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					                   PfS National Framework
                      Invitation to Tender
                            Volume 5
                 The Authority’s Requirements
                   Document Status: Issued
Document Properties
Document Author     Simon Brown

Document Owner           Colin Howell

Organisation             Partnerships for Schools

Title                    PfS National Framework Invitation to Tender Volume 5 The
                         Authority’s Requirements
Document Type            Template

Review Date

Abstract



Version History
Date            Editor       Version    Status      Reason for change
                                           Contents



                                                           Page

Index                                                        1-8

Introduction                                                9-14

Part 1 – General Conditions                                15-49

Part 2 – Strategic Objectