteer 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
             INDIA                           50         Rab C Damo 
                                             51         Meeting the Folks 
1           A Blow to the Head               52         Border Reiver 
2           Arrival in the Raj               53         The Fourteen Feelings 
3           Mashtupville                     54         Home is Where the Heart Is 
4           Vijiyanagar                      55         Native Lays 
5           Headin South                     56         On the Trail of Owen Glendower 
6           Mosquito Wars                    57         Taffyland 
7           By the Ocean                     58         Yaki‐Fuckin‐Da! 
8           A brief note about headphones    59         Dubb‐Lhynn 
9           Thirruvallavar                   60         The Glen & the Two Lakes 
10         The Fourteen Forms                61         Men get PMT too 
11         The cheapest beer in the Raj      62         Burnsʹ Supper 
12         Paradise                          63         Big Wednesday 
13         Near‐Death Experience              
14         Admiral Akbar                                   EUROPE 
15         Another Near‐Death Experience      
16         I Can See Dead People             64          Baltic Antics 
17         High                              65          The Estoniad 
18         Mountain Stuff                    66          Smokinʹ Crack 
19         More Mountain Stuff               67          Aha Praha!  
20         Smelly Delhi                      68          The Orient Express   
21         Stoned Immaculate                 69          Eagleʹs Nest 
22         Desert Ranger                     70          Rocking & Roland 
23         A Narrow Escape                   71          Zut Alors! 
24         Bundi Bindi                       72          Tapas & Top Asses 
25         Hari Rama & His Magic Karma       73          Tuscany 
26         Taj Mahal                         74          Battlefield 
27         Nearly Home                       75          Ashes to Ashes 
28         Home                              76          Scozia Piccolo 
                                             77          Epiphanies 
            GREAT BRITAIN                    78          La Route Napoleon 
                                             79          Silent Disco 
29         Landan Tahn                       80          Milano Milano 
30         Killing Fields                    81          Casanova 
31         Garlic Frolic                     82          Free Drinks 
32         South Coast Cruise                83          Island Retreat 
33         Play Up Pompey                    84          Hapsburg Princes 
34         D‐Day                             85          Romans 
35         Capital                           86          Seasider 
36         North & South                     87         Abbazias & Olive Groves 
37         Ridinʹ the Rails                  88         Paradise of Exiles 
38         Flatlands                         89         Crow’s Feet 
39         Women & Weed                      90         The Strange Case of the Beeping Salami 
40         Thatcherʹs Britain                91         Fanny & Medusa 
41         Yorkshire Puddings                92         Marettimo Merivigliosa 
42         Kendal Mind Cake                  93         When Glenda fell off her Chair 
43         A Taste of Honey                  94         Sicilian School 
44         Hoots Mon!                        95         Mafialand 
45         Headin North                      96         Maltese Falcons 
46         Highlands & Islands               97         Gonzo Gozo 
47         Caledonian Chocolate              98         Maltese Postcard 
48         Culloden                          99         Scouseland 
49         A House Fit for Poets             00         Home Sweet Home
 
                                                 1 
                                         A Blow to the Head 
 
So, a new year is upon us & the cycle of life continues... 
 
I have finally got me one of these new‐fangled e‐mail thingys. Messenger services have advanced a 
long way since the Incas used to send them over a thousand miles on foot, carried by teams of relay 
runners at a rate of ten miles an hour. Also gone are the days of formal letter‐writing & waiting 
anxiously at the letterbox for the tread of a postmanʹs feet coming down the path. Mostly gone, too, 
are the scented love‐letters of various amoureuses. But, however nostalgic Iʹm currently feeling, sat 
as I am in the Victorian library in Clapham, I do see the value of the internet. Its ability to send 
information across the globe in an instant is obviously an important tool in defining the global 
village. Another valuable asset to the e‐mail phenomena is its ability to store vast amounts of text. No 
more shall I be travelling around with bulky notebooks to record my journals in ‐ all I have to do is 
find a computer & within a few minutes my wayfaring will be presented for posterity & wired out to 
the world. That’s why this little number has appeared in all your inboxes. As most of you know I am 
a poet, with a penchant for sonnets. I have been studying them now for several years & feel like I 
have almost achieved mastery of them. I am about to embark on a series of tours in which to 
complete my education, hopefully writing a few good sonnets along the way. Then, where better to 
begin than with a soiree round the Raj – beginning tomorrow. 
 
After spending Christmas in Lancashire with my family, I jumped a train down to London for the 
New Year celebrations. Unfortunately, I was caught without a ticket the on Manchester to London 
express (yuletide hangover sent me to sleep), the conductor not feeling very festive at all, & 
determined on my arrest at Euston. Once at the station I got off the platform & saw the conductor 
stood with a phalanx of police. Luckily for me there was another train on the across the way on the 
same platform, just about to set off. I quickly hopped on board & a few moments later had set off 
north. I began to notice the funny strains of the midland accent all around & soon discovered I was, 
in fact, heading for Birmingham. Luckily I managed to evade the fare successfully as far as Coventry, 
& then all the way back south again, where, about ten hours after first setting out from Burnley, I 
eventually arrived in London (for free). There I met up with an old fuck‐buddy of mine, Alicia, who 
took me to see the fireworks by the Thames, before taking me to a crazy rave at a squat party in 
Hackney, where clicking my heels in joy off some steps, I failʹd to notice the low lying beam. After 
smacking my forehead against it my momentum carried my legs forward & I proceeded to drop six 
feett onto the floor, hurting my back & with a sudden CRACK, the back of my head. When I finally 
stopped raving I checked into Walthamstow hospital & found out this was no ordinary come‐down 
& had fractured my skull! It was only a wee one like, & after a couple of CAT scans I am back into the 
outside world... but that is definitely the last time I try a treble whiskey again. I still feel a bit 
concussed, but as usual a blow to the head is the catalyst for me to start writing poetry again... & I 
dare say the sonneteer is back!  
 
 
First Monday after new‐year I found myself kicked out of my squat at Clapham Junction. I first 
moved in four months ago ‐ a three story Victorian townhouse on Dorothy Road ‐ albeit without gas, 
electricity or water. I made do by foraging in the area around me; across the road lay Tescos for the 
toilet, the library at the top of my street had the internet & the swimming pool at the bottom gave me 
a wash. I had a coal fire for heat & a calor gas stove to cook on (plates washed up with mineral 
water). I had also been enjoying the pay‐what‐you like nights at the two local theatres, furnishing my 
life with perfectly agreeable bohemianism. However, not long ago I was taken to court by the 
Battersea & Chelsea housing association. Fortunately the owners on the deeds for 54 Dorothy Road 
were in fact the plain old Battersea Housing Association, a completely different organisation, which 
earned me three more weeks while the lawyers of B&C dug out the correct documentation. But the 
essence of squatting is only ephemeral & a few days ago the bailiffs had finally gotten through their 
six week backlog to evict me from mi half a million pound caravan‐in‐the‐city! Thus being homeless 
in January I have just bought a ticket for sunnier climes, had an armful of jabs & leave for jolly India 
in the morning. I have enough funds saved up as I had also been claiming housing benefit from 
Dorothy Road – the two hundred & fifty pounds a week coming in very handy indeed! 
 
I have also wrote my first sonnet in ages, a little number concerning the age I live in today. As I 
venture east I hope to remove myself away from all the trappings that exist while living in this 
modern world of ours. 
 
Jan 7th 
London 
 
Modern Life 
  
At this stage of mankindʹs evolution, 
We live in an age of air pollution, 
Fat‐cats & taxes, taxi fares, faxes,  
Serial killers, silky leg waxes, 
Condoms, modems, gimmicks, gadgets, gizmos  
Two rubber ducks & comic book heroes, 
Football, rock & roll, catwalk, movie stars, 
Recession, depression & wonder bras, 
Four packs & prozac, pylon countryside, 
Anarchist daughter, schoolboy suicide, 
Just‐add‐water, slaughter of Mother Earth  
Death of religion & occult rebirth,  
Not one inch left of this globe to explore, 
The whole world itchinʹ for a third world war. 
 
 
 
                                                    2 
                                           Arrival in the Raj 
 
Rudyard Kipling once mused, ʺEast is east & west is west & never the twain shall meet,ʺ & boy was he 
right. The flight to the sub‐continent began in a dull pre‐dawn, slowly permeating the skies above the 
galaxy of stars that is the city of London. The capital was surrounded by the bright, wavy circuit of 
the M25 & through the murk it seemed like the delicate gold stitching on some Chinese emperor’s 
sable suit. Soon Europa passʹd majestically beneath us, eventually broken by the Black Sea & the 
dusty treeless leagues of North Persia, before the drop over the ocean into Bombay – another galaxy 
of stars in another corner of the universe. With dawn flecking red over the rooftops I took a crazy 
black taxi to a cheap hotel ‐ £3 for a bed & a fan. My first impressions were the stench...It stinks! The 
sweat of a billion people mingling with pollution & sulphur emissions ‐ like one of my own lethal 
flatulence moments, but permanent! My first day in the very European Bombay ‐ complete with red 
double decker buses straight from The Strand ‐ was a montage of sights & smells. As I cut a swathe 
thro sight & sound, all asweat with lips parchʹd dry, my senses were drowned in native hue & cry. I 
was assail’d at all sides by various beggars, touts & conmen ‐ but you can’t blag a blagger & I even 
managed to haggle down the cost of my first score ‐ a strange blend of Indian weed, which works! 
 
I was soon blest by a priest of the elephant‐god, & painted with a bindi ‐ the spot in the centre of the 
forehead which represents the third eye. Ganesh, the elephant‐headed god, is one of the major deities 
in the vast Hindu pantheon. There are over three million of them, for all sorts of obscure things. I 
guess there’s probably gods for scratching yer bum & putting the right amount of chilli sauce on yer 
chips. The craziest one is Kali, a goddess wears a necklace of shrunken male heads & a dress of 
sever’d arms. Very morbid, but also very holy. I have recently tried my first proper India food & 
tuck’d into a thali ‐ several mini pots of curry + rice bready things ‐ all for 40 rupees (60p). The money 
is mad; I got 5000 rupees all in fifty notes & feel pretty loaded. I also encountered my first ʹshockingʹ 
scene. A man & four ragged tiny urchin children, thin‐legg’d & dirty, all asleep by the harbour. My 
automatic response was to offer them a little money but I refrained & went on my way. It felt like the 
time I saw a stoat heading for a nest of bluebird hatchlings. I scared it away the once, but I couldn’t 
stay on guard for ever, & so let nature take its course. Later on I went down to the beach and rented a 
‘friend’ for a hundred rupees (about a pound) who told me where all the Bollywood stars lived 
(basically pointing at random houses and saying the name of a random Bollywood star). He then 
took me for a ridiculously cheap and hot curry in a kind of shack cafe on the edge of a shanty town. 
 
So, I’m slowly settling in, & after buying some shades & slipping them on I prepare to face my 
journey.  Iʹll bell you when I get to Goa, it might be in a few days as there are some wicked 
Portuguese forts to buzz round on the Konkan Coast, & you know how much I love forts! 
 
Bombay 
9th Jan 
 
 
Lines written at 37,000 feet 
 
Across Europa we have both progressʹd, 
By foot, by boat, by tram, by bus, by train, 
But this hour, from a cool & pleasant plane, 
Sends me sailing air on a grander quest, 
The scenes by cyan skies & soft cloud blest, 
How seldom seen & varied the terrain 
Of ashen peak, urban sprawl, verdant plain, 
Gleaming sea, wastes of sand & wylde forest. 
 
So now we have abandonʹd Europa, 
Already I can taste the eastern scent, 
The sun is setting west of Syria, 
The starry heavens singing his lament, 
As somewhere yon the grey Arabia 
My pilot is beginning his descent. 
 
 
                                                  3  
                                             Mashtupville 
 
Goa...it’s better than its rep, believe me. Even tho I cannot drive I have hired the funkiest looking 
moped for 100 rupees a day (£1.20) & bin cruisin round the sandy roads, listening to my MP3 
player, dodging the cows & burning the straights. My petrol ran out on one occasion, so I blagg’d 
some from a roadside shack & headed for my pad in Baga. On the way back I pass’d my first 
elephant ‐ all truss’d up in psychedelic garb, stomping his way thro the street. As to partying, 
there was a crazy taxi ride to a sunset techno party in Vagator ‐ reminiscent of the Hackney squat 
raves, but on a balmy evening & cool’d by a soft sea breeze. This was follow’d by a game of 
snooker with a mad Scotsman & a chill out with some Camden girls on a rooftop terrace drinking 
beer (40p) listening to the tunes I just happened to have in my pocket (handy when youʹre fuckt)! 
 
I am staying next door to a cool Indian family, sharing their garden & toilet ‐ which is in the 
middle of the street! The streets about are narrow, sandy & really serene. An old woman visits my 
patio with a fruit basket on her head & a cheeky little scamster (who beat me at pool) will get you 
your food from the restaurant ‐ for a small fee of course! I am sharing with two Estonian guys at 
the moment. They are from a rural outpost of that little Baltic nation & seem a little country 
bumpkinified. We met on the fifteen hour bus ride from Bombay, each of us amazed as we drove 
through Dharavi (a Mumbai suburb), where a world of squallid, one‐roomʹd, tarpaulin lives 
smiled at us throʹ the glass. My continental brothers are nice enough guys & gave me some of their 
beers for the journey ‐ which soon had me pissing out of the window, consequently getting a 
yellowish spray in my face!  
So Goa is like Glasto, only more strung out ‐ Glasto on bikes! Heading down South to Hampi soon, 
but I think Iʹll stay here just a few more days… 
 
Baga Beach 
11th January 
 
 
The Ear Cleaner 
 
  Stepping out one golden Goan morning, 
  Drowsy with the sunken sun’s adorning, 
  Content I was to be in nature’s hand, 
  Soul‐freshen’d as bare feet sunk into sand, 
  From out of nowhere stept a wizen’d man, 
“Sahib! cleaning your hearing well I can!” 
  Shows Western praises in his little book, 
  Black blocks of wax from both my ears he took 
  I shook the hand that scrubb’d my hearing clear 
  Said fond farewells & watch’d him disappear 
  Round red & rugged hill flankʹd by the view 
  Of Konkan coast careering into blue, 
  Then first finding the profits of his fee 
  I never knew how sweetly sounds the sea. 
 
 
                                                      4 
                                               Vijiyanagar 
 
At last I unpeel’d myself from the lush, green dolphin shores of Goa & struck forth into the Indian 
hinterland. The other morning, as dawn stirr’d the steaming jungle from her sleep, I thought Iʹd 
try out the local buses & head west via the verdant Western Ghats ‐ jagged mountains that run for 
a thousand miles. The view of Goa from their peaks was shrouded in mist & very Lord of the 
Rings. I was startled to see old Indian women carrying baskets of stones on their heads & others 
operating a concrete mixer as they were building the road I was travelling on (road? I don’t think 
so mate). Ten hours of numb‐bum later I arrived in Hospet & was forced to take a very dirty room 
in a lodge there. Subsequently I was eaten alive by bugs. Next morning & scratching like fuck I set 
off for Hampi,  arriving on a bus just as morning was breaking & around me appear’d the ruinous 
environs of an ancyent city; Vijiyanagar. Several hundred years ago it was the fabulous capital of a 
great empire, with six‐mile wedding processions on cloths of gold, & kings with 12,000 wives. It 
was razed half a millennium back & has remain’d uninhabited until recently, when the hippies 
arrived. After passing abandon’d temples full of monkeys I was ferried by basketboat to a little 
settlement across the river from the old city. It is so serene here, a lace to bathe the soul. As pastel 
lustrʹd sunsets musterʹd oer Vijiyanagar, silhouetting a bongo player stood on a boulder playing to 
the heavens, I shared the stunning scene with Doratha, a beautiful little Romanian creature. We 
were led on these warm giant boulders, still retaining the suns heat, & there she taught me a 
soothing meditative technique. My hyperactivity went out to the stars, but it soon came back as 
she was hot as fuck!  
 
The mosquitoes came out at night (to bite) but a bike ride early in the day to Hospet saw me equipt 
with a mozzy net, and a couple of things I didn’t really need ‐ when you enter an Indian shop they 
treat you like an old friend & offer you everything in the shop. Anyhows, my new ‘armour’ kept out 
most of the bugs & I zappd the couple inside ‐ a peaceful nights sleep. Next day saw more touring; 
overbearing statues of lion‐type frog gods, funny‐faced monkeys, fluorescent birds & the world‐
fabled Monkey Temple. It was quite a climb up a hell of a load of steps to get there, & when I did I 
saw yet another‐fuckin temple. However, the place was crawling with monkeys & I shared one of 
those karmic moments with a wee laddie with big fangs. As I skinned up I’d left my bag on some 
rocks, complete with money & passport & all mi weed. Then I turned around & came eyeball to 
eyeball with a monkey who had his hand outstretched an inch from mi bag. We stared each other 
down like something out of High Noon, before he scampered off emptyhanded. “I should be so lucky ‐ 
lucky, lucky, lucky!” 
 
Iʹm staying in Hampi for a couple more days then moving down to Bangalore. This morning I went 
for a scramble over the huge boulder piles, like little hills but full of batfill’d caves. Believe me, they 
stretch for miles – like the ruined columns of some ancient giant temple ‐ Iʹm right next to the fuckin 
desert here. Anyway, I stumbl’d across a small village & smoked my last charas joint, on which the 
tripp’d  out guru‐owner of a restaurant offer’d me some nice Nepalese black, just in time for an after‐
breakfast spliff. 
 
Hampi 
14th January 
                                                     
                                                      5 
                                               Headin South 
 
Started shitting piss today… 
 
After a whirlwind tryst with the Romanian lady I left the Jupiterlike landscape of Hampi & delved 
further into the sub‐continental hinterland. A sleeper train took me overnight to Bangalore, a city 
very much in the vein of hectic Bombay (but cleaner). Spent most of the afternoon in search of some 
rizlas to go with the very fine Nepalese charas Iʹd been tripping out on the last few days, but to no 
avail. God, I would have paid ten pounds for a single fuckin rizla! I ended up in a fortress‐town 
called Srirangapattanam (try saying that with a mouthful of spaghetti), the site of the Duke of 
Wellingtonʹs first significant career victory (15 years before Waterloo) over Tipu Sultan, the Tyger of 
Mysore. Tipu Sultan stuck in the imperialist British throat like a chicken bone. It took them years to 
defeat him & claim their share of South India. The raja was martyred thro his noble death, personally 
defending a breach in the walls of his capital. The piss’d up redcoats could not differentiate him from 
a common soldier thro the smoke of battle & slew him ‐ his body turning up next morning 
underneath a pile of his dead soldiers. I spent a day being carried around in a pony driven carriage, 
checking out all the sights, & the evening trying to deflect an Indian businessman’s attempts to marry 
one of his daughters! 
 
Had a crazy conversation with this English guy one morning. A month or so ago he had been 
kidnapped at gunpoint in an alleyway in Hyderabad & held captive for three days in a derelict 
house. He had no food or water & was forced to telephone his family in England for some cash, 
inventing a reason as he did so. Luckily they didn’t understand enough English to realise he was 
telling his dad what was really going on & the gang was intercepted outside a bank just before 
they collected the money, with one ‘bandit’ being shot dead. However, instead of flying 
immediately home the guy has kept the two grand & is now writing a book of his experiences in 
the much more tranquil environs of Sriringapattanami. I mean, this country is such a place of wild 
extremes. 
 
I moved on to Mysore where fate once more push’d me into the company of an Israeli guy Iʹd 
bumped into at Goa & Hampi (weird). We agreed three random meetings is more than a 
coincidence & weʹre gonna hire out a houseboat to sail the Keralian backwaters in a week or so. 
Mysore was the most pleasant city so far ‐ wide European streets & a genial atmosphere...but not 
enough to make me stay. So I spent another six hours on a bus winding through thick jungle. As 
my soulʹs boatman cut thro Karnataka I burst once more atop the feisty Ghats, drinking in the 
heady views that lead to Calicut & the Arabian Sea, drinking a $1 bottle of whisky & grooving to 
some tunes. I am now in Kerala, an alcohol‐free state, but very charming place & I have just 
enjoyed an excellent meal watching the end of the latest one day cricket match between England & 
India ‐ which we won, much to the waiters chagrin ‐ my dessert tasted strangely of phlegm! To the 
Indians cricket is god, Tendulkar the messiah & Sehwag the second coming. Like Goa, Kerala was 
once an enclave of the Portuguese empire, & the place where the first seed was planted. Vasco De 
Gama sank his renaissance gaze upon the east here, & was palanquinʹd to meet the local king, 
bringing the winds of trade to blow upon this spicy shore. 
 
So, Iʹm beginning to get used to India & the people now. It is generally very scruffy, but the 
vegetation & scenery often stunning. As I have broken away from the main tourist trail I am 
encountering a non‐hostile curiosity as to my country? my good name?  my marital status? & my job? 
But all‐in‐all it is so far so good & somewhere south of here there’s a beach with my name on it.  
 
 
                                                                              Calicut 
                                                                              21st Jan  
********************************************* 
 
                                                                             6 
                                                                        Mosquito Wars 
 
I am winning the battle of the mosquitoes. The nazi bastards have been winning up til now, but I 
have develop’d some new techniques. At first, I set up a safe defensive position under my net, only 
venturing out for some ʹzappingʹ with my heaviest book. It is very dispiriting to look at their ʹsplatsʹ 
& see your own crimson life force sprayed across the wall. Now I have taken to using the net as a real 
net & catching them in it ‐ very effective.  
 
I am currently nestled amidst the rooftops of Fort Cochin, an old Portuguese enclave & very pleasant 
indeed. Yesterday I had your typical English Sunday, reading the Hindi times, drinking tea & 
watching cricket in my hotel ‐ England levell’d the series much to the annoyance of the staff (buzzin!) 
A couple of days ago I was walking thro a jungle town (very cool) & walk’d past a large group of 
village lads playing footy. I was soon barefooted & joining in, playing in defence with an occasional 
Sol Campbell like run into the goal scoring area. My fellow defenders were three coconut trees (as the 
rest of my lads were all strikers) & we did well to shut out the other side (despite our goalie also 
being a striker) & win 3‐0. After the match I shook about thirty pairs of hands, the game having 
drawn quite an audience.  
 
One more crazy coincidence. I blagg’d a spliff off an old, bald Swiss guy back in Goa ‐ then last night, 
after 5 days without a smoke (quite a trippy experience actually), lo! & behold he was on my hotel’s 
rooftop terrace. After nearly losing two fingers in a fan (fucking painful) he gave me a bit of weed (no 
pain no gain) & I had my first spliff ‐ & it’s safe to say I was soon suitably stoned & swaying, 
                                                                                                                                                                Fort Cochin 
                                                                                                                                                                   25th Jan 
 
                                                                               Fort Cochin 
                                                                                           
                                                           Come share a second with serenity 
                                                           Up in this lake of European rooves, 
                                                        The crescent lampʹd oer thʹArabian sea 
                                                  Lulls me thither, I hear the sound of hooves... 
                                                   At once a sacred chime grows on the breeze, 
                                                      Some teller of a thousand ancyent tayles, 
                                                   Some from the worldʹs crop‐fellers overseas, 
                                                       Some cross the Karakoramʹs lofty trails, 
                                                        Some were seekers of immortal glory, 
                                                    Some content to be husbands & be wives... 
                                                          Thoʹ the vision all clutterʹd & hoary, 
                                                          With me a single memory survives, 
                                                              Being extras in the global story 
                                                        We are stars in the movies of our lives. 
                                                      7   
                                                By the Ocean 
 
Ah, the beach! 
                        Left Cochin a few days ago on an 8 hour boat trip along the Keralian Backwaters 
(Israeli guy still up North). It was serene as Pendle mist, passing pretty little villages, some of the 
menfolk fishing with spears, dodging the steady flow of our hummingboats. I bought some 
brandy for the voyage, which the captain noticed, on which he immediately invited me into his 
cabin for a drink (of my brandy). Coming in towards Kollam I was witness to one of the golden 
treasures of Kerala...the narrow backwaters suddenly fannʹd out into an awesome, horizon filling 
scene ‐ 360 degrees of palm tipp’d coastline. I was literally hauled onto my feet in one of those 
Scott of the Antarctic moments. 
 
Ah, the beach! 
                          Here life is so chillin. Dark golden sand hugging the bottom of volcanic red cliffs, 
on which sit a number of restaurants. Life basically consists of lying on the beach interspersed 
with refreshment breaks thanks to Clapham Council! I have never been this close to the equator 
before & it’s hot! Also, we are very close to the Indian Ocean & this I can see in the waves ‐ they 
are mean fuckers & already I have lost some beads, shorts, got a graze on my arm from being 
flung onto the sea bed & all day yesterday I was convinced I had broken my neck! One day I 
approached this girl on the beach, who thought I was an Israeli & told me to fuck off ‐ but I soon 
charmed her. Come evening I dined with this sweet Slovenian lass, talking art & Rome, such  a 
slow flirtation! Our supper done I walkʹd her half‐way home, to make love mid the wave‐breaks 
while the moonbeams snaked the foam. 
 
So Iʹm staying put for a while. Iʹve got great accommodation, sexual gratification & pleasant rooms 
by a pond (so the fish eat all the mosquitoes) with my own private eating hut set out in the water. 
The tantric landlord has just leant me a guitar so Iʹm gonna sit down & write me some psychedelic 
ʹEasternʹ numbers ‐ Iʹve bought some Indian tunes to vibe out to & a big bag o grass so wish me luck, 
                                      
                                                      Varkala 
                                                        28th Jan 
 
                                                                   
                                                                   
                                                                   
                                                                   
                                                                   
                                                                   
                                                                   
                                                                   
 
                                                  8  
                                   A Brief note about Headphones 
 
As the sand it pick’d up on Varkala beach slowly corrodes the insides of my left earphone, making it 
buzz real loud on the bass, I ponder on the earphones I have already toss’d by the Indian roadside. 
Seven pairs in fact, & the last lot lasted me a whole week. They are so naff! I am sitting in a dodgy, 
dark internet room in Kannayakamari. Iʹm a little ‐ a lot ‐ stoned after sharing a spliff with Prakesh, 
the owner. Just rollʹd into town with a German geezer (of course I mentionʹd the war ‐ Iʹm saving the 
5‐1 for the right moment) & a Dutch couple I met in Varkala. It was a struggle to leave that place, 
believe me, but when there’s some adventurin to be done put mi name down Fergal Sharpley! 
Yesterday I left Varkala, one song & two bags of weed to the good. The Swedes from Baga Beach had 
turnʹd up again ‐ & it was nice dining with them both ‐ my first proper travel‐buddies! The Slovenian 
lady had already left for her flight home, so there was no teary farewell as I jumped on board a 3 & 
1/2 hour train ride to Kannayakamari, the very Southern tip of India herself. As we went the savage 
ghats petered to their end, only sole, savage peaks remaining of that mighty range. The train I was on 
had set off from Amritsar, at the very north of the country, & taken 48 hours to get here – a true 
indication of the size of the subcontinent! 
 
The place is one of the four sites where Mahatma Ghandi’s ashes were scatter’d ‐ the others being 
South Africa, London & Delhi. Throughout India there are statues of this wiry fakir ev’rywhere & no 
wonder. His attitude of non‐violence completely befuddl’d the warmongering English & won the 
day, with hardly any blood spilt in anger. In one sweep of the horizon you can see the Bay of Bengal, 
the Indian Ocean & the Arabian Sea, all meeting in a choppy, liquid mass, the Tazmanian Devil 
waves coming in from all directions. The sunset was crazy; a lucid ball of red that just sat on the clear 
horizon & was slowly swallow’d by the sea. To celebrate we hit the brandy & chilled on the hotel 
balcony while the Dutch guy got his guitar for a jam ‐ note: they were a Dutch couple that don’t 
smoke weed! Paresh, the owner has just said ʹplease kindly bring some more of that ‐ itʹs nice. I think 
heʹs referring to the weed & not that fart I did about two minutes ago. ʹI don’t have any more on meʹ I 
said, so heʹs nicked my lighter instead. Honestly, you get harangued from ev’ry side, everyone after 
yer rupees. The slow counts are the best, it takes a minute to get yer small change & then another for 
your notes ‐ they are so slow & indifferent about your change, hoping you will go away or perhaps 
die of boredom. There are many, many more ‐ my favourite is when you sit in a cafe & ask for 
something they don’t sell, theyʹll just pop next door, buy it & sell it to you for five rupees more ‐ a 
rupee a metre! 
 
Kannayakamari 
5th February 
 
 
 
                                                     9 
                                             Thirruvallavar 
                                                       
                          The only thing worth looking for is what you find inside 
                                                  REM 
 
 It’s been a weird kinda few days, but Iʹd mainly put that down to the opium. It has taken me five 
whole weeks to find some non‐canabinoid drugs, a new record for me, which explain’d how 
tentatively I bit into the oily black mass in my hands I had bought on the streets of Madurai. It 
tasted of liquorice & I thought Iʹd been done until its subtle yet expansive effects struck me. My 
mindʹs span blew interspatial round the room as I flew with the fan. I didn’t exactly have 
Coleridgian visions but feeling positively light‐headed & went for a long walk & in my smoke‐
soakʹd wanderings I met the ascetic mystic Thirruvallavar. I was resting on a fine, empty beach, 
watching the white waves sweep sublimely across the Bay of Bengal. In a soft second of existence I 
was alerted to a flutter of birds & saw a mile or so along the coast a distant figure approaching. I 
couldnʹt help but watch him come steadily nearer, a middle aged man with a thick, black beard, 
swathed in white robes, his bare feet leaving footsteps in the sand. I expected him to pass me by, 
but as he came to within a few meters he suddenly veered off in my direction & tho he was 
walking slowly was at my side in a flash. 
 
He seem’d beyond the manners of most mortal men & after discovering I was a sonneteer he 
invited me to his home for an intellectual supper, a simple two‐storey building of white washed 
stone stood within a luscious jungle of tall toddies. It was just as dusk was falling that the guests 
arrived & they were soon deep in conversation. As they talked my host turned their nuggets of 
wisdom into kural, a special Tamil form of poetry that consists of two lines ‐ one of four words & 
one of three. At the end of the night, when the last pearls of wisdom had been written down & the 
dawn was casting ethereal shadows across the wax‐warped candles, the sage showed me some of 
his kural. ʺAs there are seven words in a kural,ʺ said the mystic, ʺthere are seven kural in a kural 
sonnet ‐ making it a grand kural in itself.ʺ As a lover of sonnets I feel like Vasco De Gama when he 
reach’d Kerala. When discovering old poetic forms I feel a little like India Jones, a kind of literary 
archeologist. Raiders of the Lost Ark was a massive influence on my life – I must have watched it 
hundreds of times ‐ & here, in this crazy village, using this mystic geezers laptop in a mud hut (the 
village has wi‐fi apparently), I feel like I’m living my dream.  
 
Udanlimat 
10th Feb 
                                                    KURAL 
                                                          
                                   Rainʹs continuance preserves existence 
                                          Speaketh celestial ambrosia   
                                                          
                                    As ant‐holes collapse embankments 
         Civilians topple governments 
                            
       Exquisite fortresses become rubble 
           Without excellent inmates  
                              
         Her chrysoberyls perplex me ‐ 
          Celestial? Peahen? Woman?  
                            
           Hatred, sin, fear, disgrace ‐ 
        Stain bedswervers imperishably 
                            
       Candles of knowledgeable beings 
              Light many millions 
                            
    Ancyent civilisations indecipherable pages 
            Futurityʹs erudite manna  
                         
                         
                   On Poetry 
                         
      Splashing thro Parnassian streams 
       Mankindʹs glorious attainment  
                         
       Poets defer immaterial rewards   
         Preferring soul enrichment  
                          
        Hierophants of heavenʹs voice 
     Unacknowledged global legislators 
 
    Inspirations connected by craftsmanship 
         Poesyʹs mosaic intertertexture 
                         
      Evanescent pegasi swiftly disappear  
             Words color visitations 
                         
      Inaudible mimesisial music moulds; 
           Acoustics, meter, meaning 
                         
      Imaginationʹs eagle plucks mimesis 
        From swampy sub consciousness 
                           
 
                                                   10 
                                           The Fourteen Forms 
 
I have just left the lap of Thiruvallavar & feel completely inspired. After several years of searching I 
have finally found the fourteenth & final form of sonnet. Before I continue with my travels I thought 
it would be prudent to record them all in an e‐mail, being; 
 
 1  Italian 
 2  English  
 3  Scottish  
 4  Lancashire  
 5  Terza  
 6  Couplet 
 7  French  
 8  Oriental 
 9  Open  
10  Heroic 
11  Artisan  
12  Modern  
13  Acrostic  
14  Kural  
 
The Italian is the original form, consisting of an octave, usually rhyming abbaabba, then, following a 
change in direction from the poet known as the turn, a sestet usually rhyming ccdccd. The English 
consists of three quatrains, rhyming ababcdcdefef (Shakespearian) or abbacddceffe (Spenserian) ‐ then a 
final couplet summing up the poem of gg. The Scottish is similar to the English, but its rhyme is 
enveloping, going ababbcbccdcdee. The Lancaster is an intricate form, consisting of two stanzas of seven 
lines, rhyming aba(c)(b)dd & efe(c)(f)gg, the rhymes in brackets only being half‐lines. Terza is based on 
the form of Danteʹs Divinnia Comeddia, four three‐lined stanzas rhyming aba bcb cdc ded, & a 
summary couplet of ee.  The French sonnet developed from the Italian by the troubadours of France, 
is an octet of abababab, where the last two lines are a refrain of the first two. Following the turn, there 
is a sestet of aabccb, where the last line must echo the first line in a kind of half‐refrain. The Couplet is 
seven connected couplets rhyming aabbccddeeffgg.  The Open sonnet may be a simple list, or more 
often a piece that is almost prose, with each unmeasured & varying line being more of a sentence, a 
single lyrical breath if you will. Its cousin is the Heroic, the blank verse of sonnetry, being fourteen 
unrhyming lines of iambic pentameter. The Artisan is the Leonardo Da Vinci of the sonnets, where 
the emphasis is on visual representation, a picture on the page using words, whose only rule is its 
depth may be only of the sacred fourteen lines. The Modern is based on the free verse of the twentieth 
century, the only rule being it must only be fourteen lines long, tho a certain modern aesthetic is 
desired. The Acrostic is an unusual & delicate form ‐ its body may consist of any of the other forms of 
sonnetry, but the first letter of each line must spell out a word, phrase or personage. 
 
Madurai 
11th Feb 
                                                 11 
                                     The cheapest beer in the Raj 
 
I was forced into my first train jump from Madurai ‐ the sleeper train was full & I didn’t want to 
hang around a crazy city in my new state of mind. Sometimes travelling through India is a bit like 
banging your head against a brick‐wall hoping a little eastern enlightenment will seep in! So I got 
a couple of hundred k before being collarʹd ‐ & despite my offers of baksheesh (bribes) & beers the 
fella just wouldn’t let me stay ‐ the best I got was a third class carriage. I took one look at the hot, 
thirsty mass of humanity & opted for a new mode of transport. As usual luck was on my side & 
outside the station was a luxury AC coach heading exactly where I wanted to go ‐ I paid my 
hundred rupees & off we went into the balmy night. The winds blew me up to well‐pondered 
grids‐streets Pondicherry (an ex French colony ‐ thankfully they’ve all pissed off) where I stockʹd 
up on the duty free booze. I nearly pissʹd myself when the bemustached geezer hissʹd, ʺTwenty six 
rupees!ʺ (40p) & 20 fuckin rupees 4 mi whiskey. Great! 15 K from Pondicherry was where I chose 
to chill for a couple of nights. The place is a large ashram called Auroville, an experiment in 
communal living, a kinda European utopia. Thirty years ago a holy woman called the Mother 
bought a load of land, planted forests of trees & decreed the area to be devoted to spiritual, artistic 
& intellectual study. The spiritual leader of the group is (the now deceasʹd) Sri Aurobindo ‐ an 
oxford educated ascetic poet, whose epic poem Savitri I have been gorging on since I found it. 
Such lovely lyricism & very inspiring. It got me musing on the power of writing to affect lives & 
minds, which turned into a sonnet on ink (see below). Autryville itself is virtually a cashless place 
(I managed to bag free food by making up an account number) & very serene. The place also had 
bikes & scooters which were great & cheap ‐ I was scrambling about all over the place ‐ keeping 
the Cisco style company of Rhonda who let me ride her buzzing blue bike while clinging to me 
quite tightly. In return I kept rolling up spiffs in various scenic woodland spots. I would have 
pounced but her acne put me off. 
 
Now further up the Coriander, that Crown Prince of coasts, my wanderlust has reach’s the vast, 
Westernesque sprawl of Chennai (Madras). My bus traversed this vast, suburban lawless ribbon road 
for what seem’d like thirty kilometres or more. Then the Estonians turn’d up again (met them in the 
fuckin street!) & we all intend to get a boat for the paradisial Andaman Islands. However, a local 
strike has brought the sailing from Friday til tomorrow morning at 11am. I only got here late last 
night & had to spend today sorting out my Permit to visit this legendary archipelago. I hired a 
rickshaw for the day (Note ‐ remember to buy fleet of rickshaws & build track at home so we can all 
play Rickshaw Races ‐ with a couple of guys hanging out of the windows with baseball bats!) & we 
rocketed around on loads of crazy missions (including a trip to his cousins the dealers), the net result 
being I get my permit tomorrow morning at 9 & thereʹs no guarantee of gettin on the ship. I mean, 
India sometimes feels like hitting your head against a brick wall in search of enlightenment, & just 
getting’ a fuckin’ headache. Fortunately there’s about twenty others in the same boat (unintended 
pun) & weʹre gonna go down en masse waving 500 rupee notes & smilin widely! An if they don’t let 
us on weʹre gonna sink the bastard, 
                                                                        Chennai ‐ 19th Feb 
The Essence of Ink 
 
If blood shall be the concourse of our lives, 
Then ink must be the very breath of men, 
For at the time it pours down from a pen, 
The sublime spirit of the soul survives 
& erudite futurity derives 
All that we glean both topical & ken, 
Yes! praise sweet ink & praise the moments when 
Love letters cement husbandry & wives. 
 
Come flow, black gold, key to society, 
From accounts of Phoenician merchantry 
To prophet‐preachings on the desert scrolls 
Through Caxton to this fledgling century, 
Record the goings‐on of history, 
So many moments & so many souls.  
                                                     12 
                                                 Paradise 
 
Sorry about the delay but Iʹve been hammockʹd up in my little slice of paradise where the internet is 
unheard of but the samosas are wicked! I last e‐mailʹd way back in Chennai, it seems so long ago 
now, where I caught a ship to the Andaman Islands.  The rickshaws in Chennai were the maddest I 
came across. I had one for the day for free in return for him taking me to some classy shops. For a 10 
minute browse he would get 50 rupees from the shop owner. One driver, however, nearly brought 
on mi temper. With the Andaman permit fresh in my hand & 50 mins til the boat left I got this 
corrupt geezer who decided to drive me around Chennai with the meter on, clocking up a massive 
fare. Once I realised his game I scream’d at him, storm’d out in the middle of a busy main road & 
jump’d in an honest rickshaw. Of course the boat was delay’d 5 hours ‐ but this is India. Spent most 
of the journey shaking off my first case of dysentery (have you ever shit blood?). Along with an 
Amsterdam whore I think a young manʹs first tropical disease is an initiation into manhood ‐ My 
body can do that!? Being thrown in bunk class with another thirty Western tourists was cool as I 
found a few new friends for the islands. As luck would have it one of them just so happenʹd to have a 
bottle of liquid acid! ʺAha!ʺ I thought, ʺThings are looking interesting...ʺ 
 
My first glimpse of the islands came on my fourth day at sea, when this deep & sheer mountain 
range submarine thrust itʹ summits clear in shades of leafy green. At first I spent a few days 
pottering about the fine Andaman capital, Port Blair, the highlight of which was a trip to deserted 
Ross island, the old British HQ. Now wylde Banyans stand on buildings grand, like some 
imperious Pompeii, wehere the White Manʹs Burden is more a ghost town in decay. Then, a group 
of us (about 12 in total) caught a boat to Havelock Island. I instantly hired a bike (my first one with 
gears) & razzed off round the island to beach seven (they don’t have names) & made camp on the 
beach. The next few days were spent swimming, snorkling, writing & playing chess in the village 
with the locals. Also Iʹve found the next new Olympic sport...hermit races. Basically you choose a 
hermit crab from the beach & place it in the centre of a circle drawn in the sand...first crab to the 
perimeter wins. Weʹve also been cooking for ourselves & some of you will soon be able to taste the 
fruits of my newly acquired culinary skills ‐ masalas & chapattis.  
 
My defining moment of the Andaman came during my second romantic interlude of the 
tour...Glenda ‐ a fine & feisty Celtic lassie. One night, while riding the rough track to the campsite 
(right by the sea & lit up all night by the brightest moonlight Iʹve ever seen) I was struck by a fine ass, 
pass’d her, stopt & invited her back for a spliff. Next morning I took her on a tour of the islands 
beaches, producing a moment to smile about til I die. On my left was the tumescent turquoise ocean, 
on my right the lush jungle, up above a perfect sun, down below a mighty motorbike, up in front the 
open road & right behind a gorgeous lady.  When spending a day at the office one likes to have 
pictures of sexy ladies to look at...I was sat musing on sonnets while her skimpily clad curvature 
splashʹd in the waves. At the end of the day we exchanged e‐mails & promised to hook up when we 
return to Britain.  The police moved us on from the site a couple of days ago & today I took a boat 
back to the capital, as two weeks with a bunch of trip heads is plenty. Iʹve had to soak my feet in 
dettol water and cover them in plasters for the coral has rippʹd them to shreds. Youʹve gotta be real 
careful with your cuts as they can soon go bad in the humidity (and the fuckin flies know exactly 
where the sores are). Iʹm catching another boat on Saturday, this time to Calcutta from where I shall 
begin my journey to Bombay & England. En route I intend to find a lovely remote spot in the 
Himalayas to write some poetry, so wish me luck 
                                                                                                 Port Blair 
                                                                                                  1st March 
 
                                                                     Departing for Andaman 
                                                                                           
                                                            Gazing across exotic ocean stream 
                                                    Mistlockt musings drift to distant Burnley, 
                                                   Where for as long as I breathe there shall be 
                                                     My friends, my family, my football team ‐ 
                                                         So far away, for following my dream 
                                                          I am a stranger in a strange contree, 
                                                        Tho slowly hookʹd upon its cup of tea, 
                                                 Darjeeling servʹd with a darling Devon cream. 
                                                                                           
                                                       The sun has fallen & the ship has sailʹd, 
                                                 The last lamps of the mainland shrink & fade, 
                                                         A moment to define me has prevailʹd 
                                                         Born of the apex of my third decade, 
                                                    Next time by solid ground my feet regaled 
                                                 Into youthʹs fleeting heart I shall have strayʹd. 
                                                 13  
                                        Near‐Death Experience 
 
Fuck me! I have been genuinely unnervʹd, the closest Iʹve come to death since a certain pasta I cookʹd 
a couple of years back. It all began when I headed down to the wee townlet of Wandoor for a bit of 
solitude. One morning I bought a ticket for Jolly Buoy, a tiny island open to visitors for a few hours 
each day. We got there & sure enough it was paradise, jungle, white sands & shallow coral flush with 
lushly colourʹd fish ‐ thro my snorkel mask there appearʹd an emʹrald phantasie kingdom. So I had a 
couple of reefers & did a spot of writing whilst tucking into my packʹd lunch (major munchies) in a 
quiet, shady corner of the beach. After a while I went to check on when the boats would leave & to 
my horror found they had fuckʹd off! I was completely alone on a deserted island with no sign of a 
boat anywhere ‐ the boats would come back in the morning but after taking stock found I only had 
one third of a litre of water & half a samosa (vegetarian).  
 
Across the waters fishing boats were hugging the mainland but they could not here my shouts over 
the sounds of the engines which chuggʹd over the waves, then faded with the boats into the distance. 
So I was shipwrecked ‐ & without a reality TV camera crew in sight! So, after stripping off naked I 
checkt out my possibilities. On one side of me was the ocean’s expanse (next stop Antarctica) & on 
the other, various islands of the archipelago. The closest one seemʹd a mile away & there seemʹd to be 
smoke rising from the jungle... people! After two abortive attempts to swim (not stoned enough) I 
tried to make a raft, which duly sank. Fish kept flying out of the water reminding me I was in 
tropical waters & I remember’d that someone had seen a four foot shark two days ago not far from 
here. After another spliff I thought fuck it, itʹll be an adventure & began to swim. After 15 minutes of 
easy breaststroke I look’d back & realised the current was sweeping me out to sea! Panic kickʹd in & I 
turnʹd round for Jolly Buoy, but the current was really strong. For the first time in my life I was 
dependant on my own strength to save my skin. I swam & swam & swam, my life flashing before my 
eyes ‐ no more black pudding from Burnley market, no more hollyoaks, nor more peachy lady 
bottoms! Fortunately, after a full‐on heave of effort my feet touchʹd solid & I collapsed in the sand, 
listening to my thumping heartbeat in a state of shock...thump.... thump... thump... thump... thump 
 
...thump...thump...chug....chug...chug‐chug‐chug‐ another fisherboat! This time I shouted as loud as I 
could & waved frantically & almost piss’d myself when I saw them turn for the island. I quickly 
dresst & greeted them passionately ‐ they were very curious about me ‐ & soon we were chugging 
out across the waters. I quickly skinnʹd up & pass’d a spliff round my three new shipmates & lay 
back in the boat to watch the magnificent sunset ‐ a sunset I was lucky to see! At their astonished 
village I gave a geezer 60 rupees to drive me on the back of his bike to my hotel where I order’d a 
huge feast. Apparently I was lucky not to have reach’d the island I was swimming to (with the 
smoke), as there was a good chance they might have eaten me!  
 
A guy from the Forestry commission came to see me this morning & they will be taking action 
against the boat owner, despite my protestations as to the otherwise. I figured if their chief witness 
(me) had fuckt off the captain couldnʹt get into trouble so I scarperʹd back to the capital. I catch the 
boat to Calcutta on Saturday so Iʹm gonna hole up in a hotel for a couple of days away from the 
world ‐ its too fuckin dangerous, man! 
 
                                             March 4th 
                                             Port Blair 
 
P.S. Top tip ‐ if u are ever stuck on a desert island you must wave a piece of material to signify you 
have been stranded (internationally understood). 
 
                                                         TSU‐NA‐MI 
 
                              Remember the host of the ghostly battalion  
                               Imagine them drown’d in a growling sea  
                             Beach‐huts for driftwood, corpses for carrion  
                                O sing a sad song for the TSU‐NA‐MI  
                              Sing to the outlying islands of Andaman  
                            As waves strip the tribesmen’s neolithic dress  
                            Ripping them out to the mad, frothing ocean  
                           Leaves nothing behind but waste & wilderness  
                                                    
                          Remember them fleeing the huge walls of water  
                       That snapped them & tossed them & made bloody piles  
                         The aftermath pale, she searchʹd for her daughter  
                          A sad scene repeated some three thousand miles  
                                                    
                              From Asia to Africa surged the wild sea  
                               O sing a sad song for the TSU‐NA‐MI! 
 
 
 
 
                                                      14 
                                               Admiral Akbar 
                                                          
How r ye doing mi old landlubbers? Just got off the old boat from Andaman & am tryin to shake off 
me sealegs ‐ wobblin all over the place I be. Just when I thought it was gonna be a pleasant voyage 
across the Bay of Bengal who would arrive at the quayside? That’s right, the dudes with the liquid 
acid. I didn’t take theirs tho’, I took a drop (licked from the top of my hand) of Steve from Buxtonʹs & 
had a jolly trippy time exploring my ship, the MV Akbar. The Westerners were apartheided from the 
Indians & we had a huge bunk class amidst the pipes that threaded thro the bowels of the ship. It 
was painted Kendal green & with all the ropes & rigging seemʹd like a giant Jungle Jims. 
 
Day two of the voyage started off mellow, reading in my hammock as it swung to the ships swaying, 
so I thought Iʹd try a bit of the opium again. The voyage was slowly turning into one massive mash 
up as the only option from hanging out in the crampʹd & claustrophobic deck was getting wreckt ‐ a 
choice most people made. After sharing some opium with this guy, he whipt out a bottle of ketamine 
(100 rupees any Indian chemist) & cooked it up right there in the bunk. I tried a line & this turn’d out 
to be rather erroneous as I had my first chundering whitey of the tour... 
 
I recoverʹd from the mess my mind was in & had a much smaller line of Ketamine which turnʹd out 
to be wiser as I then had a floaty few hours watching the ship scythe through the midnight sea. 
About 3 AM this morning the boat stopt & I saw we were at the mouth of the Hugli River. Around 
me ships‐lit‐up‐like‐space‐stations oozed through the murky blackness of the night. Come dawn a 
pilot came to guide us upriver (which took the best part of the day), waving to the bathers on the 
banks as we passʹd. As we did I was suddenly inspired to write a few psychedelic lines... 
 
                                                    Avataras 
                                                           
                           As the skipping stones skip, at the height of the trip, 
                               Drawn by the harmonies of Lord Vishnuʹs call, 
                                  I saw cross the waters navel rooted lotus 
                                    Absorbing the beateous bay of Bengal, 
                                Transcending to milk, pearly seaway of silk, 
                                  Thou lavender cushion of infinite white, 
                                  Surrounding the foetal spirit centripetal 
                               That sucks upon toenails painted starry bright. 
                                                           
                                        ʺRider, thou art welcome to India, 
                                       Saraswathi, I see, has smilʹd on you, 
                                      Thy mortal aura blessʹd in her prayer, 
                                     Thine energies hued in a rainstorm blue, 
                                       Come drape thyself in the Himalaya, 
                                For there, my child, thou wilt know what to do.ʺ 
 
So we came to Calcutta, a city virtually sweating humidity, a kind of permanent light mist hanging in 
the air. Tonight I find myself in a ʹposseʹ with four Australian girls (three single!) & two Austrian 
guys (one nice, one Nazi), taking over a corridor in a hotel. It feels strange again to be amidst the 
sensory assault of a crazy Indian city after the serene seclusion of Andaman. But Iʹm here now & I 
won’t see another beach til Bombay, so Iʹd better get used to it… 
 
12th March 
Kolkatta 
 
                                                15  
                                   Another Near‐Death Experience 
 
You won’t believe this one. I had spent a buzzin couple of days checking out the very London‐like 
Calcutta, including footy in the park & a trip to the races (didn’t bet just watch’d) ‐ plus a very 
pleasant time with the three single Oz girls bare‐chested on Ketamine in a hotel room. However, I am 
a sonneteer, & last Thursday morning I decided to take a trip to Plassey, 150K North of here to check 
out the battlefield where Clive won Britain her first important slice of Raj cake. The battle of is a 
microcosm of the British Empire in India. Despite having just 3.000 troops against 50,000, Clive 
somehow pull’d off the win. By promising the leader of part of his opposition’s army the Nawabcy of 
the region, he managed to sew discord & the guy buggar’d off from the field with all his men. What 
was left was defeated with accurate volleys of rifle fire. Thus, by playing off prince against prince the 
British slowly conquer’d the sub‐continent & held down a country of 300 million souls with just 
40,000 soldiers ‐ & their guns.  It was a cool trip & I hired a cycle rickshaw to show me what was left 
of any features of the field, all spent underneath a hot & shimmering sun. Iʹve hit the Gangeatic plane 
now & all one can see is alluvial flatlands at every turn. After a couple of hours pottering & musing 
on the dark dragonflies that darted hither & thither, my guide dropt me off at the bus stop where I 
hopp’d on a bus to Murshidabad, the capital of Clive’s opponent in 1757, the Nawab of Bengal. I 
noticed the driver was a bit reckless, but this didn’t phase me as I’ve gotten used to the crazy roads & 
nothing has happen’d...until now. I was happily cruising along in the middle of one of those days 
that makes life worthwhile when I blackt out. Regaining consciousness sev’ral hours later I found 
myself in a hospital ward, cover’d in blood & surrounded by my fellow passengers ‐ some hook’d up 
to drips, moaning & in a pretty bad way. The fuckin bus had smashʹd head on into a truck! 
 
I took stock of my wounds...a face cover’d in minor scratches from flying glass (even my pockets had 
glass in them), two deep cuts to the temple (which still throbs painfully) & a completely fuckt right 
shoulder. The hospital was pretty dire so after blagging a sling I snook out the back (they wouldn’t 
let me leave) & caught a train to historical Murshidabad.  There I found a room & basically slept for 
40 hours out of 48 ‐ minor concussion I think. I ate my first food in two days last night & decided to 
head back to Calcutta to find a doctor as the one in Murshidabad couldn’t speak English & just gave 
me these drops ‐ which are no good for a suspected fractured/dislocated shoulder. I caught the 6am 
train back this morning, which took 5 hours. En route I spoke to a geezer. It turns out the crash was 
big news & there had been two fatalities. My second near death experience in a week ‐ I hope these 
fuckin things donʹt come in threes! After a couple of days R&R I was feeling better til I hopt in a 
rickshaw pull’d solely by a man who managed to find ev’ry pothole between the station & my hotel. 
However Iʹve landed now & the geez on the train has given me the numbers of a couple of good 
doctors, so that’s tomorrows plan. Tonight, however, my favourite of the Oz girls (who are still 
around) is coming to mine with her pot to watch satellite TV & nurse me through my pain (hopefully 
naked but for a very skimpy apron), 
 
 17th March  
   Calcutta 
                                                                                        16 
                                                                     I Can See Dead People 
                                                                                           
Iʹm not dead, which is pretty fly if you ask me. The doc in Calcutta said its muscle damage & a 
dislocated shoulder, gave me a sling & some medication & I have recently felt a little better. The 
headaches have gone & Iʹm startin to get back into the swing of things. It’s been pretty weird the past 
week or so as Iʹve been full‐on zombiefied & its not that appealing a thought when you realise you 
are ten thousand miles from home in the middle of a crazy country like India. 
 
So, after three days in Calcutta being nurs’d by one of the Oz birds (unfortunately my libido had 
completely disappear’d in the smash, so no action ‐ but she did wash all the blood from my hat) I got 
on a train to Varanasi. I am never gonna complain about the English network again. My journey 
across those endless alluvial flatlands took 20 hours, it seem’d to stop and wait 20 minutes at ev’ry 
minor station & even a few that didn’t exist. But I got here early yesterday morning & boy am I 
impress’d. 
 
I took my first glimpse of the Ganges as the train roll’d over it on its way to the station. Its 
breathtakingly romantic, cushionʹd in a hazy mist & flank’d by some of the most gorgeous phantasi 
buildings I’ve ever seen. After being rickshaw‐whiskʹd to a hotel I took a stroll thru the cityʹs narrow 
streets ‐ very Italian. Varanasi is the holiest site in India & there are temples at evʹry turn. Also, if you 
die here you are known to be blessʹd & this brings me on to one of the most bizarre things Iʹve ever 
seen. At one of the Ghats corpses are draped in silk & flowers & placed on funeral pyres of bamboo 
bier. Their souls fly to the sky, their ashes sprinkle in the Ganges & their bones return to the soil ‐ 
very trippy. 
 
I found a much cheaper hotel today, & have unpackʹd...my library lines the shelves, my weed is 
looking good & there are monkeys masturbating at my window. I think Iʹll stay here a few more days 
as you can hire boatmen to row you up & down the river which sounds perfect to do some writing, 
lounging around a boat with some nice charas & a pencil. Tho’ a place of death, the place is also full 
of life – from the water buffaloes that wander up & down the riverbanks, to the huge snakes hanging 
from the old geezers necks. However, unlike many of the hippies I don’t feel exactly ‘comfortable’ 
here, so Iʹll soon head up to the mountains before turning south for the trip through Delhi & the 
desert to Bombay – where I’ll be taking a plane home on April 17th. 
 
 
                                                                                                        Varanasi 
                                                                                                     23rd March 
 
                                                                                           
                                                                                           
                                                                                           
 
                                          Long Way From Home 
                                                       
                          In aulden times, when men would leave the realm, 
                                  Growing with the spirit of adventure, 
                                The seeker of the unknown at the helm, 
                                   Defiant of hardships yet to endure 
                                                       
                              They would cry, ‘England!’ to a soaring sky, 
                               Bid Albion’s angels keep them from harm, 
                             Erewhile the shores recede, the sea mews fly, 
                                   & all is taken with an ancyent calm. 
                                                       
                                For he that keeps his contree in his heart 
                             When those flock’d about him flaunt another, 
                                   Tho huge, intrepid distances apart 
                                      Asia’s fastnesses, to America, 
                                                       
                                 They find a certain solace in the sound 
                           Of fellow tongues when stood on foreign ground. 
 
 
                                                    17 
                                                   High 
 
Hi, 
      Iʹm high...up in the Himalayan foothills. Just got here & mi shoulders still fuckin killin after some 
hard, bumpy travlin...but Iʹm gettin ahead of myself. Varanasi was cool, one day I got a boatman to 
row me up & down the Ganges while I skinn’d up & wrote a sonnet about the birth of Buddhism, 
which happened under a tree here round these parts. It was pretty special til we drifted past the 
burning ghats & the smell got up mi nostrils. Another incident sticks in my mind. It began when a 
young monkey got struck by a car. Suddenly there was a huge kerfuffle as all his tribe turned up to 
rescue him, stopping the traffic for a good thirty minutes! Also, my last night in Varanasi was spent 
watchin DVDʹs on an Amstrad green monitor ‐ very weird indeed. 
 
I took another massive train ride (8 hours) to Lucknow, where I was soon bookʹd into a plushish 
hotel. Another example of the Imperial cancer can be seen at Lucknow. The Raja of the area invited 
the British to his city, to forge trade relations. They duly built themselves a separate apartheided area 
call’d the Residency, from where they began they political scheming. Eventually they managed to 
take over the region & a year later the mutiny broke out, epicentred on Lucknow. The siege lasted for 
five dreadful months, a very dramatic story in itself, until the mutiny was put down. The aftermath 
of this was the British Crown took over from the East India Company & Queen Victoria became the 
first Empress of India. 
 
The next day  I caught a sleeper train to the mountains. The gauge is narrower in the north, meaning 
less space in the carriages ‐ we were packʹd up like sardines in a Kwik Save tin, mate! This morning I 
had to travel by cycle rickshaw & jeep to Naini Tal. It was cool entering the Himalayas, as all of a 
sudden the plains gave way to lofty peaks ‐ a mixture of English fells & Alpine heights. After another 
45K we arrived here, it’s like the inside of an ancyent volcano, with a lake & surrounded in forest.  
Iʹm not gonna be too active, no treks or anything, on account of my injuries. But one day Iʹm gonna 
go on a trip to gain a glimpse of the Himalayas at a place called Almora. By coincidence the guy who 
I bought the liquid acid off on the Calcutta boat is gonna be there. Now that is interesting... 
 
Naini tal 
29th March 
 
 
                                              Bhagavad‐Gita 
                                                       
                                     Let us transfer to a field of battle 
                                Where two armies are solemnly opposed 
                                     Forever on the Gangeatic plane, 
                                    Between, steering a golden chariot 
                                Drawn by four horses whiter than the eye, 
                               Stands Krishna, sacred keeper of the cows, 
                                  Him born when all India was asleep, 
                                 By him knelt Arjun in woeful weeping, 
                               Shedding tears for brethren he must affray, 
                                  The king buoyʹd up by his charioteer, 
                                From potent lips gallops the song of God, 
                               Defining how a man should live with peace, 
                                 & thoʹ the fight would be a bloody one, 
                                     All karmas laid a spiritual base. 
                                                       
                                                       
                                                       
                                                       
                                                       
                                                       
                                                       
                                                       
                                                       
                                                       
                                                       
                                                       
                                                  18  
                                             Mountain Stuff 
       
I left Naini Tal following the holy Holi Festival. After taking myself on a walk round the delightful 
lake I was persistently assaulted by paint splattering Hindus. They would wish me a happy Holi 
then proceed to throw paint dust over me. To top it off the kids would throw water on me as I passed 
their house. These are no conditions to compose poetry in so I set off the next morning. However, I 
got my revenge by throwing water from my balcony on the kids next door to the hotel ‐ great fun. 
 
The Himalayas are weird. As soon as the sun drops behind a cloud or mountain the temperature 
plummets. By night it reaches as low as 13 degrees! Iʹve had to shell out for a jumper, but it’s OK as 
Iʹll be home soon & Iʹll need it. Also, Iʹve only got a pair of sandals now so Iʹll probably have lost a toe 
or two by the time I get back ‐ if anyone comes across some spare shoes Iʹm a size eleven. 
 
The bus from Naini Tal wound me further & further into the Himalayas & after a couple of hours I 
won my first glimpse of the mountains & my first real snow since Xmas. They are cool, just rising out 
of the foothills reaching for the heavens ‐ a sight to wonder at. The valley mist soon reclaims the skies 
so you can only see them in the morning, but I think Iʹll take a trip closer to them one day this week. 
Iʹm in Almora now, & it’s off season at the moment (it gets busy in the summer when the rest of India 
tops 40 degrees) so Iʹve got an entire hotel to myself. For 150 rupees Iʹve got a double bed, colour TV, 
my first towels since England & a great view of the mountains ‐ perfect poetic conditions, 
 
 
                                                                                                  Almora 
                                                                                               31st March 
 
 
 
                                                                                        19  
                                                                      More Mountain Stuff 
 
So I found the guy with the liquid acid. Didnʹt take any tho,’ didn’t need to. Nine Kilometres above 
Almora on a ridge nestles the hamlet of Kasa Devi, a true poetic paradise, the blooming spring 
enough to bring on my hay fever. I trawled up there on an expedition in a jeep & stumbled upon a 
hideaway for serious Western smokers. Some guys have been here for years! It turns out this is where 
the geezer who became the Beatles Guru is from & he used to bring them up here back in ‘66. Thereʹs 
one good reason why ‐ marijuana grows in the street. Its true! Iʹm just walking around checking out 
the view & stumbling across ten thousand pounds worth of ganja crop. Its crazy! The Females arenʹt 
cultivated so they are not full of bud, but its still an awesome sight. No wonder the Baba sold me a 
bag for 10 rupees back in Naini Tal. I stayed a couple of days up in Kasa Devi, sharing a house with 
some dudes I met on the boat. It’s all very chillin, surrounded by breathtaking views ‐ especially 
early in the morning when the five peakʹd Nanda Devi range ‐ the highest mountain claimʹd by the 
British Empire ‐ is resplendent in all its towering, snow‐capt glory. I hired an Agatha Christie book 
for 10 rupees, bought 10 grams of charas for 2 pound fifty & chillʹd out in the sun. The one drawback 
was the chilly nights. My housemates had all the gear, including thermal socks, where all I had were 
sandals & a hammock for a blanket. 
 
                                                                        Before Nanda Devi 
                                                                                           
                                                       Up to the worldʹs rooftop I slowly rose; 
                                                       Checking upon the progress of the soul 
                                                      Appears a mountain prospect a la snows 
                                                           Of Austria, New Zealand & Nepal. 
                                                                                           
                                                           I left Almora for the Kashyap Hill, 
                                                         High commune of fairest tranquillity, 
                                                      Fresh dawntint drew me to the lofty chill 
                                                              Of this monolithic Axis Mundi. 
                                                                                           
                                                      It seems for me the lips of Laksmi smile, 
                                                    No sweeter place on earth to greet the sun, 
                                                       Here summonʹd by the lyrical lifestyle, 
                                                                I whisper a gentle dedication; 
                                                                                           
                                                           ʺUntil my feet have circuited the globe 
                                                        My thought & life with poesy I shall robe. 
 
Came back down to Almora on the 4th, one of the guys in tow. Book’d in to the same hotel as before 
& we had a real lad’s day. Beer, weed, two Champions League matches & pool. There is a cool 
snooker place in town with two swish baize tables & our playing pool on a full sized snooker table 
led to quite a crowd watchin the games. Despite my fuckt shoulder (the exercise actually did it some 
good ‐ 60% heal’d) I won 2‐0, the third game being abandon’d because we were too stoned. Caught a 
sleeper bus straight to Delhi last night & got in about 5. It has taken til now (11 am) for the sun to 
break thro the clouds of smog that hang over the city. Iʹve taken a reasonably starr’d room (200 
rupees) for tonight but move into a cheaper one tomorrow (100 rupees). There’s a couple of things I 
want to see here being all the British shit at New Delhi & the ruins of Tuqluquabad. Apparently the 
capital is thick with thieves so wish me & my wallet luck, 
                                                                                                         Delhi                   
                                                                                                      6th April 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                   20  
                                              Smelly Delhi 
 
The same reason why I don’t like living in London also applies to Delhi. Too many people, too much 
traffic, too much noise, etc. But at least London’s clean ‐ the streets here are like pungent sewers, flies 
everywhere, stinkin stagnant water & huge piles of rubbish in the middle of the cow‐crowded paths. 
I step tween mendicants, oxen, fresh stools, strays, tips & crows, strange monkeymen, hags, swine & 
then a sense of friendship grows, ʺItʹs one fuckʹd‐up sub‐continent, but wondrous I suppose!ʺ This is not 
doing the mozzy bites I picked up in the Andamans much good ‐ a month down the line & they have 
turned into gigantic puss flowing scabs! However, the place retains a certain charm & I have enjoyʹd 
the narrow alleys between some cool looking buildings around the hotel where Iʹm staying. Its callʹd 
the Diamond & my innate bagging ability got me a 400 rupee deluxe room (with marble bath) for 200 
rupees just by being cheekily ʹNorthernʹ with the Manager. 
 
It’s been a weird kinda few days in Delhi. Almost immediately on my arrival I came down with a 
sore throat, which I put down to the pollution (its terrible). Iʹve been constantly sucking strepsils for 
five days now. Iʹve also been a bit fluey so Iʹve spent most of my time in the aforementioned deluxe 
room resting, sleeping & skimming throʹ the 60‐odd channels. Most of them are in crazy Hindi, but 
the movie channels are cool, the footys on most of the time & Iʹm now hooked on Benny Hill ‐ the 
guy was a fuckin genius. Iʹve enjoyʹd myself doing nothing tho ‐ after 3 months hardcore travellin I 
appreciate the chillout ‐ I cant even remember the last time Iʹve relaxed like this. My excursions have 
been restricted to the early mornings, before the day gets too hot (about 37 degrees). Day one saw me 
take in the parliament buildings, built by the British. They were cool enough but crawling with police 
‐ of course I gave them some banter one guy was particularly unimpress’d when I persistently tried 
to buy his gun off him. Day two was a trip to the Red fort, about 400 years old, very wide, grand & 
imposing & beautifully preservʹd ‐ but closed on Mondays, tho I did enjoy the walk back thro a 
cleaner district. Yesterday was the best...I hired a rickshaw to take me 20 K south of the city where 
stands the ruins of Tuqluqabad. They were great! The empower Tuqluq decided to build a new 
capital (named after himself) which lasted until he died, when everyone packt up & moved back to 
Delhi, leaving the city to the decaying ravages of time. All that lives there now are bats & snakes. The 
view of Delhi from the battlements was pretty stunning, but my guide was gutted when I told him 
Iʹd spent all my cash on the rickshaw & entry fee. 
 
So, that brings me to today. In England I can usually shake off a bit of flu in a couple of days with a 
packet of lockets & some tasty pie, but if anything last night I felt worse, breaking out into hot sweats 
at regular intervals ‐ so this morning I hit the doctors. He wasn’t around for a couple of hours but I 
did speak to him on the phone. I told him my symptoms & he ask’d if I was takin malaria tablets ‐ I 
told him I hadn’t had any for a month & he told his assistant to take some of my blood. Iʹve gotta go 
back tonite at 7.30 for the results & any medication I might need, after which Iʹm gonna catch a 
sleeper train to Rajasthan & the desert... 
                                                                                       Delhi 
                                                                                    10th April 
                                                  21 
                                          Stoned Immaculate 
                                                    
Out here in the desert...  
 
Whoo! It was Salmonella...but just as I was ready to finish my tour with a flourish, the fuckin doctor 
stung me for a great whack of rupees for mi antibiotics & now Iʹve had to go easy on the spending ‐ 
so no shopping b4 I come home. However, health comes b4 wealth & I only really needed to buy a 
pair of shoes so that’s cool. So on to Rajasthan...its bloody scorchin man! From my train window just 
cacti‐dotted wilderness framed by jagged silhouettes of mountains – pretty magical really but still too 
bloody hot. I pullʹd into Pushkar first, a bustling place crowding round a small lake. It’s very holy & 
there was definitely some kind of ley‐line craziness goin on. The women are all garbed in psychedelic 
colours, the men wear nappys on their heads, camels whizz by yer in the street & me head was 
buzzin on the energy. Altogether a cool place, but, after beating the local chess champion with a 
cunning kingside attack (to the shock of the locals) I knew it was time to go. With funds now low I 
actually did a pre‐dawn flit from my hotel, stealthily stepping between the legs of the sleeping 
Indians in my hotel before jumping on a bus out of town. 
 
Reached Jodhpur next morning, where the first of the famous Rajasthan fortresses tower over all & 
are seen for miles. The city itself sprawls around the majestic walls of the Mehwangar fort, with most 
of Jodhpurʹs rooftops painted sky‐blue, giving a watery feel. Spent my time settling into a rickshaw‐
fuelled, cannabis‐driven writing rhythm, staying in a classy hotel, with a rooftop terrace & food on 
call. Had to book into a hotel near the train station on my last day, where to shelter from the heavy 
heat I watched HBO movies & shook off the last off the salmonella. Outside, the city swirled about 
me, a constant drone of beeping cars, bikes, camel‐wagons, buses & rickshaws all competing for 
whatever space they could find on the roads. Occasionally the smells of various street‐vendors frying 
pans would waft up to my room & drag me outside for the munchies (good weed), where I mingled 
with 99.9 per cent Indians. It is a far cry from the traditional tourist routes of Goa & Kerala, & I 
sometimes feel like I’ve just walked thro Blackburn town centre with a Burnley shirt on.  
 
After the chaos of Jodhpur it was a joy to reach the medieval city of Jaisalmer, very Italianesque as its 
narrow streets crowd the fortified hill on which it stands. Every building is built from a reddy‐brown 
sandstone, so the whole city seems to blend into the desert around. The city does have its down side; 
the constant harassment of the traders to buy something ‐ I mean fuckin constant, everyone leaping 
out at you to buy a plethora of goods, from the rajasthani violin to camel safaris. I was tempted to do 
the latter, but the thought of a sore arse & the blazing sun put me off. Instead, I have hired a moped 
for a pound or so a day & razzed happily around the empty desert roads. I stumbled across a large 
town called Kuvalla, deserted for two hundred years after the locals citizens thought the local taxes 
to high. In fact, only last weekend nine debt‐laden farmers have committed suicide...  
 
So all is well out here on the edge of the Thar desert. A few hundred k across the dunes lies Pakistan 
‐ but I aint goin that far, they don’t sell booze. One of the maddest things about being here, a long 
way away from friends, family, acquaintances & even the idiosyncratics of my native land, is that one 
feels a sense of ʹpersonality.ʹ That is to say, my self is pure & I do things for myself which please me 
& no others. The way I interact with strangers is also based purely on my personality. The realisation 
of which has inspired me to pen the following sonnet. 
 
 
Jaisalmer 
13th April 
 
Me 
 
I love the smell of garlic on mi fingers 
& The Raven by Edgar Allen Poe 
Canʹt stand a night of karaoke singers 
Or pain after stubbinʹ mi biggest toe 
 
Iʹm angry when the chippies charge for ketchup 
& Burnley losing to a stupid goal  
Iʹm noble when defusing a punch‐up 
Or savinʹ spiders from a water‐hole 
 
Itʹs silly watchinʹ synchronised swimmers 
& dafter when lads grow a milk moustache 
Itʹs mellow trimminʹ lawns with new strimmers 
& laughter as pockets cough‐up lost cash. 
 
                     ʹCos when Iʹm not writinʹ mi poetry 
             The little things in life are what make me! 
 
                                                          22 
                                                    Desert Ranger  
                                                            
Mount Abu is a great relief from the rajasthani heat & the dust whipped up by phrenzied tourist‐
leeches whenever a western wallet is opened. Amid all that flat sandy tank country nature has 
happily congregated some stunning Indian peaks ‐ the oldest in the world! I have found a great hotel, 
for only two pounds fifty a night, with room service & a mopeds for hire. I arrived here on a fifteen 
hour sleeper bus, leaving behind the dusty desert for the amazingly fertile mountains about Mount 
Abu. En route the driver invited me into his cabin for some kind of religious ceremony. By his side 
was a box of tricks, with ten or so buttons creating a series of swirling siren noises, which he used as 
we would use morse code. I began to recognise one, which I think meant ‐ I am hurtling round this 
corner at eighty miles an hour on the wrong side of the road & hope there is no‐one coming towards 
me. Suffice it to say I soon headed back to my cabin & blanked the whole thing from my mind.  
 
The native rajasthani is a colourful affair, from the lithe curly moustached men squatting on their 
haunches all day, to the busy women, who seem to be constantly pumping water & carrying it on 
their heads in metal pans. Yesterday I saw a group of teenagers building a wall in the blazing sun, 
like some Louisiana chain‐gang. I am actually rather more enjoying the animal life, who have much 
more freedom here than in the West; there are dogs, camels, boars, goats, donkeys & especially the 
sacred cows, swaggering about the place nuzzling through the rubbish for food. Talking of goats, I 
now know why humans call their children kids ‐ the sound an anxious young goat makes is identical 
to a wailing baby. On the same note, I have also discovered that Thomas Crapper was once a very big 
name in the porcelain toilet industry.  
 
The place is alive with fluttering butterflies & zip‐zipping dragonflies, adding a poignant dreaminess 
to the clean, green, serene scene. There is a gorgeous lake here, watched over by a ʹToad Rock,ʹ which 
has been poised ready to leap into the water for millennia. It reminds me of the toad rock in 
Tunbridge Wells where a young lover of mine, Alicia, currently lives. I have just returned from the 
sunset, shared by two thousand Indians, looking out over a vast fertile plane, made verdant by the 
recent rainy season, the sun reflecting off scattered rivers & lakes which would have dried up by 
December. As the sun reached the hazy horizon, a great cheer rose up from the happy crowds all 
about me, a moment reminiscent of our new years eve. I feel very relaxed up here, away from the 
cities, but almost too relaxed. To rectify this I am setting myself a mad mission to see a few places 
night‐by‐night, before reaching Jaipur for the England‐Australia cricket match this weekend. If I 
make it in one piece only time will tell, but it’s gonna be a hell of a lot of fun finding out...  
 
Mount Abu 
17th April 
 
Paneer 
 
First make paneer from bubbling pans of milk  
A little lemon juice to separate  
Freezing the cheezy tofu to smooth silk  
& place it by the veggies on a plate.  
Heat up the oil, two cloves of garlic fry,  
Toss in red onion & a pepper green  
Stir till the scent of cooking warm & dry  
Then add paneer with soft & salty sheen.  
Mix in the sauce, tescoʹs or one own brand  
Of soy‐sauce‐brushʹd tomatoes flush with spice ‐  
All the colours of the hot desert sand.  
Cook up & then your curry will appear  
To serve upon a bed of saffron rice,  
Washʹd down with a white wine or nice, cold beer.  
                                                  23 
                                           A Narrow Escape 
 
Comas Da!  
 
I set off from Mount Abu last week, my bus sweeping me down from the hill‐station on a series of 
serpentine roads, only a three‐foot wall protecting us from the 1000 metre fall. Safely upon the level 
plain we entered a country not dissimilar to England, the rolling, grassy hills reminding me of the 
peak district. Eventually we came to the mystical lakes & decadent palaces of Udaipur, which viewed 
from either a high vantage, or from the soft waterside, endow a moment of soul‐bathing serene. I was 
here primarily to buy weed, the desert being dry in several senses, & began to find myself on the 
backs of bikes & rickshaws, being whisked to quiet streets & peopleʹs houses. There the obligatory 
bartering began, including many a sample which befuddled my sharp shopping instincts, as these 
ʹmerchantsʹ very much intended. Buying weed in India is a case of damage limitation ‐ you know you 
are being ripped off, but its a case of how much ‐  but eventually I got a good deal & have been 
stoned ever since.  
 
To be born with an Indian life is a both a beautiful & a desperate thing, yet they all seem content with 
their lot. A hotel worker is on 1500 rupees a month – that’s less than twenty quid ‐ but he was happy 
enough. Another thing I have learnt is to get the time in India you only need to ask two different 
people ‐ work out the average of the times given & voila! It works every time. Drinking beer in the 
streets is frowned upon ‐ but sometimes you just fuckinʹ need one (bars are practically non existent) ‐ 
but be warned. A ragged boy collecting empty bottles latched on to me & follow’d me for about half 
an hour, urging me to drink up ‐ quite annoying!  I also thought I had seen it all, but then I saw a pig 
eating fresh cow shit & I knew I still have a lot to learn.  
 
From Udaipur I caught a sleeper bus to Jaipur. Despite its size it is surprisingly refreshing & has 
given me the best day of my tour so far. I met Steve & Kate here, after I had snorted ketamine with 
her back in Calcutta she bumped into Steve (one of the guys from the Andamans) & they were now 
are now much in love. Thanks to the wonders of e‐mail we had arranged to all meet up here & 
managed to get some great seats for the England ‐ Australia cricket match for cheap off a local. We 
had a front‐row couch, free drinks & a veritable banquet at ʹhalf‐time.ʹ The funniest thing was getting 
in however. The Rickshaw driver dropped us off right at the gate, were twenty or so cops peered at 
me. They would have seen me hide the weed, so I just risked it. One frisking later they found both 
the whiskey & weed. Now possession is six months & dealing is ten years ‐ but luckily the chief 
inspector was a rajasthani poet, & after listening to a few of his native airs, he gave me back the weed 
& the whiskey (which I hid round the corner under a bush) & let me in. The actual match was alright, 
a pre‐ashes blast, but England underperformed & watching them lose slowly to the aussies felt like 
having a terminal disease‐ the long certainty of knowing the end is near, but still brief moments of 
hope to keep you going.  
 
 
Alongside the cricket was the festival of Diwali, the Hindu Christmas. Jaipur became a psychedelic 
war zone as a million fireworks went off round the city ‐ one of which nearly landed on my head & 
another rocket fell over & whizzed by Kate’s head & went off under Steve’s chair. Very fuckin 
dangerous. The displays go on for hours & puts our drizzly bonfire nights to shame. But after the 
show the streets are quiet this morning ‐ too fuckin quiet. I find myself in a nice new hotel typing 
this. The manager of the old one became hostile last night & tried to overcharge me, so I left in a 
flurry of argument & was manhandled as I did so. Luckily I had the chief police inspectors address in 
my pocket, & on saying his name I was suddenly let go...  
 
Jaipur  
21st April 
 
Overtaking Lanes 
 
Two saddhus stood by the side of the road  
Staring at a truck that had spill’d it’s load  
By that, an old wreck that just would not start  
Bypass’d by a man in an ox‐drawn cart,  
& faster still; first a cycle rickshaw 
A dull green tractor from the days of yore,  
Auto‐rickshaw belching dirty black smoke,  
Bright red moped missing many‐a‐spoke,  
Some weird lorry’s siren psychedelics,  
Bus driven by two mad alcoholics,  
These by breezy motorcycle bypass’d  
Til last ‐ a white car of the Rajput caste,  
O lawless highways death‐dark angels stalk  
You know, it’s a nice day, I think I’ll walk. 
                                                        
                                                        
                                                      24 
                                                Bundi Bindi 
 
After an all‐night train journey the first hint of Bundi was the shadowy profile of a distant range of 
hills that swept the full length of the horizon. Bundi station is about 6k from the town itself, so I 
found myself along with six others, all crammed into a little trickshaw, like we were trying to break 
some kinda record or something. The town is a joy, far from the tourist trails with a great goblin‐built 
fort clinging to the steep slopes of the hill that overlooks it. It has been beautiful at sunset, stood on 
the jump‐london rooves with the monkeys, simply staring at its beauty.  I am staying with a very 
friendly family who have thrown open their house to the outsiders ‐ including the very noisy kids. 
My hosts even threw in a free motorbike, which I immediately sped off on toward this waterfall I had 
heard about. Unfortunately I kinda soon crashed into another bike, carrying four big pots of water. 
After a bit of hammering down at some garage I got the bike back into shape, apart from one of the 
brakes didnt work. The falls themselves were gorgeous, & I had my first chance in weeks to fully 
immerse my whole body in the emerald waters. Revitalised I returned to Bundi, stopping in a village 
halfway to dress the small wound I had received in the crash. It was a right Wild West moment, 
slowly cruising down the main street, all eyes upon me. After parking I was soon surrounded by a 
crowd of children, each staring blankly at me in confused wonder. I felt like a total alien, & it is here, 
away from the rickshaws, touts, tourists & internet shops of the tourist trail, that I found the real 
India.  
 
One day I went to buy a ticket & somehow ended up on the back of a guy’s bike who drove me 35k 
to Kota. En route I actually got out my notebook & tossed off four lines ‐ surprisingly legible 
considering the bumpy roads ‐  something that Byron, Dante & Shakespeare never achieved in the 
poetic spheres. Kota itself was yet another big noisy city & I soon scarperʹd to the refreshing relief of 
returning to my little oasis. The market here is busy, but the ginger‐dyed shopkeepers begrudge you 
the right price ‐ thinking it is a westerner’s duty to pay more. They may be right, for it takes a week 
in India to spend what I would in one day in England ‐& it takes a week for an Indian to earn what I 
would spend in one day in India. Also, I have just recently recovered from a bit of flu. After checking 
the symptoms for the Dengue (which is claiming lives in Delhi right now) & Malaria, I went to the 
local ayervedic clinic for some free, what I can only call ʹpowders.ʹ I have been ingesting them with 
honey & they seem to have done the trick, giving me the energy to continue with my tour. 
 
Bundi 
25th April 
 
Lines Written at the Jait Sagar 
 
If India can make a man a man 
More than the brothel‐nests of Amsterdam, 
If thro the chaos he can make a plan, 
Respecting Hinduism & Islam, 
If he can give the beggar his rupee  
& tip a tout charging above the odds,  
If he can read his Rajput history  
& choose a god but still bless other gods, 
If he can bear the rolling railway run,  
Find fresh clean waterfalls amid the dirt, 
If he can wonder how the Raj was won, 
Then pause upon the horrors & the hurt,  
If he can haggle down & know his daal,  
Then does he need to see the Taj Mahal? 
 
SPELL CHECK DONE TO HERE 
                                                                     25 
                                                         Hari Rama & His Magic Karma 
 
I am a strong believer in karma, especially the way it tends to bite you on the ass when you think 
you’ve got away with it. I once stole a couple of euros from a convent‐well near Dublin & on the 
walk back home ripped my clothes to shreds & by the time I reached Dublin, had in fact lost the two 
euros. Well, the bad energy I produced by sneaking out of Pushkar rebounded back upon me, for as I 
was leaving bundi & rajasthan ‐ 1000 rupees went missing from my room. I think it was the innocent 
acting ʹmommaʹ who runs it, who had spent several days lulling me into a false sense of security. Yet 
the fact iʹd done the Pushkar runner has been niggling me, but now that niggles gone & I feel the 
score is even. Yet Karma decided to stay with me a little longer.  I left Bundi on an overnight train & 
pulled into the bustling sprawl of Gwalior. I once played a music festival to raise funds for this 
mythical orphanage in India. I suspected it was all going to feed the organiserʹs coke habits, but how 
wrong I was. I was met on the platform by a driver, who whisked me away to the Gwalior Childrenʹs 
hospital & then on to the SNEHALYA orphanage itself. It is set in a compound in the middle of 
ʹbandit countyʹ, protected by armed gaurds. But inside it is an oasis of peace for thirty kids with 
varying degrees of disabilty. They were all delighted to see & play with me. I even found a guitar 
there & played them a gig ‐ but as they only spoke hindi it was difficult for them to appreciate my 
lyrical genius. The maddest moment was seeing this blind kid with a burnley top on ‐ honestly. 
Apparently it was donated after a recent visit by the RAF, but either way it was cool to see.  
 
The set‐up there was very colonial, with the medical volunteers having an upper floor to themselves 
& waited on hand & foot. Their was only one volunteer at first, a writer called sarah, & we shared a 
couple of days of literary bohemia before a couple of other girls turned up with a goa hangover ‐ 
which I soon cured with a big bottle of whiskey. I spent the mornings going out with the staff ‐ once 
to a school & once with a roving ambulance, pulling into villages to give out health advice & 
medicine. While they were doing this I wandered into a local school & gave an imprompti english  
lesson to kids ‐ great fun, especially when I sent out a kid for talking to much ‐ just like me when I 
was his age. On the way back karma struck again, for some guy who had just had a bike accident. 
Tho in pain his face lit up when our ambulance rounded the bend he had just skidded off. Back at the 
ranch the frequent power cuts got me into writing, both poetry & a couple of songs on the rooftop 
with a guitar donated by a scot. I got friendly with the local farmer ‐ the place aspires to self 
sufficiency. His house was in a corner of the compound, a bathroom sized single roomed cottage 
about three foot tall! How he fits his wife & five kids inside at bedtime I wil never know.  I left there 
this morning in a flurry of fond farewells & didnt have to pay for my stay ‐ I guess karma had 
watched my gig at the festival & once again balanced things up nicely. It was quite poignant saying 
bye to the kids ‐ we dont realise how lucky we are guys ‐ both to live in the west & to be able‐bodied. 
I set off south on the Shatab‐di Express, the fastest train in India, as wide as a plane & pretty 
luxurious compared to the charabangs i am used to travelling on. It took about an hour to reach Jansi 
& then, sharing a rickshaw with a yank, I pulled into Orcha. It is a great, quiet little temple town & I 
am hopefully going to spend a week in indian idyllia within its small cluster of streets.          Orcha 
                                                                                                                                                                 May 2nd 
                                                                                 26 
                                                                            Taj Mahal 
                                                                                   
The elegant ruins at Orcha were magnificent, haunted by vultures & flanked by two gorgeous 
swimmable rivers. It was a lovely place to spend a few days. Unfortunatey they didnt have ESPN. So, 
last Saturday, I hopped the twenty k to Jansi, drew out a little extra money & treat myself to a great 
hotel for the footy. My six pounds bought me veritable luxury & some of the best food Iʹve tasted so 
far. It has been a bit of a tradition recently, every Saturday trawling thro hotels to get the best picture 
for the six hour footython of the English Premiership. ‘We have hot shower,’ they say, or ‘we have 
good air conditioning’, or ‘we have nice price’ – but for me, on a Saturday, I am only interested in a 
good quality TV picture. Talking of which, the first ever Indian Big Brother – BIG BOSS – has just 
begun – peopled by bollywood actors & one token gay guy. The sexes are kept separate, & all the 
men are smooth, muscly types – far from the rag‐tag collection of muppets in the UK. My highlight 
of Jahnsi, an otherwise nondescript typical city, was playing MORTAL KOMBAT for one rupee a 
time in this little hut with a load of Indian boys – I managed to win a couple of games but they really 
kicked my ass.  
 
Then I finally saw the Taj Mahal. Agra is on the way back to Delhi, so I thought fuck it. Money a bit 
low now so instead of paying to get in, I climbed a fence & skirted the perimeter along the river. This 
afforded me a glorious view of the thing, quite spectacular really, with beautiful polished marble & 
an aristocratic sense of superiority. Once I had had my obligatory spliff there, I just bedded down in 
a scruffy hotel for the night. Next morning I arrived at Fataphur Sikri, another small town nestling at 
the bottom of magnificent ruins – the splendour of old India is truly only a memory now. Spent the 
day winding up the guides, who offer a tour for ‘free,’ then hit you for cash. I only took out 5 rupees 
with me, which really pissed them off. Maybe I was taking out four months of constant touting on 
them – but it was fun all the same!  
                                                                   Fataphur Sikri 
                                                                        May 7th 
 
Rajputana 
 
Gigantic Jodhpur  
Round mem’rable Mehranga  
Rippling sea‐surf rooves  
 
Oasis Jaiselmer  
From turret & tower gold  
Homesteads blend with sand  
 
Jaipurʹs pink lady  
Thro the Tiger Fort breaches  
Fledgling climbers rise  
Oer shanti Bundi   
Stoic Tarragarh hovers  
Grand & goblin‐hewn  
 
Visions conjured forever  
             In somakshetriyan fire 
                                                   27 
                                              Nearly Home 
 
Reachʹd Bharatpur a few days back to see some maharaja’s national park ‐ 5000 ducks shot in one day 
kinda thing ‐ & a quick shimmy over the wall gave me access to its serenity. Most of the birds haven’t 
arrived for the winter yet, but I saw a few owls & green‐feather’d things being stalked by the odd 
drooling jackal. After a serene potter about I hit the bus stand by 8AM & was soon on a bus to Delhi. 
The road was bumpy as fuck & on several occasions I was flung into the air, bucking‐bronco style, 
disturbing the nest of mosquitoes that made its home on the bus. They say that a mosquito never 
strays more than 90 metres from where it was born, but five hours later we had all travelled 200 k & 
reach’d the seething beeping cauldron that is the Delhi ring road.  
 
The bus dropped me off to see a dog shivering prostrate with distemper ‐ never a pleasant sight & a 
reminder that I should remain cautious for my last day in Delhi. Walking through South Delhi was 
rather a pleasant experience & being far away from the tourists & touts my view of the city has 
changed completely. The traffic & buzz was immense, but one sight I think will stay with me always. 
Two noble white oxen, a bull & his cow, were casually strolling down the wrong side of the road, 
gliding like two swans on water, totally oblivious to the imminent death‐on‐wheels that constantly 
approached them, then veered away at the last minute. I then stumbled across a lovely park full of 
cute bambi‐esque deer, where even the stags had fluffy antlers! There, I joined in a game of cricket 
with some Indian kids, who used bricks for wickets, getting to bat for as long as i wanted. To make 
things interesting I offered a couple of rupees to anyone who could bowl me out, which added to the 
excitement.  
 
Next day I was soon on a train heading south ‐ a great relief after the crazy roads. Ten hours down 
the line, was Chittorgarh. It has to be one of the dirtiest hell holes anyone would choose to live in. But 
I wasnʹt there to see the oily sludge in the street, nor be run over by the constant stream of trucks that 
whizzes thro this one road dungheap, but was there for the ancyent fortress city that sleeps on a 
tabletop plateau above the town. The fortress itself has been witness three times to the same 
gruesome event. Three times has an invading army laid siege to the place & three times, after a long 
siege & when the food has run out, would the outnumber’d defenders ride forth to face the swords of 
their besiegers & to die a bloody, yet noble death. While the men were doing this, the women & 
children would be busy jumping into a huge fire prepared for the occasion & joining the men in 
heaven. Crazy!  Went for a walk beneath it this morning, just as the sun peepʹd above the 
battlements. It felt like the last true poetic moment of the tour & I blew it a kiss as I turn’s my back on 
the history & thought, ʹItʹs time to go home.ʹ  
 
I arrived in my last port of call this afternoon after an interesting train journey. As Iʹm budgeting I 
took third class & was cramps up with & the object of humour for a load of Indians. Despite knowing 
no Hindi, however, I resorted to my good olʹ Burnley manner & we were soon having a whale of a 
time. Thank fuck, I was sure they were going to mug me. Iʹve book’d into a hotel for a couple of days. 
It’s got a telly for the weekends footy, a great restaurant underneath & is still only 90 rupees a night. I 
guess when you stray from the beaten track (which I have ‐ no tourists for 100k) it gets cheaper. Iʹve 
bought a sleeper train ticket (no more 3rd class) which leaves here at 7 pm on the 15th, gettin me to 
Bombay 6am on the 16th for my 6.30 am flight to London on the 17th. 
 
To tell you the truth, Iʹm lookin forward to it, 
                                                                                                
13th May 
Ratlam 
                                                                                           
                                                                                           
                                                                                           
                                                                                           
                                                                                     India 
                                                                                           
                                                         Nation of nations, hot & happy land! 
                                                      With spicy dishes morsellʹd by the hand 
                                                           Being a valourous & graceful race, 
                                                           Thy universal mullet firm in place, 
                                                     Despite taking three men to stamp a form 
                                                          Corrupted feudalism Laksmiʹs norm 
                                                                  A fanatacism for the rupee 
                                                                 Cements this secular society  
                                                          Of power‐cuts & cripples & bazaars 
                                                           Neath a pristine panapoly of stars, 
                                                          Of swastikas & cricket in the streets, 
                                                       Bounteous crops & oversugarʹd sweets, 
                                                          Ashrams soothing riot‐torn religion 
                                                         & always blaze the rays of Asiaʹs sun. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                                                        28  
                                                                                    Home 
                                                                                           
After a couple of days in the fairly anonymous town of Ratlam ‐ where the rickshaws are these huge 
monstrous petrol‐billowing three‐wheel dragons ‐ Iʹve now reach’d an especially humid Bombay, & 
finally completed my circuit of India. All four corners, north, south, east & west have been explored 
in 90 days of crazyness. Iʹm only a couple of K from the airport, but there’s 17 hours to go b4 check‐
in, so I think Iʹm gonna go there soon & pretend Iʹm off to the Costa Del Sol & mi planes been delay’d 
by some strikin Spaniards ‐ if Joe Bloggs can while a few inane hours in an airport lounge then so can 
I. Iʹve recently crackt into my last 100 rupee note (one squid fifty) for a particularly tasty sweet lassi, 
meaning Iʹve got enough for this internet, a meal or two & some mineral water‐ plenty enough to last 
me til breakfast on the plane 
 
The wait wasnʹt as bad as I thought as I hookt up with an English couple & a crazy French Canadian. 
We whiled the while with poker, chat & at one point the Canadian got out his Tablas, on which I 
borrow’d this Kenyan geezers guitar & we had a full scale psychedelic jam in the waiting lounge, 
much to the confusion of the Indians. It was sat with these guys in a cafe outside the airport when I 
had the last funny moment of the tour. For three months Iʹd kept a watchful eye on mi wallet, after 
ev’ry brush my hand would go straight to my pocket to check & nothing had happen’d. However, 
after spending my very last rupees on a meal & thus emptying my wallet some fucka stole it. Iʹd have 
loved to have seen his face when he openʹd it...pretty funny. The flight back was pretty tame after 
experiencing 20 hour train rides. Two square meals, constant tea, sexy, savvy hostesses & some cool 
movies. The highlight of transit in Kuwait was beating this guy 3‐0 at travel connect four, much to his 
arrogant annoyance. It was cool breaking thro the clouds over London, seeing Tower Bridge & the 
Millennium Wheel, b4 the drop into Heathrow. At the airport I got chattin to Stefano, an Italian Iʹd 
met in Bombay, who was faced with a £300 flight to Milan. I told him to fuck it off, come to my mates 
with me & get a cheap Ryanair ticket for £50 ‐ which he did. He goes home tomorrow & with him my 
last bit of Indian karma. So, I nearly died a couple of times, but I also got laid twice which seems to 
balance it out. It’s been well worth it, all this Asia malarkey, but I am intensely looking forward to 
sitting down with a copy of the Sun & swigging a can of Stella ‐ tho not so much the mist, rain & 
wind. I expect everyone is as lamb‐pale, but drowsy with the fragrant bloom of Spring, so see you 
soon, 
                                                                                                       Heathrow 
                                                                                                      18th May 
                                                
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                           
    On Departing India 
 
An olympiad since that piazza 
   Where first I flirted with the myrtle muse, 
Now knoweth I a new peninsula 
   Whose galaxy of monuments enthuse 
The spiritus, where all Earthly aspects 
   Have formʹd a microcosm of the sphere, 
Firm foundation for when I journey next, 
   Days of endeavour drawing ever near. 
 
Around the Raj was flung a faerie ring 
   & all itʹs channelʹd poesis regaled, 
 I have succeeded in my conquering 
   Where Ghengiz Khan & Alexander failʹd. 
 
         I smile a moment, musing on the wing, 
                 As oer the sea of Araby we sailʹd. 
         
                                                       29 
                                                   Landan Tahn 
 
Beep‐Beep‐Fuckin‐Beep! 
 
Yep, thatʹs me, back in London & back in Britain with the other 97 percent of the world’s baked 
bean buyers. India might have been dangerous, but in my home country there’s an accident every 
three minutes – I’m taking more care now I’m home than I ever did in India. So I have cast myself 
loose, without a home but breathing the sweet air of summer freedom. After such a spirit 
cleansing sojurn to the east it was quite a shock to be thrown into the lion’s den of Brixton 
underground station. The rush of life overwhelmed my senses & within 30 seconds I was offerʹd 
weed. Met my hippy hosts in the capital, Jimmy & Annie. I had met Jimmy on the steps if the 
Andaman office in Chennai, & had two terrific weeks of his company ‐ & eternal monologues! He 
is a classic old‐school hippy ‐ heʹd seen the Stones play dodgy pub gigs, the Doors free‐jamming 
on Venice Beach, the first Stonehenge free festival in 1974 & the Battle of the Beanfield ten years 
later. His girlfriend was a bonnie lassie, twenty‐five years his junior, & b4 I knew it was whisked 
off to her gig. It wasnʹt far away, at the Bedford pub in Balham. What a place, four floors of 
Georgian class, the toppermost being the intimate venue where Annie, sat at a keyboard & backʹd 
by her boys on brass, chilled me out completely. Other acts included a Danish bird on banjo & a 
Madagascan doing things on guitar that blew me away. Most bizzarre, however, was going on 
underneath us. The guitarist from the Scorpions was playing vivaldi, backʹd by a string orchestra 
full of fit birds, one of whom, when positioned best, was wearing some very skimpy velvet 
knickers. 
London can be a little much at time, but there are pockets of loveliness, like deer‐haunted richmond 
park. So in need of a little nature I headed for the wide open wilderness of Hampsted Heath. In its 
heart is the VALE OF HEALTH, an idyllic cluster of houses in the middle of the expanse of green, 
like a rush of magic mushrooms in a farmer’s field. From there I dallied through the Heath, by 
pleasant ponds & the excellent capital vista from Parliament Hill. From it you can see the telegraph 
tower at Euston, thro Saint Pauls & the Liverpool Street Gherkin to the metropolis skyscrapers of 
London Docklands. At the other end of the Heath I entered Highgate, drawn to the literary memories 
to the house where Coleridge spent his last years, & the little church across the road where he is 
buried. Nearby is the school where TS Elliot taught Sir John Betjemen ‐ all suitable poesia for my 
upcoming trip. I am to undertake a ʹGrand Tour di Poetiʹ to enhance my sensibilities & replenish my 
recently emptied bed of creativity. Fortunately this is to be paid for by Clapham Council, who are 
still paying the rent for my old squat in Dorothy Road. 
 
By now it hardly felt I was in London at all, but this sensation was soon eroded as I made my way 
through the sweating concrete cyst back to Brixton. This was alleviated by a trip to the national 
gallery to see my favourite paintings ‐ four epic, Napoleonic battle scenes from the French 
revolutionary wars that hang at the entrance hall. A quick zoom on the underground from Waterloo 
& back in Brixton I have found myself staying in this old Pub, the King of Sardinia. Itʹs wicked, 
instruments in the basement next to the old taps, acoustic guitars & sofas in the old pub bit & two 
floors of rooms, with a roof top terrace. I recently cooked Jimmy & Annie a curry to say ta (three tins 
of chopped tomatoes!) & after some hearty drinking & literary chatwith Jimmy feel chilled out to 
fuck.  
 
                                         Brixton 
                                       20th May 
 
Inner‐City‐Life  
 
In London every person is a passing thought... 
In cities every tree is a weeping willow 
Drooping sadly in the poisonous air, 
Airless stacks are the soul‐sapping pillow 
Where only money‐mongers proffer care. 
Builders labour by the dance‐all‐nighters, 
Commuters rushing to captivity, 
City‐litter‐louts & failing writers, 
Lust‐for‐life crushʹd by blind servility. 
Traffic encircles the concrete conurbations, 
Mobiles by the million melt the mind, 
Germs breed in the underground stations, 
This microcosmic mirror of mankind.
In London every person is a passing thought... 
                                                     30 
                                               Killing Fields 
 
After a few days in England its feels good to be away again. The highlight of my brief chill in the 
motherland was my induction into the Japanese game of GO. Apparently it takes a man 20 years to 
just reach the first rank of mastery of the game... it took me 2 games. So, with a yawning space in my 
war journals for the sights of world war one I set off from London to the fields of Picardy. En route I 
collected my bon amis, Miss Alicia Knight, from the Tunbridge Wells, feeling no self respecting 
sonneteer should visit the continent without a beautiful young blonde by his side. I love this little 
corner of England, a true poet’s paradise. I had fallen upon the spa town as morning dew, a Pegasus 
amidst the hippogriffs. The Wells is a funky little place, rich as hell, laden with great little pubs full of 
coke kids & cityites. Even Big Issue sellers are better dressed than me. We took tea at Linden Park 
cricket club, flankʹd by inspiring, neolithic sandstone formations, where young Aleister Crowley 
summonʹd his Sumerians. We wash’d down our salad with a bottle of pimms to the flash of willow & 
the dull thud of the bat hitting ball, then made exciting love in the verdant woods. With leaves & 
twigs stuck in our messy mullets we then went to the Happy Vally, not far from the Toad Rock at 
Rusthall, for a spot of sandstone climbing, before driving down to the ancyent town of Rye, a 
wonderful little place, with most of the buildings dating back centuries. In fact, I cannot recall such a 
collection of old buildings in such a large area. From there we hit the coast &, a few miles West of 
Winchelsea, found a perfectly poetic spot. We were perched atop a cliff, a private beach below us & 
the blue channel stretching out to France. Behind us was lovely Downland & to our right a forested 
coastal hill dotted with extravagant looking houses. I soon struck up a ʹmanʹ mode & whipped 
together a fair campsite, then found a pallet which a few ninja kicks had broken it into firewood. This 
was used to cook up a veritable feast, washed down with wine & the sunset. All this food had 
worked up a little appetite, & soon we were indulging in a little appertif at the cliff edge.... thrusting 
not too hard in case we fell.  
 
Sunday dawnʹd glorious & it was soon too hot in the tent, so we brought out the duvets & slept al 
fresco to the sounds of the sea. After a spot of topless, barefoot cliff scrambling we broke camp & 
carried on our little tour. At Dover we wandered the castle & got to see the rooms where the 
evacuation of Britain’s bedraggled soldiers was planned way back in 1940. Filled with excitement I 
determined on seeing Dunkerque later on that week ‐ but not after giving Alice a damn good seeing 
to ‐ of the sights that is. The journey from Dover to Calais was very relaxing, the weather perfect & 
the sea breeze real schwell. Once again the White Cliffs stirr’d something within me, as they always 
do when I see them recede. The train jump from Calais was a triumphant success. At virtually every 
station we swapped the sealed off carriages in order to avoid the enemy. Three hours later we pulled 
into the city of Albert (pronounced al‐bare). We were soon settled into some excellent, spacious 
rooms, my MP3 player blaring out of some little speaker on our balcony overlooking the town 
square, where the Basillica de Notre Dame overtowered all. Topping the church is a golden gilded 
statue of the mother Mary holding out, with outstretched arms, the baby Jesus. In the first world war 
the statue was leant almost horizontal after German shelling... it was said when she toppled the war 
would end. 
 
Albert was the British centre of operations during the battle of the Somme, & after a continental 
breakfast I left Alice to her shopping & went on a war walk. I walked for ten miles over the terrain of 
slaughter, takin a minute to traverse land it took the Allies three months to take. The countryside was 
peppered with war graves ‐ a small reflection of the fact that a million young men lost their lives here 
on this sacrificial ground. I had a beer & some soup in the village of Pozierres, meeting some war 
buffs from Sheffield. They told me that during WW2 Britain spent 200,000,000 pounds on concrete fer 
its airfields & other such juicy snippets, & I even found some rusty souvenier shrapnel balls. A 
shrapnel shell consists of 365 lead balls which shoot out like bullets when the bomb explodes, ripping 
all to pieces. I mean WW1 was mad, just sheer slaughter. A typical conversation at supper between 
generals on both sides would go, “How did you do today?” “Oh, I advanced 200 metres at the cost of ten 
thousand men!” “Damn it, I only advanced one hundred metres at the cost of twenty thousand men!” “Not to 
worry, there’s always tomorrow, have a cigar!”  
 
Eventually satiated of my nerd‐like love for battle I return’d to Albert I took lunch with Alice, then 
spent an hour in our stupidly small French bath. As I drank mi wine & dozed off the march Alicia 
proceeded to get drunk. Now shes cool until she gets pissed, when she gets very frisky indeed... but 
who was I to complain? 
 
Albert 
23rd May 
 
                                                  Calverly 
                                                      
                                As the Tesco truck thunders back to base 
                                       I find serendipity’s space, 
                                 A certain elegance claims the crescent 
                                    Like Pimms, poetry & pheasant. 
 
                                 Yonder, in old Decimus Burton’s park, 
                                  Sun‐scouts of Spring waken the lark, 
                            Gracious nature constructs a spacious wreath, 
                                    Am I far from the swarthy heath? 
                                                      
                             Winter’s proud trees stripp’d of leafy beauty, 
                                      Wait Gaea’s golden regency, 
                              The sweet vernal grass & the wild primrose, 
                                 Such stuff for the watching windows. 
                                                      
                               I may return with the lush blooms of May 
                                   & the roads they seem so far away. 
 
                                                  31 
                                             Garlic Frolics 
 
Following a crazy nights drinkin with the French, Alicia & I were woken by the sound of badly 
played bagpipes comin from the basilica facing the hotel. A few moments later its bells began to ring 
& it was definitely time to leave for Blighty. On our first jump I put Alicia in the toilet & paid  for 
myself... I am still gutted about the loss of that 5 euros, but admittedly the hangover had taken my 
sharpness away. We then found ourselves in the city of Amiens, an airy place with very fine public 
buildings. We breakfasted on the lawns outside the cathedral, while within the Catholics were doing 
some of the crazy shit that they do... the costumed old guy with a shepheards crook & silly hat 
splashing holy water on the French as they sang in that strange language of theirs. With my 
hangover dissapearing I joined Alice in the toilets on the next train & on regaining our seats hurtled 
North on an intercity, the day glorious & the plains of Northern France bedecked in a golden light. 
As we hit Boulogne the sun was beatin down, so we bought ice creams & settled down on the beach 
for a few hours, listening to tunes & laughing at the locals... but remember the French are wiser than 
they seem (as the Spanish seem wiser than they are).  Our final jump to Calais was the best. After 
finding ourselves trapped on a double‐decker with a pincer attack comin our way & the toilets 
locked, there was only one thing to do. I quickly got Alicia to crouch in a luggage space & covered 
her with a coat. When the conductress arrived she was only half a metre away from an 
uncomfortable Alicia, but failed to notice her.  I had to pay £5.50 to get to Calais, but on reaching the 
port I had a bit of a giggle with the conductress. We walked up to her on the platform, me holding 
the coat over Alicia, & with a curt ʹvoilaʹ proceeded to uncover her, much to the conductress’ chagrin 
 
                          Reminiscences Concerning a Curious Tour of France 
                                                          
                               The triumphant train jump from dreary Calais  
                                Our spacious rooms & balcony above Albert   
                            Took a minute to traverse the grave‐peppered land  
                            It took three brutal months of murder once to take,  
                           Playing marbles with the little rusting, shrapnel balls  
                          Glorious weather paints the plains of Northern France 
                                 The old city of Amiens & golden Boulogne   
                             Ice creams on the beach & laughing at the locals... 
                                                         
                                 At last! Our final train jump back to Calais 
                               Pincer attack approaching & the toilets locked,  
                         My girl crouchʹd in a luggage space, covered by her coat,  
                      At one point I thought weʹd blown it for I was using schoolboy  
                               Nous & ‐ons (for we) rather then Je & ‐e (for I)  
                         Luckily the lady assumed I was your typical Englishman  
                            Sold me a single ticket, & when the coast was clear   
                                We giggled all the way back home to Blighty 
Not long after, as our hovercraft whippʹd out of Calais, out of the hazy sea rose the famous white 
cliffs, merging with the white band on the horizon. The Seacat soon slow’d into harbour, Englandʹs 
first castle stood watch above the town, & with the time zones being different we had in fact travelled 
back in time. Passport control was a breeze ‐ a luminous‐vested border guy didn’t take too kindly to 
me claiming political asylum. I pretended to be Moldovan ‐ the gag gets them every time. On Dover 
beach I remember’d Mathew Arnold, who heard the grating roar of pebbles as the tremulous waves 
churnʹd up the shore, like Sophocles by the Aegean green. Scruffy tobacco smugglers escorted us 
through the quaint streets of Dover, where we found a tea‐shop full of nattering old dears, & slowly 
sipped on a pot of aromatic Earl Grey – the quintessential flavour of a refined English day. After the 
pleasant walk to the station & the usual half‐hour or so of waiting, we caught a clanking train out of 
town, the British Isles spread majestically before us. Once back in Tunbridge Wells I spent another 
amorous night, where once again Aliciaʹs infernal chainsaw‐like snoring kept me up all night, forcing 
me on the next thing out of here ‐ which just so happens to be a bus to Brighton in an hour or so. 
 
Tunbridge Wells 
25th May 
 
                                                          
                                                         
                                                      32 
                                             South Coast Cruise 
 
Less than an hourʹs ride from London wind the bustling Brighton Lanes. On display were T‐shirts, 
vests, oriental eats, florists, flatcaps & funky beats, plus a plethora of pipes, beads & bangles. Further 
still the shlinky streets were laden with bookshops & babes, socks & calendars, creams, laughter, oils, 
rings & everyone flitting around like schmetterlings. I walked through the exotic Pavilion Gardens 
deeper into the narrow streets of old Brighthemstone, past the vinyl hives & the mopeds, botanical 
lives & electric threads, flea markets, ironmongers & duvet dappled beds as to my ears swept the 
sea’s dull roar. I passed delicatessens & jewellers, pills, thrills, pubs, clubs, stars, bars, bags, slags, 
scarves & cars until I saw the sea‐slit sitting through a gap in the street.  
 
Onto the beach I tarried where waves crashed in onto the stony sands as like a grey slab to the 
distance the sea expands. On the wet rocks only the gulls were at play by a grey‐haired old geezer 
with scarf & beret. He played Robert Johnson & Leadbelly, sang the gospel blues, with shrieking 
copper slide & brown, tapping shoes. This is why I travel, for moments like these, melodic music & a 
warm seabreeze, with the buzz of Brighton flowing through my veins I glide barefoot along the 
promenade, past the throbbing clubs to a skeletal relic & its fluttering flocks of gulls, where barefoot 
upon the stones, beside the West Pier, sat with the sea‐brace, quaffing a cool beer, I watched the gull 
fleet sail the spangled wave.  
 
Ragabond Vagabond 
(Composed at an old busking spot) 
 
In the year of nineteen‐ninety‐seven 
I staged my very own Summer of Love 
Valhalla for vagrants…gypsy heaven… 
Conjuring words & music on the move 
 
The south of England play’d mother & host, 
In sand‐dunes, communes, woodland would I sleep, 
From town‐to‐town ‘long it’s sun‐kiss’d coast, 
Singing to the people to earn my keep. 
 
So many seasons passʹd those good times 
& since I have journey’d both wide & far, 
Sweeten’d my tongue in more sensual climes, 
Soften’d my song & accomplish’d guitar – 
 
But no! tonight my thread I shall not spin  
          So these memories remain, lingerinʹ 
 
I notice a kerfuffle on the stones ‐ masses of people, tables & glasses. It’s not ev’ry day yer break a 
world record, 225 people, a rollin shot of schnapps & 191 Californians canʹt bear to hear the news. I 
took my beer tokens to the Sanctuary Café, where an open mike night carves the atmosphere. 
Poets & musicians trade riffs, thoughts & tunes as I chillʹd at the back with roll‐ups & a beer. A 
Pagan goddess takes the stage ‐ tie‐dyed t‐shirt, alien eyes, beads, necklaces & guitar. As she sang 
my soul & pants were stirring, then she finished her songs & took her seat alone. I soon joined her 
with a stack of G&Tʹs & told her I wrote a little poetry. There is something about the ʹpʹ word  
that makes girls think immediately about fucking. After the last act, a strange dreadlockʹd geezer, 
axe in his head ranting about George Bush, we left the joint our eyes oozing lust. We drifted in 
moonlit talk by the waves, “I’ve got another guitar back at mine,” she said, “fancy a naked back‐to‐back 
jam?ʺ  
 
Next morning I took a train heading due west, past Shoreham‐by‐seaʹs strange docklands 
&, where Policemen still ride pretty bicycles, Worthings Old‐fogeys slowly bored to death. Then 
fabulous, romantic Arundel castle, rose like some grand Poseidon of the sea, ancestral seat of the 
Earl Marshal of England, who runs all the royal coronations & funerals. Thinking about posh nobs 
reminded me of a friend. I changed trains at anonymous Barnham junction & trundled four miles 
to ʹBuggar Bognorʹ Regis. One of those places you laugh about til you get there, then realize its a 
cool little place. From the termini I follow the throb of music to the stony beach & the Selsey Bill 
curve. The annual Rox on the Prom was kicking off ‐ Bognorʹs best bands strumming like souls 
possessed. I pass’d the townʹs perfectly tacky attractions, past the whelks & half‐tanned beached 
whales, the crazy golf, & the cockney concentration camp that is Butlins, complete with millenium 
dome. A half mile later I reach’d the charming flat village of Felpham, where my mate Gyles had 
bought William Blakeʹs old cottage, imagining that poet’s spirit would help his own paintings ‐  
I found his stuff remains as wish‐wash as ever. Gyles chopp’d out a line of Peruvian flake, clad as 
ever in some strange Eastern regalia, a far cry from his strict Etonian upbringing. Then wine 
bottles in hand we hit his yellow mustang & hit the Bognor plain – a wide expanse of flattenʹd 
fields, framed by sea & down & pierced by the glorious spire of Chichester cathedral. 
 
We cruised thro darling streets where Keats once mused ‐ past a gothic market cross & modern 
university campus ‐ & rode ride the quiet hedge‐lined lanes up to Goodwood to enjoy the famous 
Festival of Speed. The Ascot of Motor Racing was in full swing, when cars of every era jostled for 
public attention. Gyles park’d his Mustang with the 50’s grand prix cars, steam carriages, land‐
speeds & crazy little soap boxes. After pimms & revs we went up to Goodwood House for the 
annual cricker match between the local nobs & the leading lights of the world of cars – for example 
Murray‐Fucking‐Walker was Umpire. Suddenly WW2 Spitifres flew low above the crease & 
everybody huzzah’d loudly. Come nightfall, I was plied with spent cocktails thro til midnight, 
when I found myself romping naked with a girl call’d Priscilla.Aristocratic blood breeds sexual 
deviants & I squirm’d as the croquet mallet made an appearance. Exhausted, I spurn’d her offer of 
a cat o nine tails flogging, so giggling & wiggling she left to find more prey. These fucking people 
own our country, I thought last night, trying to unloosen the silken, ermine scarf that tied me to 
the old oak four‐poster. 
                                               Chichester 
                                                 30th May 
                                                                    
                                                                 33 
                                                           Play Up Pompey 
 
I enter Hampshire by the way of Havant, Bedhampton & the Arlington marshes ‐ four square miles 
of nature preserve, seasounds & occasional scatterings of birds. A single rambler & a couple of 
fishermen share the wide panorama the walk affords; The long sweep of Hayling island harbour 
which almost meets Southsea at the mouth, the tall buildings of Portsmouth city centre & the houses 
that climb up Portsdown Hill where stand the forts of Palmerston’s Folly. Portsmouth is an island, a 
small channel seperates her from the British mainland. Despite her rough & ready facade her local 
lary lads & their constant ʹmushʹ sheʹs an unofficial gem of the islands‐ a funky bohemia of great fish 
‘n’ chips, the sunsoakʹd idyll of Southsea shore & the fifty‐pee bookstore on Albert Road. I rummage 
about a bit & pick up a slick, little, green volume ‐ Keats’ delicious poems of 1820, a suitable tome for 
my poetic meandering. Skimming thro the book I hit Waverly Road, knock on the door of a dealer I 
once knew. A large lesbian answers in a fluffy pink leotard, piercings in places I never knew you 
could pierce. She looked me up & down as if to say, ‘What the hells a man knocking at our door for?” 
“Eh… is Eli in, loveʺ “Yeah, she’s in love with me!ʺ I finally get in & after the formalities I find Iʹm a few 
ecstasy tablets to the good, little pink ones with a smiling face on the front & soon Iʹm off to paint all 
Pompey with my love. 
Itʹs the last ever gig of the funk‐ass Mambo Juice. Thirty‐strong, multi‐national drumming collective ‐ 
that’s a hell of a lot of drums & noise. No wonder theyʹve all gone deaf & callʹd it a day. As the last 
pounding bass‐line comes to a close they pull out their ear‐plugs & hug like old amigos & back in 
Waverly Road their practice room neighbours throw a wild party. We all hit the glass Pyramid by 
Southsea promenade, for a rock night with all the local painted Goths where I, having pills amidst 
the pure beer bedlam, hook a couple of black‐lipp’d blondes from the mosh‐pit. After the show & the 
full‐moon shennanagins I find myself partying with twenty Goths, made up to the max crammed 
inside a tiny flat. Grooving on pills I play a set of classics, got off with one of the blonde goths in the 
bath, ut when she went home to get her stash of weed I got off her her mate ‐ it was a terrible faux 
pas. Apparently I had broken some sacred goth code or something, & my tunes were actually ʹfuckin 
shite man!ʹ  
 
“What do you mean you don’t like Betty Boo!” I shouted as three punks threw me out into the morning. I 
take a walk all thro the gull‐squawking morning along Southsea promenade, the lands first 
waterfront, flanked by wide common & gardens of roses. A tudor castle & rusting D‐Day vehicles, a 
vast, vainglorious monument to the dead, the solent full of sail & steel & seagull. The Isle of White so 
close you could reach & touch it, Clarence Pier, mast Old Portsmouthʹs mast‐strewn harbour, HMS 
Warrior ‐ gigantic iron‐clad relic, HMS Victory ‐ Nelsonʹs imperious flagship, splendid specimens 
from the age of steam & sail! 
 
Walk’d to the ferryport, buying wine & pasta en route. I bought a ticket on the 1:15 Cherbourg boat 
for a paltry nine squid & found myself the only foot passenger. I felt like royalty with all the attention 
I got, my own private bus & bodygaurds. Once on the boat I was joined by the car passengers & we 
began to pull away from England. I celebrated by munching the pasta & downing the wine. As we 
rounded the Isle of White, but then the seas got choppy & I was soon chundering a bright red vomit 
into a sink. This help’d, however, I was able to spend the rest of the voyage without wishing I was 
dead. Pulled into Cherbourg at 8PM, a pleasant enough ‘feel,’ if a little quiet. There was no train east 
so I found a reasonable hotel to chill in before tomorrow’s early start, reading Keats’ major odes.  
 
Cherbourg 
31st May 
 
 
 
                                                      34 
                                                   D‐Day 
 
War! What a crazy thing. Picture yourself walking through a field with a load of folk... all of a 
sudden another bunch of folk with various death‐dealing instruments turn up & everybody starts 
killing everybody else. Itʹs not like on the playstation when you get another go, but for real! Years & 
years of some mothers love & care had gone into making these lives, just to be extinguished in a flash 
of violence. I count myself lucky to be existing today, the threat of warfare far removed from my 
daily affairs. War still happens, but always somewhere obscure & never a threat to my person or 
ideology. But it hasnʹt always been that way, less than a century ago young men like myself were 
queuing up to die in droves, all in the name of King & Country. It took two gruesome world wars, 
about 75 million deaths & a bomb that could murder thousands & lay whole cities to rest before man 
finally got his act together & realised that Peace was a more suitable path for him to progress along. 
 
On my own one‐man rambo‐style mission I awoke before dawn, then shower’d & walk’d sleepily the 
half‐mile to Cherbourg station. The jump to Carentan went ok ‐ the guard being probably still asleep. 
From Carentan I set off walking for the D‐Day beaches, pausing for a caffine fix in a roadside café. 
On emerging I found Dawn flushing the sky & set off walking, high in spirits & composing poetry as 
I went ‐ as Bob Dylan said it is best to write in the jingle jangle morning. After the sun rose I half‐
heartedly tried to hitch, as there were no buses operative in the idea. Somehow, despite my 
unenthusiastic use of the thumb I managed to blag a lift off a woman on her way to work at La 
Blanche. She drove me a few K thro the town of Isigny‐sur‐mer, dropping me off by a road‐sign. 
Painted in bold white capital letters upon it were the words, ‘OMAHA BEACH.’ 
 
In good spirits (despite the rain) I soon polisht off another 7K & arrived at the surprisingly 
picturesque fishing village of Grandcamp Maisy. The harbour was full of sailing vessels & mi old 
sealegs gave a slight wobble. Bought some food with my schoolboy French & began to walk along 
the invigorating coast, picturing the D‐Day phalanx of the Royal Navy out at sea. An interesting 
feature was seeing the Eastern shoreline of the Cotentin peninsula stretching into the distance. At one 
point nature call’d & I had to do a poo. Just as I was wiping mi ass a car pull’d up. Waited 
nonchalantly for five minutes hiding the steaming pile, but he would not go away, so I just left… the 
look on his face as the Frenchman saw my poo was priceless. Soon after I found myself climbing up 
onto some small yet rugged cliffs. The way led me to the Point du Hoc, the headland storm’d by the 
US Rangers back on that bloody day in 1944. It was really cool, just as the Allies left it; broken 
bunkers, massive grassy craters & huge slabs of concrete shatter’d by the Royal Navy’s shelling.  
 
While seeking shelter from the rain in one of the bunkers I met a group of 3 English warbuffs. The 
cry, ‘Brits on Tour’ went up & they offer’d me a lift back to civilisation. It was great fun chattin away 
with them in the car & they fill’d in the gaps in my research effortlessly. They even knew the gauges 
of bullets to various obscure weapons…cool! We took in Utah beach ‐ which was pretty empty apart 
from a couple of landing craft rusting in the sea‐spray. Not far from there was hte village of Saint 
Mere‐Eglise, sight of the 101st airborne landing in ’44. There was a model of a US paratrooper 
hanging off the church spire which was a bit tacky but gave the place character. After a couple of 
beers the guys had the decency to drive me all the way to Cherbourg. I said au revoir at the 
hypermarcher where I have just pickt up six bottle of French red for a measly £1.29 a bottle. In my 
possession I have a return ticket to England, which many young lads never had the fortune to posses 
way back on the original D‐day. 

Cherbourg 
June 1st 
                                                 35 
                                               Capital 
 
It’s been a bit mad since I was in France. The voyage back was unusual as there was a force 8 gale 
blowing up the channel. Unfortunately the Queen’s harbour master at Portsmouth thought it too 
dangerous to berth & we had to wait. To avoid us getting restless we were entertain’d with bingo 
(for toblerone) until finally treadin soil at 12:30. P&O were very kindly putting on free taxi’s, so I 
got one all the way to Brixton, where I knew there was a party goin on. They were happy to see 
me, but I’m sure they were happier to see the 6 bottles of red. It was a buzzing night, where a band 
called Armitage Shanks (named after the toilet bowl for free advertising) set up an all night jam 
session. It was a great feeling to picj up a bass guitar & lay down a few grooves with the local 
musical fraternity. One‐by‐one these mad rastas turned up & began to beat their drums, until a full 
scale tribal dance was kickin off, surrounded by a full‐on pill‐poppin’, wine‐swillin’ hippy rave! 
The musical montage was kicking off big style, all drumming, shouts, clapping & chanting & me 
goinʹ wild to the symposium of beats. Out came the free food & soon old friends were touching, 
entwining their painted bodies & after an extremely strong dose of peyote I joinʹd in with all the 
hippyfied festivity, on an intergalactic mission, at light speed, thro the electrical machinery of my 
mind. I mean, despite all the chaos & the dirt, the capital knows how to party, & party we did, all 
the way til dawn, which was greeted on the pub’s roof with a few spliffs & lines of ketamine. Thus 
full of life & drugs I decided to go on a strut round London. 
 
I set off in the calm of early morning & thought Iʹd spend a day in the city. I am an Englishman & the 
sensation of hitting the countrys core & the capitalʹs heart is a great one. So many of my fellow poets 
have passʹd through these streets & though the skyline has changed vastly since, the essence remains 
the same. The wide Thames looping lazily through the city, past Westminster & its gothic spires on 
its way to the North Sea, surrounded by the teeming huffle‐puffle of humanity. London is so vast a 
place, with so much going on & so many places to see, that I cannot hope to bind them within the 
confines of one of my little e‐mails. However, yesterday was a typical one, with visits to some famous 
wets‐end landmarks, from the Mr Wuʹs all you can eat Chinese buffet down Soho to my favourite 
Napoleonic battle‐paintings at the entrance‐hall to the National Gallery. I also had the delight of 
hooking up in th evening with one of my old flames, a sexy red‐headed Geordie called Ruth, whose 
dad used to be in the seventies folk band, Lindisfarne. She works at Selfridges & after meeting up we 
went to see the Mousetrap by Agathie Christie, that pillar of English literature. I also paid homage to 
other great English artistic pillars, by visiting the paintings of William Blake in the Tate Gallery, & 
sneaking in the back door of Westminster Abbey ‐ which coincidentally leads to Poetʹs Corner. 
 
London 
June 3rd 
 
 
 
 
Tower of London  
 
Upon Tower Hill the angry mob calls 
To the hooded axeman, 
                                      ʺOff wiʹ ʹis ʹead!ʺ 
 
Traitors believed theyʹd be better off dead 
Than a rottin ghoul in these devlish holes… 
Thousands of epitaphs scrawlʹd into walls 
Tongue worn by black tongues… 
                                                     In this clammy dread 
A doom‐dripping gloom from which all hope hath fled, 
                       A phantomʹs tortured wail rises then falls. 
 
Thumbscrews, Iron maiden, stretchʹd on the rack 
Flailing cat ʹoʹ nine tails clawing the back ‐ 
Foul instruments of an inquisition. 
What cruel devices have we in their place, 
In this age, to form an equal grimace? 
 
                                Try sitting throʹ a full Eurovision! 
 
 Poetʹs Corner 
 
Where art thou now, dead poets, the fine dust 
Of each soul‐wrought line by time is scatterʹd 
& lies, a thin shroud, oer plaque, tomb & bust, 
Til colomns of church & state lie shatterʹd. 
 
My fingertips grace the grooves of the names 
Of those rare few who sought a nobler truth, 
Whose burning thoughts of empyrean flames 
Embarkʹd on an eminent path of youth. 
 
My mistress muse, O temptress dragoness, 
Has brought me to this hallowʹd space today, 
Tho have no right to be here I confess, 
Willowing blindly down the poet’s way. 
 
        But such monumental pangings as these 
          Sets my craft drifting on spangling seas. 
                                                                          
Romantic Liasons 
 
Twas a quintessential English evening 
All about town & the capitalʹs core, 
On my arm a wonderful flutterling 
Perfectly amenable to the tour. 
 
We met in a wine‐bar off Trafalgar 
To delve within a cosy eaterie, 
Then took our places at the theatre 
With Dame Christie & her twee company. 
 
So the night brimmʹd a goblet romantic 
& our spirits they sparklʹd as the stars, 
Dabbling with the gentle alcoholic, 
Floating, flirting, throʹ my favourite bars... 
 
Gently nibbling the lobes of thine ear, 
Whispering, “My darling, I want you, right here… 
 
                                                     
                                                     
 
 
                                                  36 
                                            North & South 
 
Just finished the craziest rock n roll tour since Right Said Fred toured Humberside. A guy from the 
King of Sardinia asked me if I could play bass for the Armitage Shanks (his regular guy had just been 
sent back to South Africa for not having a visa). It was a two‐day tour of London, North & South. Norf 
oʹ the rivva, we hit Camden. On a sunny day the place  is as cool as ever & I even shelled out £35 on a 
pair of trousers after being sucked into the local funk. In shock from my purchase I bought a gigging 
shirt for a quid from a charity shop, somehow hoping to offset my folly! Come evening we played at 
the the Mint Bar, in the heart of Camden, & after passing on all the hard work to our promoter we 
found ourselves playing in front of a great crowd, full of old friends & new, supported by another 
cool band & this Dj I met down Brixton who played all the old Hendrix, Zeppelin & Madchester 
classics. After everyone had gone buzzing off home we had a private rave from, playing all sorts of 
Aphex Twin like grooves. From there we hit a rave in Hackney & the next night a wicked party 
down in New Cross before returning home in the wee hours of Sunday morning. During the 
weekend I got engaged! Itʹs not proper love like, but one of my good friends is a Croatian lady & she 
needs to marry a brit to stay in the country. I said Iʹd do it cos Iʹve always wanted to marry, less for 
the lifetime commitment & more for the stag‐do in Ibiza with the lads!  
Sahf oʹ the rivva, last night, we were at the Ivy House in Peckham for a great wee gig. It is run by this 
cool old dude who played with the sex pistols a few times back in the seventies. There were several 
acoustic acts on before us, then a wicked band from Oxford & finally us guys headlining the night. 
The candlelit atmosphere was swell & we were playing in front of these thick, golden, velvety 
curtains ‐ very retro. After the gig I found myself heading back to our hosts house for wine, weed & 
jamming thro the wee hours before departing with our Japanese groupie, Yoko ‐  which reminds me 
of the age‐old adage, ‘every great band needs a yoko!’ Now I love my pills, taking ecstasy is like putting 
ketchup on the chips of life, but apparently by playing straight I had put on a good show (for once 
there were no shouts of ʺstop gurningʺ coming from the crowd), so I might try it again sometime. We 
spent the night at the pub in Brixton, where I found our drummer in bed with my fiance, which is 
kinda funny. Not long after that a mad spanish girl (who cant get out of bed without taking MDMA) 
kicked us out for being too noisy ‐ so we all slept in the van, smoking weed. However, she also called 
the cops on us who came & confiscated all our stash! Rock n fuckin roll! 
 
Brixton 
June 6th 
 

                                    The Esoteric Art of Bass Guitar 
                                                     
                               My essential thoughts on playinʹ the bass 
                              Are explore the depths of yer greatest riffs, 
                      Learn the grooves, scales, styles, chords, patterns & grace, 
                            Tune up before yer skin‐up pure skunk splifs, 
                           It’s not the note count that counts it’s the space, 
                            Music must mean more than money & health, 
                        Root‐notes‐while‐U‐wait, Blues, Funk, Slap, Fretless, 
                            Find the best band (don’t be dust on the shelf), 
                                 Embrace the lifestyle of bass to excess, 
                                  To influence be influenced yerself; 
                                Pepperland panache is the purest Paul, 
                                    My Generation’s Entwistle solo, 
                                   Jack Bruce on Berlin,  MDM‐amo, 
                            Flea’s lightning groove & Mani’s mellow roll. 


 
                                                      
                                                      
                                                      
                                                      
                                                      
                                                 37 
                                           Riding the Rails 
 
I am now officially on a ʹPoetʹs Tourʹ & left London yesterday about 2PM. The reason being I have 
been asked to appear in a play up in Penrith. Apparently they need a ʹcolouredʹ guy in it & there are 
only three in the whole of Cumbria. So I set off jumping trains, headin north. It felt nice to get outta 
the capital. It kinda clogs up yer mind with crap & you ened up ranting at Hyde Park Corner at 
whoever will listen (usually one person). On the first train I noticed another girl was doing exactly 
the same thing, so I began to chat her up (we had at least one thing in common) & now I’m going to 
visit her in Norwich in a couple of days! She has lovely curly hair, eyes like a solar eclipse, some 
great personalities & lives in Norwich. I was going to follow her straight there, but I’d already 
arranged to see a mate of mine first.  first His name is Gaz & he lives in the village of Hare Street, 
near Bishopʹs Stortford. Heʹs an MC & he gave me an exclusive live performance of his latest rhymes 
over Pizza, chips & wine. This was followed by a trip to the Fox & Duck pub in the charming 
townling of Buntingford. He had no cash, but his album is on the jukebox & he proceeded to run up a 
huge bar tab ‐ great. After closing I found myself at some random guys house (who was in Scotland‐ 
Gaz just burst in on the house sitter sayin everythin was cool) to smoke spliffs & drink vodka til I 
passed out, while this mad bird was gettin her chuff out for all to see (ah Southerners). 
 
Woke up at Gareths (how, I do not know) who was all dressed for work (how, I do not know), tho 
still pissed. He put me on a bus to Royston, which wound throʹ the Hertfordshire countryside & 
villages ‐ very romantically rural. From Royston, I travelled to Cambridge to meet an old Polish 
fuckbuddy ‐  God she’s blossomed! I popp’d a secret pill in the toilet & she show’d me around King’s 
College, an immensely poetic experience in my current state of mind. Cambridge is nice & it’s 
students well‐dressed, if a bit nerdy.  After a beer or six we headed back to hers for brews & 
spliffage. There was no sexual activity but she read me some sublime Polish poetry, which I found 
more rewarding. As she read her smile melted my heart & I felt struck by the femme…a rare & 
beautiful moment in my life. Woke up on the floor by Goska’s bed, the bellringers of Cambridge 
doing my fuckin head in. So I got up & took an early morning walk around the town, musing a 
sonnet as I did so.  Once back, we breakfasted in Kings’ refectory, a splendid archaic room, altho 
portraits of ancyent Professors putting me off my beans. After this she took me on a pleasant walk 
around the rest of Cambridge’s gothic colleges, including Christ’s ‐ Milton’s old haunt. As I said 
farewell at a street corner to her only minutes ago I could feel a great energy between us ‐ or was that 
the weekend’s drugs?   
 
Cambridge 
June 10th 
 
 
 
 
 
   This is My Contree 
 
Good Morning Great Britain 
           Still great, still Britain 
               The sun is shining, 10:45 AM 
                 £296.26 pence in my pocket 
Time to bet it all on black & hit the road again 
 
       But if time is a mere scratch & life is nothing 
  & nothing that occurs is of the slightest importance 
 
         From Aberdeen to Birmingham, Arundel & Deal 
          From Dullis Hill to Rotherham, Bristol & Peel  
           From Inverness to Liverpool, Leeds & Palmer’s Green 
            From Lewisham to Padiham & all the pubs between 
              From Badminton to Twickenham & Barton‐in‐the Beans 
 
                      From mud, thro blood to the green fields beyond  
 
                     This is my time, this is my rhyme, this is my contree 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                            38 
                                                       Flatlands 
 
A bottle of champagne contains approximately 56 million bubbles – that’s about one for every person 
on the British Isles. I am rather feeling like one of those bubbles at the moment, fizzing about & 
heading upwards! So, after leaving the delectable Goska & the posh, lazy boaters that are the 
Cambridge punts (cunts for short) I headed north, passing through the town of Soham. Its strange 
how places are associated with events, & this one will always go down in notorious history after the 
slaying of those two little girls by Ian Huntley. As we passʹd by I descended into thought & 
composed a sonnet there & then ‐ a sonnet which would not have been written before Jack the Ripper 
stalked the Whitechapel streets. After Soham I came to the gloriously peaceful city of Ely. The 
cathedral stands upon a hill (in fact the whole city was once an island, surrounded by fens until man 
recaimed the land from the sea) & dominates the entire scene. My breath was taken aback as I 
stepped from the train. It was here I first heard the ʹtwangʹ of this part of the world... it sounds like 
everybody had a serious car accident in their youth.  
 
Spent an hour or so in Ely b4 attempting the last train jump of this leg of the tour. Now I hate 
hitching. I was 16, on my first adventure away from home, stuck at the top of the M1, trying to get a 
lift South in the pissy Yorkshire rain, realising hitching stunk. After three hours & looking like a 
drown’d rat I made my way to Leeds Station, got on a train & perform’d my first jump to Sheffield ‐ 
& have never lookt back since (or paid). This time it was a new line for me, but it was almost too easy 
as I rumbled over the level lands of Brittaniaʹs arse (look on a map & Youʹll see what I mean ... it 
sticks out like a right royal rump) to the city of Norwich. The sign said... Welcome to Norwich, a fine 
city, & indeed it is, if a little filled with pretty stupid people or Norvicencians to get the correct 
phrase). The place is plumb bang in the middle of nowhere ‐ Big Brotherʹs Jade Goody thought East 
Anglia was abroad & in a way she was right. 
 
Iʹm currently in the central library doing this, & I know it was only this morning that I sent off an e‐
mail. But Iʹm on the road now & have already written three sonnets today.  I guess Iʹm excited 
because in an hour or so I shall be entering the bar where my train jumping lady friend works. Who 
knows whatʹs gonna happen, but it should be nice to get laid... or at least swap train‐jumping stories. 
So wish me luck, Iʹm goin in! 
 
Norwich 
June 11th 
 
Serial Killers 
 
There is a strain of personality 
Surrenderʹd in the birthrealm of the soul 
When grown men cry release the beast in me 
& stranglers do their work behind a wall. 
 
What is this strain, this stigma of the brood? 
So many men may never understand 
Cursed phantasies so sickening & crude 
& motives guided by a higher hand. 
 
From what source does this restless spirit spring? 
When perversion rejoices in killing 
From the whore‐rippers of Leeds & London 
To the Son of Sam & Dennis Nielson ‐ 
 
Crimes unknown but a century ago 
What traumas to the world these deeds bestow? 
 
 
 
Training in the Art of Fare Evasion  
The Fader Code  ‐ 
 
1 Remain alert 
2 Always keep your cool  
3 Trust your instincts 
4 Never show your money 
5 Know your stations 
6 Another five minutes wonʹt hurt in the loo 
7 Know your enemy 
8 Know your postcodes 
9 The trainʹs going there anyway 
10 When in doubt, clout 
11 The train always comes when youʹre skinninʹ up 
12 It is every Fader’s duty to baffle & confuse 
13 Always remember your free cup of tea 
14 There’s no need to rush ‐ unless you’re being chased 
 
 
 
                                                         
                                                      39 
                                               Women & Weed 
 
So I here I am in Norwich, a pretty big grin spread across mi face after a portion of some o that ol 
fashioned good time luvin... buzzin. Now I never normally kiss & tell, but as Iʹm taking you on tour 
with me, I feel I have to... & I was wrong about East Anglia having no hills... Iʹve just been up & 
down a couple of mighty fine peaks! So who is this lady whoʹs just walkʹd into my life... well sheʹs 
callʹd Kate (as they all are), born in Southport only twenty years ago, making her a bona fide 
Lancashire lass. So I meet her at her bar, which turns out to be a classy cafe where sheʹs a chef. How 
fetching she looked in her stain filled, food smeard white togs... loveliness incarnate. When sheʹd 
finished we strolled thro the evening lights to hers. Luckily, she had some pills at home, which we 
ate, endin up cycling round the park with Discmans on. It was when she gave me a BJ in the 
cemetery that I smirk’d the most. A bit creepy tho. Went back to hers & ended up at her bedroom (1‐0 
to her). Half an hour later her fuckin dad turns up (crazy Scottish artist guy) & I had to be all 
pleasantness & smiles while thinking Iʹve just done your daughter. As Kate cooked us up a wicked 
pasta I entertained them with my tayles of India & cheeky Northern wit. We then buggared off to the 
pub, where I was used to get her ex‐boyfriend jealous. We then returned with wine to watch O 
Brother Where art thou... but I didnt follow much of it as we found ourselves in an overhorny state, 
floated into nudity & Kate stormed into a 2‐0 lead. To date, after a plethora of ladies, she gives the 
best blow jobs, taking such pleasure in her work. After some fantastic fucking she crawld to bed 
contented. I just chill’d in the electric afterglow of our lust, speeded up & unable to sleep.  
This mornin I pulled one back for the lads (2‐1) before going to meet her mates as she took me round 
all the sights & coffeeshops. Itʹs been nice to get some detox as Iʹve been recently pissing beer. 
Norwich is quite an arty place, a hive of studenty types & cosmoplitania. Hereʹs some facts about the 
land of Alan Partridge... Norwich is the capital of a 60 mile radius area that’s still pretty feudal, full of 
large agrarian landowners & many villages of inbred yokels who still tip their hats at the boss ‐ the 
industrial revolution passed this place by. The Barclay & Debenham families both herald from here, 
as do most of the planes that a bomb Iraq. Before the industrial Revolution Norwich was Englandʹs 
second largest city (its 120,000 at the moment) & in it thereʹs a pub for every day of the year & a 
church for every week. It was also acrazy place to be during the 1640’s, being the epicentre of the 
nationwide hunt for witches by Matthew Hopkins, chief royal witchfinder & closet Satanist! He got 
paid for each witch he found, so its not too surprising that many an old crone was executed for her 
sins, handsomely lining the pockets of Mr Hopkins. Ah, the good old days! Back in the modern‐day I 
equalised with some pretty fine loving, not so long ago (2‐2) & Iʹve recently walkʹd her to work. Iʹm 
currently waiting to meet Kate again after being ʹchaperonedʹ by her pretty foxy best mate, sweet 
Genevieve, who was my escort for the evening. Apparently Kateʹs picking up some weed & itʹll be 
nice to have a good smoke b4 setting off North in the morning, hopefully 3‐2 in the lead... but if not 
thereʹs always time for a late equaliser in the morning... 
                                                                                                                                               Norwich  
                                                                                                                                              June 12th 
 
                                                                         Wooing Women 
                                                                                        
                                                   Enticing, trick‐abounding rougish words 
                                                              Demolish feminine firmness  
                                                                                        
                                                                 Gently, into lovely states, 
                                                                Caress female sensibilities 
                                                                                        
                                                             Wine, gifts, poetry, promises;  
                                                                     Bewitch vain women 
                                                                                        
                                                      Clean, confident, eloquent, charming ‐  
                                                                Capture susceptible ladies 
                                                                                        
                                                            Music, poetry, flowers, flattery 
                                                          Create seductive pleasure‐rooms  
                                                                                        
                                                     Conversation, candlelight, wine, desire 
                                                          Intensifies rapturous anticipation 
                                                                                        
                                                     Tongues bestowing succulent passion ‐ 
                                                                  Flickering candle flames 
                                                                          40 
                                                                   Thatcherʹs Britain 
 
Well, my tryst in Norwich ended 3‐2. Iʹm not really sure who got the winner, but it was a hard‐fought 
game & we were both pretty knackered by the end. Over breakfast her dad declared he liked me & 
said we should take a trip to see his dad, Bert. A wee drive later we were in the village of Totten Hill, 
whose centre consists of a post box & a phone box, & despite being perfectly idyllic would not be a 
place I would stay long. After a lazy day me & Bert had an evening jam, his boogie‐woogie piano & 
my Madchester rythyms merging in a wine fuelled phrenzie accompanied by his 13 year old grand‐
daughter on drums. Next morning I found myself going on a family trip to the seaside with my hosts 
‐ things getting all a little bit to cosy & prospects of ʹmarriageʹ shining in Kateʹs eyes. We trundled 
North thro blink‐&‐youʹll‐miss me villages, past Kings Lynn & thro the royal estate of Sandringham. 
Like Boudicea two millenia ago, it is the queenʹs residence & Bert told me she would often drive 
around in her range rover on her 35,000 acres of land, shooting peasants. Talking of land, do you 
know Prince Charles owns Cornwall & Lord Derby the whole of the Pennines ‐ rich buggars!  
 
Awoke to spliffs & a chat with m’lady’s six year old cousin. The talk consisted, in the main, of ‘fart’ 
gags & I played him ‘Old MacDonald’ on the guitar‐ which very soon turned into ‘Old MacDonald 
did a fart’. Kate was urging me to stay, but I knew I had to get out of there, quick (leaving Kate a 
quickly penned sonnet as I did so). As I left East Anglia I felt like the eels who leave this regionʹs 
waterways to swim the mighty Atlantic for the warm seas of Saragossa. There they mate & not long 
afterwards die. The baby eels then travel all the way back to the Fens where they grow up... until 
they start to feel horny & set off for South America themselves... these same eels are the ones hunted 
by cockneys to be jellied & eaten dahn the market. My own departure was cloakʹd in mist as my train 
trundlʹd North West. I got off at Grantham to change trains. This is Maggie Thatcherʹs old 
constituency & I had my first taste of the North... grime & terraced houses. I was tempted to have a 
mooch about but after buying a bag of chips I soon threw them away they were so bad & left town. 
 
Now, in the olden days it took people several days of carriage riding to cross the country, thru wolf‐
haunted woods & bandit‐ridden forests. These days, u can fly to New York in three & a half hours & 
Cross England by rail in 4. However, Iʹm old fashionʹd & decided to break my journey to Yorkshire 
up & reached Newark late in the day, the sun close to setting & the sky gloomy & dark. Its great little 
place, full of ye olde stone houses, narrow alleyways & courtyards around a wonderful town square. 
The locals bare that broad Nottinghamshire twang & the castle ruin is suitably gothic. Called on a 
friend, the gold‐hearted, violin‐making Chris.  Newark is the epicentre of the craft, attracting people 
from all over the world. You can get £2,000 for a well‐made violin, & they take on average a month to 
make (or 2 weeks at 9‐5 rate). His pad is cool, all timber & thick walls, the best part being he doesnʹt 
do TV. We were thrown on to the more traditional forms of entertainment, like story telling. His 
mates came round for a jam, wielding guitars, violins, cans of lager & spliffs, & it was nice to get my 
hands on a guitar, but unfortunately a combination of my sexploits down in Norwich, beer, that 
stupidly strong skunk & ten days on tour soon took itʹs toll & I have just recently slept for 15 hours... 
                                                                                                                                                   Newark ‐ June 15th 
                                               Lust 
                                                  
                              Lustʹs thundering battleaxe sunders 
                                      Modest bolted chastity  
                                                  
                                 Lovers unleash celestial armies 
                                    With steamy underlooks 
                                                  
                              Sweetest multiple sensary moment ‐ 
                               Lovers climaxing simultaneously 
                                                  
                            Watching sweethearts caress themselves 
                                   Illuminates elucid insights 
                                                  
                         Intensively investigating pleasureʹs pathways 
                                  Electrifies sexual experience 
                                                  
                               Flesh penetrating welcoming flesh 
                                       Yields starry magic 
                                                  
                                Intoxication excites sexual desire 
                             Unleashing bacchanalian promiscuity 
                                                  
                                                  
Loveʹs Sweetness 
 
As bakeries stock sugar‐coated treats 
Like danishes, cakes, stroodles, tarts & pies 
I skipt on clouds to see thy brimming sweets 
& taste the apples spinning in thine eyes 
You are the dairy cream of an eclair 
& like fine berries of a bramble bush 
As honey dew the gold locks of thy hair 
& with rose milk your soft cheeks are aflush 
You are an hour spent bathing in the sun 
& yet another swimming in the sea 
But in warm rays the blazing skin grows numb 
& in the waves its texture vexes me 
For ecstasy should be a fleeting touch 
But candy children often eat too much.  
 
             
                                                 41 
                                         Yorkshire Puddings 
 
I left Newark in fine spirits & soon arrived in Sheffield, rosy‐cheekʹd & ready to rave. Went up to mi 
mate, Parisʹs studio, & waited for the fun to commence. Ive known the big P for years, he’s the kind 
of guy who nicks all the birds & smokes all yer weed. Butthe laughs, hijinx & escapades we’ve had 
have been well hilarious. This particular one began by putting some basslines down for him & his 
ʹpartnerʹ ‐ the big black ex‐British karate champion, turned coke‐dealin muso...a line of coke for each 
bass‐line renderd...cant be bad. 5 beers, two bottles of wine & a good smoke later his MC mate turns 
up (E‐LL) & dragged us to this proper funny hard‐house rave at the Adeplhi, Sheffield, as his 
bodygaurd.“We’re with the MC!” & were soon inside. I scored four pills for a tenner, two pink, two 
white... Paris couldnt decide which to take first so we necked them both & were soon buzzing to E‐
LL, wielding his mike like a modern day Troubadour. It’s handy to know the MC when chattin up 
drum & bass birds as a timely shout out from him makes all the difference.  However, before too long 
things got a bit messy. I got thrown out first... for chillin in the ladies toilets. Luckily E‐LL had to 
come & sort things out. Yet, just as we were back inside & the tension had eased, who would pass us 
but Paris being thrown out for chattin up the DJʹs bird backstage. The MCʹs bodygaurd had double‐
dropped & he endin up gaurdin us. However, it was all great fun & we rolled in back to the studio 
with three hotties who did our heads in actually, convinced we were gonna murder ʹem. Woke up 
covered in make‐up next to one of them & believe me those ecstasy specs had kicked in I’m surre she 
was a ten out of ten when I went to bed, but by morid‐day she’d turned into a two!  
 
I thought I’d check out another of my Sheffield crew Rikki Dee, a very funny man who was in the 
market for a new table. We walked up the road to Dronfield (twinned with Sondelfinger) where the 
bus‐stops are green, & found a car‐boot sale by Bowshaw. There were prams & baby clothes, toy cars 
& jigsaws, weights & suitcases, settees & lawnmowers, crap coats & old comics, CDs & fish ‘n’ chips, 
portaloos & chess sets, mothball suits & fluffy old bears & finally a table for £8! “Too pricey!” said 
Rikki D, so we carred on; sweet stalls & tea stalls, videos & boxes of books, fishing nets & china, pool 
balls & pictures, cut glass & jewelry, car seats & ornaments & finally a £3 table! On a wood to coinage 
ratio the real deal, Made in Czechoslovakia stamped underneath, looking a bit like a bench. “Sold!” said 
Rikki D. We set off back, the smash & grab complete, walking three miles thro the city of steel ‐ Low 
Edge & Meadowhead, by Batemoor, Jordanthorpe & down into Woodseats‐ chillinʹ frequently, 
perched upon our ‘bench.’ “What’s wrong with you people, have you never seen a table before!” Then 
finally home to a perfect fit! After drinking a couple of cups of tea perch’d nicely on Rikkis Dee’s 
spanking new table I jumped a train north & passʹd through Barnsley, the place (of all places) where I 
set my first step upon the poetʹs path. As the memories came flooding back I was suddenly inspired 
to write a few lines, for that path had already led me as far as India, where I had had a wicked time.  
 
 
 
 
 
Epiphany 
 
Old Town Barnsley, nineteen‐ninety six 
Pushing back the boundʹries of the corners of my mind 
Cultivating the way of the artistic essences 
Even kinda dabbled in a little wyrd occult 
Read the esoteric life of Aleister Crowley ‐  
Smack‐addl’d mystic of Sumerian lore ‐ 
& beginning to write ‐ all the energy within me 
Focused upon the page… creation… literature 
& my breath, O frail spark, was changed forever 
An intellectual girlfriend at the time saw my glow 
Gave me her edition of the complete WB Yeats 
Starry acolyte of the order of the Golden Dawn, 
& as eagles rose from my fermenting imagination 
            Led by the light of a true Gaelic bardsman 
                                     I found I was a poet after all 
 
 
Arrived in Leeds about seventeen hundred hours. Now Leeds is a heavily guarded station, but 
thereʹs a secret exit where the cleaner‐mobiles enter, just off platform one. After they pass thro 
some electronic gates, you have twenty seconds of light‐flashing before the gates close... I needed 
just ten. From there I headed to my mateʹs house in Chapeltown, Leeds. Sheʹs called Christine & is 
quite cute ‐ but unfortuantely mi mums called Christine & they look a bit alike ‐ so its never gonna 
happen, much to her annoyance. However she soon invited me to a rave at the West Indian Centre 
in Chapleltown. I swiftly put on my scruffiest gear, popped one of the pills Iʹd brought from 
Sheffield, blagg’d a handful of last Autumn’s mushrooms from Christine & careerʹd round to her 
mates, some hippy‐types from York, who also had some shrooms in ‐ strange looking fellas from 
Hawaii! After a good dose of coming up antics to the Stone Rose Remixes, we jumpʹd in a taxi to 
the shady side of Leeds. Jesus Christ ‐ what a mash up. a couple of hundred techno kids who were 
more out of it than me, from crack‐faced old ravers to fourteen year old pill dealers, all marshallʹd 
by a gang of big, black gangster type rastas. It wasnʹt long after arriving that the Hawaiian 
shrooms kickʹd in, all spangley & brain‐scattering... & for a time I didnʹt know where, let alone 
who the hell I was. To alleviate my confusion I popped my second pill & the drugs seebmʹd to 
balance themselves out. Now pills & shrooms are my favourite tipple... you feel both physically & 
mentally superb, & often a fantastic time ensues. However I was so wrecked that as I was walking 
home I stepped right into the canal! 
 
Soggy‐as‐fuck‐in‐Leeds 
June 18th 
 
 
                                                    42 
                                             Kendal Mind Cake 
                                                      
Think yourself lucky you have a healthy mind! Only very occasionally does life throw up a situation 
to reflect on that particular maxim. Recently one of my brothers, Victor Pope, has been sectioned for a 
brief foray into madness. Heʹs not my real bro, but one of my seven ʹbrothersʹ (as in 7 brides 4 7 
brothers) who I feel are my close companions thro life. Anyhow, the big V was picked up by the pigs 
wandering the streets of Maryport, a dodgy West Cumbrian sea‐side town. They took one look at 
him & came to the conclusion he was mad & took him to the West Cumberland hospital just down 
the coast at Whitehaven. Christine is also a great friend of his & had wanted to pay him a visit, so 
with me heading to Cumbria anyway, it seemʹd a perfect time. Together, along with Rachael, a highly 
intelligent medical student from Washington DC, we threw our duvets into the back of Christineʹs 
car & set off to save Victorʹs sanity. Two minutes outside the city it began to rain, a vicious flurrying 
of windy weather accompanying our journey North West across the moors. We paused for a pint & a 
pie in Kendal, the traditional gateway to the Lakes, before driving north, one by one the great white 
Fells coming into view. By Keswick I took my two ladies to see Castlerigg stone circle, an excellently 
preserved ring of druid stones set in a majestic setting, surrounded by an ampitheatre of mountains, 
& was, as always, taken aback by its beauty. It’s also the solstice tomorrow, & the place is filling up 
with hippies. There was one middle‐aged guy with a beard who turned up, nosied about a bit, then 
want back to his camper van, then returned in full medieval regalia. He’s managed to convince 
himself he is King Arthur – but I though he was just King Fucking Loopy Juice! Anyhow, we stayed 
awhile, joining in the festivities ‐ but our American friend was no hippy, so we booked a B&B in 
nearby Cockermouth &, after the sun had finally set, drove to our duvets. 

         Lakeland Sunset 
                        
                    Visions of heaven roll out to the west, 
                The orb of morning clutching to her chest 
              Our Starbird swoops thro burning copper sky 
                         Neath lilac bands behued as harvest rye, 
                     Lands perfectly, & with mystical craw 
                Perches talons high upon old Skiddaw 
            Completing ephemeral embassy, 
    Nestling for the night, snugglʹd in airy     
Clouds of rosy dusk, moonbeam‐dappled hulks, 
               Wearily drifting as the Dark Knight skulks    
  Round his coal‐charred kingdom, shapeless & starred,     
                Where each bright twinklet is a crystal shard               
    Studding eveningʹs armor, which when worn brings  
                       The stunning universal thing of things. 
 
 
We reach’d Cockermouth (to a wry titter from Christine) at a little after eleven & was let in by a 
cranky old dear who huffed & puffed her way up the creaking stairs to our room. The girls got the 
double bed – which looked very comfy, but my offer a ménage a trios was quickly rebuked! The next 
morning we found ourselves close by Wordsworthʹs birthplace. Across the street from his old pad we 
found a bookshop & bought Steve a couple of books. Christine got him a book on French swearing & 
I got him a book of 1980ʹs graffiti. We arrived the next morning in Whitehaven. Rachael went off to 
amuse herself while me & Christine called on Victor, in the Yewdale ward of the hospital. Now, he 
looked well, but soon his recent experiences began to splurt out in a barrage of nonsense. He was 
allowed out so we hit the pubs of windy Whitehaven (not reccomended for the faint of heart). I think 
our visit did him the world of good & soon he was back to a semblance of his former self. I told him 
he wasnʹt mad, just an artist. I feel the artist who doesnʹt channel his ʹcreativityʹ will often start to lose 
the plot. I mean, he’d lost the plot before, declaring he was going to marry his armpit after seeing a 
reflection of it in the bath & thinking it was a woman’s poonani! I went on the stag do & everything, 
but he eventually broke off the engagement, citing the impossibility of consummating the marriage! 
But this was different, hard core madness & a shock to see. However, I think we helped him a little & 
dropped him off happy & drunk at the hospital. We then found ourselves cruising along the West 
Cumbrian coast, the sun setting nonchalantly over the Irish sea. The roads back were lightless, 
winding past Sellafield & anonymous little villages where youʹd think no‐one would ever live. 
Eventually they dropped me off at Oxenhome, Kendal.  Luckily for me there is a late train from 
London heading north, which I will be catching very soon. I’ve recently borrowed this local guys 
laptop to write all this down. It followed a conversation I had with him about an incident in the 60’s, 
when a homeless guy ended up shooting three coppers on the platform across from where I’m sitting 
now. Not quite a visit to the Somme battlefields, but interesting all the same.  
 
Kendal 
June 21st 
 
 
                                                      43 
                                              A Taste of Honey 
 
Ah Penrith... Iʹve only ever brusht it in the past, either on my way to the druid stones at Castlerigg or 
up to Carlisle. However, itʹs a fine old market town, full of narrow yards & chunky buildings, the 
invigorating Northern nip ever in the air. Itʹs the kinda place that nothing ever happens... the Penrith 
Heraldʹs headline this morning was ʹSchool lockers ransackʹdʹ... a far cry from London & its terrorist 
attacks. The reason why I am here is that I am going to do a play ‐ & am now part of the cast for the 
ʹThe Honey Trap.ʹ Theres the leading girl (who I get to snog) called Joe, James the gay guy (who 
plays a gay gay), Andy & the middle aged Val. Theres also the director, a charming old lady called 
Liz, & Isabella, the costumes woman. It was great fun when she took me upstairs, told me to strip 
(theres no embarrasment in the theatre luvey she told me) & proceeded to fit me out in a reyt cool 
sailors outfit... proper funny. Liz bought the cast a drink after in the bar of the Penrith Players own 
theatre. At that point I realised Iʹd somehow got miself into this, but it should be a laugh. Back at the 
fairly swanky ranch I chillʹd out with my hostess, who after some wine & gentle flirtation, went to 
bed. I think sheʹs up for it (she was last time), but I dont fancy breaking the rule Never sleep with Yer 
housemate for a little longer yet.  
I spent a couple of days ferried about by birds from pub, to club, to house, to Indian restaurant ‐ 
being fed & waterʹd at every turn. People have even come up to me & told me who I am, proper 
weird. The place is yer typical small town, where everyone knows each otherʹs business & even what 
youʹre gonna be thinkin about next week. The areaʹs cool, right on the edge of the lakes. I took a little 
walk up into the pine forest that rises over the town, the ferns a pretty swathe of midsommer green . 
From a space in the trees I chillʹd out with the fells, only a few verdant miles away. The play itself is 
going well & Iʹm learnin how to act. I even dropt the book & rememberʹd some fuckin lines today. Itʹs 
not as easy as you think, but Iʹm lucky Iʹve got a sultry‐eyed lass opposite me whoʹs quite 
experienced. She playʹd Shakespeareʹs Juliet last play so I reckon Iʹm in safe hands... an sheʹs got big 
tits... an I get to snog her. The castʹs really nice, especially the gay guy who sits down doing his 
knitting when heʹs not on stage.  Last night I was thrown straight into ʹblockingʹ with the leading 
lady. Blocking is the pencilling in of directions & moves over the text of the play. It went well (I even 
threw in a couple of sly kisses at the appropriate moments) & today weʹre all going to the directors 
house to watch the movie of the play, washʹd down with tea & cake.  However, Iʹll have quite a 
hangover as the younger members of the cast decided a trip to the local nightclub would be fun. It 
wasnt really fun, & I couldnt score any pills for love no money. Most provincial towns are nests of 
debauchery, but Penrith is just a little bit too twee. However, I did get a rather fine sonnet out of my 
experience. 
 
Penrith 
June 24th 
 
 Friday Night Lights  
 
        Sometimes I, after a week‐long bender, 
           Observing the human menagerie, 
   See a species named ‘Work‐for‐Weekender’   
                In the Town Zoo & City Safari. 
            At watering holes or in dog‐eared flats 
     Snakes, Dinos, Vultures, Rats, Birds, Cows, Moles, Sheep, 
                   Packs of Fox‐Hounds & scatty Pussycats, 
                 Are Sardine crammed at bars, seven ranks deep. 
             Two‐by‐two the babbling rabble migrate 
                 Throʹ Gorilla doors, get tanked up on hooch, 
                 Drink rats‐piss like Fish, ass‐wiggle like Bait,                   
                         Their rasion d’etre the ten‐to‐two smooch. 
                           & they sing, kiss, spit, piss, shit, fight & feed, 
                                   Then hurry home to his or hers to breed.  
 
                                                 44 
                                             Hoots Mon! 
 
Now Hadrian’s Wall is completely undefended (both sides) I have just rapidly been to Scotland & 
back, & believe in the interim I may just have fallen in love! I am now skippin about in a gay kind of 
way & smiling like the got who got the squirty cream! From my brief sojurn into theatreland I caught 
the train up to Edinburgh & took a lovely hour‐&‐three‐quarter cruise thro the Scottish lowlands. 
Only they werenʹt so low, most of it was pretty high! Yet I thrillʹd on the space my eyes were 
suddenly allowed, & not a fuckin soul for miles. So far Scotland was a barren wilderness, then 
suddenly we reachʹd the Firth of Forth, & in the distance Edinburgh castle was thrust up out of the 
sky, the green‐brown mount of Authurs Seat towering up behind her.  I met Glenda off the train. 
Weʹd met in the Andamans last summer & had maintainʹd contact via e‐mails ever since. Seeing as I 
was in the area (about 100 miles or so) Iʹd popped up & we were soon back to where we left off. I was 
glad to be following up the meeting... itʹs not every day you meet someone as mental as yourself.  
 
Edinburgh is a grand, stately city, full of splendid grey buildings & cool monuments. My hostess 
gave me a brief tour, then we hit the bars, the summer sun holding out superbly. Suitably sozzled we 
wandered thro the wide avenues to her pad, a very slick basement flat of an old Georgian terrace, 
with a cool garden ‐ its in a street called Scotland Street, made famous in a book serialised in the 
Scotsman newspaper.  Sheʹd prepared for my visit ‐ wine & skunk ‐ & after Iʹd cookʹd us up a pasta 
we had an ecstasy apertif. Glenda works with filming & coincidentally some of her ʹTime lapseʹ 
photography (when street & weather stuff is sped up) was being shown that night on a program 
called ʹJump Londonʹ all about Free‐running, the funky new sport leaping from rooftop to rooftop. 
Well things were goin fine & weʹd just had our first kiss, when the skunk upset me too much & I 
puked all over her doorstep before collapsing in her bed ‐ much to her annoyance ‐ whiteying for 
England.  
 
Woke up at 7AM & immediately began my penitence for being crap. Cleaned up my puke & tidied 
up her house, then took her in the shower & washʹd her hair & back.  As she dozed off the 
lovemaking I spent a great day roaming about Holyrood park, the great volcanic mass just a stones 
throw for the city centre. Spent a couple of idyllic hours climbing up the Salisbury crags (cue comedy 
panicky mobile calls every time I got stuck) before descending back into the city & stumbling across 
the Scottish poetry library where I read a few of King James the Firstʹs sonnets. The evening was 
spent with pasta, red wine & yet more poetry with one of Edinburghʹs cosmopolitan open mike 
nights. They are the finest I know, of a very high quality, but when the locals get up I have a great 
difficulty understanding them through their whiskey & slang. Checking out more of the city we hit 
the bars, including Whistle Binkies, a reyt cool jam night. We followed this by a trip to the Royal Oak, 
full of folkies, where sat across a genuine tartan‐clad old geezer from the clan Mac Donald I joined in 
with the violins & had a reyt hootenanny.  
 
 
 
The next day we set off south – Glenda had kindly agreed to drive me as far as Dumfries, where her 
family lives. Before we left Edinburgh we called on the stately home at Craiglockhart (a suburb) 
where Wilfred Owen & Seigfried Sassoon met in the First World War. It was here, beneath the 
imposing mountain & in the green grounds that many of the famous poems were composed. Among 
them the anti‐patriotic ‘Dulce et Decorum Est’ is a classic, with his expression of rushing for your gas 
helmets as an, ‘ecstasy of fumbling,’ one of my favourite expressions in the whole opus of English 
poetry – so much power in two little words. After this literary detour we cruised the Scottish 
Lowlands again, calling off at a 14th century inn in Biggar for pool & whiskey, then Robbie Burns’ 
old farm where he composed Tam O Shanter, before she dropt me off in Dumfries. The place has a 
lovely feel, & the river Nith which sweeps through its heart a joy to behold (or am I just loved up 
with Glenda?) By now I was getting late for rehearsals, but my hostess in Penrith had kindly agreed 
to pick me off from the train station at Carlisle. I reached there after an hour & a half of bus ride by 
the side of the Solway Firth, the distant Cumberland peaks poised magnificently over the sparking 
waters.  
 
Penrith 
June 27th 
 
 
Love at First sight... 
 
....Like songbirds witnessing the worldʹs first dawn 
        Or proud parents cooing the babeʹs first yawn 
     Like virgins witness to the breast exposed 
       Or an exploring of the always closed... 
 
...Like mountain men & archipelagos 
       Or young sweethearts sniffing a first red rose 
     Like money men glimpsing a glint of gold 
        Or distant kin returning to the fold... 
 
....We are two frogs full‐throated with desire 
    We are two rabbits sprinting cross the glen 
    We are two pussies purring by a fire 
    We are two badgers snuggled in their den... 
 
          ...Like Muslims when they first met Mahomet 
                     My soul this moment never must forget. 
 
                                                          
                                                          
                                                          
                                                  45 
                                             Headinʹ North 
 
Iʹve just found my new favourite drug... acting! Tonight was the opening night & there were about a 
hundred paying Penrithians all sat down waiting for me to fuck up... which I didnae! Iʹve never 
known mi heart to beat so much just before I swaggerʹd on stage, a strange scent following me on. 
The reason for this was that I literally shit myself before going on stage ‐ but apparantley this is not a 
rare occasion among the thespian community. However, somehow I managed to pull it off & was 
buzzin off the adrenalin for at least an hour (better than coke). One of the scenes is a bed scene & the 
leading lady asked me to be more physical with her for the part... so I did & apparantley it was reyt 
authentic. Plays are actually good fun to do, loads of back stage banter & beers bought for yer in the 
bar... plus Iʹm trussed up as a sailor, complete with cap & bell bottoms. Seeing as Iʹm only in the first 
act (just long enough to get the lead pregnant) I took a wander thro Penrith, my outfit raising quite a 
few eyebrows in the streets. Back at the theatre opening night had gone swimmingly & was receiving 
the plaudits – no‐one could believe I had never acted before. I replied that when one is jumping the 
trains, I have impersonated a fare‐paying customer on countless occasions, honing my technique 
over the years. 
 
The best bit about doing this acting has been hangin out in Edinburgh with Glenda, mi fine Celtic 
lassie. Thereʹs definitely something brewing here & for all my wanderings I think I may have found a 
lass carved from the beatings of my own heart. After a couple of chats on the phone she agreed to 
take me on a tour of Scotland. After arriving back in Edinburgh we first drove to East Lothian to stay 
in her mateʹs cottage for a week. It is called Heather Lodge, a wonderful building on the ancyent 
Whittinghame estate – where the Balfour agreement was signed in 1919 partitioning off Israel from 
Palestein. Our neighbours live in the majestic Whittinghame House, which has been divided into 
plush apartments, porsches & Bentleys parked on the drive. There is a lovely church nearby, who has 
this wee library in it, consisting of books mostly from the nineteenth century, which I <cue coming in 
pants> have the full use of! Our own little cottage is set in a beautiful wood, with Traprain Law only 
a mile away, & the quaint villages of Dunbar, Haddington & East Linton a ten minute drive. I have 
felt rather like Wordsworth in his Dove Cottage, completely inspired by nature & her scenes. There is 
even a colony of bats in the attic, & it is amazing to hear their excited clicks as they leave to hunt each 
sunset (eating several tonnes of insects in the process) or to watch them dance for the sunrise, 
returning one‐by‐one to their home. We have walked beneath the neath the ruinous gaze of Tintallen 
Castle & bathed in the beauty of Sea‐Cliff beach. I have wandered the battlefields of Dunbar & climed 
the Lammermuir hills, whose view of East Lothian, the forth & the kingdom of Fife are unparalleled.  
However, my chief past‐time has been converting the garden into a pitch n putt course ‐ a dream 
come true. While we have had guests the ladies have been sitting edwardian style of the lawn, 
sipping pimms, while the gents have been locking horns with a sand wedge.  
 
East Linton 
July 10th 
 
Over Lothian  
 
We forage up volcanic Berwick Law 
Reliqury Votadinian our mates 
From gorse‐gold mount the jewell’d Lothian shore 
Curves round the Firth of Forth’s most famous gates, 
 
From Dunbar, past Bass Rocks Howthian traits,    
Grand Gullane & soft‐shored Aberlady,    
To Prestonpans, where redcoats rue their fates,    
Waiting raw revenge at poor Drummossie,    
 
& further still, beside the Fifer Sa,   
The silver streak of Portobello sands,    
Leads us to Leith, then inland, shadowy,    
Peeps Arthurʹs Seat, by the sleeping Pentlands;    
 
Althoʹ ours be a journey of the mind   
Forever with this verse the way we bind. 
 
 
 
                                                    46 
                                           Highlands & Islands 
 
Heather Lodge was wonderful, a total relaxation of the soul & somewhere we will return to again I 
am sure. Several incidents come to mind. Firstly, One day I heard one of ʹmyʹ bats squeaking ‐ it had 
fell into an empty hanging plant thing outside our house ‐ so I tipped it up to let it out, & as it flew 
off a load of dead bats fell on the ground ‐ complete with white maggots ‐ very surreal. Then, there 
was the local  phone box full of cobwebs thick with bimblebees & very big spiders ‐ I dont think its 
been used in twenty years! But there is one little incident that gave it that extra twist of memory. I 
was walking around the cute harbours of Dunbar where, after having a poo in the local leisure 
centre, I looked in the toilet bowl & saw blood! Immediately panicking I booked an emergency 
session at the local health centre, where two Scottish ladies, a doctor & a nurse, had a good probe & 
declared they couldn’t see anything wrong. Still convinced I was at deathʹs door I rang up m’lady 
who reminded me of the meal we had had the previous night – wash’d down with some liquidized 
beetroot juice! Let that be a lesson to us all!   
 
Then it was in such high spirits we set off merrily on our tour of Scotland. First port of call was across 
the gargantuan bridge that spans the Forth at Queensferry & into the Kingdom of Fife. There we 
found Loch Nevin, a fabulous serene glacial body which grew mirror‐like in the setting sun, the 
noisy herons speeding mechanically across the water. I was happy to be camping by the glow of our 
open camp fire. Next morning, after breakfast in a church cafe in scenic little Kinross, we headed off 
into the heart of Scotland. Our journey took us thro the twee little walker towns of Perthshire, before 
our spirits rose as we arrived at the ragged wilderness that is Rannoch Moor. On all sides the savage 
gargants that are the scottish highlands rose up, eerily majestic in the glow of a rare sunny day. Little 
lochs were peppered with islands & this once inhospitable bandit‐country suddenly became 
hospitable. Before reaching Glencoe we turned off into Glen Etive, almost untouched by man except 
for one lone road that eventually petered out into loch Etive. We camped by some sensuous 
waterfalls, millenia‐hewn into the neolithic rock, & after climbing a hefty mountain in time for 
sunset, & dining once again over an open fire, we slept to the sound of the roaring falls. The rushing 
waters were reminsiscent of a Brixton street, but we were totally alone.  
 
Today we awoke & bathed in the falls, despite the persistant pursuit of the midgie‐like flies which 
got everywhere. After traversing the wondrous valley of Glen Coe, where the butterflies harbour the 
souls of lonely people, we reached Appin country. This was the clan that fought on the right flank of 
Bonnie Prince Charlie at Culloden, & gave such a savage slaughter to Burrel’s regiment, saving the 
honour of the highland army. From wee Port Appin we saw the isle of Lismore & determined upon 
spending the night there. The main ferry was at Oban, & once arriving at this ʹGateway to the Isles,ʹ 
we found the annual Highland Games was on. It was great fun, from the daft highland fling to the 
running races reminiscent of the opening scenes of the Chariots of Fire. For the first time in my life I 
also shouted ʺWhat a reyt Toss!ʺ at the top of my lungs, which was heartily agreed on by the crowd. 
Apparently, when tossing a caber it is not the distance that matters but the landing of the caber by 
the kilt‐wearing Hamishes in the twelve o clock position.  
 
Oban 
July 19th 
 
                                                 Soul Mates 
 
           As seventy percent of road accidents are caused by particularly pretty pedestrians 
             I first saw you driving in the other direction along the duel carriageway of life 
              & almost fainted, realising the next turn off was not for another twenty miles 
               & noting by the time I got there & set off chasing your vapourʹs sexy stream  
             You would be long gone forever... as for every maharaja theres a maharajaraja 
           & the key to winning womenʹs hearts is to feed them exiting slices of melodrama 
           Risking incarceration, skipping three lanes, smashing thro the central reservation 
            Some Copernicus shocking the world with avant garde theories of geocentricity  
          To follow you for fifty vibrant miles of traffic, where by some fabulous coincidence, 
           You arrived in my county, my town, my district, my street, my building, my door 
              Some cosmic puzzle kept kicking in as I parked my car right up your exhaust 
            Joining your ravishing neckline I considered spending many lifetimes with you 
               ʺCan I help?ʺ I asked. ʺI had a dream,ʺ you said, ʺThat destiny awaits me here!ʺ 
                        ʺHow do you take your tea?ʺ I asked & led you thro the door.  
                                                 47 
                                        Caledonian Chocolate 
 
We spent last night in a very plush hostel in Oban, before sailing to Lismore this morning thro this 
landscape forged by fire & ice, where the Gaelic language still glimmers on the air & the whiskey is 
the best in the world. I have always wanted to check out a slice of life on a Scottish island ‐ & finally 
my desire has been fulfilled. We caught a morning ferry from Oban yesterday, sharing our passage 
with the dayʹs mail, newspapers, fresh loaves of bread, a nurse & a BT phone truck. The voyage was 
less than an hour, but beautifully still beneath a rare gloden day this far north. All around was water 
& mountans, from Mull to Ben Nevis & as we neared our destination I could see fully sixty miles 
along the great rift that tears scotland in half, begininng at inverness, hurtling down loch ness & 
opeing up into the loch linnhe & the sea where I stood.  
 
A post van was waiting at the harbour & whisked away the bread, papers & mail. The isle of Lismore 
(meaning big garden in gaelic) is a low, rolling swathe of rocky green, eight miles by two, reduced in 
population from 2000 by the highland clearances to a pleasant 170 today. In the centre of the isle is 
the post office / general store ‐ the isle reminding me of a normal village, but with a half mile 
between every house.  There we caught up with the bread & papers, which combined with some 
other foodstuffs served us a lovely hour on a rise, basking in silence in the sun & admiring the 
wonderful panorama. Fully energized we visited the ruins of a castle, where six horses grazed & the 
viking longships were passing in my mind. On the other coast stood a solid Pictish Broch – a crazy 
temple of turf & stones ‐ & we dawdled there awhile, the thick, seed‐pregnant thistles rising all 
around. We got there by hitching a lift in the post‐van, where, at one in the afternoon, a newspaper 
printed in london the previous midnight had finally arrived at its destination.  
 
Back on the mainland we drove up to the Kyle of Localsh & the island of Skye. Trust me, the place is 
like another world ‐ humungous grey‐green mountaisn like nothing youʹve ever seen. We spent the 
night in a B&B overlooking a lovely wee harbour. Going out for a few beers we found something that 
looked like a party ‐ however it turned out to be a meeting of the local Alcoholics Anonymous & the 
place was dry ‐ & very busy indeed. Luckily we met some local radges who put some base speed in 
our mouths & took us back to theres for a rave, which via a webcam was shared with some folk in 
Uzbekistan!  
 
Portree 
July 21st 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                 48 
                                              Culloden 
 
My trip to the highlands has been invigorating, assisted by glorious blue skies & hardly a breath of 
wind. Our journey north was courted by the immensity of the open spaces, the grand immpassable 
Grampians, capped in cloud & summer snow, the sparseness of the settlements & many a 
breathtaking moment on the way. The highlight of the drive to Inverness was stopping by a loch 
close to a village called Boat of Garten where Glenda used to go as a child. Close by was a pair of 
protected Ospreys who had just had three eggs to the eggsitement of the local bird watchers. The 
loch was brilliant, pure & untouched by man, the sun gleaming off a surface whose shimmering 
reflection of trees pleased the soul observant. Glenda, being taken up by the moment, decided to strip 
off for a skinny dip. Unfortunately for her the loch was lined with bird watchers, hidden in their 
camouflage nets, who all came out, binoculars waving, to check out & photograph this new 
specimen. Needless to say we made a swift exit.  
 
Inverness was finally reached toward sunset & a fine, flowery B&B found. The town is very fine in 
the European style, collected both sides of a wide flowing river (the Ness), & framed by many a high 
mountain. The town is pretty quiet at night (though Iʹm sure that will change at the weekend), the 
busiest place being a karaoke night in the Gunsmiths, where we were bombarded by very drunk old 
Scotsman singing indecipherable tunes. The next golden morning was a soul‐stirring one & we were 
soon at Culloden battlefield, ominous with history on its blood‐soakʹd soil. Its where the Jacobite 
cause was finally lain to rest, rather in the way illegal outdoor raves were manhandlked by the 1994 
criminal justice bill. For wide‐eyed ravers read kilted highlanders & for boys in blue read soldiers in 
redcoats. What happened was the DJ (bonnie prince Charlie) put on an all‐nighter (long march 
through the night to the enemy camp, only to turn back a couple of mile away confused & tired), so 
when they were raided by the fuzz they were caught on a major come‐down & all got arrested 
(slaughtered at bayonet point). Not far from that dreary moor were the Clava Cairns, three temple‐
like heaps of stones in a perfectly peaceful setting, where we ate our lunch. From there we drove 
twenty miles or so to the wee hamlet of Furness, where luckily enough there was a rave happening 
on the local estate. It was wicked do, with three sound sytems, plenty of cocaine & MDMA. Come 
nightfall the whole place was lit up with lazar beams & tea‐light candles in paper bags, which formed 
ewok‐style avenues through the wide clearing in a tall, piny forest. Suffice it to say we had a jolly 
good rave before finding a space in a dance‐tent to catch a few loved‐up zzzzzs!  
 
Next morning we began our drive south, skirting Loch Ness thro a mythical landscape peopled by 
Lambs, Calves, Seals & Deer. The Loch itself is very long, but no sign of the monster unfortunately ‐ 
though I did see a couple of monstrous looking local ladies. We picnicked amid the ruins of Urqhart 
castle, an excellent medievil specimen set right against the waterside. There Glenda brought out a 
poem she had written herself at Culloden & read it to me, a light loch breeze ruffling her hair. This 
was the moment that really blew my brain ‐ i had found the perfect soul‐mate. I asked her there & 
then if she wanted to come to Italy with me for the winter, so I could live with her loveliness ‐ & she 
said aye! In romantic spirits & continuing our journey we passed Ben Nevis & reached Glen Roy. We 
have taken a cottage here for the night, a place of perfect isolation & quietude. Apparantley a woman 
of this glen wove a kilt for willam William Wallace, on the run from the English, when a night of 
wild passion ensued, disturbed by the howling hounds of the approaching English. 
 
Glen Roy 
July 23rd 
 
                                                      Skye 
                                                           
                              As Kestrels surf the mountain‐fringed spaces  
                                 Road twists between saturnine gargants, 
                                 Romantic mounds of monstrous magma, 
                              Marvelous munroes of aulden minstrel‐song, 
                               Lost in the moment, eyes keen to the skies, 
                                Hard traveling unravels, sailing above us 
                                 Silver‐fire mists of the sylvan alpine rise, 
                                  & beyond, entering the stunning scope 
                                    Of another planet, another Jupiter, 
                                     Sodden expanse of treeless waste, 
                              But beautiful land, stupendous Cuillin hills, 
                               Seats of Titans, where thrusting solar shafts  
                                 Induce startling notions of timelessness ‐  
                          Here there is no time, only milky flowing waterfalls. 
                                                           
                                                    Glenda 
                                                                 
                                                 you         are 
                                                poetic     clever 
                                               sensual‐amusing 
                                             sweet‐sassy‐sharing 
                                            warmhearted‐caring 
                                              adorable‐decadent 
                                               funny‐joyloving 
                                                 inspirational 
                                                   kittencute 
                                                     o baby 
                                                     I love 
                                                       you 
                                                        so 
                                                         ! 
                                                           
 
                                                49 
                                        A House Fit For Poets 
 
The Bible says that a man should have his daily bread ‐ but it never says to buy it at take‐the‐piss 
prices. A couple of days ago in Fort William a baker heard my accent & when I asked him for a 
warmer version of the haggis pie Iʹd ordered, he said that would be an extra twenty pee. Obviously I 
walked out in disgust & got some chips. But enough of my rantings, that was then & this is now, my 
soul slowly soothed by the waters of Loch Fine. Yesterday, Glenda & I left the flanks of Nevis & 
arrived, via the wonderful expanse of sea & mountains that is Loch Awe, at nearby Inverary. It is the 
largest place by some way in Mid‐Argyle ‐ but still relatively tiny, perched at the waterside, a white‐
washed ʹNew Townʹ (by Georgian standards) with a large Grecian church, a prison, a belltower, a 
couple of streets & the old harbour. Combine this with the surrounding scenery & you are left with a 
true jewel, the brain‐child of the Duke of Argyle, a Campbell, who still resides, or rather his 
descendants do, at the grey, gorgeous neo‐classical, fairyland castle, just outside the town. 
Unfortunately, the place was a little overpopulated by French & German tourists, piped off their 
coaches, getting their taste of Scotland in the same fashion as I was shunted around Rajasthan. This 
was a good reason to find somewhere else to stay for the night. Luckily I had somewhere in mind. 
 
At the head of Loch Fyne you can find the hamlet of Cairndow, perchʹd by a thin, mountain‐shielded 
sea‐loch called Loch Fyne ‐ the mist so low you can almost touch it. The hamlet itself is just a few 
houses, a church & a very old coaching hotel. Queen Victoria had changed her horses here, Dr Jonson 
had popped in on his tour of Scotland, & two romantic poets dear to me had also spent the night. In 
1803, William Wordsworth stayed with his sister, eating herrings for breakfast fresh caught from the 
loch. Fifteen years later Keats stayed here with his mate early on on his walking tour of Scotland (the 
one which brought on his tuberculosis). Thus it was a great sensation to join my brethren in such 
lovely surroundings, with congenial & accomodating hosts. I am sure the atmosphere had hardly 
changed in two centuries. In the morning I took a walk while Glenda was sleeping (she still is), round 
the woodland gardens of the Ardkinglas estate ‐ threaded through by a swift‐flowing river carrying 
waters from the highlands down to the loch. It was a lovely walk & I ended up penning a sonnet. 
                                                      
Cairndow 
July 26th 
                                                      
                                                      
                                                      
                                                      
                                                      
                                                      
                                                      
                                                      
                                                      
                                                      
                                             Wooded Garden 
                                                      
                             As I went walking round wild Ardkinglas 
                          With sea‐loch mist a wood‐thrush swoop oerhead 
                              My senses stirrʹd as speechless I did pass, 
                               The noble Fir, tall Beech & Rowan red. 
                                                      
                               I felt an Oak, as centuries have spread 
                                The foliage of these monarchs of trees 
                                 & canopy the soil on which are shed 
                                 Their leafy legacy! a deft sea‐breeze 
                                                      
                              Did shake a flower‐stalk as thoʹ to please 
                               My love of natʹral things, a soul reborn, 
                                 Like pond & lilypad at perfect ease, 
                           I found repose, harbourʹd neath a Hawthorn, 
                                                      
                                   As seasons rouse our sensibility 
                                      I felt a pagan in my poetry. 
                                                      
 
                                                 50 
                                             Rab C Damo 
 
I know it has been less than twenty‐four hours since my last e‐mail, but things happen fast when you 
are on the road. Besides, since then, my eye muscles have moved ten thousand times & I have 
breathed in a trillion air particles – that’s a lot of action if you ask me! Back at Loch Fyne, once 
Glenda had woken up, we went on to a place called Rest & be Thankful, which was nothing but a 
stone at the head of an enormous valley. We did rest for a while, before driving south, where a 
savage looking peak called the Cobbler came into view. It was too beautiful to resist & parking up 
the car we climbed into the heavens. The view from the top is the greatest I have ever experienced & 
one I reccomend to anyone with a head for heights. Full of life we descended & hitting the road once 
more arrived by the bonnie shores of Loch Lomond just before sunset, the waters shimmering with 
the pinkness of the sky. We chased the sunset thro steadily lowering peaks to Dumbarton & the 
Erskine bridge which swept us over the Clyde. The motorway then swing round the south of the city 
before recrossing the Clyde at the city centre later in time for an evening meal at the Thirteenth Note. 
Glendaʹs friend is the boss there & we had some great food, finished off with some local bands 
gigging in the basement. The best bits were my chat with the locals, for whom truth never gets in the 
way of a good story. Every famous personʹs name that was vaunted was almost invariably linked to 
them by only one or two degrees of seperation ‐ either there mate, or a  mate of a mate. I have also 
found out where everyone is always smiling & happy in Glasgow ‐ apparently you never know 
whoʹs carrying a knife!  
We are currently staying at Glendaʹs mateʹs pad, a stones throw from Celtic Park, whose awesome 
presence has inspired me to write a sonnet. Iʹm not a particularly religious guy ‐ I mean to be honest 
its all a bit nonsensical really ‐ crazy institutions that have oppressed the masses for millenia. Luckily 
the age of science & reason is dispelling most of its illusuray edifices ‐ but is still exists, especially in 
sectarian Glasgow. However, all that singing does make for a cracking atmosphere, but seeing knife‐
scarred fans looking for trouble after a narrow defeat is probably not a great advert for the recently 
resurgant Scottish football. 
 
Glasgow 
July 27th 
 
Old Firm 
 
To Celtic Park, vast stadium of green, 
Two famous football teams have come to play 
Tricolors answering ʺGod save the queen!ʺ 
Both urging laddies on into the fray 
To happy cheers & gestures of dismay 
Those twenty‐two young lions give their all 
As the swirling winds of a winterʹs day 
Whip up a frantic phrenzie round the ball, 
Lord of a contest far too close to call! 
Both ʺCome on the Hoops!ʺ & ʺCome on the ʹGers!ʺ 
Loudly resound til found the precious goal 
When little lads & leaping managers 
Become part of the great soul‐stirring show 
That settles the little league of Glasgow. 
 
 
 
                                                       51 
                                               Meeting the Folks 
                                                         
Lanarkshire & Galloway are both extremely beautiful places, towering hills & great expanses of 
nothing ‐ dotted by the occasional brave farmer ‐ serve to induce a perfectly poetic mood in the 
failing sun. A few miles shy of Dumfries we spent a few moments at Ellisland farm, where Robbie 
Burns used to live, & I retraced the walk on which he used to compose. Later, I found myself in 
Glendaʹs own farm‐house with three of her sisters, her brother & her dad called Jock. They are a 
family of Scottish farmers, those who turn the clocks back in winter so they can see what they are 
doing in the morning, leaving the rest of the country dark evenings. They’re the kind of family who 
have worked on the same fields for generations – but Glenda & her siblings are a new breed & none 
of them seem to want to ‘take up the yoke,’ preffering sassy city‐based lives instead. We had turned 
up at one of the family ‘get‐togethers’ & they all made me feel very welcome. Aftyer meeting them all 
me & Glenda went walking around the local pine‐forested hills. The views are beautiful all the way 
across the Solway Firth to the mountains of Englandʹs lake district. However, after tea I was soon 
caught slipping one in over the families pool table in the barn by the local farm‐hand, but luckily he 
kept his mouth shut ‐ yet Glenda remained embarrassed for the rest of the night. Post‐meal we all 
gatherʹd together & talk soon drifted to poetry, when a very animated Jock recited some Burns ‐ I 
think I understood about three words. I then read them a sonnet or two & everybody went to bed in 
a grand old drunken Scottish mood. Me, I fancied another game of pool... 
 
Yesterday was a nice bohemian kinda day. For the afternoon we driove to nearby Caerlaverok castle, 
a wonderful triangular keep nestled by the Solway Firth. While Glenda was dooing some ʹtwitchingʹ 
at a nearby bird sanctuary I was walking around the castle soaking up the history. Apparently King 
Edward the First, the Hammer of the Scots, turned up with a few thousand men ‐ the sixty or so 
inside putting up a brave fight. Then, come evening, Glendaʹs friend Andy came down for the night. 
Him & Glenda had made a short film called Black Sheep ‐ where he basically tells his family he 
doesnt love them & gets his cock out for the camera. All shocking stuff, but it seems to be going 
down well. The film is being shown at the Milan film festival in a few weeks time & as I am thinking 
of popping to Italy then myself a rendezvous is definitely on the cards. Back in Dumfries, we were 
winded & dined by the local arty‐folk ‐ compared to Edinburgh, Dumfries is a distinct cultural 
backwater& getting an actual film‐maker down is quite a coup. We finished off the night back at the 
farm, raiding Jockʹs whiskey cabinet & chatting about favourite movies. Mine, incidentally, is the 
Raiders of the Lost Ark! 
 
Ingleston Farm 
July 30th 
 
                                            Scottish Proverbs 
                                                       
                               Daith & drink‐drainin name near neebors,  
                                 The fairest maidens wear nae purses, 
                                A crookit stick thraws an awfa shadow, 
                            Call back again yeʹre no phantom fellow,           
                                  A good manʹs anger passes rapidly, 
                             Great pains an little gains makʹs a man weary, 
                                Gie the deil his due an to him yeʹll gang, 
                                  Breid an broun ale winnae last lang, 
                                   Sellers of ales shouldnae tell tales, 
                                    Force wiʹoot foresicht aften fails, 
                                   Guid advice is never oot o season, 
                              Woman dea their wirk efter her ain fashion, 
                                 A giud tayles no bad o bein twice told, 
                          Spare when yeʹre young, an spend when yeʹre auld! 
                                                  52 
                                             Border Reiver 
 
After seeing off Andy at Dumfries with the promise of meeting him in Italy as a translator, Glenda 
drove me down to Carlisle. It would be where we would part for she had to race back for the annual 
Dumfries cattle show where she was selling bottles of Elderberry wine her farm has produced. I love 
talking to her, & as we drove the art of conversation was in full flow. Chief topic was the Border 
Reivers, those medieval outlaws that basically used to rob each other blind, passing around cattle like 
chips at a poker table. They were romantic days, however, where familial loyalty meant much more 
than the loose attachments to King & Country. For example, at the battle of Pinkie way back in 1547, 
the borderers in the opposing armies manoeuvred themselves to face each other & then engaged in a 
pretend fight, with plenty of convincing shouting & screaming, then left each other unscathed. 
Although King James I, the first king of a united Britain, basically kicked the troublesome Reivers out 
of Britian to settle in Ulster (creating the Northern Ireland question in the process), there still remains 
a strong sense of uniqeness in the area ‐  coupled with the ancient code of honour that kept the 
original ‘bandits’ in check. Back in those days there were a lot of cross‐border intermarriage, & I 
commented on the historical precedent to our Anglo‐Scots union. However, she neatly told me that 
talk of marriage was a bit early, & she’d kick me in the nuts if I mentioned it again.  
 
So we eventually saw the giant, red lego‐brick that is Carlisle Castle & after kissing farewell to my 
wee lassie I found myself in my native land! Now, if Lancashire is godʹs country & Burnley is 
Jerusalem, then Carlisle must be purgatory, a sort of half way house between the paradise of the 
Lakes & the hell of a Glaswegian housing estate. I was visiting my ʹgentlemansʹ club there, for spliffs, 
chess & poker, when the sudden onrush of a summerʹs day dragged us out to the North Fells. The 
drive took about twenty minutes & soon myself, a couple of friends & two tongue‐happy dogs were 
marching thirstily up the slopes of High Pike, on a deeply gouged Caldbeck fell. The nearest 
settlement is the village & cute duckpond of quaint & spacious Caldbeck, once a mining village but 
now a getaway for millionaires eager for a sllice of rural serenity.  The view from the top was 
stunning, a cloudless sky & only a slightly‐heated haze permitted a perfect panoroma. Close to the 
South lay the brown massif that incorporates Blencathra & Skiddaw into itsʹ solemn splendour, with 
Sca Fell & Great Gable a good twenty five miles to the South.  On the other side I encountered a wide 
sweep of verdant field, beginning with the mountains of Galloway across the shimmering Solway 
firth, past Chapel Cross power station, Gretna Green & then on into England with Carlisle, the spire 
of Wigton & Penrith nestled below the North Pennines which swept South as far as the eye could see.  
 
We descended in fine spirits, examining a couple of abandoned mines en route. The place would 
once have been a hive of activity, but now nature had more or less reclaimed & healed the scars of 
manʹs hunger for minerals. However, you could still scent the dust in the air, the same dust that gave 
all the miners their Pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanokoniosis, a terrible lung disease. But now 
was not to time to dally with hippopotomonstrousquipedalsm (use of large words), for back at the 
car park we were surprised to find about fifty cars had turned up, including a burger van & two 
bookies. We found ourselves milling with many a tweed‐clad Cumberland country gent & 
excitement was at almost fever pitch as there was a race in progress. A couple of hours before a ten‐
mile trail of aniseed & paraffin had been laid around the area, & then a pack of hounds released. 
Suddenly a couple of dogs came bounding over the crest of a hill & sprinted towards their owners, 
stood in a line calling their names. It felt rather like the scene outside kindergartens the world over. 
One‐by‐one the dogs came in til at the last there was one lone women looking thro binoculars for her 
dog like a young Mary Shelley staring anxiously across the bay of Lerici, waiting in vain for her 
drowned husband to return. We set off back just as she was giving up...  
 
Carlisle 
July 31st 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                       53 
                                             The Fourteen Forms 
 
Still in Carlisle, playing a lot of poker with the lads, interspersed with conversation & weed. I’ve 
known the fellas over ten years now; we used to play chess fiendishly & even formed our own mini‐
club away from Carlisle Chess club just so we could play more. At one tournament, in Blackpool, we 
even won a chess clock which takes, pride of place on Dave’s mantelpiece above his roaring fire. 
Dave is a total gamer, & even won 10,000 pounds once in Canada, becoming the world paper, scissor, 
stone champion. IN a year starved of British sporting success there was even a petition going round 
so he could win the BBC sports personality of the year! Now all forms of games have been 
superceded by poker, but the competitive element is still as vicious as ever. Lots of huffing, puffing & 
bluffing, crazy comebacks & all‐in action. First one out deals, second out makes the brews & the 
winner gets his fifty pees! Going out first is a total nightmare, as the guys seem to detect impatience 
(after the third hour) & start playing even more cautiously & slowly than before (cunts!). But as they 
say ʺ thats poker! ʺ & the poker godʹs rest full in the knowledge the anything can happen in poker 
and usely does! One of mi pals, Paul, was the one who got me the part in a Taste of Honey, a literary 
type we share many a pleasant chat about poetry. I even gave a talk at the local Austin Friars school 
to my teacher friend’s English Literature class. They are studying Haiku at the moment, & I shared 
what I knew about them, before getting them all to write oriental sonnets – that is 40 haiku building 
up to a concluding rengu. Walking back from school I began to reflect on what has recently 
happened. The beauty of meeting Glenda is that now I have finally fallen in love & achieved the 
sensations that encapsulate the fourteenth feeling which every sonneteer needs to complete his 
education.  Like the monumetous meeting with Thirruvallavar I have now completed my education 
in the fourteen feelings, or genera, the life‐blood of the art &which dictate the poemʹs subject matter, 
shape, mood & choice of words. Them being; 
 
1  POETIC 
2  ZEITGEIST 
3  PHILOSOPHICAL 
4  BIOGRAPHY 
5  ODE 
6  DIDACTIC 
7  DEDICATION 
8  LOCATION 
9  JOURNEY 
10 HISTORY 
11 VISTA 
12 PASTORAL 
13 DRAMATIC 
14 AMORETTI 
 
 
Several of them are descriptive in nature & describe a scene; The Vista is a poetic photograph, where 
the poet describes a panorama, usually from a high point. The Location describes a particular place 
from the poetʹs point of view, while the Journey is a sequence of locations & vistas connected by 
travel. The Pastoral is one of the oldest feelings that originated with the shepherds, those keepers of 
the flocks who sung for the sheer love of their rustic surroundings. It is marked by a simplicity of 
style, a brevity of tone, a delicacy of feeling & a delight in nature. Of the econmia, the Ode is a poem 
praising a non‐human object or event while a Dedication praises a person or personages, living or 
dead, usually addressed to by the poet. The History is the retelling of a story from the past, when 
gorgeous memories of days far distant in the past flower afresh beneath the poetʹs touch. The 
Biography is a history of a person & their deeds, whether the poet or some other figure, either a grand 
life‐story or some small snippet of that life.  Poetic poetry concerns all aspects of the art itself, from 
the poetic schools to individual expression.  Philosophical poetry stems from the poetʹs mind, & 
reflects their musings on a certain topic. Amoretti are a poetʹs expression of love, either as an attempt 
to woo the object of desire, or to explain the feelings the object has generated, where the ephemeral 
essence is collected & crystallized, clad in a lush, lyrical flora & placed in adoration upon the 
immortal plinth. Zeitgeist is the journalism of poetry, capturing the poetʹs life & times. With the 
Didactic the poem becomes something of an educational lecture. Dramatic poetry brings to life a scene 
by giving the carachters within it a voice, either purely spoken like a Shakesperian play, or mixed 
with description & action. 
 
Carlisle 
August 3rd 
 
 
 
 
                                                54 
                                     Home Is Where The Heart Is 
 
I have decided to take a tour of England, Wales, both Irelands & Scotland before heading to Italy to 
write to complete my education in Sonnet Lore. After taking lunch in sleepy Wigton we went on to 
the gargantuan flanks of Skiddaw that tumbled down into the idyllic pastures of Keswick. There I 
visited the world famous pencil museum (quite crap) & also the tumbledown bricks of Greta Cottage 
– Southey & Coleridge’s old residence. Unfortunately a very grumpy woman said ʺThis is a private 
house you know,ʺ & kicked me out. Surely if you’re going to buy a house with such historical 
significance you will be prepared for visitors. A much better time was had on the epic walk I took 
thro the stunning, dusk‐drowsy Hellvelyn valley, past scattered Grasmere & dreamy Rydal to 
charming Ambleside. The last time I was here was a few weeks back when we travelled to see Victor 
Pope in his Cumbrian madhouse. This time I took a much more leisurely pace, emulating the poets of 
old, whose residences I thoroughly enjoyed visiting, from Dove Cottage to Rydal Mount. 
  
I was now knackered from my massive hike (Wordsworth would have been proud), so caught a bus 
to misty Kendal, before arriving in Lancaster just in time to see my train pull out of the station. I 
would eventually arrive in Burnley at midnight, via two more trains & a rail‐replacement bus at 
Blackburn. Spent a few days R&R in my hometown; visiting friends & family ‐ who all commented 
on my new lovely India‐soaked tan ‐ plus my favourite chippy in the world, Yips Chips. Honestly, in 
all my travels I have never encounterʹd a finer chips n curry in my life. It is always a nice feeling to 
return home – it’s the place where everything kinda makes sense. Here I lost my virginity when I was 
15 to a shot putter down Burnley atheletics club. Here I discovered the joy of beer down the local 
Ritzy nightclub, from Thursday to Sunday each week. Here also, as a schoolboy, I represented 
Lancashire at football & attracted the interest of Bolton, Preston & Burnley. To the bafflement to all & 
sundry on the day I was meant to sign forms for my beloved Burnley FC I simply went to school 
instead. At the time I could not understand my actions, but now I do. If I’d have been playing for 
England in the World Cup I would not have had time to complete my education in sonnetry, to the 
eternal detriment of World Literature.  
 
However, there was a solemn air to this particular trip to my homelands, as brooding as Pendle on a 
misty day. My dear granny had died while I was in India ‐ a granny whose love for me was 
unconditional & who had been a massive rock through all my youthful years. God bless her. My 
Uncle Jeff took me to see the place where her ashes had been scatterʹd, & even gave me a little box of 
her last remains. I instantly decided to scatter them in the River Arno when I get to Italy. It was a 
river she said she loved & I thought it a suitable event for me to do in honour of her memory. A sense 
of parting & of loss consumed as a little later I walked around the streets where she used to live, now 
one‐by‐one being levelled & turned into grassy hillocks. It reminded me of when she used to say, ʺI 
remember when all this were fields.ʹ Now, ʹI remember when all this were streets,ʹ is more relevant.  
 
Burnley 
August 5th 
                                                 55 
                                           Native Sonnets 
 
Being home always inspires me to write poetry. I have penned several on my return to my native 
soul & soil, one of which (the swollen river) begins with the very first lines of poetry I composed ‐ 
they won the Lowerhouse junior school poetry competition when I was about 8 years old. Another 
one was inspired by a trip to Turf Moor to see the first game of the new football season, where me & 
mi dad sang our hearts out for the lads as the beat Blackpool. Yet another sonnet was inspired by a 
trip to the old folks home where my mother is a warden. Every Saturday night is bingo night – the 
nearest thing to sex that the old dears have these days. My mum asked me to be a guest caller, which 
inspired me to record some of the sayings before they die out completely. 
 
Burnley 
August 7th 
 
                                                                   The Swollen River            
                                                                          (The Calder)   
                   
                                     The river flowing by is often wide & high 
                                              Upon a timeless voyage to the sea, 
 
        Beside the scene I’m caught, connecting to the thought 
                                          Of nature & her rimless mystery, 
 
      Growing after the rains, flowing ‘long swelling lanes, 
                              Upon her banks a special place to be,  
 
    Beyond the smoky town that turns the water brown, 
                       I listen to the special sound she makes, 
 
       As lower fall the skies we watch the river rise, 
          Up to the trees to seize the branches breaks, 
 
At ever faster pace her swirling foam curls race 
            Along the course that she forever takes      
 
          For rivers flowing by are often wide & high 
                                On voyages out to a timeless sea… 
 
 
 
 
Burnley 
 
You must know Burnley to see itʹs beauty, 
Twixt Hameldon & Pendle where she lies, 
Thou fertile region of the North contree, 
Of Bingo halls & market stalls & pies, 
Of cobblestones & Bovis Homes & lanes, 
Of working men & the working menʹs pride 
Of balmy days & snowy greys & rains 
& blatantly the worldʹs best football side. 
 
You must know Burnley to see itʹs beauty, 
The arches & the chimneys & Turf Moor, 
The stately halls of Gawthorpe & Towneley, 
The station & the bus‐stop & mi door ‐  
You can keep yer New Yorks, Delhis & Rome 
At th’end of the day thereʹs no place like home! 
 
Slum Clearance 
 
As a poignant time‐lapse of the soul, 
Removes my child‐hood street‐by‐street 
I brooded on an artificial meadow  
Where recently dilapidated terraces 
Were brick‐by‐brick demolishʹd, levellʹd low, 
 
Once, with life, these districts resounded 
But all are dying now, like falling flies, 
Grandmas, Grandads, old Aunties, bald Uncles 
Now, a generation of old photographs 
Then, they laughed & cried like me & you 
 
My own street seems to have survived the cull 
But for how long? if others of its ilk  
Were deemed ungodly, then surely snobbish time  
Will banish mine beneath a grassy mound. 
 
 
 
 
 
 
    Bingo Lingo 
 
“…Eyes down fer yer full house!” the camp caller croons, 
     “Kelly’s Eye, on its own, the number one, 
       & its thee & me, two & three, twenty three, 
        Heinz varieties, five & seven, fifty‐seven...” 
         Mary glances nervously at Eileen Pointer’s sheet 
        “& its Sherwood Forest, all the threes, thirty three, 
           You’ve been & gone at eight & one, eighty one!” 
            Tension, frustration, tutting & twitching, 
           “A fumph & a duck, five & two, fifty two,  
              & its those legs, eleven!” The room fills with wolf‐whistles 
              “Now who didn’t flush the toilet, it’s a dirty loo, thirty two, 
                 Ooo! It’s the top of the shop, blind ninety…” 
                 “EEE‐YAAAAA!” screams Mary Pie, spilling her drink. 
                   “Buggar,” puffs Eileen, “I only needed seventeen.” 
 
 
 
 
 
      Turf Moor 
 
Robbed of life & lifestyle the yeomen came 
    T’worship King Cotton amidst the hills, 
     Built terraces & the cathedral mills  
  Then demanded sport, the beautiful game. 
 
      On a famous site from the Bob Lord Stand 
 My brethren sing their ‘arts out fer the boys, 
 “COME ON YOU CLARETS,”  what an awesome noise   
                           Shaking the cup oʹ Bovril from mi hand. 
 
A silent prayer, a few strides, the shot ‐ GOAL! 
          The crowd erupts in divine elation. 
 
      Burnley F.C. are the best at football 
        & that’s the Bee‐hole & end of it all. 
 
 
 
 
                                           Over Lancashire 
                                                    
                            With the vigours that horde the squirrel stores 
                              Twixt scatterʹd wracks of industryʹs decay 
                            Midsommer morning drives us out of doors, 
                             Long the Leeds & Liverpool make fair way. 
                                                    
                             Mounting the sheerest slope of Pendle Hill 
                             From whale‐back peak the county Palatine 
                            Sprawls by the Pennines ‘neath a sky so still; 
                                                    
                              Fair Ribble snakes thro Preston like a vine 
                            Accrington, there a flash of Morcambe sand! 
                             The rugged range which buries Manchester 
                              The blue‐bell fold of Barley close at hand 
                               The tiny snow‐cappʹd fells of Cumbria... 
                                                    
                                I soak the scene once more afore I go, 
                               Then turn my back & track to Clitheroe. 
 
 
                                                  56 
                                  On the Trail of Owen Glendower 
 
Britain is currently inundated with lollygaggers, gollywhoppers, ginny spinners, daddy longlegs or 
whatever the hell you call them! I set off from Burnley through a great cloud of those drunken 
insects, bursting into glorious sunshine. I’m not the only ‘poet’ who has departed Burnley – back in 
the 60’s modern masters of verse, such as Jimi Hendrix, the Beatles, The Who, the Kinks & many 
others, had all popped into East Lancashire, staying in the town after their gigs in neighbouring 
Nelson. Retracing the Beatles journey home took me through the rolling Lancashire hills to 
Rawtenstall & then on to Manchester. In the chic‐soakʹd cottonopolis I called in the grand, circular 
city library & photocopied a few maps for my trip, then set off in good spirits this morning. My 
journey took me past the golden gates of Warrington town hall & all the power stations that line the 
Dee estuary. Stopped off for two pints of lager & a packet of crisps in Runcorn, then spent half an 
hour wandering the excellent Chester city centre. All right, I was putting off entering Wales, but who 
wouldnʹt?  The trains were full of holiday‐goers trundling off to the summer beaches of Rhyll & 
Llandudno. I got off at a place called Flint (in Flintshire) ‐ my first proper taste of North Wales since 
Pwllehi Butlins when I was ten. I had now reached bus country, no more train jumping for me. In 
Wales the buses are infrequent, every couple of hours or so & only on market days in the more 
remote areas ‐ but this is cool as it gives me an opportunity to check out the places I find myself 
unceremoniously dumped in. I caught a bus south through a few miles of Lancashirelike countryside 
to the county town of Mold, which was more like a market town with a few grand buildings. The 
place is famous for Daniel Owen, the Welsh Charles Dickens, & I did hear one geezer speaking the 
Welsh language that their bard has helped to preserve, but was surprised to learn most people here 
have a scouse accent ‐ uurgh!  
My next bus took me ten miles to the West, past Offas Dyke, the ancyent ditch that the Saxons bulit 
to keep out the marauding Welsh. We steadily climbed the Clwydian hills, a perfect natural 
boundary that divides the two ancyent nations, & the vista from the top was well worthwhile. 
Suddenly Wales was spread far below me & curved for a good many miles in all directions. Below, in 
the sun‐speckled vale, a tall church spire markʹd the town of Ruthin. The place is a gorgeous find, full 
of excellently preserved tudor buildings based around the 13th century castle buiilt to subdue the 
Welsh. The castle is now a splendid hotel, with exotic peacocks & their bright hens wandering the 
ruin‐peppered grounds. I have finally heard people speaking in Welsh ‐ a bit like arabic without the 
pint of phlegm.   
 
Ten miles south of Mold, in a wee townlet called Corwen, stands the aptly entitled Owen Glyndwr 
Hotel. It was from there that Mr Glendower declared himself the Prince of all Wales & roused his 
people to rebellion. As luck would have it I met some local tokers on the bus to Corwen who 
generously gave me a lump of fine charas to smoke in Wales. I soon found myself by Owen 
Glendowerʹs ancestral home, in the Owen Glendower hotel with a statue of the main man in the 
small village square opposite. The hotel held the first eisteddfodd (meeting of Welsh bards) open to 
the public back in 1789, a great base to begin my potterings round the area. The village is set by the 
wide, sparkling river Dee & full of pretty grey cottages & flanked by forested hills, whose snowy 
brown floor was a delight to walk through. At one point I heard the bleetings of a lamb & rescued it 
from the gate that had fallen on her ‐ Iʹm sure she gave me a wink as she scuttled off to her parents. I 
am also studying Welsh poetics, thanks to some books on the sunject in the hotel’s library. Most of 
them are in Welsh, but there is an English one on Cynghahnedd (pronounced King‐hah‐neth). This is 
the very involved art of creating harmonious music through words ‐ through alliteration & other 
techniques – which I hope to be using soon in my own verse.  
 
Corwen 
August 10th 
 
 
 
 
                                                        
                                                      57 
                                                  Taffyland 
 
After a night skimming through the hotelʹs library of Welsh poetry, I set off west. The bus passed 
Bala & its crystal llyn (lake) as it trundled into the mountain fastnesses. Not long after I pulled thro 
puicturesque Dolgellau & the mountain fringed mouth of the sandy river Bar.  Now the road pass’d 
thro tumultuous peaks & gorgeous forests, a totally stunning journey, & we pass’d by the lofty peak 
of CAdir, the giant’s chair. Legend has it that if you spent a full night on its top you would become 
either a poet, or insane (they are generally associated together anyway. Luckily for me, I was already 
a poet, & had already booked a room in a hotel down the road – with duvets! I hit the market town of 
Machynlleth, site of the last true Welsh parliament back in the age of Owen Glendower. After 
spending a night in a local hotel I had a lovely fried breakfast & walked the ten miles along the 
Dovey river to the seaside village of Aberdovey. It is a true secret ‘emerald’ of our islands, a sort of 
Welsh Riviera with boats & beaches & bars, all linked by the nicest community harmony. Luckily for 
me my B&B was across from the village hall & some nice‐assed lass was having her eighteenth 
birthday party with half the town invited. Great fun! 
 
Yesterday I plunged back into the Cymric hinterland, calling at Barmouth for a game of golf on a 
wind‐swept links course. I opted to spend the night a few miles further north at Harlech, with its 
splendid castle overlooking the dunes & golden sands of Caernarvon Bay. It was here that Mr 
Glyndwr made his capital ‐  after kicking out the English back in 1405 ‐ & I tripped out on the well‐
preserved medievils. The modern Wales is well wicked &, unlike Scotland, has preserved a lot of itʹs 
ʹtrueʹ national essence. The Welsh are warm, can talk the hind legs off a donkey & think all 
Londoners dress in Gucci.  Life in the narrow roads of the villages is cool & the communitys seem 
self‐sufficient, from the little independant shoe shops to the bric‐a‐brac newsagents ‐ & there is a 
thriving Womenʹs Institute. I met an old lady, sat outside her cottage facing a little school. She was 
charming & told me that she attended the school as a girl, left at fourteen for fifty years work in the 
local post office, had a family along the way & bought the house where she now lives across the way 
from all her memories of her youth. After a few days of all this I am feeling very much ʹin the zoneʹ & 
have decided to go on a wee jaunt round the rest of Wales. 
 
Woke up to my second great breakfast in a row ‐ I think my welsh dragon of a landlady fancied me & 
after giving me the room on the cheap she gave me extra beans. As I munched them down I could see 
the top of Snowdon peaking above the clouds a few miles to the North & duly set off to climb her. On 
the way I called at Portmeirion, a perfect, idyllic example of eccentric folly. Some crankpot had made 
a ʹhome for unwanted housesʹ & rebuilt, brick‐by‐brick, about thirty houses from all over the world 
in this pretty, sea‐splasheʹd part of the world. I snook in SAS style round the coast & was soon idling 
by a hotelʹs warm swimming pool, preparing myself for the climb. Thoroughly refreshed I soon 
found myself at the foot of Snowdon & scampered up one of her more tranquil faces in less than two 
hours, bare‐chested & wielding a good, strong stick The views were often amazing until I broke into 
the clouds which gave an otherworldly effect to the rocky terrain. It was to here that the big G 
retreated after his defeat, a fugitive hiding in the caves & thickets of the mountains. As I reached the 
summit my mood was disturbed by a shed load of tourists & the reek of a noisy old steam train. 
Shunning the crowds my descent took me down the other side of the mountain, through many a 
vibrant view, into the delightful lakeside village of Llanberis, where I spent the night, writing wine‐
fuelled poetry in a cool, crumbling castle as the sunset painted the lake .  
 
15th August 
Llanberis 
Over Gwynedd 
 
I tackl’d Snowdon from the low Rhyd Ddu 
Infinite furlongs from her summit view;  
The little cluster that is Liverpool 
& many mountain masses minds enjewel,  
The twinkle of the distant river Dee, 
The rising lion of Aran Fawwdwy, 
The quaint domain of old Dolgellau grey, 
The epic sweep that keeps Cardigan Bay, 
Dinas Emrys & her sleeping dragon, 
Castles at Flint, Harlech & Caernarvon, 
The isle adjacent to th’adjacent isle 
& yonder Wicklow’s shadowy defile ‐ 
The British Isles have wrapt me all around, 
Tho in the heavens I still touch her ground.  
 
 
 
                                                   
                                                 58 
                                           Yaki‐Fuckin‐Da! 
                      
Left Snowdonia fully inspired & loving Wales, so I thought Iʹd head south & check out some more of 
this delightful find. A bus or two later & I had traversed Britannia’s beer belly & found myself in the 
strangely charming ‘metropolis’ of Aberystwyth. Unfortunately it was high season & I couldnʹt get a 
room ‐ but luckily I met this epileptic on the bus who opened up one of the disabled toilets ‐ this 
coupled with a lucky find of some blankets left in bin liners outside the local oxfam served to provide 
me with a comfy, warm bed ‐ complete with en suite bathroom. I was disturbed a couple of times 
thro the night by some geezers eager for a shit ‐ but all in all slept well.  Next day I left early & 
followed the sweeping curve of Cardigan bay to Cardigan itself (pretty dull). Then, on to Fishgaurd, 
a surprisingly charming town, with stupidly narow streets & great views of the bay. The coastline 
around these parts is stunning, 100 ft ragged cliffs, weather‐beaten &  sea‐smashʹd. On then to saint 
davids, a wee little place set  above the stunning cathedral ‐ it was here 1500 years ago that David 
landed & built the first christian church. The views are stunning of the Irish Sea as it curves round 
this extreme corner of Britain. From here I passʹd the gorgeous golden beach of St Brides bay & 
reached the capital of pembrokeshire ‐ haverfordwest.  
 
Booked into a B&B & quickly double dropped a couple of the pills I had with me ‐ leading to a merry 
night on the razz. My neighbour was luckily a coke fiend, who I met at six this morning as i went to 
the loo. We soon hooked up ‐ he was getting out of Llanelli because his bird had slept with his mate 
& he didnt want to get arrested. My payment for his coke was a couple of threatening phone calls to 
to said unfaithful girlfriend in my broadest northern accent. Not really my normal actions, but quite 
funny, especially after a big line of coke. We caught a train east this morning, him getting off at 
llanelli & myself going on to cardiff, dominated by the huge millenium stadium. It was here that I 
caught a bus all the way back Britannia’s beer belly, arriving in Caenarvon four hours later. Managed 
to merge with a group of touring pensioners & sneak into the splendid castle. The view from the tops 
of the turrets was phenomenal, with Snowdon & her phalanx of brooding sisters dwarfing all around 
them. I had reached the coast by now, & across the glittering waters of the Menai straights lay the isle 
of Anglesey, & thither I was drawn. It was at this spot that Roman Soldiers, looking to conquer the 
‘breadbasket’ of Celtic resistance, saw naked druids across the waters chanting, singing & banging 
things in an attempt to scare the Roman off. Suffice it to say their lack of weapons put them at a 
major disadvantage once the legion took to their boats.  
 
From Caenarvon I caught a bus to the interesting, yet slightly shoddy, Bangor & from there crossed 
to the isle. Enjoyed a lovely walk by the seaweed covered shore to a castle dominated place called 
Beaumaris. Unfortunately there was a regatta on so I couldnʹt find a bed for the night & had to travel 
further North, including a walk across two miles of the widest beach Iʹve ever seen, called Red Wharf 
Bay. Spent Saturday night in Bennlech, a touristy spot, watching crap TV & resting my weary loins. 
Next day was another day of walks, ten miles in all through the peaceful wide spaces of the island, 
chomping on the ripening blackberries as I went. After passing a psychadelic coloured ʹmountain,ʹ 
ravaged over the years for its mineral deposits, I came to Almwych & its cute little harbour. A bus 
ride later I reached Holyhead, took one look at the town & realised Iʹm gonna catch the first ferry 
outta here. Ireland awaits & I can’t wait to check out those green‐eyed ladies with their knee‐
tremblingly sexy accents. 
 
Holyhead 
August 18th 
 
 
 
                                                          
                                                          
                                                        59 
                                                   Dubb‐Lhynn 
 
ʺDont be a cunt all yer life, go to Ireland!ʺ said Sean Coah ‐ so here I am on the emerald Isle & enjoying 
it immensely. Arrived at the land of Yeats, Wilde & all those green‐eyed sirens that are the Celtic 
ladies, on a choppy sea, the misty peaks of the Wicklow Hills announcing my arrival. My spirit was 
drawn within them, but first I had to check out Dublin. Its not the prettiest place in the world ‐ the 
river Liffys quite whiffy for example ‐ but the Craaack is wicked. Wilde once said to Yeats over xmas 
pud that Ireland was a nation of glorious failures. But today, it’s a global success story with one of 
the best economies in Europe. However, this makes the beers ridiculously pricey & I feel my heart 
being ripped out Indiana‐Jones‐&‐the‐Temple‐of‐Doom‐stylee every time I buy one. I’ve now been in 
Dublin three nights ‐ in a different youth hostel each time. Once to get away from the vodka‐swilling 
poles, once to get away from the fleas & one to get away from the sexy Swedish girls who were doing 
my monogomous vows for Glenda no good at all. Spent a lot of time just wandering about ‐ 
especially the Temple Bar district, that busy music‐filled tourist trap that is the heart of town ‐ the 
highlight of which was this Hare Krishna festival, with obligatory free curry! There was Indian 
dance, some amazing swordsmanship from an Estonian devotee, followed by two twins performing 
the most masterful (& painful‐looking) yoga I have ever seen! Then came the speaker, who could 
waffle on about reincarnation & karma til the cows come home, but thankfully spared the pin‐
dropping audience after forty minutes, when the mad dash for the free curry turned into a hare 
Krishna rave! By the way, the krishnas don’t advocate eating meat, getting drunk, gambling & casual 
sex – so that’s me out then.  
 
Enjoyed wandering around the scenes of the 1916 Easter rising – there are still bullet holes in the 
GPO building by the way. There is also a prison where the chief ‘culprits’ were executed by the 
British – the wall which once carried their blood now emblazoned with the majestic poetry that are 
the words of the declaration of Irish independence. I have also been hanging out within the grounds 
of Trinity College ‐ a lovely oasis in the middle of a busy city – with lazy cricket & stuffed elks about 
three men high! But sensing that was not enough to soothe me of my cityitis I decided to explore to 
the north of the city. First stop was Howth, where a little island, ‘the eye of Ireland’ looks out to the 
sea. In my minds eye I could see the Viking Longships arriving for the first time before going on to 
found their Dubb‐Lhynn (black pool). It is a quiet place, where lads & lasses go to fall in love, & on 
this occasion there was a brisk sea‐breeze hurtling the clouds above my head. The place is set against 
a headland, with tall cliffs & remarkable coves, a perfectly poetic place & indeed one where the 
teenage WB Yeats grew up. Setting off from Balscaddon House, the family residence, I emulated my 
youthful idol by scrambling over rocky cliff paths to the squawk of gulls. I took a 100 foot climb up a 
mini‐mountain, gaining a number of stings & cuts en route. On reaching the summit the view of 
Dublin & the distant Wicklow Hills was wonderful, & I genuinely felt the ‘electric charge’ that it is to 
be in Ireland. 
 
Continuing my day trip I rejoined the train network & headed north to Drogheda. Today it is a quiet, 
wooded place, but three & a half centuries ago it was the scene of indiscriminet slaughter as Oliver 
Cromwell paid bloody homage to the Irish rebels. More history later, a few miles upstream along the 
river Boyne, I came to the battlefield of the same name. This was the true start of the Jacobite 
rebellions (which would end at Culloden), when the deposed King James II & his Catholic army 
faced the much more numerous protestant forces of King William III. The battle resulted in James 
fleeing to France & leaving behind the simmering sectarian resentment that has recently boiled over 
in the Troubles of Northern Ireland & whenever there is an old firm match in Glasgow. In fact, the 
anniversary of this battle is always celebrated by the Orange Marches (after William of Orange), 
which never cease to stir up angry sentiments, despite the centuries that have since pass’d.  
 
Dublin 
August 21st 
                                          Simple Common Sense 
                                                        
                               They say there is only one certainty in life 
                                & that’s death ‐ but, man, that’s bullshit 
                         For life only counts when you leave the downy nest 
                               & face the big, bad world upon yer own ‐ 
                                                        
                                 Where ya win friends & ya lose friends 
                             You gain trust, you use trust, you abuse trust, 
                          Ya make money, ya take money or ya fake money 
                              You laugh & cry & piss & shit & all that shit. 
                                                        
                         Where are you now as you read these leaping lines 
                          Faces lit up, watching fireworks dance & crackle, 
                            I bet the sky still stretches endlessly above you, 
                           While below a great gravity pins you to the floor 
                                                        
                             So life is for the living & death is for the dead 
                     Live it while yer living ‐ make love, make war, make bread! 
 
                                                   
                                                   
                                                   
                                                   
                                                   
                                                 60 
                                      The Glen & the Two Lakes 
 
However vibrant Dublin is, city life soon pales on me, so I decided to head south toward those 
Wicklow Hills, whose northern fringes tower over the Dublin plain. Somewhere in the middle of 
them lies Glendaloch ‐ a suitable place to head for in relation to my recent trysting. I caught the 
DART train to Bray, an unassuming little place by the sea, then caught a bus into the hills. The 
scenery where Braveheart was filmed began to unfold... great fells & pretty vales, brightened by 
vibrant yellow lines of gorse ‐ a most pleasing flower. At Glendalough I booked into a pleasant 
hostel, set in its own grounds by the first of the two lakes that give the place its name (the glen & two 
lakes). I had come here to potter & free my mind, my first walk taking me around the lake & the 
nearby monastery, a splendid ruin of a place, but far too full of yanks. There were even some yanks 
back at the hostel, who I tried to initiate into the ways of Eastenders ‐ too no avail!  Spent my first 
night playing chess with one of the yanks in a local bar, to the accompaniment of an old german 
tinkling on the piano. Then back at the hostel we had a great time flirting with a couple of middle‐
aged Irish birds, before I hit my pilllow. 
 
The last couple of days were even better! The area is saturated with streams, waterfalls & tall pines, a 
lush paradise connected, perhaps, to the tempremental weather I encounter’d on the first day. Ten 
minutes rain then ten minutesʹ summer sun ‐ you could set your watch by it. Today was much better, 
a glorious affair which had me embarking on a great walk up Camaderry, a vast barren heap nearly 
three thousand feet high. Passing a heather‐clad bog I reachʹd the summit with a blast of wind & took 
in the wonderful panorama of sea & mountains. The descent was a brilliant scramble, using a tree‐
branch as a third leg, coming across underwater streams, my kindred mountain goats who didnʹt 
notice me until but a few feet away, then a herd of thirty deer which I sent scattering over the peak. 
Back in the valley I traversed a lovely waterfall, bounding boulder‐to‐boulder to the amazement of 
nearby ramblers. Then last night I had a lovely poetic moment. A worker at the hostel brought me 
some wonderful photos of the Dun Chaoin area (west coast ‐ looks lovely) & asked for some words. 
Snappy Haiku seemʹd appropriate & I adorned six of them ‐ earning one in the process. Its been a 
wicked break here before I go on to meet Glenda on the west coast tomorrow, & feel suitably shanti‐
shanti as the Indians would say. 
 
Glendalough 
24th August 
 
 
 
                                                    61 
                                            Men get PMT too 
 
Left Glendaloch in good spirits & after a quick spin back to Dublin I headed out West on an Inter 
City. After three hours of dull, agricultural lowlands I found myself in the charming medieval streets 
of Galway, the gateway to the legendary Irish West Coast. I munched my lunch by the harbour, 
wondering what was in store. I wasn’t to be disappointed. My bus was soon roving through a 
fantastic landscape of mountains & wild, uncultivated bogland, interspersed with many an island‐
dotted lake. I almost came in my pants on several occasions (the male equivalent of a chocolate 
orgasm) before I was picked up in the wee town of Clifden by mʹlady Glenda & her mate from 
Sheffield. Her friend had brought her six year old son along who I immediately clicked with ‐ both 
ladies were full of PMT (pincer attack!) & we definitely needed each other for a bit of sanity. They 
took me out to a beautiful spot on the coast, where I immediately chased the sunset up a mountain & 
itʹs cool poolʹd summit to be given a spectacular panorama of mountains, islands & the mighty 
Atlantic. Descended in the fading dusk I found myself beside a fire on the beach, beneath a panapoly 
of stars, where a dancer, guitar & fiddle accompanied the old Irish folk tunes. I gave them a 
rendetion of my version of Yeatsʹ poem ʹThe White Birdsʹ (heʹs from just up the road in Sligo) & 
somehow managed to blag a sleeping bag for my stay (I travel light). That starry sky was the most 
beautiful I have ever known & I wrote a wine‐drenched sonnet listening to the waves & the music by 
the crackle of the fire;  
 
 
 Thither the Above 
 
O knightly lights of heaven, star on star  
You never shone so beauteous, we are  
The work, perhaps, of some astral being  
Or am I him now I am the all‐seeing  
Acolyte of the lost art of the skies  
Painting Orion & the Geminis  
Musing upon those long, eternal days  
Soar shooting stars, trailblazing my amaze  
Mixt with the phantom lluminʹd Milky Way  
I saw, I swear, the Seraphim at play  
Dancing between the planetary kings  
Lord Jupiter & Saturnʹs eerie rings  
Venus is beaming streaming dreams of love  
    Sweetheart come hither, thither the above 
 
Next day beat sunny & I took Glenda up the rocky mountain for an excellent hike, vast swathes of 
distance between us & humanity. Later in the lovely day the still furious vestiges of a Carribean 
hurricane turned up, turning the tent into a scene like that in the Blair Witch Project, only about fifty 
times worse. A mere twenty yards away the waves were rolling in massive & fierce & we knew it 
was time to leave. Next morning we ended up camping a few miles inland at a place called Cong, a 
serene little place full of history, pyramids & temples. I cooked the girls a big curry while about thirty 
other campers shared the kitchen, & settled down at the camp site cinema to watch a John Wayne 
film called the Quiet Man which had been filled in the area. It was cool to see him riding a horse 
along the same beach I had been musing on earlier that morning.  
 
After saying goodbye to Gʹs mate the journey back began with an hourʹs delay at some obscure town 
waiting for a crashed bus, then we whizzed back a couple of hundred miles or so through Galway to 
Dublin for yet another night of the craich. However, her PMT was by this time raging & we spent 
most of the time bickering. Hung over to fuck we set off this morning & headed North, our strategy 
of buying one stop singles on the busses still working well,  & the buzz of ten text messages coming 
in thro my hitherto inactive phone signal alerted me to the fact I had crossed the border & entered 
Northen Ireland, Great Britain & home. Spent a couple of hours in Belfast striking up conversations 
so I could listen to the delicious accent, the highlight of which was a quick taxi ride round the Falls 
Road to check out the vivid murals & sectarian atmosphere of the troubles. Then a ferry ride to 
gloomy Stranrear & a midnight cruise thro the lonely roads of Galloway brought me here to Glendaʹs 
dads farm, in the heart of Burns country, with a warm whiskey by my side...  
 
Ingleston Farm 
28th August 
 
                                                   62 
                                              Burns Supper 
 
Yesterday me & Glenda were sitting on the majestic Criffel, the great hill that dominates this part of 
the world. It was a scintillating sunset, a fiery red & a clear cyan sky, a fair tonic for the soul, & sent 
us off back to the farm in great spirits. Now, being in the very heart of Burns country, where his 
actual bones are buried, suddenly Glendaʹs dad (Jock) turns up in a blue kilt & said we were going to 
have an impromptu Burns supper to properly welcome me to Scotland, what with me being a poet & 
all. Burnsʹ birthday is actually in January, but that didnt seem to matter. Jock was the chairman, sat at 
the top of the room with his four guest speakers (a few mates of his), & after introducing the night 
with a couple of jokes (the scots went to england to steal their women, but took one look at them & 
stole their cattle instead), got the meal started. After a while a hush descended as a big, fat fresh 
haggis was cordially piped into the dining room to the rhythmic handclaps of the company and 
deftly opened with a great dagger as Jock recited Burnʹs poem, ʹTo a Haggisʹ in a broad scots accent 
that I could barely understand. Then the piper piped the haggis back to the kitchens, its warm aroma 
ʹreekin richʹ as it got everyone’s bellies rumbling. 
 
The haggis is a small bald hedgehog that roams the highlands & was accompainied on my plate by 
some chappit tatties & mashed neeps (turnips) ‐ a bit bland, but quite filling. Then we all raised a 
toast (one of many through the night) to the immortal memory of the bard, & heard a piper play a 
dirge which struck me in my belly. Later I thought this was probably the tartan coloured haggis as I 
had been teased a little as a sassenach & told a fib or two. Haggis is actually all the odds & ends from 
cattle (ie the bollox) all wrapped up in a sheep‐stomach ‐ & I had fuckin seconds! There followed a 
lecture on Burns, some of his poetry & then the customary toast to the laddies & the toast the lassies. 
These consisted of some sexist banter between a male & female speaker & were proper well funny. 
Then, in a drunken haze we splashed thro a few Scots songs & the arms‐crossed, foot‐stamping Auld 
Lang’s Eyne (also written by Burns), before staggering back to the farm in a warm glow. The Scots 
really love Burns, he is felt like one of them, not some snobby middle class poet. I find it a shame 
there is nothing like this to bring the English together, so duly propose that when I die Iʹd like 
someone to inaugarate the Damo Rave, where instead of old scots songs weʹll have Betty Boo, take 
tequila & ecstasy instead of the whiskey, & some yips chips n curry instead of a haggis.  
 
Ingleston 
30th August 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                                                        63 
                                                                           Big Wednesday 
                                                                                           
Hungover to fuck me & Glenda left the farm for my first taste of the internationally renowned 
Edinburgh festival. On arriving at the city the event was in full swing all around us, a Scottish hot‐
pot of cultural fancy. Looking through the ʹguidesʹ we were drowned in choice, over three thousand 
acts, films & exhibitions. So over a few glasses of wine, listening to jazz by the harbour at Leith, we 
prepared the inaugaral Big Wednesday, & were soon ready, a little after noon, for our first event. 
This was a lunchtime improv comedy in the frame of whose line is it anyway? ‐ A reyt funny way to 
start the show. From there we were met by Glendaʹs mate Andy who provided us with some pills ‐ & 
we were soon coming up in Princes Street Gardens with some violins & piano. We then drove down 
to the gorgeous botanical gardens for some sublimley excellent aeriel photography from all over the 
world, before a quick drive back into the very busying town for the 4:15 start of Grease, the musical 
(my 2nd favorite movie if the truth be known) by a bunch of American teenagers. We then rushed off 
to see a play, written in just 24 hours by a bunch of drama students, then found ourselves at Cirque 
Surreal, becoming 5 years old again as I gasped at the aerobatics, wondered at the guy keeping five 
footballs up at the same time, & laughed heartily at the clowns! Half‐way through we snook out to 
the big tent next door, where the Ladyboys of Bangkok were performing ‐ an hysterical cabaret‐rave, 
with many a confused moment from the seat‐squirming gentlemen. Even the women were put out, 
with many commenting, ʹHow can he have a better body than me?ʺ  The end of the show was 
hysterical, with the ladyboys in full highland regalia miming to the Proclaimers, ʹI would walk 500 
miles,ʹ the crowd going wild & singing & clapping along. Only in Scotland, I told myself.  
 
It was ten of the clock by now, the pills in full flow, & we headed to the piece du resistance of the day 
‐ a strange gothic production of lights, music & aerial ropage, set in the stately grounds of the 
university, with action on all sides in an epic fashion. From there we hit Whistle Binkies for some live 
bandage, then the Royal Oak for a little hootenenny action with some violins & guitar geezers, before 
buzzing down the Bongo Club for a very Spanish rave. From there we ended up partying at Glenda’s 
mates, Andy, in Penicuik, finishing off the pills & some of his Peruvian flake coke ‐ now that 
wednesday was proper big! Andy is a film‐maker, like Glenda, & also the lead singer of Scotlandʹs 
biggest ska band ‐ Bombskare. After a great jam, me on acoustic & him wielding his harmonica, I 
woke up on the Penicuik Estate, about ten miles from Edinburgh. The place is owned by some filthy 
rich Scottish Knight, living in a fairly swanky pad next to the gorgeous gothic ruin of the old stately 
home, which burnt down about a hundred years ago leaving a great shell of a house. Some guy 
recently offered to buy the ornate stonework, bricks & columns for three million pounds, but was 
turned down. The Estate is full of pine forest & river‐running ravines & as I found myself walking to 
the sound of  echoing gunfire I came across a recently dead fox, left by the road to be cleaned up by 
the estate manager ‐ still warm with life yet looking very pissed off he’d just been shot. NMy walk 
took me up into the Pentland Hills, a series of savage, windswept peaks with fantastic views over 
Lothian, Edinburgh & over the Firth of Forth to Fife. The prospect storing a little ‘Britain’ in my heart 
before I begin my mission to Sicily ‐ starting tomorrow with a flight over the North Sea to Sweden.  
                                                                                                                                           Penicuik  ‐ 3rd September 
Farewell Brittania 
 
Sir, have you ever seen Cumbria clad in snow  
Or Brighton’s beaches been in summerʹs easy glow  
& have you ever heard the Cambridge matin bells  
Or felt your senses stirrʹd when England’s anthem swells?  
Sir, did you drink the ale brewed for the northern mills  
Or watch seafarers sail from Whitby’s salty sills  
& did you ever feed your thirst in Cornish Springs  
Or take the time to read thro histories of kings?  
Sir, did you ever take these bright isles in a tour,  
The pride of Scotland slake on Hampden’s awesome roar  
& did you ever stun the herd of Wicklow deer  
Or strike a mountain run on Snowdon sloping sheer?  
To an Englishman with liberty come leave these fabled lands  
The English call their own, set sail for sundry strands 
                                                         
                                                         
                                                       64 
                                                Baltic Antics 
 
Woke up yesterday morning underneath a sexy German lady... trouble is she was in the top bunk 
& I was in the bottom ‐ nevermind! I am staying on a boat that has been converted into a 
hotel/hostel & the decor is all seamanlike. Stockholm is a very pleasant place, a sort of bigger 
version of Venice with many forested islands intermingled with the choppy waters of the Maleran 
Lake & the Baltic Sea. The architecture is wonderful, with the royal palace a stones throw from the 
modern city centre & the Nobel Prize museum, where I mused on a possible prize for literature ‐ 
Iʹm not saving up for a pension at the moment, so that would come in perfectly. Obviously the 
ladies here are hot... as slickly dressed as an Italian, with cuter cheeks & the softest pink lips. I treat 
myself to a swim & a sauna, a perfect way relax into my continental tour. Walking through the city 
suburbs is a very tranquil sensation, both physically & spiritually distant from most bustling 
European cities.  As I walked I was suddenly inspired to write a few lines in the beat fashion, & 
finished it off with an arty kind of twist about discovering an old photograph of myself holding a 
pretty young lady ‐ she was wearing beads ‐ sat upon the beach of, perhaps, San Francisco. It 
never happened like that, but all poems need an end. So I found myself having one of those 
moments; the sun setting sublimely as I ate my evening meal upon the forecastle of the hotel boat, 
the splish‐splosh of the waves & a gust of sea breeze blew out the sheet as I turned a page, to float 
on the air like a falling feather. Time was standing still but the paper started falling – to slip 
between the narrowest of cracks between the boards ‐ to be found one day in the distant future by 
somebody breaking up the hold for scrap. I was gutted at first, like the time my girlfriend ran off 
with a German! But as I ponder’d home to my cabin empty handed, past painted memorials of the 
age of sail. I had a remarkable epiphany ‐ at last my poem had a proper end! 
So musing on the fate of my lost sonnet I left the calm air of Stockholm on a pretty cool ferryboat, 
where old folk waltzed to the violinists on deck & the younger folk boogied at showtime disco & 
its renditions of eurovision song winners, including an excellent version of making yer mind up 
by Bucks Fizz. The voyage itself was wonderful, scything between the little forested islands which 
make up the east of Sweden, a magnificent archipelago which seemʹd to go on for hours. As the 
sun was setting we pourʹd into the Baltic Sea & pausʹd to pick up more passengers at a place callʹd 
Mariehamn ‐ ownʹd by Finland but Swedish‐speaking. The boat then shimmerʹd into the night 
waves, but with us being so far north there was always the red streak of day swathed accross the 
horizon. This morning we came to Tallin, where on trying to pass through passport control a 
moody, menstruating Scandinavian picked me up on my dodgy passport ‐ I had ripped out the 
page with a no entry stamp six years back when the Swiss refused me. Luckliy my Estonian 
friends were there & it was agreed that if I left my bags at the port we could go to the British 
embassy & get a new passport. This idea was immediately abandonʹd & we hit the cheap Estonian 
vodka & had a picnic overlooking the sea on the rooftop of an old soviet building. Thus full of 
Dutch courage I then marchʹd back to port &, due to a change of guard, simply reclaimʹd my 
baggage & re‐enterʹd Europe. On the way out of the port, though, who should I meet but the fat 
jobsworth whoʹd caused all this in the first place. ʺSo you have sorted it out?ʺ she asked. ʺEh, yes!ʺ 
I replied. ʺThen welcome to Estonia!ʺ she smiled. As a fair contrary to the influx of Polish workers 
into the British economy, I must be the only guy who has smuggled himself into Eastern Europe! 
Tallin is wicked, the very medievil old town a joy to be in. I am staying in a cool, plush apartment, 
ownʹd by a friend of my friends, & tonight I am being taken to the album release of an estonian 
punk band. Luckily I brought a few pills with me (another reason for rescuing my bag)... 
 
Tallin 
7th September 
 
Alfred Nobel  
 
Nitroglycerine & siliceous sand 
Mix accidental, vast a fortune spannʹd! 
Dynamite forging tunnels & bridges 
Soon deity on blood‐splattered ridges, 
His conscience prickʹd, dictates heroic will, 
His legacy shall save his conscience still, 
Each year his rich estate awards a prize 
To those with distant vistas in their eyes, 
Abundant in life’s creativity 
Or devoted to Earthʹs fraternity;  
Einstein, Curie, Alexander Fleming, 
The Dalai Lama, Martin Luther‐King 
& many others have deserved their name 
      To know a portion of his global fame . 
                                                                      65 
                                                                 The Estoniad 
 
Ah, the dust is settling on my spontaneous mission to the Baltics & I find myself overlooking  the 
tramways of Tallin, red wine to hand, an apartment to myself & mi tunes annoying the neighbours. 
Tallin is wicked, the very medievil old town a joy to be in. I am staying in a cool, plush apartment, 
owned by a friend of Elari, one of the Estonians I met back in India. I also met a lovely girl called 
Ketryn, a lawyer with Setu descendancy (a region in the south of the country) who seems to have 
taken a shine to me. The album launch where I met her was cool as fuck, several lo‐fi indie bands, 
reminiscent of pre‐britpop grunge, assisting the pills I had snook over (which the estonians rated 
very highly). ASfterwards she gave me an introduction to Estonian literature, reciting me a number 
of verses of the Estonian epic poem, the Kalevipeg, then translating what she’d just told me – all very 
interesting over another bottle of that strong vodka. The book was the first original book in Estonian 
(1851) & served to furnish this Baltic tribe with a sense of history & identity – the foundations stones 
of their surge of national independence. 
 
The contree is cool, still trying to forge its own identity after decades of soviet oppression. This was 
very evident this evening when I snuck into the pentannual national song festival a couple of k out of 
town (I pretended to be in the choir). It was an amazing experience, as thousands of balloons took to 
the skies & over 30,000 singers filled the air with music, accompanied by the national orchestra, the 
estonian president receiving rapturous applause.  The only thing I have learnt about their language is 
that if you ask a lady how many months there are in a year she will reply cocks taste good (12 
months). One night I blagged my way into the club by pretending I was writing for NME & ended up 
drinking vodka with the finnish djs at their after party. Ketri turned out to be an intellectual lawyer 
(with a nice ass) who understands the nature of mnemonic poetry, & we have had a highly civilized 
time of it. She took me for a walk which went past the presidentʹs house, which you could look 
through the windows of. I tried to get his statuesque gaurds to laugh, but they couldnt understand 
my jokes. She has been a great guide & we hopped on the bus through the flat, forested countryside 
to the Estonian ʹresortʹ of Haapsalu 100k away. It wasn’t at all like Blackpool, or even Monte Carlo,  
but very invigorating & with a big, cool castle, so I was happy as larry drinking beer on the beach, 
reading through a book on Estonian history. The country was founded about 700AD by local pagans, 
& soon christianized & conquerʹd by the Teutonic knights ‐ then the Russians, Finns, Poles, Danes, 
Swedes & the Russia of the Tsars before finally gaining independance after WW1. This lasted for 
about twenty years, when it became the front line between the Russia & Germany in WW2, leaving it 
occupied by the red army. They tell me that if you wanted to write a book or a song or do just about 
anything you had to get permission from Moscow. I can imagine me twenty years ago ringing up 
Gorbachov when I wanted to wipe my ass! Then the Baltic states formed one long human chain from 
here in Tallin, thro Latvia & into Lithuania (a long way) & sang themselves to freedom 13 years ago 
(hence the recent song festival). It was a case of tractors v tanks, but the people here are peaceful & 
there was none of the mess & gore that happened down in Chechnya.  
                                                                                                                                                Tallin 
                                                                                                                                         10th September 
                                                   66 
                                              Smokinʹ Crack 
 
After the passport incident at the Tallin I decided to negate the chance of being pulled up at the 
latvian/lithuanian/polish/german/dutch borders & fly straight to the Dam. I have been twice before & 
each time I swore down I would never go again... thereʹs too much fun on offer for a raver with no 
will power. I mean, what a culture shock the Dam is... it hits you like stepping out at Brixton after a 
week with the fells... the endless hours of coffee shops, the bikes ridden by those fit birds & their 
sugar‐sweet accents (like german sean connereys)... the tourists & the hard core beggars, the pimps, 
dealers & all the cerazy shennanigans of night time in the city of pleasure. The first thing I noticed 
were the eyes... very stoned with a thin glimmer of mist hovering round them. I soon joined this hazy 
bunch with some fine orange bud & settled down for a couple of days in the hostels, sharing a room 
with a south korean called elvis. As for partying, I coudnt resist and bought some of those legendary 
dutch pills. Luckily I bumped into a manc who was on the same procession and we had a grand old 
rave... until the Dam completely shut down at 3 much to our shock! Luckily, however, he had some 
crack cocaine on him. This was the hardest drug I’ve ever taken (I prefer to live life rather than toss it 
away) & we smoked it out of a coke can by a canal. It was very funny to experience, but one I won’t 
be trying again. I mean, it’s the Dam isnt it, & this kinda shit only happens here, right?  For example, 
I got chattin to this Dutch guy over weed & coffee & he was telling me all about the original Flower 
Power, three hundred years before the hippies went naked at Woodstock. Back in 1630’s Holland the 
Tulip was king. Yes, that lovely wee flower that you can get for about thirty pee. Well, back in those 
dares it was an exotic new rarity, & day by day the market began to rise irrisistably. Eventually the 
cost for a single bulb was about the same for a rather nice house & everyone simply lost their heads. 
Then, inevitably, the bubble burst & people found themselves broke – except for a few pretty flowers. 
 
With my ears ringing with that tayle of Tulipmania I was intrigued to tour a little more of this crazy 
land. Luckily my recent escapades in the British Isles have sharpened my train‐jumping & I had a 
funny run. Despite looking like porn‐stars the Dutch conductors are ruthless & seem’d to possess a 
6th sense. Once, I managed to hide my cash in the legs of a pair of jeans in my bag. It was funny 
watchin them searchin for my cash while lockt up in a police cell. They could not believe I had no 
cash, but my story that I was meetin my mate in the Grasshopper at the Dam eventually got me 
releas’d, much to their headscratchin annoyance.  Yesterday I checkʹd out Arnhem & that bridge too 
far, which was, well, a bridge. On the way I passʹd through Utrecht which had a very lovely air ‐ a far 
cry from the zaniness of the capital ‐ a fine old place... it feels proper dutch, with canals, old streets & 
huge company buildings.  This was a far cry from my last visits to Holland, which on each occasion I 
swore blind Iʹd bever go back on account of me not being able to remember my name. Howevere this 
time it was nice to visit ‐ especially toing & froing from this gigantic airport, which is something else, 
so clean & epic in scope. Over a few reefers in the Dam coffee shops I have worked out a wee tour of 
Europe, the scenic route to Italy if you will. For this purpose I am flying to Prague in an hour or so. 
 
Amsterdam Airport  
12th September 
Amsterdaminit 
 
We trawl the long‐haul of the motorway 
& pick up more pot‐heads past Birming‐Nam 
Jelly‐wobbles on the waves to Calais, 
Mojo pukes in the lowlands near the ‘Dam. 
 
We rush to relax in the smoky cafes; 
Try Purple Haze & buy Sensemelia, 
Each coffee & space‐cake adds to the daze 
Of a mushroom‐gilded psychedelia. 
 
We tram through ‘Dam to the sleezy district, 
Pluck up Dutch courage for ‘Sucky fucky,’ 
Crack head whores beg at doors wink to be dicked‐ 
‘Tis a shame when you pay to get lucky… 
 
Skunked‐up, smashed to fuck, zombie bus, bongtubes, 
         Grass stashed up Nicky’s ass, Richie’s itchy pubes. 
 
                                                      67 
                                                  Aha Praha! 
 
Left Amsterdam by plane for the short flight across Germany. Our descent began somewhere over 
the spires of Dresden, quite recovered from the hammering the Allies gave it in 1945. Our soaring 
skiey wings followʹd the Elbe’s scenic valley over the lovely Czech Republic ‐ the hills growing larger 
& the sights prettier as the Elbe swellʹd majestic, cutting swathes thro the carpeted mountains, 
peppered with hundreds of pretty little houses. We then broke out over a wide, hill‐fringed plain & 
landed near the capital city. Ah! The sweet streets of Prague, the city of music, the city of culture, the 
city of the artists soul! I was soon suckt into a swirling vortex of funky vibes & good time feelin (via 
some Dutch shrooms). Watch’d a magnificent piece of classical music in a wonderfully ornate 
church, complete with glittering chandelier, absorbing all the energy & enriching my soul with suave 
& style. I unwound with a stroll & a nice bar where, over red wine, great live tunes & dodgy English 
language singing, I grinn’d a pretty big grin.   
 
The next day I bump’d into a couple of Scottish girls & show’d them the way to the centre. They were 
‘shoppers’ & show’d me a side of travelling I don’t usually see. I got a bit carried away & ended up 
being the only one to buy anything ‐ a funky, metal Pegasus for only a couple of quid. We sat down 
for a quiet drink, but soon a bunch of mad, loutish mancs sat on the table beside us. I was instantly 
drawn to them. The girls soon piss’d off, tuttin beneath their breath, but I hung around. The boys 
help’d me score some weed (fuckt immediately ‐ strongest stuff I’ve ever had) & even bought me a 
meal in a plush Italian. It turns out they were drug dealers & loaded. We hit a dingy bar where I 
checkt mi karma & gave them the last of mi shrooms. It was funny watchin them come up, abusing 
the Czechs with northern monkey antics. One bar even shut down (til we’d gone) because of ‘em. 
After open air beers & pizza we hit their very nice hotel (who sez drugs don’t pay) where two of the 
Mancs had arranged for a prostitute, She was fit as fuck, a very high standard, & she even let the rest 
of us watch (& take photos). It was even funnier when the lads couldn’t get hard‐ons because of the 
mushrooms. After half an hour they ask’d me if I wanted to have a go, seeing as they’d paid ‐ but I 
politely declined their kind offer. But then this lady says to me, ʺHave you ever fisted a girl?ʺ & 
began to check out my hands. That was my cue to leave, with some of the mancs, & all got stoned 
then hit another bar, where one of the guys was plied with absinthe. It was even funnier watchin him 
stagger thro the streets & collapse in a prostitute‐fill’d square. It was at this point I knew it was time 
to back to my bed. 
 
Today I have dawdled in the hills over Prague, musing, sipping beer & smoking Dutch skunk. Once I 
was suitably stoned I saunter’d back into town to see the orthodox church where the hangman of 
Prague, Heydrich’s, assassins were trappʹd & slaughter’d in 1942.  People are still laying flowers 
outside it to this day. Further along the Elbe I climb’d a parkland slope, as steep as a Lakeland fell. 
This gave me a splendid prospect of the city ‐ very beautiful amidst the Roman hills. There I began to 
muse on a conversation I had with one of the Mancs about the Stone Roses & the birth of Britpop, 
circa 1994, turning it all into a sonnet. On descending with my poem from the hill I shopp’d for 
absinthe & got two bottles for 399k each (£7.70).  The day’s missions done I have just sat in an 
internet café & had a couple of shots of absinth ‐ & believe me things are getting pretty fuckin trippy 
indeed!  
 
Prague 
15th September 
 
Birth of Britpop  
 
Far from the electro‐pop of the forgettable eighties 
Cigarettes & alcohol made us want to live forever 
& new buzzing bass‐lines burst about our earlobes 
As purveyors of the mid‐nineties musical montage   
Gave us the retro‐rock of Definitely Maybe,  
The New‐Mod anthemʹs of Blurʹs Parklife 
The glitzy‐disco wisdom of Pulpʹs His & Hers 
The honky‐tonk of Supergrass in I Should Coco 
The delicious optimism of Dodgyʹs Homegrown 
Rideʹs Carnival of Light caterʹd for the shoegazers 
The Jilted Generation raving crazy in devotion 
To the Prodigy boys & their neo‐punk technotronics 
&, somewhere, in a secret corner of the country 
The Stone Roses, god bless them, were recordinʹ... 
                                                    68 
                                            The Orient Express 
 
The other day, back in Prague, I woke at 5 AM (?), shower’d, packt & stumbl’d bleary‐eyed into the 
early morning. I caught the 7 AM train South & thought I’d fare evade in a new way by hiding in the 
conductor’s room. It was cool til she came in ‐ but I play’d penniless & she let me off ‐ so I gave her a 
carton of wine in thanx & was soon trundling thro the Bohemian hills. The idyll was disturb’d, 
however, when we were unceremoniously dump’d at the Austrian border.  The weather was boiling 
so I went to eat lunch in a woodland park. However, this was in Czech so I had to flash my passport 
in & out. I was then ready for the Jump down to Austria, which I breezed into confidently, but found 
I had come up against some Dutch‐like conductors.  On one simple line I was caught 3 times & with 
there being a two hour gap between trains this was pretty bad. After the second time I sackt off the 
wait & walk’d a few K along the line, which turn’d out to be scything thro’ an Austrian Army zone. It 
was really cool with shell‐fire echoing in my ear, & I figur’d they probably would not blow up the 
train line, so I stuck pretty close to that. As I walkʹd I mused on the battle of the Teutoburger Wald 
which took place not too far away from here, when an entire roman legion was slaughtered by the 
Goths. The next train later I finally reachʹd Vienna, but not after being frogmarch’d to the police by 
the third conductor (it cost me a fiver ‐ my first sting of the tour). I tried to explain to him that it was 
cool that he’d caught me, as I was enjoying the interaction with a foreign culture – but he kept on 
saying that ‘ist nicht cool! ist nicht cool!’ – the veins in his his temple throbbing furiously as he did so. 
As I stood by the busy road outside Viennaʹs central station, the sun set upon what to all extants & 
purposes had been one hell of a day. I still had sixty hours to meet my plane at Salzburg airport, but I 
wanted to spend a day at Hitlerʹs Eagleʹs Nest, Berchtesgaden, & that meant crossing the full length 
of Austria before daybreak.  
 
I arrived on the stationʹs bustling main concourse & looked up at the departures board. My heart 
skipped a beat as I noticed the next train heading west, in fifteen minutes, was the Orient Express! My 
wits were sharpend with a keen sense of competitve edge, as fate or chance had laid a perfect chance 
for revenge in my lap. I felt like AC Milan in Athens, two years after losing the Champions League 
final in dramatic circumstances to Liverpool. Only this time it had been three years since I had been 
uncermoniously dumped off the worldʹs most famous train in some Hungarian backwater. This was 
a chance to even up the score, & even if I had to wait a few hours for the Express to set off, letting 
several trains fly west without me on them, I would still have waited. Then the train pulled in, not 
the plush carriages of Agatha Christieʹs world, but a modern high‐speed train. I steppʹd aboard, 
found a seat, then composed myself as a great surge of power sent the train lurching toward Paris. 
The jump went off swimmingly & I drown’d in the superb sunset, dancing over North Austria’s 
undulating verdure. Night fell & I grew drowsy, trying to keep awake so I wouldn’t miss Salzburg. I 
finally arrived there at midnight last night, very tired, & got the nearest hotel. It was right by the 
railway & I drifted to sleep to the creak & crunch of cargo trains 
 
Salzburg 
17th September 
The German Frontier ‐ 9 AD 
 
Thro the Teutoburger Wald went the arms of Varius  
Arminius of the Cherusci made his excuses 
& soon a ghoulish baritas surrounds the sons of Mars 
Chaunting for Lord Tuisto & Odin amidst the stars 
The chiefs fighting for victory, the stalwarts for their chief 
They set out all for slaughter, no quarter & no relief 
A black storm rages all around the javelins & spears 
The fallen Goths are carried off to dry the widow tears 
Three days of carnage rampant in the dark & marshy wood 
The roman gen’ral cuts his throat & gurgles on the blood 
Some men cast off their armour & await the lethal blow 
Only a lucky few would safely reach the Rhine’s wide flow 
         The news reaches Augustus, flying thro grieving regions; 
                  “O Quintillius Varius, give me back my legions!” 
                                                              
 
 
 
                                                              
                                                            69 
                                                      Eagleʹs Nest 
 
Woke up this morning in fine spirits. Salzburg is a lovely wee place, with high castle‐dotted peaks 
sheer on all sides of a pleasant, spacious city. The air is clean & verily the hills are indeed fileld with 
sound of music. This is where that famouys musical was set & filmed, when the jewish von trapp 
family stay one step of the nazis. I mean, we are practically in the Nazi heratland here. Munich is not 
far, as is Linz where Hitler was brought up. So I jumped trains into Germany ‐ land of Wagner, 
Bratwurst & very big glasses of frothy beer (they are the biggest beer drinkers in the world). It was 
only going to be a toedip into the country, setting myself in the fabulous valley of Berchtesgaden. It 
was very cool entering the Alps ‐ very tall fuckas indeed. At the station I hookt up with a Yank who 
was celebrating having his brain tumor removed. We made our way up the piny Obersalzburg by 
taxi & bus to found ourselves surrounded by tourists at the Eagles Nest, Hitler’s platform above the 
world. At such lofty heights we dined overlooking beautiful Berchtesgadenland & the Austrian Alps. 
No wonder that Hitler got his delusions of grandeur, here, for the place is truly heavenly. It was also 
the site of Neville Chamberlainʹs infamous capitualtion that set the scene for the second world war. 
The British PM was basically a nice guy, but he totally bottl’d it when confronted with the fascist 
front of Hitler & Mussolini,  signing away part of Czechoslovakia to Germany. Coincidentally it was 
the bit with all the border defences, so the next year, when Hitler decided to ignore the treaty & 
invade Czechoslovakia, there was nothing to stop him. Peace in our time? No chance! 
 
After a couple of hours I said adeui & walk’d down the mountain’s winding road to hop on a train 
back to Salzburg. However, a little slackness kicked in & I was soon dumped uncerominiously at a 
middle of nowhere spot. I decided to walk the remaining 20k to Salzburg as a sort of grand finale. 
My haul was heavy with the absinthe, but I enjoy’d it, having great fun with the Austrian border 
police & drinkin beer at sunset, chillin with the Alps. As I sat, watching the planes take off from the 
airport, their fumes tainted the alpine air which my lungs had been filled with. This led to me 
musing on the co2 emissions them & the countless millions of cars driving around the world at the 
moment. I mean, we are killing the planet guys & I just hope that our descendants can share some of 
the experiences I have been having of late. 
 
 
Salzburg Airport 
18th September 
 
 
The Last of the Great White Pegasi 
 
ʺSylvermane, O Sylvermane, fly, fly, fly!ʺ 
There is a sadness mellowing thine eye 
Looking upon the lands thy fathers knew, 
Where once the Gryphons & the Dragons flew. 
 
But now there is a change upon the breeze, 
The heapʹd white ice slow‐melting into seas, 
Our time on Earth is slipping with the snow 
Upon the slopes of Kilimanjaro! 
 
Her wings are caught upon a sudden gust 
The oil refineries are wrackd with rust 
Manʹs greed for gold, the brotherhood of trade, 
The need for luxury foreʹer displayed, 
 
Bind them together & their driving force 
     Has set our planet on a lethal course! 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                  70 
                                           Rocking & Roland 
 
Basking in the Basque country at the moment. Its a bit like North Wales; with an independant streak 
& a crazy language full of K Z X & G.  I was soon wingin my way over the dusty sierras, by the 
majesty of the Pyrrynees, very tranquilo for my wander around central Europe. After checking out 
Britain, the Baltics, Holland & central‐eastern Europe I feel that only the dusky continental south 
remains to complete the picture. So I landed in Vittoria ‐ classy shops & bars, clean streets & not a 
smelly kebab shop in sight. Spent my first night in a hotel & wandered round the old city, a fair place 
indeed, where kings & popes have slept & Wellington won a famous victory way back in 1813. 
English is hardly spoken here & my Spanish is terrible. However, I did get an e‐mail off my very 
fluent girlfriend, Glenda. A few years ago she had spent a cocaine‐fuelled couple of years in Peru & 
was now fluent. However, she was winding me up a bit & I on one occasion I was trying to flirt with 
a bonny girl, but Glenda exacted her pre‐emptive revenge. I ended up saying things like Desculpa 
mi, soy un homosexual, no me gusta mujers (excuse me, I`m gay and don`t like girls), teinnes un 
coolo gordo (you`ve got a fat arse) & estoy feliz y contenta y tengo una novia bonita quien me  
estraynya (I am happy and content and have a beautiful girlfriend who misses me). I guess birds are 
a bit like Big Brother – eyes everywhere! 
 
This morning I set off east on a 7 euro coach, coursing like a river through an oval shaped plain, 
peppered with little villages & their barn‐like churches. ʹGood cavalry country,ʹ I thought as I read 
thro an internet print‐out on those Napoleonic battles of the Pyrynees, when Wellington kicked the 
French out of Spain. An hour or so later I arrived in the tall city of Pamplona (high rise after high 
rise), famous for its bull‐chasing tomato throwing locals at the annual festival. Spent a couple of 
hours dining in the grassy centre of a massive starry fortress, a legacy of its vital strategic position at 
the foot of the Pyrynees passes. Idled the time by reading THE SONG OF ROLAND. It is the French 
epic poem & the chief reason why I have come to this part of the world. It tells the story of the 
nephew of Charlemagne (Roland) & his death at the hands of the moors. It was primarily written as a 
piece of crusader propoganda ‐ but in this world of post 9/11 it still holds a great refernce ‐ as well as 
being cool as fuck! 
 
The poem & my path led me out of the city on another coach that began to rise up into the green 
mountains. I was surprised to find that every now & again the terrain would flatten out into farm 
country, not what I had imagined at all. Then I finally arrived in the religious hamlet of Roncesvalles. 
There is a large abbey & a very pretty panorama, all refreshed by a cool mountain air. It is the second 
port of call on the pilgrim pathway called the Camino de Santiago, after it begins in France. 
Apparently Saint James´ bones are in Galicia (N. Spain) & the europeans would flock down this 
valley towards them in the medievil age. Today the route is still popular with hikers, with places to 
stay along the road from as little as 3 euro a night. I paid 5 & will be sharing my sleep tonight with 
about 100 snorers ‐ so wish me luck! 
                                                                         Roncesvalles  
                                                                       20th September 
                                                    71 
                                                Zut Alors! 
                                                       
I suddenly find myself surrouded by the French? Luckily this part of the world is still Basque 
Country; marked by its curious union jack like flag of green, white and red. I arrived in the land of 
the old enemy a few days ago, after traversing the pass of Roncesvaux. At the head of the pass, when 
you can see the plains of France beyond the mountain valleys below, strecthing into the milky 
distance, I rested for a while and read thro the poem, THE SONG OF ROLAND. I ran through the 
pages sat by the monument that reputedly marks the battlefield. Then thirty kilometres of idle forest 
pottering later I had walked down into France, picking up some duty free gin for five euros at the 
border. Spent a couple of nights in the fortress city of St Jean Pied Du Port; a charming castle‐
dominated place nestled at the foot of the pyrynees ‐ like Kendal is the gateway to the lakes. To take 
advantage of the cheap accomodation I continued my pretence at being a Catholic Pilgrim, including 
a trip to church,  
 
Now, when it comes to jumping trains in Europe, The Austrians are Nazis, the Dutch are porn stars, 
the Italians are asleep and the French, howerever much it pains me to say, are the perfect gentlemen? 
In France you are supposed to punch your ticket at a machine before boarding, and if you dont you 
get fined. However, knowing I could plead ignorance ʹanglaisʹ I didnt stamp it & once I had arrived 
in Bayonne, via the last rippling rises of the Pyrynees & the valley of the jade river Nive, I went to the 
ticket office and reimbursed my eight euro ticket, saying that I had walked instead... FORMIDABLE! 
 
So I am now in Anglet, with the Atlantic in my ears and the scent of forest in my nostrils. I have hit 
surf country, the Newquay of France, and the place is full of bronzed, long haired, intellectually‐
challenged dudes from all corners of godʹs globe. Itʹs really relaxing watching them have a pop, with 
the mountains of Spain and the Atlantic horizon as a backdrop. I was told a story about the scene... a 
couple of summers back a south american boat was halted by customs... resulting in thousands of 
packets of coke being tossed overboard. These would then start to drift ashore right into the middle 
of the surfers...  
 
Four kilometres round the wave‐swept coast lies the grandiose millionaire’s playground of Biaritz... 
it cost me thirty euros just to ask someone where the toilets were! Four K in the other direction are 
the tall buildings and narrow atmospheric streets of Bayonne. The whole area is remarkably cool and 
now my mind has caught up with my body I am beginning to settle in nicely, musing on my coming 
sonnets, speaking schoolboy french, wandering the forest, challenging the waves & knocking back 
the cheap red wine. Iʹm starting to miss Glenda a bit actually, so I have composed her this poem til 
the next time we meet ‐ which is not that far away, as the gods intended. 
 
Anglet 
23rd September 
 
                                                       
On Remembrance of my Loverʹs kiss 
 
What is more beautiful than Paris in the Spring 
More lovely than the thrill the morning chorus brings 
Damcing, perchance, beyond lifeʹs most precious thing 
Sweeter than sensual, fairer than faerie rings, 
Deeper than heart sublime, tender than all of this 
I fade & pass the time til Glenda & her kiss. 
 
Ah! Glenda & her kiss, the taste still lingers long 
Moment of perfect bliss, of lips & teeth & tongue 
Some night Olympian as spirit centres meet 
Land of lustful fusion, how can life seem so sweet 
Complete, & in my mind, behind the half‐closed eye 
Calm waters as I find forever passes by 
 
When sun & moon eclipse, when sunflowers petal 
When graced by Glendaʹs lips, what is more beautiful... 
 
 
72 
Tapas & Top Asses 
 
Left glitzy Biaritz a few days ago, my plane climbing over the sea with the twin‐spired cathedral of 
Bayonne glittering heavenwards in the distance. Then the plane swung 360 degrees & flew across the 
plains of southern France, the mountains on our right. Eventually the petered ou at the 
Medittaranean, which we skirted on the descent to ground. Touch’d down in Catalonia & met Chris, 
an old friend of mine who has been learning Spanish.  He was very reliev’d to see me after getting his 
credit card stolen yesterday. Fortunately 4 him I was coming, so his mum put £200 in my account 
earlier today. We both breath’d a sigh of relief when the pesetas came out of the hole in the wall. We 
caught a bus into Barcelona (first glimpse of Baldy’s Spanish ‐ terrible!) & walk’d thro the balmy 
streets to the hotel, where we quickly popt a pill (I’d brought a few along for luck) & hit the town. 
We came up on the E by the sea & felt pretty good about ourselves & ev’rythin. We found a beech bar 
& drank, chatted & groov’d into the wee hours, it all bein very buzzin indeed. Hit the hotel for a 
cheeky half & a skunk spliff. Our room overlook’d the Placa Reial & it we chill’d on our balcony a bit 
watchin the endless srotation of street entertainers ‐ skiffle bands, acrobats, buskers, jugglers & the 
coolest famenoco dancer, tappin his feet to the bongos with grand sweepin gestures of his arms. Hit a 
club about 4am, but it was dead so we danced a bit & did one. Unfortunately the pill had made me 
horny, so when, a prostitute from Sierra Leone came up to me in the street & said she’d be my 
girlfriend, I thought, ‘Fuck it,’ & I almost did ‐ but suddenly Glenda flashʹd accross my mind ‐ as did 
the Aids epidemic that Africa is in the rage of.  
 
Woke up early after two hours of blissful sleep, pack’d & left Barcelona forthwith. It’s a bit of a 
stinkin hole really, but that’s cool. Our train meander’d down the coast (easy jump, the conductor 
was havin a siesta) & soon we found ourselves at the lovely resort of Sitges. We bookt into a plush 
hotel by the sea (the mini‐bar was a touch). It was nice to be on the Spanish coast without the site of a 
group of piss’d up Brits, bedeck’d in footy shirts, puking up along the front. After unpackin we 
polisht off the last of the exstasi & hit the beach. It was lush! Beautiful busty babes, warms seas, 
soothing breeze & a sulty sun. However, walkin long the front I noticed that the beach was mainly 
full of men in short pants. It turns out Sitges is the gay capital of Europe ‐ gutted! Still, we managed 
to find some sexy English chicks, & despite our best pill’d up charm, they refused all attempts to pull 
them. Then we realised, they were fuckin dykes ‐ gutted! But, it was cool, no hormonal overload to 
disturb our holiday. We got on famously with the birds, drinkin beer & smoking spliffs ‐ but they 
weren’t that impress’d with our bravado when we swam out to the yellow bouys, Baldy nearly dying 
in the process. We took this as proof they were full Lesbians & not Bi (our last hope gone). 
 
We parted company & snatch’d a couple of hours sleep b4 meetin them again in our hotel lobby last 
night. After munchin up in a few Tapas bars we hit the very funky Sitges’ strip having a very swanky 
old time. The place has a definitively buzzin atmosphere, ev’ry one partying in street & bar. We 
found a little niche in a club, me & Baldy dancing with the Spanish Ladies. It was sweet, man, rockin 
away til 4am. To finish the evening the four of sat la‐de‐da on a huge blanket on the beach, drinkin 
wine, eatin chocolate & finishin off the skunk. I managed to hold my whitey in til the girls whitey’d 
first (to protect my masculinity). 
  
Sitges 
27th September 
                                                         
                                                       73 
                                                  Tuscany 
 
Italia! Italia! Italia! 
 
With the arrival of various low cost airlines, the continent of Europe has open’d up. It is now cheaper 
to fly to places like Milan & Barcelona cheaper than it is to get from London to Manchester by rail. 
Crazy! So after enjoying the weather & the beach for a couple more days at Sitges, playing bat & ball 
in the surf, soakin in the rays & raidin all the empty hotel rooms’ mini‐bars I said bye to Chris & took 
a cheap flight back to Stanstead to immediately get on a plane to Pisa. It worked out a lot cheaper & 
faster than getting the boat from Barcelona to Livorna (my original plan) ‐ & anyways, after those 
fifteen hour journeys in India this was childʹs play.  The flight was wicked, through clear morning 
skies, Englandʹs patchwork tapestry steadily growing beneath our wings. London passed on the right 
& below us lay the River Medway & the castle of Rochester. Next came Dover & the thin sliver of 
white that form her cliffs, then the channel which seemed to blend with the sky so that the ships 
crossing to nearby Calais seemed more like planes, the white foaming streak of their wakes like trails 
of jet fuel. Europa was passed in an hour, a constant parade of rivers, forests, towns, trains & roads, 
before we reached the great walls of nature, the Alps. They were snow capped & in the deep gouges 
between them lay the dark green valleys of human habitation. After passing by the gleaming 
grandeur of Lake Garda we soared above Italy; the vast plane of the Po, the coastal mountains & the 
tumbledown Tuscan hills. 
 
So I landed in Pisa, that scene of my bohemian youth where armed with my acoustic guitar I busked 
up enough money to support myself as I composed my first ʹproper poemʹ ‐ the Death of Shelley. But 
that was almost a decade ago now & as time stands still for no man I left the memories behind & 
passʹd on to Lucca, whose walls rose in Rajastani rage. From there I came to Monte Carlo ‐ not quite 
the millionaireʹs playground, more a sleepy hilltop village, where on a rooftop terrace I ate pizza & 
shared the setting son with the splendid Monte Serra. I then pitched my tent in an olive grove & 
spent my first night on the road listening to sparkling cricket‐song. The next day I jumped trains east, 
mingling with the Florentine commuters. Aftee the obligatoary visit to Dante’s old house, I thought I 
would get myself in ‘tune’ with the Italian spirit & check out some renaissance art – in my eyes the 
peak of aesthetic appreciation. The city gave birth to Giovanni Cimbaue, ‘the first light of painting,’ 
who inspired the works of the great artists, such as Da Vinci, Rapgael & Michaelangelo.  In Florence 
itself there is a fresco covering the walls St Marks, wonderfully splash’d by the talented painter‐
brothers who once lived at the convent. Unfortunately its most spectacular sections, the Coronation of 
the Virgin by Fra Angelico & the Madonna Enthroned by Fra Bartolmeo, hang in the Louvre in Paris. It 
was the price Italy had to pay for being the land that wealthy English nobles visited on their Grand 
Tours of the Continent. Also in Florence is the Death of St Francis by Ghirlandaio, the Madonna & 
Angels by Titian & Michaelangelo’s Florentine soldiers surprised by the enemy whilst bathing in the Arno – 
All seminal paintings on that period of immense creation. 
 
Now suitably poised & prepared to posie I temporarily left that gorgeous city. I say temporarily, for I 
shall be back soon to meet Glenda. She is definitely coming to Italy to see more – no girl has ever 
done that for me before, & I guess that seals the deal. My first place of arrival was Vallombrosa, a 
magnificent abbey where Dante once lived while composing the Divine Comedy. It is set in the 
centre of a thick mountain forest, with gigantic pines thrusting upwards for miles around. There is a 
little town called Saltino just along the wooded road, & as I was walking within I noticed a window 
open to an old hotel. Lo & behold I am now squatting it ‐ there are newspapers from 1992 but no 
other signs of recent life. Its mental with beds & everything ‐ but no power or water. Perfect medievil 
conditions to write some poetry & last night I spent musing by candlelight to the sound of songbirds 
& the dodgy turn that was entertaining pensiers in the hotel across the way. I am currently sat in the 
grandest hotel in Saltino, which is hosting an international forestry convention. I managed to mingle 
in with them at breakfast (food always tastes good when its free) & am now on their personal 
internet station ‐ the only one for miles. I think I am being rewarded by the muses for paying a 
pilgrimage to the Tuscan School of Dante, inorder to inspire my sonnetry. I mean, a decadent ruin’d 
hotel to myself & tasty, free breakfast laid on ‐ happy fuckin days! 
 
Saltino 
October 1st 
Vallombrossa 
 
Drawn to Florence I found myself alone, 
Arch‐festival, Savonorola’s fame 
Numb’d parch’d senses, searching for quietude 
There came to me a lane & little church ‐ 
Escaping to the reign of Beatrix 
An apparition clad in priestly robes 
Led us to Vallombrossa’s skiey pines 
Instinctive, as when the Sacred Poet, 
God‐adoring, mused to the abbey‐bells, 
Hoping for glory, & since those soft strolls 
Italians forever taste his tongue 
E’er tingling in his song‐like harmony, 
Roseate, or rising to royal pitch 
In sermons of Savonorolan flame! 
 
                                                   74 
                                               Battlefield 
 
Had to leave my cushy ʹhotelʹ this morning as a work man discovered my stuff in the hotel. When I 
returned from wandering the forests I found some local polizi waiting for me ‐ luckily i charmed 
them with my poeta inglesi stuff & was saved from a night in the cells. However, after asking for a 
lift to my next destinatation I was quickly ran out of town. The funny thing was, I was working on 
my first poem in italian before I arrived back at the hotel. Being an early starter in the language I had 
ran out of rhymes for ‐iaggio. However, when I had to show the lady pc how I got in round the back 
I remembered the word passagio. Its funny how the muses sort it out when you have had too much 
vino.  
 
On departure from Saltino I walked 12k over the forest clad mountains into the valley of the upper 
Arno & landed in your typical italian town ‐ one bar, three old ladies, four old guys & a dog. Luckily 
enough a bus soon arrived & brought me to Poppi, a delectable little fortress town high on a hill, 
overlooking some inspirational scenery. Last night I camped at the nearby battlefield of Campaldino, 
wher Dante & Boccacio both fought for Florence in 1289. I am currently back in the bibliotecca 
communale (public library) in the dusty old halls of the castle, where I am flicking through some 
books of Italian sonnets. The chief reason of my trip to Italy is to pay a pilgrimage to Sicily, the birth‐
place of the sonnet. However, it does seem rather apt to at call in Tuscany on the way down, for it 
was the Tuscan School that first refined & polish’d the raw materials of the Sicilian Sonnet, before 
passing it on to English sensibilities. 
 
Poppi 
October 3rd 
Campaldino  
 
Across the sheer Consuma Pass the Papal Guelfs did steer  
To permeate the Poppi plain, the Ghibellines appear  
Noble Swabian lineage with rival war ensigns  
Amplified by Catenaian Alps & spangling Appenines  
The sun had risen muggy on Saint Barnabasʹs day,  
Where over Verna Francis of Assisi’s hands did pray,  
Dante Alighieri, far beyond his metaphors,  
Stood in the first line of the Guelfs, the fearless Feditors,  
& faced the charging enemy & yes he was afraid  
But Appollo‐protected many mortal parries made  
As now the Pavesari wrap around the fading foe  
Who drop their shields & flee the field, splashing thro the Arno,  
The Guelfs did claim a victory & furthermore the pride  
ʺCome Dante,ʺ said Boccacio, ʺLet us to Florence ride!ʺ 
 
                                                      75 
                                               Ashes to Ashes 
                                                        
Back in Poppi following a few scandoulously mellow days in the mountains. After waking up by the 
Arno on my own private beach, flicking through the stolen copy of Dante’s Inferno from Poppi 
library to the lap of the waters, I walked 8k to funky little Pratovechhia & its wide main square. The 
half a shark ecstasy tablet I took had me wobbling all over the place, but I eventually stumbled up the 
nearby slopes into the delicate village of Casalino. Had an entire youth hostel to myself (its off 
season) for 12 euros a night, which amounts to having your own private panoramic villa when 
nobody else is in your headspace. To top it off there was a bar area with ice cream & the lady said 
help myself & pay later. Obviously I did, & did in fact leave some money as I left this morning, tho if 
it was enough I dont know! I left this next sonnet with my landlady, in both english & italian 
translation, to make up any losses on the beer & ice cream. 
 
The village is wee, full of white‐frockʹd Hungarian nuns of many races ‐ whose sister superior 
typically quickly usherʹd her girls away from my gaze ‐ & fascinating lizards, a perfectly mellow 
place to write & meditate. Yesterday I enacted the real reason why I am here. My gran died recently 
& I had decided to scatter the ashes I collected from Burnley at some suitable location where the 
Arno begins. She always loved italy & would appreciate the view as she sailed thro Pisa & Florence. 
Yesterday was Sunday & with a weary soul I climbed up into the forested mountains. I first came 
across a cross on a hilltop, with wonderful views of Tuscany, & scattered a few ashes there. Then 
later on I discovered the dry, grey bed of a stream at the top of one of them. It was a strange 
sensation & I felt like Dante following the light of his Beatrice as she led him through the composition 
of his Divine Comedy. I followed that muddy gully for a while until a little trickle of water fell off a 
rock like a minature waterfall. After a few moments of emotion I scatterd the ashes & said goodbye. 
Tho sad I felt a great weight off my essence & returned to the hostel emotional, yet happier. & I just 
hope my gran had shared in the experience.   
 
Poppi 
October 7th 
 
 
Casalino 
 
More tranquil than the murmour of a rose,  
The piazzas of Pratovecchia,  
Bethlehem‐twinned, harbour a sweet repose,  
Calm cluster shepherds call Casalino ‐ 
Here Dante mused upon his fifth canto,  
For Paulo & Francesca tears did pour,  
Mixing with the streamlings of the Arno,  
Flowing to ev’ry Italian shore ‐  
A place to set poesia in store,  
Where sacred sisters break the ancyent bread,  
There, summoned by the grunting of wild boar  
Into a place where feet have seldom tread,  
Not life nor history shall help mine art,  
Just fragrant music of the valley‐heart.  
 
Pui tranquilo di mormoria della rosa, 
La piazza di Pratovecchia, Betlemme‐gemellare,  
Rifugio una villagio dolce, amosso calmo,  
Pastori chiamato Casalino ‐   
Ecco Dante meditato il suo cante cinque,  
Lacrimi versato per Paulo & Francesco,  
Mescalato con la fiumana giovane di l’Arno,  
Fluiere a tuttu riva d’Italia –  
Localitia mettere poesia in scorta,  
Dove suori sacrato spezzamo la pane antico,  
La, convoco presso gruniri di chingiale selvaggio,  
Dentro unso una bosco dove piede ha calpestato raramente,  
Non vita ne storia auiteranno la mia arte,  
Guisto musica fragrante della cuore del valle. 
 
 
 
 
                                                    Gran 
                                                       
                              As Dante found himself in some dark wood 
                               My soul has been tormented since ye died 
                            But holding back timeʹs tears ‐ my weary flood ‐ 
                                 I waited for your light to be my guide. 
                                                       
                               As Virgil took step with the Tuscan bard 
                                  Thro Hell’s inferno to the face Divine, 
                               I travell’d far &, tho the way was charr’d, 
                                   I climb’d a peak & waited for a sign. 
                                                       
                               About, the bells of church & cattle sound, 
                                    As I pursue the dry bed of a stream 
                              Sad, breaks the heart! An ickle trickle found 
                               Lit by the leafy sunbeam‐dappl’d gleam. 
                                                       
                                  These highest headwaters of the Arno 
                                  Scattering ashes in the flashing flow, 
 
 
                                                      
                                                      
                                                      
                                                      
                                                    76 
                                              Scozia Piccolo 
 
Been a merivigliosa (wonderful) few days in Tuscany. I had arranged to meet Glenda in Florence at 
the statue of David by Michaelangelo‐ only, theres a few of them. The main two are the real one in 
some museum & an exact replica in the main city‐square. After she hit the museum & I paced 
nervously awhile in the main square, we were finally reunited in the sultry Tuscan capital just as a 
warm rain was throwing it down. We spent a funny couple of hours tryin to locate a suburban 
campsite... only for it to be closed. So we headed back into the city, past the epic gates & walls & into 
the fairy tale streets that cluster at the foot of the absorbing Fiorentine hills. The sun was just setting 
thro the Ponte Vecchio in all its golden splendour, a sight to stir any soul as the rays fillʹd up the 
Arno, & we strolled to a new campsite close to the city centre. We blagged our way in a la Glasto 
(over the fence) & put up the tent amid lush greenery. After a shower we hit the town for some much 
needed food & some much‐more needed beers as we toured the centre. It remains one of the best 
places I have ever visited, the cut‐out‐&‐glue‐the‐cardboard‐flaps of the Domo a wonder to behold & 
in a very pleasant mood we retired to our campsite.  
 
The view of Florence on waking was superb. A sea of roof tops with the Domo rising from them like 
some grand Poseidon. After a swift breakfast we plunged into the city & were soon swept up by the 
buzz of the place ‐ slick‐chicks & tourists, mopeds & money. Then on the road, our first night was 
spent near the steep hilltown of Collodi, where the pinnochio stories are set. We had the good 
fortune to ask a cool guy where to camp, & he led us to an olive grove with gorgeous views of the 
Tuscan plain, complete with quaint, habitable wooden hut. We made a straw matress & after cooking 
a meal on an open air barby, slept soundly. Next day we raided the cherry trees that were just 
coming to fruition & set off on a 22 kilometre hike, up & down a 1000 ft range of forested hills. At the 
peak we came on a deserted hilltop town (it was lunch) with only a wooden shutter making any 
noise as it slammed to & frbo. We were soon eerily on the move & eight hours after first setting off 
we arrived in the idyllic Bagnia di Lucca. The place once was a colony for the english intelligentsia & 
we found a great old hotel for just 35 euros the room, once owned by Napoleonʹs sister ‐ the Duchess 
of Tuscany. However were so knackered after the walk we simply, slept deeply for hours.  
 
Yesterday we travelled yet deeper into the valley of the Sechio, surrounded by phantastic snow‐
skippʹd mountains, despite the sun pouring velvet rays upon us. We finally came to the town of 
Barga, which has the largest scottish population in Italy, primarily due to the exodus the natives 
made to sell the Glaswegians ice‐cream back in the 50ʹs, then returning home to a wealthy retirement. 
The town itself is a perfect blend of Italian life; narrow cobbled streets & quaint piazzas perched high 
on a hill with a mountainous ampitheatre all around. The place has loads of plastic Saint Andrewʹs 
flags hanging over the streets to celebrate the recent visit of the Bishop of Glasgow. Luckily, I had a 
copy of the Daily Mail I had procured earlier in the day, containing a poster of the england football 
team, which I hung in a suitable place, much to Glendaʹs disgust. We have taken the west wing of a 
delightful old pallazio, containing a gallery of a famous local artist, our rooms at the end. It all feels 
really old & bohemian, & a perfect place to write & paint... & entertain. Later on today we are 
receiving guests ‐ Andy & Analeen. He has just had one of his films accepted at the international 
Milan film festival, which Glenda helpʹd to film, which is on next week. The rough plan is we are all 
going to go there, which should be fun! 
 
Barga 
October 11th 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tuscan Tour 
 
City of Flowers  
Over sea of orange rooves  
Rises Domoʹs isle 
 
Pinnochio land  
Neath Old Collodi castle  
Snake steep, cobbled streets  
 
Bagnia di Lucca  
If Prometheus unbound  
Gods would garden here  
 
Beautiful Barga  
Valley gloom falls in a flash  
When peaks sunder suns 
 
  From the tops of Tuscan trees 
     Verdant vistas everywhere. 
                                                      
                                                      
                                                    77 
                                                Epiphanies 
                                                      
Just had a mad few days on the road with a couple of Glendaʹs mates from Scotland. Iʹd stayed at 
Andyʹs a few weeks back in Penicuik, near Edinburgh, & heʹd came along with his lady Analene ‐ 
two grammes of MDMA hidden down her bra! Our landlord picked them up from Lucca (they had 
flown in to Pisa) & the next day we all proceeded to have a proper rave in the streets of Baga, ending 
up at various locals houses drinking profusely & smoking weed. Very funny indeed. We all woke up 
a bit sheepish, however, & decided to do one. Our train journey took us through a beautiful valley all 
the way to the coast at Le Spezia. From there we took a bus to Portovenere ‐ or Port of Venus. It is a 
stunning wee spot ‐ a Norman church perched on a rocky peninsula, with a castle & narrow‐streeted 
town. The view of the Gulf di Poeti is stunning, all mountain‐backed & sea‐framed. It is called the 
Gulf of Poets as it was once a hang out of Byron & the Shelleys. In fact, across the bay in Lerici ‐ a 
place I had visited in my youthful meanderings, noticing Portovenere from across the Bay ‐ is the 
Casa Magni, Shelleyʹs last house of residence before he drowned. Approaching sunset I had a 
wonderful private moment, climbing up a cliff‐face with a  topless bottle of red in my hand, to claim 
the top, where gulls in freedoms flight, silhouetted the reddening orb, a wide band of gold spreading 
across the azure seas. I felt conviction in my choice of art, for only poetry can bring one to such 
moments in time & scenery as this. 
                                                                
        Poeticus 
 
Mine art asleep, yet she dreams in beauty, 
Paints tangible scenes to adorn the page, 
Illuminous thoughts to milk a mild age 
       Of mellowing souls...  
                                          Sing a song freely, 
 Triumphant songs draped in resplendency, 
       Stars shoot lucid cross an opaque stage, 
        Rare spirit released from a mortal cage. 
 
I have a new song for thee, poetry, 
In raptures receiving the sacred states 
Of an enlighten’d mind, virtuous heart 
     & resurgent soul...  
                                 We follow the fates, 
             & tis a fine thing to play at an art, 
   To champion renaissance, join the brave 
Who sought the greatest glory of the grave. 
 
 
We spent the night camped in a hidden garden at the foot of the castle, overlooking the sea ‐ but 
with Analene being a city girl she soon urged us to find somewhere a little safer. The next day we 
did, but not after taking a boat along the stunning Cinque Terra. These are five small fishing 
villages nestled beneath miles of grand, inhospitable, yet scenically amazing cliffs. Beyond them 
we found a campsite (which we snook into) & proceeded to get very drunk on cheap red wine ‐ 
the MDMA having run out back in Barga. Today we continued north to Genoa ‐ a fine city stacked 
against the mountains. A funny feature of the city is the painted glass panes & bowls of flowers – 
done in olden times to evade the window‐tax on windows. We spent the night in a hostel & snook 
the girls into our beds to save money ‐ however, it was a man only dorm & caused a lot of 
consternation. After all that sweat & testosterone the girls have decided they want to spend a few 
days chilling in nice hotels by the beach (Analene has brought her credit card out). However, me & 
Andy want to see more of the world, so we have decided to go on a crazy mission to cross the 
Alps & meet the girls in Milan next week ‐ so cannae wait! 
 
Genoa 
October 14th 
 
 
 
 
                                                  78 
                                          La Route Napoleon 
 
After leaving the ladies to their Cappucinos & Gucci me & Andy set off along the Riviera. After 
passing into France at Ventimiligia we arrived in the stately streets of Monaco. We pottered about a 
bit, but soon found ourselves sat in a little market square, drinking in the sun... getting drunk in the 
process. Our next stop was Antibes from where we found the Golf de Juan, site of Napoleonʹs 
landing in 1815. After a swift look around we headed to the campsite at Boit, put the tent up, dipped 
in the pool & prepared to go out. We dropped the pills on the way into Cannes & arrived off our 
heads. It was a far cry from the film festival back in May, when huge film billboards lining the front 
& Yanks & paparazzi fill the promenade. From Cannes we struck inland on a bus to Grasse, stacked 
high against the hillside. We had a couple of hours to kill so wandered around town, & to our delight 
found it very swell, with lovely narrow streets & great prospects of the cotes dʹazore in the distance. 
The city is the home of perfume, scented by the flowers that stuff its surrounding hills with blossom. 
As the ear engages the harmonious chords of music, so does the nose engage the twelve chordfs of 
smell, worked up to perfection by those old perfumers of old. After picking up some samples for our 
ladies we hopped on a bus North along La Route Napoleon. The view was spectacular as we climbed 
& wound thro the mountains, each one clad in trees giving a baize effect, & I could imagine 
Napoleon & his coloumn following the same road. However a rapid mist descended, followed soon 
after by a heavy rain, which showed no intention of letting up as we were unceremoinously dumped 
in the wee hamlet of Seranon. We dived into the only bar around for shelter & refreshment, obtaining 
a few funny looks off the funny looking locals.  
 
Eventually we found out the bus North didn’t leave til the mornin, so we were stuck. We didnt fancy 
puttin the tent up in the rain so opted for a hotel. A friendly couple drove us a half mile down the 
road to their mates hotel, which was closed. Luckily the mustached madame opened it up for us (a 
whole hotel to ourselves), but were forced to share a double bed (with pants on obviously). As soon 
as we paid our 15 francs the sun came out & we took a table onto the roof, bought wine, cheese, 
bread & sausage & had a pleasnt supper among the mountains. It was cool, me musing & Andy 
sketching & it felt nice to be doing spot of real travelling, the only sound being the constant chuckle 
of crickets. Bryn very correctly brought up the point we were stuck in a one horse dive & had less 
than two days to get to Venice, but I re‐assured him all would be reyt. We made a chess board out of 
paper & stones & played to the setting of the sun, before all the wine & well thought out moves took 
their toll & sent us a slumbering.  
 
We woke early & made a half‐hearted attempt at hitchin (I remember now why I prefer the trains), 
before catchin the mornin bus out of town. It was very expensive, but luxurious & took us into the 
wonderful townlet of Castellane. It is set amid a great ampitheatre of mountains, spread beneath a 
huge chapel‐capped crag. Beyond Castelleane we wound along a road hewn into the rocky 
surrounds & the driver had to honk hard at each bend. We were dropped off in a sleepy village 
called Barremme, where Napoleon had slept on his march to Paris. After buyin some fresh bread we 
finished off the sausage & cheese, plus a wispa Andy found in his pocket. We left the tranquil station, 
where a woman controlled the level crossing by hand, on a tiny, impossible‐to‐jump train. We had to 
pay to a place called Digne, passing along the bottom of a deep gorge, by a scintillatingly blue river. 
Digne is the largest town weʹve seen for some time now & we are idling an hour in the bar‐cum‐
internet cafe waitin for the bus to Saint Auban, & the main railway line. It feels as if weʹve been an 
arrow, slowly pulled back on itʹs string as we travelled thro the almost comatose Provencal 
backwaters, then fired away at a hundred miles an hour in the direction of Briancon.  
 
Digne 
October 17th 
                                                         
                                                         
                                                       79 
                                                 Silent Disco 
 
A couple of days back me & Andy meandered thro the mountains, our train driving thro sheets of 
dramatically pouring rain. We were so high the clouds hugged the ground, the Alps above us 
stunning beasts, even more so for the fact that people choose to live there. At Briancon (the highest 
town in Europe) we were suddenly thrown upon our wits for the first time as we discovered there 
were no buses between France & Italy. It was 7PM as we prepared ourselves for at least an 8K walk 
over the border. It was pushin 7PM when we set off, the light fading but in good spirits as we crossed 
the Alps... both Napoleon & Hannibal had done it & now I was about to... buzzin! Fortune smiled on 
us once again, for not 200m into Italy we were picked up by a proper friendly Algerian truck driver, 
taking empty bottles back to San Perrignon to be filled with water. He spoke about as much English 
as we spoke French, but somehow we managed to carry on a pidgeon conversation for the next few 
hours as we headed west ‐ mainly concerning cannabis ( which none of us had any of). Just outside 
the Milan he pulled over for the night & much to Andyʹs annoyance I got the bed while they slept in 
the seats... benne notte!  
 
We awoke in an Italian service station layby at about 8... a little tired but very happy for the fact that 
we had arrived at our destination in time. Our guy dropped us on the outskirts of Milan & we took a 
train into the centre, the women on the train were stunning, & for the first time in my life I was 
forced to give a perfect ten. A couple of trams later & we had arrived at the Theatro Strahler, a stoneʹs 
throw from the very impressive Domo cathedral, whose baroque marble spires were the most 
beautiful I had ever seen. The theatre was bustling, with the international film festival in full swing. 
As part of Andyʹs entourage I was given a load of free gifts: a slick pair of Ray Bon sunglasses, a 
lovely little moleskine notebook to write my sonnets in, a free pass to see all the films & some cool 
flip‐flops. The festival site itself was set against the great castle that dominates the ancient heart of 
Milan, where Napoleon was crownʹd with the iron crown of Lombardy, whos hade dead ivy gave a 
lovely spidery brown tinge to the epic rouge walls. In the lovely grounds of the castle ‐ now a public 
park ‐ there was an outdoor cinema & a live music stage, plus in indoor cinema run by the Silent 
Disco people ‐ a bunch of Dutchmen who gave out headsets to drown out the outside world. 
 
Last night, then, was full of excitement & merry on the free wine we all went back to the 
International Film‐makers House, where directors & Actors from all over the world were staying. It 
was once an old bank, but had recently been taken over & converted into a squat‐like environment, 
with showers, beds & plenty of free booze. Andy was loving it, as was I, him more so for the 
exchanges of ideas & DVDs that the film‐makers indulged in. Then the Silent Disco turned up ran by 
a crazy gay Dutchman called Arhtur, who was snorting valium like mad. Now, theres nothing worse 
than being out‐intellectualised by aforeigner in one’s own language, but I had to hand it to him, the 
guy was smart.  However, he loved to fiesta & a rum‐fuelled rave soon entail’d, which is a really 
surreal experience when you take off the headsets & watch the people dancing to what seems like 
silence, interrupted only by the distuneful singing of certain party‐goers (thank god for loud discos!). 
I havent actually slept, yet, & drinking myself sober I have recently wandered out blinking into the 
sweet sunshine searching for juice. 
 
Milan  
October 19th 
 
                                                    Art 
                                                      
                            Opulent, spontaneous, creative, beauty‐loving; 
                                          Deem artistic souls 
                                                      
                                        Artists first in divinity 
                                              Last in reality 
                                                      
                                    Manifestations of artistic media  
                                     Project imaginationʹs mimesis 
                                                      
                              Conception, influence, substance, topicality 
                                      Appreciate artʹs demeanour  
                                                      
                                        Names of miracle fame 
                                           Lend art authority 
                                                      
                                        As intuition creates art 
                                           It also appreciates 
                                                      
                                  Industry, devotion, taste, virtuosity  
                                         Create glorious works   
                                                      
 
 
 
                                                                     80 
                                                                Milano Milano 
 
Glenda & Analeen turnʹd up in Milan a few days ago, wide‐eyed & ready to shop. We scented them 
with our Provencal odours (bought in Grasse) & followed them into the city – the perfume helping us 
to locate them among the teeming plethora of shops in this boiling pot of fashion ‐ the birth‐place of 
Prada, Armani, Versace & Dolce & Gobbana themselves. This puts the city on a par with London, 
Paris & New York & can be seen from the bling‐dripping divas to the simple supermarket girls. The 
city heart is full of magnificently manicured universities, surrounded by some very elegant shops & 
churches. One of which, the San Maurizio, contains wonderfully painted walls, one of which, a 
tryptych of Noahʹs Ark by Luini, a pupil of Leornardo, made me sit a good half hour, exploring the 
painting. As I did this a pretty lady was singing orgasmic operatic lays over an organist, her voice as 
pure as water from a mountain stream, & it was with difficulty that Glenda held back her tears. This 
inspired us to seek out other great moments of Renaissance art; both Giorgione’s Moses Presented to 
Pharaohs Daughter, & The Madonna, Infant Saviour & Saint John by Bernardo Luini, everpleasing on the 
eye. By far the most interesting & wonderful painting was DaVinci’s Last Supper in the Church of 
Santa Maria Della Grazia. This is the one that gets all the grail theorists going, as to whether the 
disciple on Jesus’ left is actually Mary Magdeline, supposed mother to Jesus’ children. This is a centre 
plot‐piece in the world famous book the DaVinci Code, where the grail is actually the blood line of 
Jesus’ descendants. Did DaVinci know the truth & put in one of his paintings, did Jesus actually exist. 
Fuck knows, but the painting is wicked, a triumph of contemplation, considering Leonardo was 
constantly harassed to finish by its sponsor, the Duke of Milan. Leonardo’s quite Taoist answer was, 
“Men of genius are sometimes producing most when they seem to be labouring least.” A maxim I 
often try & emulate. 
 
Like its art, most of Milan’s beauty is on the inside, hung in the soul like a painting on a gallery wall. 
The city itself is a bit like Manchester (but classier) & tiring of the constant stream of films I left our 
party & went on a cultural exchange mission to the San Siro stadium. Two hundred years ago Byron 
would have gone to the opera, but times have changed & now football is the number one spectator 
sport in the world. The home of both AC & Inter Milan & is a joy to behold ‐ like some collossal 
spaceship about to take off. I arrived two hours before kick‐off in order to soak up a little of the 
atmosphere, all ablaze in red & black, a riot of Dennis the Menaces. Enjoyed chatting to some fans in 
a bar, my Italian gathering pace again after a few weeks in the country. Then I hit the atmospheric 
ground, paying ten pounds for a fairly good seat quite high up, but with a great view. As helicopters 
swept flew above the football far below mewas excellent, flowing faster & smoother than the jerky 
stop‐starting of English football ‐ less injury time, quickly taken free‐kicksall for a fraction of the 
price! The game ended up a 1‐1 draw, the small pocket of flag‐waving Parma fans behind me taking 
great delight in knocking these goliaths of the game of their arrogant perch. Toward the end of the 
game comments such as Bastardo & Merde re‐assured my notion that, aside from love & food, 
football (& its inherent swearing at the referee) is one of the true international languages. 
 
                                                                                                                                     Milan ‐ October 22nd 
                                               San Siro 
                                                     
                                     I sat as a San Siro partisan 
                               Not Interʹs cuckoo, dismissing intrigue 
                           What missile shot thro the Championʹs League, 
                                Claiming glory each man an artisan, 
                             Some Scythian Chief, some Nazi Kapitan, 
                           Who now have launchʹd another bold blitzkreig 
                               Upon defenders flailing with intrigue, 
                            Whose goal‐bound ballʹs gliding catamaran 
                                   Becomes a cataclysmic catalyst 
                                As all aroar &, all the more, upryst ‐ 
                                 The famous family of Lombardy 
                              Pays homage to their heroes on the park 
                              & tho the skies above the stars are dark 
                               In floods of light Iʹll write my poetry. 
                                                     
                                                     
                                                     
                                                     
                                                     
                                                  81 
                                               Casanova 
 
A couple of days ago, after the film festival’s closing moments & a fond arrividerci to Andy & 
Analeen, me & Glenda began a romantic trip in the worldʹs most romantic country. Our first port of 
call was an hourʹs train ride north of Milan, leaving the plains & entering the sheer Alpine foothills at 
Lake Como. The place has a very regal & refined feel, with grand villas lining the delicious lake. 
Altho a little touristy, I rather enjoyed the Italian ladies strutting about with their tiny dogs. It was 
very refreshing to be there, especially toward sunset when the sky & lake turned pink. Then as night 
fell the stars above blended with the lights on the hills in the distance ‐ a truly remarkable sight. We 
dined that night in the city square, the splendid cathedral only a few feet away & towering above us. 
I had taken a copy of Lord Byron’s Childe Harold with me, & was enjoying his descriptions of Alpine 
scenes, comparing them wsith my own observations. I had been rather enamoured of m’lords 
adventures in my youth, reading them more voraciously than his works. The guy was a wicked poet, 
a man who not only wrote poetry, but lived it! Italy made him a truly great poet, & I was looking 
forward to seeing Venice, having first been introduced to its beauties through the fourth canto of 
Child Harold. Back in the twenty‐first century, on waking in Como we took a boat around her lake, 
shaped very much like the mitsubishi symbol, flanked by rugged peaks & enough to stir the poetʹs 
soul. It finally arrived at Lecco, a town very similar to Como, both in situation & panorama ‐ tho the 
scenery much prettier. 
 
The next leg of our journey took us out of the Alps to the lovely city of Bergamo, whose ancient heart 
perches ominously on a rocky crag. From there we skimmed the Alps, looming up on our left, while 
to our right stretched the lowland plains. After a couple of hours we finally glimpsed Venice, rising 
out of the misty waters a mile or so off the mainland. Necking a bottle of vino we sat by the 
waterside, admiring the splendour of a distant Venice, a shimmering sea between us.  As we 
trundled over I reminsced on Lord Byron who had lived here himself, in the early months of his exile 
from England. Securing a suitable hotel for the night we hoppʹd on a water‐bus into the old city, the 
Grand Canal a wonder to sail upon on the unofficially free waterbuses. Composed a little to the 
splish‐splosh of the sea & the beating of a serene sun, at all times stunned by the beauty of Venice. Even 
the swarms of tourists in Saint Markʹs Square cannot put off the poetic lustre of its ambience. After a 
romantic meal we hit a jazz bar for Hemmingway cocktails, after which I was pretty damn fucked. 
Met a man called Virgilio, a Salvador Dali lookalike. We then all went dancing by the piazza 
Margarheta, downed a lot more beer, & went back to our hotel at dawn. 
 
Venice 
October 25th 
 
A Poetʹs Love 
 
There is a time, as love & lyric fuse, 
& poets pass a moment with their muse, 
When soft, erotic melodies are aired, 
A special sense of tender feelings shared ‐ 
& so, my love, what words would come to me? 
As from thy soul I formʹd sweet poetry 
Bouyant as my heart‐beat grows enraptured 
Swollen on delightful fancies captured; 
Divinity of kisses in the dark 
Cacaphony of blisses soon to spark, 
Or those amazing days tumultuous 
When Cupid sprays his love all over us, 
We mortals lifeʹs rare moments must record 
                     For memory by poetry restorʹd. 
 
 
 
                                                      
                                                      
                                                      
                                                      
                                                      
                                                      
                                                  82 
                                             Free Drinks 
 
Thro mi life I’ve always been blest with a certain amount of luck. I call em Damo moments, & sure 
enough its happened again. At this moment in time I am in the splendid Hotel Imperial in the 
Croatian town of Opatija. Its the former resort of the Austro‐Hungarian Emporers & if it was good 
enough for the Hapspurgs its damn sure good enough for me. By some quirk of fate Ive ended up 
here at the same time as some massive charity event hosted by Microsoft... which basically means 
loads of free food an as much booze as I can drink... repeat, as much booze as I can drink... & I can 
drink a hell of a lot (hollow legs). There’s loads of fit Croat birds waddling about & a band playin... 
who are pretty shite in that Eastern European kind of way. I wandered thro the very splendid, if 
crowded, hotel into a room full of computers, where I am now writing this.  
 
VERY IMPORTANT INTERLUDE  
I just went to get a top up on mi glass of red wine & some tuxedoed geezer just gave me a whole 
bottle of local Merlot... BUZZIN!  
 
Reyt, back to the action. After saying goodbye to Glenda in Venice (sheʹs gone back to Scotland to 
sort out her affairs before joining me for the rest of the winter) I decided to check out Croatia for a 
week. A train ride took me to a very grey & drizzly Trieste... quite Burnleyesque in fact. From there I 
caught a bus through three pasport controls, traversing Italy, Slovenia & passing into Croatia. The 
way went thru the Istrian peninsula, seeming some vasty corridor flanked by two chains of gloomy 
mountains... very cool in the fading twilight. About fifteen miles from the port of Rejeeka the bus 
entered Opatija. I remembered from my studies that the place sounded cool & decided to get off the 
bus, finding myself once more wandering the streets of a foreign land.  It was eight o clock & no 
tourist places were open, so I chanced my luck at a beautifully facaded hotel. I got a room fer 25 
squid with a balcony overlookin the waves the glittering lights of Rijeeka ascending the mountains in 
the distance showered & headed downstairs fer the free food & booze, which very neatly brings us 
up to speed. 
 
Opatija 
Octobr 26th 
 
                                                     83 
                                               Island Retreat 
 
Woke up in Opatija with one hell of a hangover... as tho Rab C Nesbitt had wedged an axe in mi 
brain & vomited inside. My first mission of the day was to drain a bottle of mineral water & pour the 
remainder of last nights wine inside, thus conserving it for later. Back on the road I soon reached the 
port of Rijeeka. Now, I enjoy great wandering around europe, soaking up the atmosphere of each 
place. Some are heavy with history, like Berchtesgadenland, which you can ‘feel’ as you walk 
around. Other places, where the tides of time kinda missed out, such as Belgium & the American 
Deep South, are lifeless wildernesses. Pretty to look at but hellish to grow up in. So I found myself in 
the Croatian equivalent of a backwater, wandering about a bit dazed. Luckily an old German lady 
noticed me & rushed to my aid, taking over mi holiday just like a German. She helped me get a bus 
ticket for Rab & gave me the address of somewhere to stay. I had a couple of hours to kill in the very 
unpretty city of Rijeeka. To add to its already dreary feel it was fuckin rainin & I havent brought a 
coat, me expecting eternal Adriatic sunshine.  Before my bus I passed the time in a crazy Croatian 
bar, the barmaid made‐up like she had been in the Rocky Horror Picture show. 
 
The bus finally arrived & I set off on the three hour journey to Rab island. As we skimmed the 
coastline I slipped on some tunes & watch’d the scenery unfold. A low cloud hung over all... upon 
my left rose these reyt rocky mountains, the trees mainly bare & barely a house in sight. On my right 
the sea was speckled with bright spots of azure & white waves tumbled in to shore, dancing as they 
went. Halfway into our journey we pulled into Senj, whose cool little castle over the quietude of the 
town. In the days of the Venetian Republic, which once ruled the area, the local warlords used it as 
an outpost of resistance. As I chilled with the history the sun finally returned from its two day 
AWOL as the whole sea became glazed in brilliant gold. It soon fucked off again, but that brief 
glimmer raised my spirits. Further along the mountains began to rise even higher & to my right was 
the great island of Krk (no vowels), a solid mass of barren land, stood out against the distant Istrian 
peninsula. Then the island of Rab came into view... the car ferry sailing from it to meet the bus. We 
joined up at a little harbour & soon I was on the top deck, sharing my vino with the captain, 
embracing the pleasant sea breeze. I found myself circumambiently surrounded by sea & mountains. 
I watched the cluster of houses at the harbour dwindle & then turned to look at Rab. It seemed 
inhospitable, just beige rock with hardly a whisp of green anywhere. The only feature was a road 
snaking off through the hills into the distance.  
 
The bus left the ferry & took the road. On the other side of the hills however, sheep & lambs 
gambolled thro piny fields & many orange‐rooved whitewashed houses came into view. I soon 
found myself at the idyllic harbour of Rab town & made my way to the address the German lady had 
given me. It belongs to Katrin & her husband, both lovely in their late middle age &  we cannot 
understand each other at all.  However, I’ve a nice enough room, a shower & use of a kitchen by a 
lovely little courtyard, all for eight pounds a night. The town & experience is wonderfully poetic, 
tranquil as a feather, with hardly a soul walking the streets. I spent an hour or so sat topless on a sun 
drenched balcony, eating a quality pasta, drinking wine & listening to some tunes. For entertainment 
I watched a blackbird potter about the garden & butterflies drain nectar from these lovely purple 
flowers while I nibbled on some fresh grapes. Then, my hostess brought me some yummy, honey‐
filled home‐made pancakes & my lunch was all but complete. All that remained was to let the 
sunshine & wine hit home, then slip into a drowsy Medditteranean siesta. Fully refresh’d I was soon 
pottering about the shady paths of the piny park & sat me by the sea‐twinkling waves or wandering 
the smooth, polished streets of a white=stoned town, with hardly a soul about, & sat me down in an 
internet cafe to write this. I’ve got some vino left & there’s a ruined church nearby whose belltower is 
still intact – a perfect place to watch the sunset. 
                                                                                                                           Rab ‐ October 30th 
Adriatica 
 
Serene afternoon... the streets of Rab are quiet, the stones  
I step upon as smooth as silk ‐ sky cloudless, deep azure,  
Collar turned up I begin an ascent, the terrain  
A plethora of white, jagged, quartz‐like stone, 
Half‐way up the yellow, flower‐trumpet dotted peak 
I gaze back on an island, evergreen forest‐realm  
The silky‐still lagoons, snow‐cappʹd mainland mountains 
& Rab’s marble town jutting out like a luxury liner.  
 
My ears straining for noise, relieved by buzzing fly, 
& bleeting phalanx of sheep, led by rustic Croat  
Whose rocks usher stray ewes & lamb back to the flock  
& as thet dissapear I resume my scrambling climb 
Up this lizard‐strewn gully to the stony summit, to feel 
A mighty wind thundering across a thousand islands. 
 
                                                        
                                                      84 
                                            Hapsburg Princes 
 
I am currently in a youth hostel at a place called Miramare, 5 k out of Trieste, nestled beneath some 
low lying hills on the other side of the bay. I fly to Rome tomorrow, so I thought I had best get me 
near the airport, seeing as the Croatian travel network is a bit zany. For example I had to get woken 
up by my delightful hostess at Rab this morning, at the god awful hour of 5AM... repeat 5AM... it 
was still fuckin dark fer fucks sake. Anyway, I gave her four pecks to the cheek & found myself on 
the bus off of Rab. On the way back, to my surprise it began to snow! The temperature has suddenly 
dropp’d round these parts & a vicious gale was blowing the stuff off the mountains & I was glad to 
be chillin (or should that be warmin) on the bus. It was a far cry from yesterday when I could feel the 
sun frazzlin the back of mi head where I fracture my skull at New Year. Back on the bus the driver 
was a bit of a grumpy old git (fair enough fer gettin up at 5) & kept tellin me off fer silly stuff like 
takin my shoes off. At Rijeeka He even tried to make me buy my ticket again, but I wised up to his 
game & scarpered, much to his intelligible chagrin.  
 
Now then Rijeeka. I didnt much like it on my way to Rab & I like it even less now. I was forced to 
wait five hours for the bus to Trieste. Over the past couple of days I’ve developed a sore throat & felt 
a bit fluey. The best I could do for warmth was a drafty old train station, thus becoming, for four 
hours, the low point of the tour. However, time rolled on in that same old way that it does & I found 
myself getting on the bus to Trieste. At the other stand was the German lady who told me where to 
stay in Rab... she was going there herself & I asked her to thank mi hostess properly for me. So the 
bus went away & at Opitaja we picked up some students... two Canadians, a Hungarian & a Brazilian 
bird, all having a break from studying in Milan. It gave me a chance to have my first proper 
conversation in five days... a far cry from the crazy mixture of German, French, English & Italian I’ve 
bin speakin in Croatia. They told & of a cheap place to stay in Trieste... Miramare ( who needs mi 
guide book).  
 
After four passport controls (one Croat, two Slovenian & an Italian) we were rollin along the road 
overlooking the very pretty port of Trieste. Just scenic Italian buildings perched beside a wide, blue, 
tanker‐filled bay. From there I caught a bus to the hostel, checked in & checked out the place. I am 
stayin just outside the Castillo Miramare, a former seat of the Hapsburg Princes. It is an enchanting 
castle sat on the coast & surrounded by a beautiful park. I intend to hit it tomorrow after breakfast for 
a spot of poesy. The history of the place is quite interesting. It was built by Maximillion, second in 
line to the Austro Hungarian Empire way back in the 1861. A couple of years later for some reason 
the Mexican empire offered him the throne of their country. The guy took it, but on arriving in 
Valdezar found all was not what he expected. The Republicans took an instant dislike to him & he 
was  soon lined up against a wall & shot... cool! 
 
Mirermar 
1st November 
 
 
 
Love in Absentia 
(for Glenda) 
 
As I walked the pebbled way 
To where soft promises lay 
Of your lofty tingling touch 
Frosted fingers lusted much 
I went all alone by night 
Led by benissimo light 
Evʹry special memory 
Of shared moments & how we... 
 
   ...Were waves & white birds gliding 
      Black stallions hard riding 
      So as friendship holds the fort 
      I shall send a tender thought 
      Glenda come to me in Rome 
      Spread thy wings & hurry home 
                                                       
                                                       
                                                       
                                                  85 
                                                Romans 
 
The other day I took a cheap internal flight from Trieste, when after an hour of verdant fields & 
scattered rows of red rooves, I saw, finally, by the khaki‐coloured Tiber, the tall apartment blocks & 
the scattered ruins of Rome. I am here on a poetic mission, to sonnetize the lore & legends of ancient 
Rome. After the fall of Troy a young man called Aeneas escaped his flaming city to save the Trojan 
Race. After a six year journey he ended up at the mouth of the River Tiber. I called there yesterday, 
wandering through the poppy‐speckled ruins of Ostia, the port of classical Rome, where only the 
wild cats now call home. The ruins are wicked, spread out over an area the size of Tunbridge Wells, 
& as serene as silk. There were a few parties of noisy school‐kids around, but they provided great 
cover in the cafe & I was soon walking out with several bottles of beer & a some meaty pannini for 
free! The most interesting observation I made, upon the close inspection of a brilliant statue, was the 
size of the Roman penis ‐ very small indeed!  I also visited Castel Gandalfo, a town perched on the 
outer slopes of a volcano, about ten miles south of Rome. Inside this long‐ago‐extinct mass there is a 
wonderful lake & I sat by the cool waters, composing away. The descendants of Aeneas chose this 
place to build a new city, where eventually the twin princes Romulus & Remus would be born. After 
being exposed to die by a cruel king who had usurped their throne they were suckled by a she‐wolf 
& brought up by a shepherd who lived in an area by the Tiber. On becoming men they discovered 
their heritage, slew the king & took the crown. They then decided to found a new city amid the hills 
where they grew up, which Romulus vainly named after himself once he had slain Remus.  
 
From Gandalfo I made the short journey down into the coastal plain & onto Anzio, scene of the WW2 
outflanking manouvre. The town seem’d nice enough & I put my tent up right next to the delicious 
Med amidst the decadent ruins of an old Neronian villa.  Awaking by the sweet Med I potter’d about 
for an hour on the beach with a beer & a spliff, before packing up & trying to find a boat to Ponza. 
The harbour was a delightful affair, but I had miss’d the daily boat to the archipelago. The boat 
leaves at 9.30 AM & with a paradise island in my thoughts I decided to stick around for another day, 
bought some food & wine & settl’d down for the afternoon on the beach. The sun was hot but not too 
hot & Icomposed a couple of sonnets, smoking mi skunk ‐ the weed & wine helping me slip into the 
Italian way of life. Spent sunset pacing the surf, sharing in its beauty with the couples ‐ it is a very 
romantic place.  I took a night’s walk into the bustling town, half way between seclusion & the city. 
Ah! The Italians are such a lovely people, so warm. Finished the evening beneath a glittering array of 
stars, beside a sloshing sea, watchin the bright rotations of a lighthouse’s gleaming beams.  Awoke 
this morning with an hour to go before my boat. Packt quckly & meander’d to the harbour for a 
quick coffee & pastry, watchin the fisherman prepare for the day. The voyage to Ponza was 
invigorating & the view slight misty ‐ enshadowing the mountains of the mainland. A few minutes 
after passing the magnificently monastried Circeo, the Pontine islands came into view ‐ great rugged 
cliffs jutting from the sea like the peaks of mountains. So these are my paradise islands. 
 
Ponza 
4th October 
The Art of Love 
(from Ovid) 
 
Children of cupid note down thy name, 
Best you believe all women may be won, 
Promise her presents to charm her armour,       
Wear rose‐fashionʹd clothes like men of milieu, 
Be aware of your hair & trim thy chin, 
Speak & with speed, for Venus loves the brave, 
Say her face is fair, her eyes like the skies, 
Blood warm’d by wine fine spirits flame & flow, 
Lust multiplies with each draught that we drink, 
For wine gilds women with looks & laughter ‐ 
This female forced e’en to her true desires, 
& race when ye chase, & yet if ye slow 
There comes the kiss & when passion express’d 
There leaves but little rusing for the rest... 
 
                  Latin Literati 
 
Come praise the Roman Vates & their song 
Numidian Bacchentes pour their winea 
Thro midnight meetings of the mother tongue 
       At fev’rish pitch, 
                                   Erotic in recline 
    Ovid slowly unpeels his satin glove 
  Musing til morning on the Latin love 
 
Horace prefers the art of poetry 
The weight of empire burns his lyric mind 
As life, mythology & history 
Entwined full rich, 
                              That night Virgil designed 
                        An epic in the image of Homer 
                         Enough to impress Alexandria 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
                                                  86 
                                               Seasider 
 
Autumn eh? the nights seem to come on so quickly now, the scarves are slowly arriving round the 
necks of the ladies, the horse chestnuts are shedding their giant‐handed leaves, the squirrels are 
busying about with the same sense of urgency that we busied about the summer. The shops are 
starting their late‐night openings & the weather has turnʹd ‐ for the worse. Luckily, I’m in Italy, 
whose Autumn is rather reminiscent of the British High Summer. I have just spent a lovely few days 
on Ponza, writing sonnets on ancyent Rome & enjoying life on this arid yet wildly romantic island. I 
found this terrifically seclude beach, framed by the Tyrrannean & 300 ft high cliffs, & relax’d, 
alternating swims with lazin in the sun pencil in hand. At sunset I return’d to my rooms, got my 
neighbour to open her shop for me & bought the ingredients for a fine pasta. This was cookt up & 
consumed on a verandah overlooking the harbour. It felt perfect & if this is the notion of romantic 
travelling, then I’ve found it, drinking wine & musing sonnets beneath a vast, star‐spangling sky.  
One day I snook down a hotelʹs private staircase onto a public beech ‐ the hotel charges for access – 
cheeky blaggers! From there I began a swim around the eastern tip of the island. It was lovely & 
warm & I felt like a pirate with a dagger in my mouth as I pass’d by grottos & small pinnacle of rock. 
The highlight of the swim was discovering roman fish farms hewn from the rock, long since 
reclaim’d by the sea.  Despite nearly drowning in the Andamans I do enjoy being in proximity to the 
salty depths & have a deep fondness of islands & island life. Here is a sonnet in which the sea has 
penetrated, in the same way that is penetrated my own soul; 
 
 
                                                   The Sea 
                                                         
                                    The sea is a canvas horizon frames 
                                     Colours adjusted by aerial cloud, 
                              From dark, stormy lead thro red solar flames 
                                 To pleasant pastels heavenish endowʹd. 
                                                         
                                  The sea is a life‐line for those that farm 
                              Net‐dredging from lean runs to purple patch  
                                   When sneezing sepia cast out an arm 
                                   Over the dying comrades of the catch 
                                                         
                                     The sea is a liquid field of battle 
                                   Waves rising to a howling hurricane 
                                  Fishermen fight the shaking sail‐rattle 
                                Neath flashing lightning & phosperant rain 
                                                         
                                  Here, mankind, truly finds tranquility 
                                       On a sea heaving to infinity. 
Last night I took some weed I bought off a Tunisian in Rome to watch the sunset. It was stunning sat 
high above the sea, tranquilly watching the isla of Palmora in the distance. The sky pinken’d to black 
& I walk’d back to port full of poetic fire. While sat on a rock, gazin at the stars & musin on another 
poem about Rome I realised I’d left a bag where I was sat containin cash & mi dutch shrooms. 
Walk’d back up the slope & groped around in the dark a bit, but to no avail. Then one‐by‐one the 
island’s security, their mate with a big torch & the polizie show’d up. It soon turn’d into a fiasco, 
ev’ryone chattin at once & nothing getting done. The policeman got fed up & drove me back to my 
rooms to check my passport (no probs). My time on Ponza has been great & I would have liked to 
have stayed more ‐ but time is pressing. Potter’d about for a few hours, gorgin on the tranquillity, 
nearly missin mi boat off the island in the process. The ship was open‐deck’d & very nice but I was a 
little disturb’d by this wide‐eyed nutter prowlin the ship. He decided to jump overboard half way 
thro (molto divetente!) & after the ship did a great 360 he was lockt up, smiling, & I relaxed all the 
way to the mainland ‐ where I am currently passing the time waiting for a train to Naples ‐ but 
unfortunately the place stinks of fish!   
 
Formia 
November 6th 
 
 
                                                 NAZARENE 
                                                        
                                                 Gethsemene 
                                                  Judas rope 
                                                 Archmagus 
                                 Sadly maintain the scandalised Sanhedrim 
                                 Leaning their wills upon the Roman whim 
                                 The Pilate’s orders murder the son of Him 
                                                 To Calvary 
                                                  A Crucifix 
                                                  Sanguinus 
                                                 Human sin 
                                                  Son of god 
                                                  Devils day 
                                                  Pious fires 
                                                  Epiphanies 
 
 
                                                        
                                                        
                                                        
                                                        
                                                        
                                                87 
                                      Abbazias & Olive Groves 
 
Hello from Naples! It feels a little strange among so much cut & thrust after Ponza’s serenity. 
Managed to get directed to a campsite a few K down the coast at Puzzoli, right beside a former 
volcano,  still spewing out sulphor, giving the whole area the stink of rotting eggs.  After a rowdy 
boogie with the locals & a night of much needed kip I woke latish & breakfasted by the sulphuric 
steam of the Solfanata. I chill’d, absorbing the Doctor Who type landscape til 11, when I set off into 
Naples. The city was bustling like mad, & also very dirty ‐ quite unlike Tuscany’s cleanliness. Took a 
wander thro the markets & this exited me… so much energy. Todays mission was Pompeii & I 
jump’d a train for the short hop, all the time watch’d by the imposing grandeur of Vesuvious. The 
famous eruption of 2000 years ago was so sudden that people were buried in volcanic ash where they 
stood in the streets. The entire city was rediscover’d about 150 years ago & dug‐out for the benefit of 
future generations. Hopefully it will serve as a warnin to never build cities by active volcanoes. From 
the uglyish modern Pompeii town I meander’d to the ruins & managed to sneak in the tradesman 
entrance! I found myself at the amphitheatre where Pink Floyd film’d their moving psychedelics 
back in the seventies, amazing in itself, but once I began to wander the city I was taken aback. The 
ruins are the most well‐preserv’d I have ever seen, & spread out over a huge area. I was there a good 
few hours, one of which was spent with the fossilized remains of Romans. The ‘stone’ had chipp’d off 
one guys toes & you could see his bone ‐ a pretty fascinating sight.  
 
Today I caught a bus round the other side of Naples to see Lake Averno. Its very dramatic setting is 
within an ancient bowl of a volcano & one can see why the poet Virgil thought it was the entrance to 
the underworld.  I quickly toss’d off a sonnet then caught a bus into Naples & left the city ‐ I’m not 
too bother’d about saying farewell. I read somewhere that a man should see Naples & then die ‐ 
why? It stinks so much I quickly left! I was soon enough pulling into a town dominated by 
surrounding mountains, including one topp’d by the Abbazio which caus’d the Allies so much 
annoyance in ’43‐’44 before it was razed to the ground by hundreds of bombers. One German 
mountain troop, dug into the slopes of Monte Cassino, had held off men from Britain, America, 
India, Australia, New Zealand & the rest for almost a year. Despite the fact that the Germans were 
not in the Abbey, respecting its holiness & the wishes of the monks, the Allies decided to bomb it flat 
in an effort to unlodge these annoying defenders. However, after reducing the centuries old beauty 
to rubble, the Germans just swarm’d into the ruins & took full advantage of this new cover. It would 
be months before the mountain was finally taken, & years before the abbey was rebuilt. 
 
The modern town of Cassino is in stark contrast to Naples, very clean & stinkin of money. Bought 
some bread & wine & began my ascent to the abbey. The road was a twisty one so I decided to go 
straight up. The climb was arduous over the broke, rocky terrain (result of the Allied bombings 
perhaps?) but with a final surge tho brambles I reach’d the road at the top. However, I was not the 
clean young man of the bottom of the mountain, for my clothes were torn, my skin dirty & my hair 
all over the place. This seem’d to put the monks off letting me stay in the abbey, & I was directed to 
the olive laden gardens. There, I pitch’d my tent by an old woodman’s hut, got the fire going & spent 
a very poetic night writing by firelight & drinkin vino.  It feels so good to live so naturally. Up here, 
on top of a mountain inhabited only by monks, I feel truly contented with life. If my passion 4 poetry 
will continue to bring me to such sublime places as here, I am glad I am walking the road. I have also 
just experienced one of those intense poetic moments of creation. I had been flicking through the 
Dante I had stolen in Poppi on my journeys, a great poem which filled my sensibilities. They were 
then lit up by the catalyst that was a visit to Lake Averno which, coupled with the recent grief for my 
gran, soon  had me scribbling deep into the night. A full sequanza of fourteen sonnets was the result, 
entitled ‘The First Four Circles of Hell.’ 
 
Cassino 
November 9th 
 
 
                                                 FARFALLA 
                                             
                                                                          *                          * 

                                                                             *                    *     

                                                                                *               *  

                                          skoenlapper                    *       *                   nipwisipwis  

                                    liblikas             farasha            titli           mariposa         dimago         

                               burabiro             sommerflue      motʹl       petalouʹda           paruparo       

                              pi sugnya   butterfly   uvevane   kupu    lupelupe    vlinder  pulelehua   

                              papillon                 lilldeh             popti            peplim             papalotl     

                                    txipilota          choochoo         lepke         perhonen       luvivane  

                                  prajapathi               papilio        flutur        bimbilo          kupukupu  

                          peperuda                huitzil               fuf lao             bembe              gorgoleta  

                      borboleta           kakupo                      tauriuö                  kelebek            babochka  

                  woo deep       zanimo     fithrildi             parpar           fluturi     kipepeo       bayboum  

                 serurubele              bulubulu                     metulj                ramarama                mpornboli 

                     hevavahkema                     fefe‐fefe      pepeo     pili‐pala                     schmetterling   

                            pillango       marlimarlirni              oguyo                shavishavi        parvaneh  
                                       sommerfugl                            fjril                              samanalaya     
 
 
 
 
 
 
Three Beasts 
 
... & then I awoke 
                             My pillow the wing of the last pegasi 
                  Thirty years of love & life, the crux of youth & age 
           Around me grew the pathless shadows of lifeʹs dark wood 
 
I wander lost awhile, 
                               Until a hill so sunny climbs the sky, 
                                                                                   & stumble to its foot 
 
A leopard blocks the slopes,  
                                               Clad in light revealing lingerie 
      A lion fills my ears with fear,  
                                                       Roaring modern cacophony 
        A she‐wolf eyes my rucksack,  
                                                          Raring to rid me of money  
 
     Driving me back, step‐by‐step, to where the sun shone silent 
 
 
Virgil 
 
            At the point of defeat, as I turned back to the wood 
                  I heard a voice whimper, 
                                                            ʺHave pity on me!ʺ 
         
                  ʺAre you a ghost,ʺ  
                                                I chanted,  
                                                                  ʺOr are you flesh & blood? 
 
ʺI am the shade of Virgilus of Rome, 
           Poet to Augustus & the false & lying gods!ʺ 
  
ʺPoet, Pirrenian fountain who once pourʹd forth so rich a stream of speech 
                    Pray, protect me from these maladies preventing me ascending?ʺ 
 
ʺYou must take another road & if you follow I will guide you, 
 The place eternal waits, where shrieking ancyents wail for second deaths, 
 From there spirits fitter than mine shall lead you thro the spheres divineʺ  
 
                                                                                                Then he set out & I came on behind him 
Doubts 
 
As day departed from the darkling air, 
From the conflict & the pity of the way 
                                                                   I drew back fearful 
ʺFret not,ʺ said Virgil,  
                                   ʺBut did not Aeneas visit Hades in the flesh 
                                  & Dante walk the same, seven centuries ago,   
                                          Where from the Empyrean of Heaven 
                                       The adversary of evil showʹd him favour!ʺ 
    
ʺMy faith is in question,ʺ I answered,  
                                         ʺAm I not fit for this, is going folly?ʺ 
 
ʺIf I have rightly understood your words 
  Your spirit is smitten with encumbering cowardice 
                      Turn not from this honorable enterpriseʺ 
 
                                                  ʺThen lead the way...ʺ                  
                                                                       
Journeymen 
 
     As we walked the poet spoke in a lost Latin tongue,, 
                                                       Tho long‐time dead his tones were full of life 
 
                                       ʺI am among those in suspense, limbo twixt bliss & torment, 
                                           A lady callʹd to me, eyes shining brighter than the stars 
                                          Propelling from her pious seat lush tones angelic utterʹd,  
                                                                            
                                          ʹO Curteous Mantuan soul, whose fame endures eternal,  
                                      My son has left the vulgar herd & strayʹd from the true path,  
                                                        Pray hasten to his side, I bid thee go,ʹ 
                                                                            
                                 The tears she shed while speaking forth have made me hasten here.ʺ   
 
My returning courage prospers as little flowers, 
Close at the chill of night, stem‐stand for the sun, 
& I began as one set free,  
                                         ʺNow go my leader, lord & master...ʺ  
 
                              & setting out we entered on the deep & savage way 
 
                                                 Hell 
 
                        THRO ME THE WAY INTO THE WOEFUL CITY 
                         THRO ME THE WAY TO THE ETERNAL PAIN 
                       THRO ME THE WAY AMONG THE LOST PEOPLE 
                       ABANDON ALL HOPE THOSE THAT ENTER HERE 
 
                                 Holding breath I enter a starless gloom,   
                      Sounds like whirlwind‐eddying sand surround my head, 
                                                      
                                Clapping hands *  Screams of anguish  
                                       Haunted sighs  *   Lamentations    
                                       Loud Wailings  *   Strange Tongues 
                                    Horrible Lingua  *  Words of Pain   
                                                        
                 The poet saw me shrinking back from all those angry tones & said 
                                                       
                                         ʺWelcome to the Inferno!ʺ 
                                                      
                             So breathing deeply & holding my breath  
                            I steppʹd into the land that men call Limbo 
 
 
Ferryman 
 
Behind a shifting banner I saw so many people,  
A train of wretched shades who missʹd their mark  
Neither rebel nor god‐fearing, but for themselves 
Driven out of heaven, unwelcome in hell 
History makes no record for they never were alive 
 
                      Then I saw a great crowd by a black & loathsome river 
                       & a demon on a hovercraft with eyes of burning coal  
                       ʺThis is the Acheron,ʺ said the poet, ʺ& that is Charon! 
                        Father of the livid marsh, watcher of its river crossing!ʺ 
 
                                                       Souls, like leaves of Autumn, ping into his craft 
                                                  Driven on by divine justice, until the tree drew bare 
                                                 & as a new crowd gathers while the pilot sped away 
                                       A red blaze shone, dark wind struck up, my senses overcome, 
                                                    I shudder & fall like one seized with sudden sleep  
                                                      
First Circle 
 
Heavy thunder awakens me 
Rested eyes survey the Valley of Pain 
Deep & dark & blanketed in vapours 
The poet turns to me, painted death‐pale with pity 
ʺLet us descend into the blind world down there...ʺ 
 
                                                    & so we stepped into that abysmal place 
                                                  Serpent‐realms girdling the infernal world 
                                        Where countless wailings rise, & sighs forever tremble 
                                     Where swell vast crowds of men, women & little children 
                                                                                       
                                                                                    The Poet turns to me with sadful eyes 
 
                                                                                                ʺThese did not sin, they have merit enough, 
                                                                                                 But were born before the harrowing of hell 
                                                                                             Faithʹs gateway by them never meant to know 
                                                                                                                            & so are lost...ʺ 
 
 
                          
 
Pagan Park 
 
A blazing light shone beyond that forest of thronging spirits     
& we went thither to a noble castle set apart; 
Seven walls of intelligence protected from immorality 
A gentle stream of eloquence stood watch over the dark 
Guarding a gallant tribe, gazes of grand authority 
Observe us as we drift there, men like the dashing Aeneas, 
Ceasar, Cicero, souls of science & philosophy; 
               Aristotle, Plato... 
                                          then turned back to their playstations 
       Apart from one, an old man with a sword came on to greet us 
                       His name was Homer, & we talked of poetry & how 
                           His essence had adapted thro thirty seven centuries, 
                  Our noble school of eagle‐song, & when the converse done 
               We pursued a sloping drawbridge to a place where no light shines. 
 
 
 
Second Circle 
 
                        How deep do we descend? 
                                                                     Here Minos stands gaurd 
                                                   Horrible, snarling, Judge of the Dead 
                            Examining offences as the ill‐born soul confesses all  
                           Encircled by his spiral tail soon they are hurlʹd below 
 
Beyond his watch a great wailing breaks upon me 
Place of muted light where a restless, hellish storm 
Seizes spirits & drives them, weeping in lamentation, 
Tears mingling with their streaming blood 
Shrieking & blaspheming at the Power of our God 
 
As the storm blast blows them hither, thither, upward, downward 
      I ask my master, 
                              ʺWho are these condemʹd & helpless souls?ʺ 
 
ʺLook upon the lustful,ʺ he said, ʺ& pity them!ʺ 
 
 
 
 
The Lustful 
 
ʺThese are the carnal sinners that forever reap the whirlwind 
                                    Of a life subjected to their heartʹs desires 
      No hope of rest or comfort from the lust which drives their soulsʺ 
 
Thro the battling winds a long line of shades approach us   
      Like hungry cranes,  
                                        The black air scrapes & scourges 
 
                                                       I recognize several, 
                                                                                   The deadly Cleopatra 
                                          King Edward the Eighth, who lost his land for love 
                                                   & Seriramis of Assyria who legalised incest 
 
ʺAlas,ʺ I said, ʺHow many sweet thoughts brought pity to themselves!ʺ 
      Virgil replied, ʺAbandon yourself to a love that is nothing but love  
                                                                    & you are in hell already!ʺ 
                                                       Then turned & led me further thro the gloom 
Third Circle 
 
     We walk trembling, 
                                  Our minds shut off from pity, 
                                                                        Confounded with sudden grief 
                                                                                
                                     North, East, South & West are risen new souls in torment 
                                                 Upon this place falls an eternal, cursed rain 
                                      Unceasing measure, cold & heavy hail, foul water, snow 
 
                                                                                           Three‐headed Cerberus percieves us 
                                                                                           Bares bloody fangs, fierce & hideous 
                                                                                            Red eyes, black beard, greasy claws 
                                                                                                Scar & flay & rend poor spirits,  
                                                                                                   Howling like wounded dogs 
                                                                                                 Grovelling in the sunken mire  
                                                                                               About the Great Worm of Hades 
 
                                         ʺStand back,ʺ said the Roman, ʺI shall take care of him.ʺ 
 
 
The Gluttinous 
 
My master throws three handfulls of dirt into those ravenous gullets 
Calming the devouring Beast, 
                              Who mumbling lets us pass, 
                                                           
                                                        We reach where so many fallen souls surround 
                                                                                                       Lying helpless in the rain 
 
The poet speaks, 
                                                    ʺThese know a strange & loathsome penalty, 
                                                     Fleshy fools, far from luxurious banquetry,     
                                             Yielding their souls to flesh without spiritual motive! 
                                                 They await the sounding of the angelʹs trumpet 
                                  When he above shall come once more to see if they have prosperʹd ‐ 
                            Some may find torments increased while others find their souls released!ʺ 
 
                                                                     Then we went round that curving road, lost in conversation 
                                                                             Until we came on Pluto at a point the path fell steep  
                                                                                
 
                                                                Pluto 
                                                                                                                                  
                                                  ʺPape Satan, Pape Satan, Aleppe!ʺ 
 
                                               Warning come in clucking monotone 
                                         From the old god of Hades,  baron of Zeus 
                                       Lord of the Grecian underworld, who once lost 
                                          His kingdom to the arch‐villainʹs armies, 
                                              Forced into a lowly leuitenant‐hood 
 
                                                  ʺPape Satan, Pape Satan, Aleppe!ʺ 
 
                                             Tho a shadow of his former majesty 
                                          His bloated visage strikes my soul with fear 
 
                                                  ʺPape Satan, Pape Satan, Aleppe!ʺ 
 
Master rants,       
                    ʺSilence accursed wolf, our journey has been willed on high!ʺ 
                             & as wind‐swollen sails fall in a heap when tall masts snap 
                                                                                                                              The cruel beast fell 
                                                                                        
                                                                           Fourth Circle 
 
                                             Passing beyond the whimpering God of Wealth,                                         
                                                              We follow the serpentine tail 
                                                        Scampering down the dismal slope  
                                              To where fresh toils founder & pain is newborn 
                                                                                         
                              Godʹs justice flings these sinners into wild tormenting whirlpools 
                                        Jostling & jousting & duelling with sharp credit cards 
                                                                                        
                                                    ʺWho are these souls that pierce my heart?ʺ  
                                                     I asked my master of the Perfect Word 
                                                                                        
                                                ʺThey are the hoarders & squanderers of Avarice, 
                                         Who embroilʹd their lives worshipping material existance, 
                                                Now all the gold that ever was beneath the moon  
                                                                Will never grant them rest!ʺ 
                                                                                        
                                                                                                            We left that circle & its endless scuffle 
                                                                                                           To walk on ever deeper thro the flame 
                                                                        88 
                                                                 Paradise of Exiles 
 
Back in Cassino I awoke to the craw of a cockerel & was quickly packt up. The Liri valley was 
shrouded in a beautiful sea of white mist, from which the Alpini mountains rose like Arthurian 
islands. I hitch’d a lift with three young Italian guys back to town, where the mist was all‐enclosing. 
Bought an English newspaper (we are on the torist trail here, I guess)  & waited for the train. This 
was duly jump’d &, loving the local countryside I chose some random place to chill for the night. As 
we enter’d the wooded vale of Velletri I thought, ‘This is the place’ & duly got off the train. The 
weather was sunny & clear & I made for a mountain that seem’d to be summoning me from afar. 
Sufficiently stockt up on beer & food I set forth & had the good fortune to ask directions off a cool 
dude. He gave me a lift almost to the top of the peak. We said our friendly arrivedercis & I suddenly 
found myself alone on a forested mountain & plunged into the greenery. The trees turn’d out to be 
giant horse chestnut & I spent most of my time avoiding the falling conkers. Made camp with a 
splendid view of the plain & distant peaks, relaxing with the verdancy & the butterflies ‐ until people 
began shooting that is (for birds probably) on all sides. As in my recent walk through an Austrian 
warzone I work’d out my chances of being hit were pretty slim, but the empty shotgun cases I began 
to see were not exactly encouraging. After the shooters had fuckt off I got a nice fire going for the 
sunset & the evening’s chill, my life as a squatter in London now a pleasantly fading memory. 
The next day I was woken up by gunfire. A couple of shootahs had decided to move to just above my 
tent. I dressed at lightning speed & asked them in my best, broken Italian not to shoot me. They 
moved away & I pack’d up for my descent into the valley. It was a lovely morning galumphing 
down the paths thro the trees, stick in hand a la Wordsworth in the Quantocks. At the bottom I was 
amazed to see how ‘English’ the scenery was ‐ until I nearly got run over by a psychopathic trucker 
driving on the wrong side of the road. Catching my breath & a train I was soon in Rome. It was the 
poet Shelley who said that Italy was the paradise of exiles. He was close... in fact it is the ass‐mans 
paradise. I never really notice how fine the ladies bottoms were in this part of the world, & finding it 
was affecting my concentration I left the monumental grandiosity of Rome & headed for the Etruscan 
hills ‐ the first conquest of Rome, which would one day span from the Firth of Forth to Baghdad. 
 
I am currently staying in a beautiful, small medievil town called Calcata, 50k North of Rome. We are 
perched atop a 300 foot craggy rock, surrounded on all sides by verdant primeval forest, where 
swallow‐like birds called Rondini swoop & glide like spitfires, filling the forest with their song. The 
place is home to fifty or so hippy types & even more stray cats & is perfectly conducive to writing 
poetry... a wonderful writing retreat. I have a great apartment overlooking the valley & have begun 
to settle into the simpler Italian way of life. Walks by the river to the buzz of many flies, lazing in the 
glorious sunshine, three hour siestas, pasta (with cheap veg from a local farmer), wine & music, 
curtesy of the CD player I nicked off my landlady. Last night it was more of a ladies night. Four 
English teachers from Rome had turned up, & after they had a meal in a restaurant I invited them 
back to mine for wine & chat, mainly about the distinct lack of a decent chips n curry in Italy  
                       
                                                                                                                                        Calcata ‐ November 11th 
                                                 89 
                                             Crow’s Feet 
 
Calcata was ace, the reputed home up to about one hundred & fifty years ago, of Jesusʹ foreskin! It is 
full of acid casualties from the sixties, including this cool old geezer who did all Rita Heyworthʹs 
choreography back in the high days of Hollywood. He told me a couple of smashing tales about 
seeing the Doors live on the Venice Beach in LA. He has also leant me a cool Spanish guitar (three 
wicked tunes on the way for the Shanks, lads) & let me take Jack Daniels (his Jack Russel Terrier) on 
my walks through the forested ravines. He is a bit gay like, & gets young Italian lads to drive him all 
over the place in his swanky Beetle car. I gave him back the guitar today, & gave him a cool rendition 
of Riders on The Storm for his good will. There is a cool cavern like bar in the town where, on 
succeeding nights, DJ Damo had a three hour set (to widespread critical acclaim I might add), I had a 
jam with this reyt funky Italian band that had come up from Rome, & played bongos with these 
hippies who turned up at random last night. I have been spending some time with three punks from 
Munich, who have been camping by the river underneath the town. Underneath the crazy hair cuts & 
crazy political views they are the salt of the earth.  
 
I also met the mad bird woman of the town. I was just watching the sunset from the rocks outside her 
house when she came out, poured some wine in a cup for the gods of the forest & offered me a tipple. 
I went in her studio, full of symbolic paintings & half empty wine bottles. We got on great & she took 
me inside her ‘house.’ She sleeps on a bed by a couple of massive bird cages, complete with life‐size 
Egyptian models. She runs a sort of unnofficial orphanage for the birds that fall out of the nests as 
babies, her favourites being a bunch of cool crows ‐ they are her children. One of them had a sore foot 
& I helped administer some medicine while she held it in her hands ‐ proper cool like!  On the poetry 
front I have recently found out that Aeneas does not rhyme with ass, as I first thought, but sounds a 
bit like linear (damn those Latins!). It has been real swell climbing mountains full of flying beetles, 
reading Homer, exploring three thousand year old Etruscan catacoombs & noticing the little things 
like nettle needles & ants avoiding the rain. I have collected about forty different specimins of 
mountain flowers, which I have pressed & will give to Glenda when she gets into Rome tomorrow 
with a few pills stuffed down her bra – there’s only so much good living a man can take before he 
needs to go raving.  I have also finally finished the sonnet in Italian (however dodgy) that I began 
composing way back in Vallambrossa… 
 
Calcata 
15th November 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Vagabondo 
 
Solo, sono stato viaggio,  
Dalle complessite senza vita,  
Di villagio a villagio,  
Panarami di vista a vista ‐ 
Oh! sospiri del Viarregio,  
Oh! scheletro catte di Calcatta, 
Solo, sono stato viaggio,  
Dalle complessite senza vita. 
 
Stelle quando sono campaggio, 
Pensiero sulla passagio, 
Oh! isola balerno di Ponza, 
Oh! piazza confortolvelmente, 
Oh! bellaza di Portovenere, 
Oh! Non complicato mezza‐vita! 
 
Alone, I went wandering, from complexities without life, from village to village, panoramas from view to view ‐ 
O! sighs of Viareggio, O! skeletal cats of Calcata, Alone, I went wandering, from complexities without life. 
Stars when I am camping, thoughts upon the path, O! `whale‐island’ of Ponza, O! comfortable city‐squares, O! 
beauty of Portovenere, O! uncomplicated! 
 
 
                                                        90 
                                  The Strange Case of the Beeping Salami 
 
A few hours after Glenda turned up in Rome, so did George Bush! The city was crawling with polizie 
from all over Italy, lining the streets with their anti‐riot shields & wielding guns full of CS gas. It was 
great fun! We met up with the German punks at the Spanish Steps, just next to the house where the 
poeti lʹinglesi, John Keats, died a couple of hundred years ago. From there we slowly began to merge 
with the demonstration that had closed down Rome for the day. Pulling the pills from Glendaʹs bra 
deposits we proceeded to knock back the vino & go on an extremely pleasant walk, past the ancient 
Colluseum, through many fantastic parts of Rome. Around us in the procession were the anarchists 
of Greece, a bunch of ravers dressed all in pink, the peaceful guys of Sri Lanka, the communists of 
Albania & many other eurorioters all chanting pace (peace) & down with Bush. After about eight 
hours of marching, drinking & weed, after boogieing to some bongo players while an effigy of Bush 
burned from a street lamp, we headed to the beach for a peaceful come down & our hotel. Earlier 
that morning I had booked is into a pretty B&B which I had noticed in next to Ostia Antico. Nearby 
was the old medieval village, complete with imosing castle, & a stones throw away lay the modern 
town next to the sea. I thought this was a perfect place to introduce Glenda to my favourite country, 
containing as it does the essence of the Three Italys  ‐ Roman, Medievil & Modern. 
 
The next day, on the way to our next port of call, as we were passing through the security barriers in 
a roman supermarket, they went off! highlighting the fact I had a piece of salami in my packet. The 
damn thing had been tagged. I somehow managed to laugh it off with the security guards, who were 
more interested in searching through our bags looking for weed. They were puzzled awhile by 
Glendas pressed flowers from Calcata, but in the end let us go. From there we rolled up at the Forte 
Prenistina, a funky old fort on the outskirts of Rome now home to a load of hippies & parties. We 
had turned up in the middle of a dance festival (the fine art kind) & we just chilled it in the sun 
watching it all before the techno guys turned up, set up their gear & we popped our pills, boogieing 
away in the cobbled courtyard. We were then picked up by three Italians, who drove us 30k south, 
pulling up in the centre of a factory rave in their cool Suzuki jeep. The Italians rave the same as us, 
only with cooler sunglasses, munching MDMA capsules like we do pills. I somehow managed to get 
us back to the fort in morning & we spent our last full day in Rome hiding under the duvet. 
 
Before I go, this wide‐eyed guy gave me a flyer during the march, telling me that the Twin Tower 
episode was all destined to be; ʺIt is written that a son of Arabia would awaken a fearsome Eagle. The 
wrath of the Eagle would be felt throughout the lands of Allah while some of the people trembled in 
despair still more rejoiced: for the wrath of the Eagle cleansed the lands of Allah and there was 
peace.ʺ   That’s verse 9.11 of the Koran. Now open Microsoft Word and do the following:  
 
1. Type in upper case Q33 NY. This is the flight number of the first plane to hit one of the Twin 
Towers. 
2. Highlight the Q33 NY. 
3. Change the font size to 48. 
4. Change the actual font to the WINGDINGS…………………… 
 
Fino a pui tardi  
 
18th Nov 
Rome 
 
                                                      91 
                                             Fanny & Medusa 
 
After our brush with Bush, we staggered bleary‐eyed to a Roman airport & a couple of hours later 
landed in Palermo. We had arranged a plush apartment via the internet & were soon settled in our 
penthouse, with a glorious view of the city. Palermo, home of the mafia, is surrounded on three sides 
by gigantic sheer mountains & on the other by the sea ‐ perfectly natural fortifications. Our stint in 
Rome had been too much of a rave so we have spent the last couple of days ‘reacquainting’ ourselves 
while sampling the Sicilian cuisine. The weather has been lovely during the day, & I have been 
topless, tho only on the terrace of our apartment, basking in the splendid panorama as I dined on 
fresh squid. It is a strange sensation to just arrive in a place you know you will be spending some 
time in – a mixture of excitement of being somewhere new & the need to learn something of its 
culture. Then where better to begin than the second biggest opera house in Europe, which we have 
just recently exited after a fine rendition of Schuman’s opera ‘Geneveve.’ It was sung in German, 
with Italian subtitles on a screen above the stage, & as I sat with my Scottish girlfriend I felt very 
European indeed. But however sensuous, Palermo is still a city, & a fucking busy one at that – the 
traffic is a nightmare. So drawn by my love of archipelagos, & remembering our pleasant visit to 
Lismore, we head west towards the islands off the Sicilian coast. Not directly, though, we thought we 
would take the scenic route.  
 
It was a good move. We have just spent a week in the wonderfully peaceful village of Scopello. It 
has everything a poet could ask for; mountains to wander with stunning panoramic views, rocky 
cliffs to scramble up, milk‐white coves lapped by the gentle azure Tyrrhenean, & a lovely little 
apartment for an eventually‐haggled‐down nice price. The journey here from Palermo took us via 
train along the Gulfo di Castellamare to Castellamare itself. This used to be a mafia hotbed ‐ half of 
the men strolling about are convicted murderers ‐ but these days is a much gentler affair, though 
the current capo di capo (boss of bosses) in New York was born here, so I am sure theres still a few 
mafiosi about. Ten k away, thro beautiful ocean framed countryside, is Scopello, perched silently 
on top of a crag. We were met off the bus by a black dog (soon named nero), an abandonato (a 
stray) & the mother of a very cute, bandy legged puppy. They kinda moved into our pad 
eventually, along with a stray cat & far too many mosquitoes ‐ which I took great pleasure in 
nakedly hunting down each night with a brush & a book, using techniques recently perfected in 
India. I have now grown emotionally remote from this talking of innocent life, & take pleasure in 
the discovery of the new art form of mosquito murder! 
 
The weather is great, at the moment hitting about 22 degrees in the day ‐ tho it did plummet to 16 
during a wild & rare storm yesterday. Our life in the nigh deserted village has been very tranquil, 
& very literary! We are nestled by the sea & I even found a kayak (with oar!) which me & glenda 
used to explore the quietude of the coves up & down the coast. On one occasion, while swimming, 
she was stung by a jellyfish. The next morning I woke up thinking it would be a great idea for a 
short story & said that Glenda should write it. Unfortunately this was before her morning cup of 
tea & I was told in no uncertain terms to piss off. However, I was fired up & managed to toss it off 
before breakfast. Glenda then spent the day wandering the local nature reserve & wrote her own 
version of the tale. This we have now merged into one, our first literary baby entitled Fanny & 
Medusa ‐ rather like a human but without the nappies. The sonnets have also began to take a 
sweeter shape ‐ for I am now in the true home of the form, which first found a literary expression 
at the court of Frederick the Second at the turn of the thirteenth century. The first one I have 
composed here seems to be one of my best, using the form of the French Troubadors as my model 
‐ for surely some centuries ago a French troubadour would also have studied the sonnet on this 
glorious island.                                                                 
 
                             November 21st  
                             Castallemare 
Below Scopello  
 
To become, to belong, bohemian, 
So many miles my smitten songsmith sent, 
Striving for prospects paradesean 
In an immortal momentʹs monument ‐ 
 
Time carves us this vista Tyhrennean, 
Tranquilo corner of a continent, 
To become, to belong, bohemian, 
So many miles my smitten songsmith sent. 
 
This rocky cove, this tower, this mountain, 
Blend in an often prophesied fusion, 
               Sweet Sicily!   
                                    Sat silent & content, 
Recently have my dreams increasing seen 
Visions of places I have never been 
Where I should sit a songsmith & invent. 
  
 
 
                                                       Memorium to the Passage of Time 
                                                           (Biographical Scottish) 
                                                                        
                                                Shelley has somehow made my library 
                                                   & instantly I muse back to that time, 
                                                   Far from these heady days in Sicily, 
                                                 When Tuscany enthubulised my rhyme, 
                                                                        
                                                 Remembering that perfect Pisan clime 
                                               When Kapitano drank thro our brief fling 
                                                     By Arno side, & as I sang sublime  
                                                 He pluckʹd our lira like a beggar‐king, 
                                                                        
                                                 I passʹd those sweet siestas composing 
                                                 Pretences of dining with Byronʹs crew, 
                                               Now summer rises from the finest spring 
                                            & nine years on those dreams I had seem true, 
                                                                        
                                                       Wintering in Sicilyʹs hinterland, 
                                                      A palace & a pen on either hand. 
                                                92 
                                       Marettimo Merivigliosa 
 
At last, siamo posto (we are settled). It’s been two weeks since I last hit an internet, but my Sicilian 
adventure has continued all the same. Me & Glenda left the mafia‐haunted streets of Castellamare for 
the hilltop town of Calatafimi ‐ very archetypical of Sicily ‐ populated by grumbling, shuffling short 
guys with even shorter tempers. We stayed in the only hotel in town (as the only guests) for a couple 
of nights in order to take an expedition to the temple of Segesta, a few K away. The rolling 
countryside was laden with succulent clementines, which a friendly farmer filled our bag with. The 
temple itself, about 2,500 years old, is a massive white hellenic affair, with commanding panaramas 
all around, & was well worth the trip. From Calatafimi we hit the port of Trapani & then caught a 
ferry to Marettimo, the furthest flung of the Egadi Islands, which Samual Butler once mused was the 
legendary Ithica of Homerʹs Odysseus. En route the ferry stopped off at Levanto & the butterfly‐
shaped Favignana.  These two form a natural gateway which leads to Marettimo, which hovers off 
Sicily as Sicily hovers off Italy. The population is huddled together in a wee white village, with two 
harbours full of fishing boats. There is surprisingly a lot going on here, with a bar, a couple of shops, 
a five‐a‐side footie pitch, a post office & a bank ‐ whose bancomat doesnt actually work so we have to 
sail to favignana to get cash (17 euro round trip).  
 
The people here are very friendly & the scenery is absolutely gorgeous; volcanic bathing beaches, an 
abandoned Spanish castle on a jagged outcrop of rock, softly‐scented pine forests, foggy Monte 
Falcono with its shrieking, duelling falcons, & the rest of the range which towers over the island from 
tip‐to‐tip, affording fabulous views of the stretching Meditteranean & the distant Sicilian hills which 
sometimes awake out of the seamist. Two islands, Levanzo & Favingna, look like two eyes, the eyes 
of Italy, watching the western Meditteranean for peril & pirates. Away from the small town we have 
the rest of the island very much to ourselves, a wonderful feeling when you are walking for hours, & 
not see a soul. We are very close to Tunisia here & on very clear days you can just make out the 
distant outline of a hill, my first ever glimpse of North Africa. Being so close to the Sahara the 
weather is lovely, averaging about 20 degrees in the day. After a couple of false starts ‐ including one 
landlord – Paulo ‐ who is still sulking ‐ we have finally taken the house of our dreams for a month or 
maybe more (only 400 euros). Our garden is literally a wee harbour full of fisherman’s boats, & we 
are the first to see whether the fishermen have brought anything back from the excuisite waters 
which surround us. The sea is in our ears & nostrils, the waves lapping against & soothing the mind ‐ 
it is like we are sailing ourselves, only on a very stable, unsinkable boat. We can observe when the 
fishermen bring back a catch & Glenda is immediately on the quayside, noseying about for her 
favourite, calamari.  
 
What a lovely place Marettimo is ‐ so inspiring. I once set out to write a sonnet, a local stray by my 
side who has recently adopted us. However, five minutes out a huge thunderclap announced the 
storms were back & I ran back thro driving rain, dodging lightning bolts (well, by a couple of miles) 
& reachʹd the shelter of our casa. There Glenda was settling down to work another of her short stories 
& I helped her with a few ideas, before looking out of the window to see the sun shining. So I set off 
again, walking slowly up the sea‐fringed path that led me to the highest peak on the island ‐ Monte 
Falcano. I had tried to climb it before, but the fog was too thick & made my ears cold, so I turned 
back that time. However, on this occasion the weather was clear & the views were unsurpassed by 
my memories. I had climbed mountains before, but never one in the middle of a sea, & the view was 
spectacular, like going for a swim in mid‐air, the sea circumambient. Down below, the slopes of the 
mountain gouged out green, rocky paths to the shore & above me a couple of falcons hovered, 
looking for prey. At the eerily silent summit a mist drifted in & I huddled behind a rock, sheltering 
from the wind, the dog sat patiently at my feet. It was there that I wrote my sonnet, & as I did so the 
sun penetrated the mists, a column of pure gold settling on the sea.  
 
All in all, all is well, my poetry is chugging along nicely & we are gorging on the books in our 
combined library; from ʹThe last days of shelley & byronʹ by edward trelawney, thro ʹa short history 
of nearly everythingʹ by bill bryson,ʹ to  the complete divine comedy (from favignana library ‐ & in 
italian) ‐ & of course our books on the italian language. Italian TV is also a learning tool ‐ dubbed 
movies, football highlights, dodgy soap‐operas & even dodgier gameshows ‐ plus MTV for our only 
exposure to the english language (I am now surprisingly well informed on the showbiz ʹbattleʹ 
between Christina Aliguera & Brittany Spears). Also, to alleviate our isolation, while I am writing 
this in a restaurant on Favignana (with free interenet) I am also compiling ‘The Weekly Damo.’ This is 
basically a magazine which I compile via cut & paste over the web, saving it onto a memory stick to 
plug into our laptop back at base. There’s news, footy tables, Glenda’s stars, essays on stuff & just 
about anything else that will help to bring a little Britishness to our immersion in the Sicilian culture. 
 
Favignana 
11th December 
 
The Battle of the Egadi (241 BC) 
 
Tween Trapani & fair farfallan isle 
The fleets of Rome & Carthage meet at last, 
The captain of an age the day would prove 
& as the tides of battle ebb & flow 
A shepherd hears their furious phrenzie 
Come nightfall leads his flock toward the shore 
The deadʹs crude stench uprisen with the sun 
Heart‐wrenching was!  
                                       A sorry scene of war, 
Who is conquerʹd, who is the conqueror 
He could not tell, a sanguine sea bestrawn 
With floating corpses, men condemnʹd to die 
In hopeless sacrifice, this crimson cove 
Would never wash the bloodshed from its rocks, 
Like rich red wine adance white, cotton sheets. 
                    Sicilian Proverbs 
 
       When cats are away then dances the mouse  
       Even best friends can leave you in the lurch 
       Children & chickens will churn up the house  
                                 
       The deeper you hide, the harder you search  
          Spread your feet as far out as the cover 
        Better a thief than to blaspheme in church 
                                 
          Each son shines beautiful to his mother 
         Befriend the lame, soon same ye afflicted 
           The shoemaker is the barefoot walker 
                                 
              Marital arguments rush into bed 
          What the young desire the elderly need 
        The fresh dead teach us how a tear to shed 
                                 
      They stand still who will neʹer on fashion feed 
    Those who make meat refrain from stealingʹs greed. 
                                 
                                 
                     Siciliano Proverbe 
                                 
            Quanno lʹatto nun ʹe li surci abballono 
                Lu megghiu amico ti fa lu boia 
             Ogni figghui pari beddu a mamma so 
                                 
               Cui dintra tu melti, fora ti caccia  
           Stinnicchia lu peri quanto lu linzolu teni 
            Cu pratica lu zopu all annu zuppichia 
                                 
                Megghui arrubari chi santiari 
           Sciarri di maritu, durano finu a lu lettu 
                Lu mortu ʹn signa a chianciri 
                                 
             Lu mastra chi si servi camina scausu 
             Picciotti e gaddini allor danu la casa 
              Giovini uzziusu vecchiu bisugnusu 
                                  
                  Cui fa carni, nun fa robba 
        Cu fa beni per usanza nenti vali epocu avanza 
                                                      93 
                                       When Glenda Fell off her Chair 
                                                        
Still in Marettimo... the island is too lovely to leave just yet & we have decided to stay until the end of 
January. I love Italy, its like a bath of the soul, when the mind becomes de‐cluttered, the heart 
becomes inspired & the body becomes healthier. Iʹve even gone on a mad health drive, packing in the 
smoking, booze & caffine & feel great for it ‐ you could say I’m addicted to breaking my addictions. 
Been writing some poetry about the island, & am currently translating it into Italian as a gift to the 
locals, helped by a couple of guys on the island, including the local butcher Pino, who gives me free 
sausage. I share this with our new doggy‐friend, Frodo. He just latched onto me one day & moved in 
with us ‐ a friendly little thing with white fur, speckled dalmation style.  
 
The festive season is now over, a much mellower affair than the beer‐food‐party fest that is the 
British one. Christmas Eve was exciting enough, with a trip to the mainland to buy gifts ‐ including a 
joint fishing rod to catch the delicious local squid (calamari), the main evening past‐time round these 
parts. Iʹve had no luck as of yet, but G has caught a couple & is always on the blag for a freebie 
whenever fishermen return from the seas in their little blue boats. There was also a parcel for me at 
the local post office, sent by my sister, which included, among other things, the xmas Viz ‐ great for 
those moments on the loo. There was also a midnight mass in the local church, which Glenda went to 
but I cunningly avoided. Apparently the elderly vicar was trying to chat Glenda up, but that’s 
another story. I mean, I’ve never really dug the religious side of Christmas. During my literary 
studies discovered that the Jesus story (virgin birth, star in the east, 12 disciples, death & 
resurrection) is based on many precursors such as Perseus, Krishna, Dionysis & Mithra. Also, the 
astrological explanation put the nail in my belief coffin. The star in the east is Sirius, & on December 
24th the ‘Three Kings’ star system aline with it, pointing at the place where ‘The Sun’ is born on 
December the 25th – for the sun read Jesus Christ! As all this happens under the star sign of Virgo (the 
virgin Mary), I remain very dubious as the factual source of Christmas. 
 
Xmas day really lasted a couple of days, thanks to the MDMA that Glenda had stashed. Suffice it to 
say I didn’t get round to cooking xmas lunch 11 AM on Boxing Day ‐ but boy was it good. New Year 
was a blast, we got whisked off to a real Sicilian family do on a farm out of town. The car was packed 
so I had to hang on to the roof ‐ cue legs streaming in the air & me clinging on for grim death. There 
was wine, some delicious vino, the obligatory countdown (in Italian) & then the double‐cheek peck 
for every family member. A very drunk Glenda (who had fallen off her chair not long before much to 
the hysterics of all) got everyone to sing auld langs eyne, arms crossed & waving, & it was all very 
merry indeed. We were then we whisked off by the young uns to a house party, & ended up dancin 
in the streets with some guys who had parked their yachts up on the island for the night. It was the 
most excitement we’d had for weeks, & we took a couple of days to recover. The festive season was 
brought to a close on the fifth of January, in the catholic festival known as the Epiphany, where some 
woman dressed up as a witch gave sweets to the kids. There was also a procession to the local church 
led by the three wise men, & we sang along to Silent Night & other tunes, altho only in English.  
 
A couple of days ago our ʹlandlordʹ took us on a boat trip round the island, beneath the prehistoric 
dolomite cliffs riddled with rainbow‐coloured grottos. As sunset came on, with a 360 degree horizon 
one continuous swathe of pink, we began to fish for calamari. Instead of tossing our fake fish into the 
shallow waters of the port & slowly reeling it in (to simulate a real fish), we simply dropped a 
weighted line twenty five foot to the bottom of these deeper bits, with a few fake fish tied to them. 
Then we bobbed them up & down until lo & behold Glenda caught a beauty, who wasn’t that 
pleased seeing as he proceeded to squirt me with ink! In revenge for running my white shirt he was 
fried up, guts n all, & consumed within the hour, served up with boiled artichoke hearts ‐ another 
local delicacy ‐ the leaves of which you dip into garlic butter. Tasty.! 
 
On the sonnet front, I have been enjoying composing in Italian ‐ with a little help from Pino the 
butcher with my grammar. I have spent a month or so composing a number of haiku to encapsulate a 
tour of the island. The highlights of which I have reformed into three oriental sonnets entitled 
Marettimo – Il mio giro di un’isola bella! Once I had completed the poem I printed off a few copies & 
distributed them to various people around the place, from the bakers to the local library, including a 
reading in the local bar. I mean, it might lose something in translation, but it has been quite an 
experience & personal accomplishment to write in a foreign language & get positive feedback. 
Happy fuckin days! 
 
Marettimo  
January 12th 
 
 
What Bleeds For Five Days & Does Not Die?

ʺVarium et mutabile semperʺ 
                                                  Virgil 
 
She moans about her hormones every second week in four 
Goes clattering the cutlery & slamming every door 
Like when we went to Sicily & found a paradise 
But she was full of PMT & said, ʺItʹs not THAT nice,ʺ 
Reminding me of Dublin by the whiffy, Liffy shore 
When all I needed was a spliff, well she just wanted war, 
But women are manʹs reason, so when swings the pendulum 
Put on your safety helmet for the fireworks to come ‐ 
She sulks & yells, her belly swells, her paranoia grows, 
Now fear the snarling werewolf where you once could smell a rose, 
Cosʹ women synch up to the moon, that’s just the way things are,  
So never say ʺirrational,ʺ or let her drive the car, 
Then when the fun is over, son, thereʹs one thing you should do ‐ 
Embrace your woman, kiss her lips & whisper, ʺI love you!ʺ 
Marettimo 
 
Mattina 
Italia dʹoro 
Paradiso di pensiero esiliato 
Regina di poesia  
 
Sicilia sublime 
Cuore di oceano antico  
Cucina di cultura 
 
Animato Trapani 
Smeraldo del Mediterraneo 
Delizia di pescatori 
 
Magnifico Egadi; 
Farfalla Favignana 
Pigro Levanzo 
 
Lʹonde riflettono il sole 
Marettimo splendida estensione 
 
 
Pommerregio 
Scalo la Spalmatore  
Sopra ‐ unʹaltro pianeta, 
O quando nostro mondo era giovane? 
 
Signore di Marettimo 
Piramide di sassi muscoloso  
Mare su tutti lati 
 
Suono spacca il silenzio 
Aviogetto Italiano 
Curva attraversa le scene 
 
Da Tunisia lontana 
Pantelleria nebbiosa   
A Sicilia chiara 
 
Questo momento purifica, 
Canta per poesia 
Sera 
Discendando con il giorno 
Da questa cresta dʹedera 
Faccio valanghe miniscule 
 
Orrizonte rosa 
Mare inghiotte il sole rosso   
Stelle di sera scintillio 
 
Stelle cominciano il loro regno 
Capre fuggono al mio passaggio 
Scorto la barci alle paese 
 
Uomini, donne e bambini 
Gettano le loro canne per calamari 
Gloria in chili 
 
Nel bar della piazza animato  
Ho finito mio giro di unʹisola bella 
                                                            
                                                            
Golden Italy, paradise of exiled thought, queen of poetry  
Sublime Sicily, heart of ancient ocean, cauldron of culture 
Busy Trapani, emerald of the Mediterranean, Fishermen’s delight 
Magnificent Egadi, butterfly Favignana, lazy Levanzo 
Waves reflect the sun, Marettimo spread splendid 
 
I climb the Spalmatore, above ‐ another planet, or when our world was young 
Lord of Marettimo, Pyramid of brawny stones, sea on every side 
Sound spilts the silence, Italian jetplane curves across the scene 
From distant Tunisia, cloudy Pantelleria, to clear Sicily 
This perfect moment sings for poetry 
 
I descend with the day, from this crest of ivy, I make a small avalanche 
Pink horizon, sea swallows the red sun, evening star twinkles 
Stars commence their reign, goats flee my path, I escort the boats to the village 
Men, women & children, cast their rods for calamari, glory in kilos 
In the bar of the busy square, I have finished my tour of a beautiful island. 
 
                                                          
                                                          
                                              Atheism 
                                                    
                             Coercian, quarrel, intolerance, persecution 
                                     Masonic faiths maintain 
                                                    
                             War, incarceration, assasination, torture ‐ 
                                   Christianityʹs historical pillars 
                                                    
                                 One ancyent shamanic metaphor 
                                   Omnipotent diety personified 
  
                                      All aspects of divinity 
                                          Created by man 
                                                    
                                 When renaissance atheists burnʹd 
                                 Insensate multitudes celebrated 
                                                    
                            Reason, philosophy, liberality, conversation  
                               Superstitious religiousness suffocates 
                                                    
                                Upon abstract, theistic summising 
                                     All existance converges 
                                                      
 
 
 
                                                     94 
                                              Sicilian School 
                                                       
Finally got off my lazy arse & left Marettimo ‐ tho not before catching my first (& only) calamari. I am 
now a killer, a taker of life & a place has been reserved for me in hell. However, it was pretty tasty. I 
shared it with Glenda & half her family, including her dad, who had turned up in sicily for the week. 
Itʹs been great fun & Jock (her dad) hired a car to sweep us across the Sicily. But before I met them, 
choppy seas had forced them to spend a night on Favignana. Back in Marettimo I had completely ran 
out of funds & my shoes were proper fucked. The boats weren’t running the next morning either,, & 
panic began to ensue. However, in the afternoon I climbed a hill, looked out across the waters & saw 
the familiar shape of the hydrofoil streaking through the mist towards us. Me & Frodo met them at 
the harbour & we had great fun showing them all the cool spots my two month meanderings had 
discovered. A couple of days later, after an emotional farewell to my dog frodo at the harbour, we 
left Marettimo & drove along the gorgeous coast. Dining at Cefalu I could see the ghostly heaps that 
are the Aeolian islands ‐ a very inviting archipelago & one for my next visit to sicily. We had a meal 
in the delightful town of Cefalu, washed by the waves, with the mountains of Palermo in the misty 
distance & a huge outcrop of castle‐cropped rock above us. Back on the road we began to rise & rise, 
up many a twisting road, with the sun setting all the time. Suddenly, with the last vestiges of the 
dusk, glenda sister pointed out a shape ‐ it was difficult to tell at first, but suddenly I said – that’s not 
a cloud, its snow ‐ & Aetna was glowering before us.  
 
We took rooms in a town called Linguaglossa & next day attempted the ascent. This was helped 
thoroughly by the car which drove us through a series of lava flows ‐ one as recent as 2002 ‐ which 
are amazing to see, dark rocky rivers punctuated by the odd sapling. It was far too cold & snowy to 
attempt a climb to the smoking crater at the top, so we contented ourselves with a walk around the 
Sartorian hills, seven cinder‐cones which formed the crater of a nineteenth century eruption. From 
there we took a drive to see one of the oldest trees in the world, a horse chestnut that seem’d more 
like a number of different trees all in a circle. But amazingly they share the same root system. It 
apparently once gave a hundred horses shelter in a storm – hence its name, the Chestnut of a 
Hundred Horses! Then, back in Linguaglossa, I found myself having my fourth night in a row very 
drunk in deed ‐ this was my first holiday with the scots & I was struggling to keep pace. The next 
morning was a very lovely one indeed. & we drove round the volcano, then through lush hinterland 
to Enna, perched 1000m on a hill. This is the geographical centre of Sicily & the views are stunning, 
including the still gargantuan Etna peeping out of the clouds. 
 
The Grand Tour  
 
Ascending Aetna Linguaglossa shrank 
From five‐year‐flow fresh Astralagus grow 
Their fathers, further up the northern flank, 
     Stand with strippʹd birch, 
                                               Mist blankets sloping snow, 
                                  Feet, round circlet of seven cinder hills, 
                               Defy these fierce & fresh midwinter chills 
                                       
Salubrious Sartorious behind 
Crossing scenes from Saturn centuries cool 
The Chestnut of a Hundred Horses find 
                 Natural church, 
                                            Lord of life renewel 
    Long ʹfore old Homer walkʹd the Trojan shore  
   Ye thrust a happy sapling through earthʹs floor. 
 
In Enna is the Castello Lombardo, dominating the town & the strategic centre‐piece of Sicily, It was 
built by Frederick II, the Holy Roman Emperor & Stupor Mundi (wonder of the world) at whose 
court the Sonnet form first flourished. This Sicilian School went on to inspire Dante & his Tuscan 
School, who would continue the work done by poets such as De Lentini & perfect the sonnet, 
reaching its early peak with the love sonnets of Petrarch to his Laura. This form consists of an octave, 
then an invisible turn where the poem shifts angle, followed by a concluding sestet. From the Italians 
the sonnet form came to England through poets such as the Earl of Surrey, where the English form 
developed. This consisited of three quatrains & a concluding couplet – the Shakesperian quatrains 
rhyming abab & the Spenserian quatrains abba. These forms have remained the staple until recent 
years, when myself & other poets have push’d the sonnet forward to encapsulate many other poetic 
forms, taking many under its own majestic wings. I have recently been working on Sequanzas, that is 
a series of fourteen sonnets. One of the blueprints for a sequanza of Italian sonnets I present below. I 
told all this to Jock & Co as we shared our last tasty meal together. But this was only a few hours ago 
as we have just dropped off them all off back at the airport, then drove the hire car into the mayhem 
of Palermo traffic. We are spending the night here in a very ornate hotel, the sensations of city‐life 
once again filling our senses. Beep‐beep‐fuckin‐beep! 
 
Palermo 
January 26th 
 
 
Italian Sequanza 
 
 1 Sicilian ‐ Rima Alterna 
 2 Petrarchian ‐ Rima Incatenata  
 3 Envelope ‐ Rima Incatenata 
 4 English ‐ Rima Alterna 
 5 Petrachian ‐ Rima Alternata 
 6 Sicilian ‐ Rima Incatenata 
 7 English ‐ Rima Incatenata 
 8 Envelope ‐ Rima Alternata 
 9 Sicilian ‐ Rima Italiana 
10 Petrarchian ‐ Rima Italiana 
11 Old Sicilian (as no.1 but end words remain the same) 
12 Envelope ‐ Rima Itialiana 
13 English ‐ Rima Italiana 
14 Own Design (rhyming scheme of poets choice) 
 
Octave
Sicilian = abababab
Italian = abbaabba
Envelope = abbacddc
English = ababcdcd

Sestet
Rima Alterna = xyxyxy
Rima Incatenata = xyzxyz
Rima Italiana = xxyxxy
                                                 95 
                                              Mafialand 
 
So, we are set to leave Sicily. It has been an excellent visit to this ancient & venerable land, almost 
three months of fine foods, good weather & interesting meetings with the colourful locals. Talking 
of colour, our night in Palermo the other day coincided with a Friday night & we were soon 
mingling with the local youth & bantering in Italian! It was a far cry from my weak efforts way 
back in Lucca, when I first arrived in Italy several months ago. The next morning we began 
negotiating the crazy maze that is the Palermo road system & eventually set off on a three day 
mini‐tour of the rest of Sicily, turning into reired middle‐aged couple in the fuckin process!  Its 
surreal at this time of year, rolling into these ghost towns that are apparently buzzing in summer 
but theres tumbleweed action going on in winter. However, the weathers been pretty nice, 
averaging about 17 degrees, & its been relaxing just lazing about snoozing & drinking wine ‐ a sort 
of holiday from our holiday. It’s a totally different way to travel but definitly more relaxed and 
free....just seeing a place in the distance that looks beautiful and heading in that direction!!  It is 
such a sweet sensation travelling at this pace. The modern world is so fast, one should always take 
time to get away from it all & let all the experiences catch up, in the form of flashbacks & dreams 
just popping into your head. Its been like having a strange movie of my life these few years past 
slowly unfolding in my mind from time to time on my lonely walks. I have mused upon them all, 
leaving no stone unturned in my analysis of them, & feel better for it, one could say I feel cleans’d. 
 
Back on the road, our first port of call was a trip to the town of Corleone. The place reeks of mafia & 
as we drove into the place the gaggle of squat, narrow‐eyed men clustered on benches around a 
game of boule were very scary indeed. The town has the stench of mafia hanging over it. Not only 
was it the inspiration for the surname of the mobsters in the Godfather trilogy, but it was also the 
heart of a very real mafia story that had only just been played a few months before our arrival.  
Bernardo Provenzano, a very violent mafia boss, had been wanted by the Italian authorities for over 
thirty years. He had always kept one step ahead of the law & had grown to become the most 
powerful boss in Italy, ruling his empire with a series of pizzini ‐ coded messages sent out from his 
secret hideaway scrawled on little pieces of paper. For years nothing concrete was ever found that 
would give away his location, that is until a tapped telephone conversation hinted that Provenzano 
was in the Corleone area, where his closest family lived. Eventually the whole town was covered in 
hidden cameras & a daily bag of food sent out from the family home was eventually followed, via 
several changes of hands, to a farm several miles from the town. Lo & behold the now elderly Capo 
di tutti I capi of the Cosa Nostra was there! One swift bust later he was behind bars, for what will 
probably be the rest of his life. His arrest is also bound to start a power struggle within the mafia 
itself, dredging up long‐hidden minor bosses from their hideaways as they attempt to fill 
Provenzano’s boots – which can only bring them to the attention of the increasingly anti‐mafia 
authorities. Is this the end of the Mafia as we know it? 
 
You could cut the atmosphere of Corleone with a knife & after only a few minutes me & Glenda 
thought it better to go on to pastures new. The best parts of the mini‐tour, which saw us sweep from 
one side of the island to the other, were the greek ruins in the valley of temples at Agrigento, which 
donimate the high points below the modern city ‐ buildings over 2,500 years old. There was also the 
gorgeous baroque sensuality of Noto, rebuilt after an earthquake in a very sumptuous style. You can 
still see the great gouges of earth seismically ripped apart in the surrounding area. Last night was 
spent in Marzemi, a resort which had quality arcade machines for 50 cents (30p) ‐ & after my year‐
long month poetic sabbattical it felt great to have some good old fashioned blackpool style fun! But 
now, two months & three weeks since arriving in sicily, I have only got two hours left. Me & G are 
currently at the port of Pozzalo, a pleasant enough place, where the hovercraft for malta leaves in 
two hours. Glendas crazy mate is waiting for us over there, so who knows whats gonna happen… 
 
Pozzalo  
January 31st                             
 
Marzemi Sunrise 
 
As all the sky grew lighter at the change, 
With pastel arms, from rich & vivid heart, 
Emboldening & merging with godʹs art, 
The peachy dawn reachʹd round the ʹrisonsʹ range, 
As milk‐white sea caressess waves to shore, 
Which kisses rock, bows gracefully, takes leave, 
Where rising from the lands of make‐believe, 
             The red, all‐seeing eye that I adore. 
 
Though you are far away in outer space, 
All other images crumble to dust, 
Filling with feelings more than love or lust 
My humble soul enters the special place 
Of two spirits, conjoin’d by natureʹs hand, 
       One omnipresent, one a grain of sand. 
 
                                                        96 
                                                  Maltese Falcons 
 
So Sicily is now just a memory, from the elegant sensibilities of a Taorminan street, to the peculiar 
taste of a horse‐meat kebab, it is now all 6o k away to the north across the scintillating blue med.  Far 
too far to swim, so it looks like I´ll be staying here for a while now. Me & the lass were met off the 
boat by Glenda´s mad spanish mate, who just happens to be the biggest mdma dealer on the island ‐ 
in layman’s terms that means lots of partying mixed up with losing your stash, then finding it again 
the next day in a rare moment of clarity. Me & Glenda both feel like we’ve been picked up by a 
hurricane and spun right out of our mellow island headstate. Its definitely been a more interesting 
way to arrive on the island, & we have taken in quite a lot already, from crazy raving in the Ibiza‐
style Paceville, hob‐nobbing with the minister for culture at an art exhibition in the fabulously 
fortified city of Valetta (with free wine & caviar).  The city is a wonderful piece of European 
architecture, built by the Knights after they successfully defended the islands from the Turks five 
centuries ago. We also took a trip to Mdina, possibly the oldest long‐running settlement in the world, 
where we proceeded to drink this Maltese nobleman´s wine cellar dry!  
 
Malta is a fascinating place, reeking in history from the various owners it has had nto put up with, 
from Napoleon to the famous Knights Hospitallers. In contrast, the area we have been staying in for 
the past few days is like Benidorm ‐ English bars, breakfasts & newspapers, peopled by pale, plump 
saggy‐jowelld fogies. It is rather nice, tho, with sun & sea soothing the atmosphere. We have decided 
to stay in Malta for at least a month or two, & a couple of days house‐hunting we have finally 
plumped for a two week stay in a seaside apartment on the sister‐island of Gozo, a twenty minute 
cruise from Malta. We are paying about 55 pounds a week ‐ not too bad ‐ & there is a big festival 
happening on the island next week. To top it off it is the legendary home of Calypso, the nypmh who 
kept oddyseus for seven years on his return from Troy. Co‐incidentally enough that’s just the chapter 
I have reached as I read the epic poem, the oddyssey. After all that stuff Samuel Butler wrote about 
Maretimo being the Ithaca of Homer, my interest was very much piqued, & I got the book sent from 
my library in England to Sicily, which I am now studying with interest. The topic of whether 
Homer’s islands were based on real islands has raged for centuries, recently being raised again with 
the discovery that Cefalonia was once two islands divided by a channel, fitting in with Homer’s 
description of Ithica. Its all terribly exciting & one feels something like a literary Indiana Jones! 
 
9th February 
Victoria 
 
The Seige of Malta 
                                                         
Launchʹd forward with a single‐minded goal 
The Sultanʹs arm reachʹd for the Maltese thorn, 
Beaching his high renown upon the stone 
& waited for the day when she would fall, 
Waited as thousands fought & gave their all, 
Brave Saracens, each one a soldier born, 
Baring the Crescent of the Golden Horn,  
To plant them on Saint Elmoʹs carnage‐wall. 
 
But not for nothing is a native raisʹd 
On sacred soil soakʹd in ancestral blood, 
By Christʹs Knights Maltese fought on every side, 
Facing furious battle full unphazed, 
Til on the batterʹd ramparts freemen stood, 
Cursing that fleeing fleet with tearful pride.   
                                                    97 
                                                GONZO GOZO 
 
The Maltese sure know how to party ‐ something to do with catholic guilt, I think, & the sun ‐ but 
whatever it is Iʹve got one hell of a hangover. Lent starts in a couple of days, & the Maltese have been 
partying since last Friday ‐ AND ARE STILL GOING! They have a mad carnival on Gozo ‐ carne vale 
means without meat & for the next forty days that’s what they are supposed to do. There is a town 
on Gozo called Nadur & basically half the Maltese population turn up (200,000), rent the pads that 
are normally filled up in summer & unleash their libidos on each other. There’s a constant procession 
of dj‐floats & costumes from about 8pm to 6am ‐ EACH NIGHT! Got dressed up as a blood‐soaked 
serial killer on saturday, but unfortuantely I had dropped an acid & got lost from the group ‐ no 
wonder I didnt get too many responses when I asked for directions. However, I did manage to find 
glenda & our party ‐ a mixture of Maltese, Serbians & Glenda’s mate with all the mdma ‐ & have just 
woken up from a two day sleep. Just trying to get my head back together again as I had set off 
writing the Maltiad ‐ a number of poems for Malta which I’m trying to squeeze in before leaving. I 
am beginning to tire of the sonnet form a little now. A year of intense composition in one form has 
seen me grow deep roots into rosy‐bedded sonnet‐lore, but at the same time, as familiarity breeds 
contempt, I feel ready to try new modes of poetic composition. One of my first new efforts is set in 
Calypso’s Cave, near where we are staying. In the Oddyssey, the hero gets enchanted by a sea 
nymph called Calypso & forced to be his sex‐slave for seven years. It seem’d a suitable place to share 
the seven‐century‐old customs of valentines day, & we made a midnight picnic there, lighting the 
lovely pad with candles & knocking back the wine, perch’d high over the moonlit magic of Ramla 
Bay. As we snogged to the sounds of the sea this was my most romantic valentine’s night to date.  
                                                                                                        
                                                                                                          Feb 20th 
                                                                                                           Victoria 
On Valentines Eve  
 
My love… as we drift toward Valentines Day  
Upon the endless water that is time,  
I pause to reflect on the light of your face,  
Half a light now, then brighter than the evening star... 
As with the sea & the waves & all the oceans  
The tides of time have brought you to my side 
When we shall set ourselves adrift for islands of soft exstasi...  
Two fine liners fluttering the ocean blue,  
& on the occasion we dock in the same port,  
Some shanty of Mauritius or the Harbors of New York,  
There we shall float upon times velvet ocean  
Bobbing together in unison, a special shared tranquility,  
Til time & life’s pathways shall separate us both again 
Remember kindly always... you are forever in my heart! 
                                                  98 
                                           Maltese Postcard 
 
The Maltese have a proverb ‐ for every piece of wood there is an axe ‐ & boy do they mean it. Malta 
doesn’t have many trees, hacked down centuries ago revealing a barren, rocky landscape. Iʹm, lucky, 
I guess, cos its nice & green at the mo ‐ but apparently the islands turn brown in the summer heat. 
Talking of which, it’s been very summery of late & as we drew to the close of our wintery sabbatical 
we had a last chance to soak in the sun. We did this in Bugibba, a britesque part of malta, with a 
rooftop pool & views of the sea, for 50 quid a week. Money is starting to run low now, so me & G 
have done a bit of work. Not as barmen for less than the local three quid an hour, but a chain of 
events has found us a relatively lucrative ways of making cash. First, last weekend I took my acoustic 
down Paceville, where I did my first busking for about 8 years. With Glenda as my charismatic hat‐
girl we pulled about thirty quid in an hour or so – ‘sympathy for the devil’ by the stones being the 
highest earner. On the same night we met some guys who work in the timeshare world over here. It’s 
all about sales & percentages & the companies over here figure that for every twenty couples that 
look round their hotels, one will hand over several thousand pounds. So, the touts roam the streets to 
get the people through the doors & get cash if me & Glenda stay for the full two hour tour – which 
they split with us! We are on the blag with a nice lass from chile, the money paying for her studies. 
All in all its about fifteen pounds for two hours of being fed beers & coffees & being shown around 
some very classy joints, plus a couple of free bottles of wine to take home. We were in one today, 
where Brigette Nielson got married & Troy was filmed on the golden sands. The queen also had her 
commonwealth meeting here last year (53 heads of state) & we saw the toilet where her official toilet‐
seat holder placed a then recently perfumed piece of polished ivory down so the royal bottom 
wouldn’t pick up any proletariat‐germs. I had the obligatary poo there & only hope a bit of its now 
inate regality has washed off on me.  
 
The Maltese archipelago is cool, actually ‐ you can buzz about them quite cheaply on these mad 50s 
style orange buses, & we have seen quite a lot of the temples/forts/bars/caves that the place has got to 
offer. Plus there’s calamari fishing to be had which brings back some of the Sicilian tour. The last 
couple of weeks in Malta were interesting to say the least. There was rabbit stew, the national dish, 
cooked in wine & garlic & tasty as fuck ‐ except for the rabbit heads (complete with bucked teeth) 
that I neatly hid under a serviette by the side of my plate. Another notable incident was an LSD 
drenched barbecue by the sea which ended up at one of the islands holy feasts ‐ everybody 
commented on what a good mood we were in ‐ in fact we had been laughing for about seven hours 
solid. I have also been enjoying watching the Champion’s League in the local pubs. There are often 
four games on at the same time, which can sometimes give you a bit of a headache trying to keep up, 
but very enjoyable if you’ve had a wee wager on the outcome of the games. However tomorrow are 
all set to leave these remarkable isles, those ‘Sister tenants of the middle deep,’ & it all seems a 
dream.  
 
Buggiba 
March 20th 
                                            Maltese Proverbs 
                                                      
                                       Ugly husbands soon hated 
                                       Lovely husbands, stalked 
                                                       
                                       When accounting for lives 
                                      Endings outrank beginnings 
                                                      
                                           As corpses rot away 
                                         Grief diminishes daily 
                                                      
                                     Better honest, tatterʹd peasant 
                                     Than bitter‐tongued aristocrat 
                                                      
                                   Money employed invites interest 
                                         Money saved, theives 
                                                      
                                      To destoy irritating cobwebs 
                                      Kill thread‐spinning spiders  
                                                      
                                         Prior to renting houses 
                                   Investigate neighbouring families 
                                                      
                                                      
 
 
                                                    
                                                  99 
                                              Scouseland 
 
So Malta is now just a memory & the continent a mere image on the BBC weather maps. We set off 
homewards on a cheap ryanair flight to Pisa for the night. Nine years ago I had just set off on my 
poetical career there, & spent two months busking in the streets. As I had a guitar with me I thought 
it would be nostalgic to return to my old busking spot for a few numbers (10 euros worth). It was 
beautiful really, & I felt like I had come full circle since those heady days back in 98.  Using our 
profits we settled down with a couple of bottles of wine, silently chilling by the Arno. It was then that 
I realised, however miniscule, a part of my grandmother was passing me at that moment. It was a 
moving moment, taking me back to that morning when I scattered her ashes near the Capo D’Arno 
six or so months ago.  Hand in hand, then, we walked back to the airport to await our final 
continental dawn. This came on a golden morning as we flew out of Tuscany, following the coast up 
to the Cinque Terra, bringing back memories of our days with Andy & Analeen, the Appenines dark 
& light on either sides of the arrow straight snow‐line. Then Europe was swept in a white cloud until 
they finally broke over the green fields of England. We landed, virtually penniless, the bright spring 
sunshine giving the eight‐hundred‐year‐old second city of the empire a pleasant glow. The airport 
itself was very busy as apparently it was coming out of a four hour terror alert. The police had found 
a suspicious vehicle in the car park – it was fully taxes, insured & still possessed both wheel‐rims & 
radio! 
 
We were met by one of my friends, a lad who I set up with one of Glenda’s mates, who drove us to 
their pad in the idyllic Sefton Park district of Scouseland, surrounded by a familiar Britishness, & fully 
happy to have missed her wintry  ravages. Apparantley Liverpool was named after a seaweed, & the 
place does stink  bit, but after a wee tour of the cosmopolitan city centre & I was surprised to find it 
quite a funky wee place – not at all like its perm & ‘tash portrayal. The two skyline dominating 
cathedrals were excellent, both Anglican & Catholic, reflecting the city’s position as the port between 
Catholic Ireland & protestant Britain. Like sectarian Glasgow both sets of rival ‘fans’ hoped to outdo 
the other, & vast sums of money wer poured into them. This duality has also penetrated into the 
local’s famous accent – which does rather sound like an Irishman having his balls squeezed tightly by 
an Englishman (or vice versa). There’s also Beatles world – with the old Cavern club that can still set 
the feet tapping – its like the Beatles never left. It was in a nearby pub that I heard the obligatory 
Scouse football joke’ There’s two teams in Liverpool, you know, Everton & Everton reserves!” It felt 
weird touring Liverpool – I mean, I am English & everything, but six months back on the road had 
turn’d me ‘foreign’ once more. There was only one thing for it, we had to have a rave. 
 
So we went on a mad night out that night, fuelled by a little MDMA we had brought from Malta, & 
ended up at New Brighton ‐ a coastal resort across the Mersey ‐ for coke‐fuell’d adventure 
recollection. It was great fun regaling our friends with tales of Sicily, especially the one about Glenda 
falling off her chair. Then morning came we took a walk along the local beach – quite sandy as 
opposed to the old Brighton. Our hosts then gave us a story of their own – about her giving him a 
blow job on the beach & the tide coming in & they were literally caught with their pants down, 
before arriving back home in a very soggy state indeed (scouse foreplay). Later on we took the ferry 
cross the Mersey, whistling a Beatles hit or two as we sail’d across her waters.  Then the tall Royal 
Liver Building announced we had arrived back in Lancashire. This felt a more appropriate re‐arrival 
in my homelands. I’ve always preffered sailing to flying & was determined upon a return to Burnley 
to see the folks. We caught a bus to Manchester & another one over the moors to Burnley. There is a 
moment, on a rise of the Rawtenstall‐Burnley road, when the whole of east Lancashire spreads before 
you, Pendle Hill rising solemnly at its heart. It is my favourite view of the area & never ceases to fill 
me with a sense of homecoming. This sensation was swiftly & officially consummated by a visit to 
Yips Chips! Then it was with the taste of paradise in our mouths that we called upon my friends & 
family, catching up with all the gossip. It seems people have been busy, for in the not too distant 
future I am to be a best man, & then a godfather thrice over! 
 
Burnley 
March 24th 
                                                         
                                                                   100 
                                                             Home Sweet Home 
 
A lot has happened’ in the past month or so. There was a time when I would fling these e‐mails out 
at the rate of every couple or days or so, but I was travelling then, striving for excellence in the sonnet 
form & loving those moments of ‘mediatation’ at an internet café or random guys house, where I 
could pour my travelling sensations into my first ever blog. But now I am settled, not back in 
London, or even Lancashire, but up in Scotland. If someone would have asked me when I arrived at 
Heathrow from India last April that within twelve months I would be settled near Edinburgh with a 
wee Scots lass I would have told them, in no uncertain terms, ‘stop smoking crack you muppet.’ 
Talking of which, I am happy to say that I have never touched the stuff since that first & only time in 
Amsterdam, nor have I tried any more opiates since Madurai. Me & hard drugs definitely don’t mix 
– however I’ve popped enough pills recently to stun an elephant! Since my last e‐mail in Lancashire, 
me & Glenda called on the farm in Dumfries where her dad has agreed to lend us a field to put on a 
festival in the summer called Jock‐Stock – a kind of thank you for showing him round Sicily.  
 
We then drove up to Edinburgh with a few acid trips my hippy mates in Brixton had popped in the 
post. After a crazy ‘welcome home’ party Glenda’s mates threw, I spent the next morning looking up 
the internet for a place to live. We had decided to choose some idyllic spot in the country, to replicate 
our ‘perfect’ life on our private Sicilian island, but nothing seemed to be coming up. Then all of a 
sudden, I guess it was my psychedelic state of mind, but some ‘spirit’ seemed to guide my hands in a 
weird google moment. Then lo & behold, what popped up in front of me on the screen, but Heather‐
fuckin‐Lodge! I quickly woke Glenda, who made a couple of phone calls & before you know it the 
property was off the rental market & we had the goddam keys. I tell you, if you give yourself 
completely over to the muses, they have a funny way of looking after you. I mean, my landlord is 
now one of Glenda’s best mates & we haven’t even had to give her a deposit! I’ve had to move my 
housing benefit claim from Clapham, who must have been so busy that they never realised I had 
moved out sixteen months ago!  
 
So I shall say a fond au revoir to sonnetry. Since our return to Britain I have only composed a single 
Oriental sonnet about the passage of Spring. Just fourteen lousy lines! No doubt I shall return to that 
‘scanty plot of ground,’ in the future – for the muse that has inspired my recent glut of sonnets seems 
something of an occasional mistress, whose beauty one must court from time to time. My journey 
through these past sixteen months has been one of excessive adventure, a time in which I have fallen 
in love &, hopefully, perfected my experience of sonnet‐lore. But now the future beckons, & the only 
way for me to progress as a sonneteer must be in the localities of sequanzas. I know not when or 
where I shall begin to compose such stuff, but first I must send my soul to fallow, surrounded as I am 
by the wonderful nature of East Lothian – a mere stone’s throw from the best city in Britain. But now 
I shall take a wee walk through the wild woodland of the nearby Pressmennan lake, resplendent in 
spring sunshine, wondering what the muses will bring, whether another outpouring of sonnetry, or 
my art’s ultimate Zyzzva!  
                                                                                                                                   Heather Lodge ‐ May 1st 
Spring                       
 
Woolen wilderness 
Crowning white, whale‐back Pendle 
Mist‐lock’d frost & snow   
 
Beams of warm amber 
Penetrate morn’s whisping mists 
Snowdrops drink the thaw 
 
O trees! such budding! 
Thy delicate bursts of green 
Nervous turtleheads 
 
Year’s first warm morning 
Lone bee stalks the wilderness 
Birds breeze on the wing 
 
As colour surprises eye 
Spring smiles on our lives at last  
 
 
 
                                         The Only Lake in Scotland 
                                                         
                                With Juneʹs long afternoons approaching near 
                                  I took a stroll along Pressmennan shore, 
                                     Sliver of tranquil water, yet so near 
                                 To restless Northern Oceanʹs endless roar, 
                                                         
                                Which mixes with the rustling trees of May, 
                              Whose freshest greens have framed this river‐lake, 
                                  Swan family, snow‐white & dusky grey, 
                                 Reflects them in the glimmer of their wake. 
                                                         
                               The Squirrel scampers high, the Roe bucks east, 
                                The drunken Bees sup pungent garlic bloom, 
                                      On all side elfin forestry releasʹd, 
                                     As if fairies span Maryʹs holy loom. 
                                                         
                                     So this is Serendipʹs pastoral muse, 
                               Far from lifeʹs fish‐hooks, love‐wishes & news. 
                         
                   Calypso 
                         
          This is a story I must tell 
           Tho a very famous tayle 
      & Homer sings it more than well ‐ 
         After the Trojan fortress fell  
      Leaving behind that smoking shell 
           King Oddyseus set sail. 
 
     As his swift‐sailʹd galley did part 
     The plain of the wine‐dark waves 
     Zeus cast a blinding thunder‐dart 
       To blow that little ship apart 
    Where all but one gave up their heart 
      In the ghostly deep‐sea graves. 
 
     Fate washʹd him neath a cliff so sheer 
         Where Calypso had her cave 
         Tho beautiful she did appear 
          Formidable was she in fear 
      Not man nor god would to her near 
           Even Hercules the brave. 
                         
      She took this shipwreck to her lair 
         With kindness him did cover 
       Her maids a fine banquet prepare 
    Sweet wine & honey would they share 
      Before the nymph fell for his stare 
            & took him for a lover. 
 
        She was a very ardent dame 
         Til the dawning of the sun 
     & tho the night was full of flame 
     With kisses blissful as they came 
        Oddyseus was full of shame 
      When the whirl of passion done 
                        
      & he did wander when the day 
       Lit the red, sea‐girdlʹd sands 
       Sat on the rocks of Ramla bay 
    Our captive wheeled the hours away 
      Haunted by love so far away 
     With his head held in his hands 
                      
      Oddyseus wept for his wife 
        Far across the rolling sea 
    How once they shared a perfect life 
     Before the bloody Trojan strife 
     Had like a surgeon with a knife 
        Severed their tranquility 
 
     & any boats that buck’d & passʹd 
       Close in the Maltese Channel 
       She sent a zephyr to the mast 
        To take its sail & trail it fast 
       For other climes, until at last 
     The Nymph had won her battle 
                         
       ʺFor me thou art too powerful,ʺ 
             Oddyseus objected, 
       ʺDo you not find me beautiful,ʺ 
      Calypso purrʹd, ʺTis no trouble 
         To turn you to an immortal 
            By age never afflicted! 
                         
       & you shall live & love with me 
          On this green & easy isle, 
           Our wonderful eternity 
       Soothʹd by a deep, romantic sea, 
         Few men gain immortality,ʺ 
     Whisperʹd she, with sultry smile! 
                         
       ʺTho this is rare what ye intend, 
          Thine offer I must refuse, 
      Spurning a life in sweet suspend, 
       For I would wish that life to end 
     Without my true‐love & my friend, 
      Tis my good wife I would choose.ʺ 
                         
         So lonely lived Oddyseus 
         Throʹ a life of lust & tears, 
        His lover grew vainglorious 
         His loving grew laborious 
          Him ice & she sartorious 
       Throʹ the swirl of seven years 
                         
    For seven years this was his doom 
       As Calypsoʹs hopeless spouse 
  By day, while she workʹd at the loom 
   Down by the bay he sunk in gloom 
     Til nightfall & that womby room 
         In her carnal cavern‐house 
                         
     The gods met, wisdom to impart 
         On misty‐toppʹd Olympus 
       Teary Athene shrill did start, 
       ʺA man has been too long apart 
      From the soft harbour of his heart, 
           Please release Oddyseus.ʺ 
                         
       So the sacred council clashes 
   Til Zeus passʹd his wise judgement, 
       ʺBefore this man turns to ashes 
     Let him touch that to him precious,ʺ  
    To the nymph with flashing lashes 
      Fleet‐sandallʹd messenger sent. 
                         
    With honour went happy Hermes, 
         To converse with Calypso, 
 When golden sandals caught the breeze 
     He skimmʹd over unending seas 
       Until a vision him did please, 
             Misty archipelago! 
                         
                         
                         
                     Part 3 
                         
        The lady of the lovely locks 
       Was weaving with precision, 
      Her prisoner wept on the rocks 
    Hermes slippʹd by him, sly as fox, 
The Star‐Mermaid showʹd her deep shocks 
       At the Cloud Kingʹs decision 
                         
      They shared rosy ambrosia 
       ʺYe gods,ʺ began Calypso, 
      ʺWill not let man be my lover, 
     I would have loved him forever, 
       Must he go over the water?ʺ 
   ʺYes he must!ʺ ʺThen he shall go.ʺ 
                       
     As to Olympus flew Hermes 
        Calypso drew to the sea 
 & gently touchʹd her captiveʹs knees, 
But she had long since ceasʹd to please 
  He shrivellʹd back, ʺBe at your ease, 
       For you are free to leave me, 
                       
     & I shall help ye leave this place 
    But why did my love ye spurn?ʺ 
     ʺTho ye have ever youthful face 
      & shine so gentle in thy grace, 
       My never‐fading wishes race 
        To the day of my return.ʺ 
                       
 She placed a bronze axe in his hand 
      With handle of olive‐wood, 
 For seven years her lust had spannʹd 
  But such was her dreadful demand 
    She never let him tread inland 
   Where the stony temples stood. 
                       
    He saw table mountains tower 
     Over lush, green valley floor, 
   Where Calypso used her power 
    To summon a morning shower 
    Soon a blanket of fresh flower 
   Lined the highway to the shore 
                       
   Oddyseus stood on high ground 
       Surveying this sweet vista 
  The jade seas on all sides surround 
 The trees rustled with breezy sound 
  & as that Greecian freedom found 
 He thankʹd the nymph & kissʹd her. 
                       
 The goddess blushʹd, then led them on 
        Down to dramatic Dwejra, 
  Where skiffy sea‐mews breed upon 
   The rocky cliffs, where sable shone 
The night‐black fungus ‐ now them gone 
        Down to a happy harbour. 
                        
   It was a place where dolphins play 
          Fed by the heavy ocean 
    That swept in thro a tall archway 
 Neath cliffs that kept the storms at bay 
      With forest thick on sandy fray 
     Where birds sang with emotion. 
                        
      Into the trees the freeman tore 
        With the full force of a gale 
 There cut down twenty trunks or more 
   Then bound them with Ithican lore 
       & as the boat the waters bore 
      Sea‐nymph knitted him a sail. 
                        
      Heavy‐hearted grew Calypso, 
       Sad moment of their prising, 
      ʺThis fragrant clothing I bestow, 
     Two skins with wine & water flow, 
        A sack of corn, a ball of dough 
         & sweet‐meats appetizing.ʺ 
                        
        Taken with such solemnity 
      Her goddess‐tears kiss water, 
    ʺFarewell man‐king, take to the sea, 
        I give thee back thy liberty,ʺ 
   ʺFarewell sweet nymph, Atlas must be 
      Proud to call thee his daughter,ʺ 
                        
  As that trim‐ship slippʹd to the sands 
      Pleasant bouyancy was found, 
    Calypso a cool breeze commands 
   & waves him off with weary hands 
      Now over fish our hero stands 
  Sailing their spangling playground. 
                        
           The boat drifted thro the archway 
             To the oceanʹs wide expanse, 
           Now far from shore & surfy spray 
            He looked his last on Ramla Bay 
            Where lovers on Valentineʹs Day 
           Shall share the momentʹs romance. 
                             
                               
                               
                               
                               
                               
                               
                               
                               
                               
                               
                               
                               
                               
                            
                            
                         
                  HEATHER LODGE 
 
 
                                 
                      Country‐Dreams 
                   (Philospophical Terza) 
                                 
           My cities, I leave thee, gritty & grime, 
       This budding muse prepares the spiritʹs ark, 
      Where bird‐migration marks the pass of time 
                                 
      What was lifestyle now grey & stranger‐stark 
            Like Guernica or Oranges‐sur‐Seine, 
          Once‐vivid colours growing daily dark. 
                                 
    This strange occasion wends my thoughts to when 
     Wordsworth had found a stool to ease his mind 
             From crowded sensibilities of men 
                                 
                             I, too, hope happy harbourage to find 
                           Beside a world of green, where piny glade 
                               By Vallambrosan cardinal designʹd 
                                                 
                            For as Ionaʹs church from wattles made 
                            The forum for a forest made fair trade. 
 
 
 
The Battle of Dunbar (1650) 
 
When Cromwell crossʹd the border men of Scotland held their breath 
Then marchʹd them down to Dunbar, there to claim an English death, 
Descending from the old Doon Hill they blockʹd the Broxmouth burn 
Now only at the push of pike could parliament return 
 
                                         Teenage Terrorism 
                                                    
                              Come acclaim the children of Columbine 
                                  Chosen for this natural selection 
                             A student’s rage the age must now refine 
                               Bubbling with the loss of introspection 
                               Where were you on that easter somesta 
                             When rebels flung their bullets at the law, 
                                Manhattan, Palermo or Manchester 
                                  May ne’er calm erudirity restore 
                               As helicopter shadow skirts the school 
                            A world of books becomes a world of blood 
                             Al fresco cops tarr’d with ‘la garde recule! 
                         While cool, roof’d murderers did what they could 
                                Homicidal, the caught up victims cry 
                                    Suicidal the perpetrators die 
                                                    

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Tags:
Stats:
views:134
posted:5/3/2010
language:English
pages:171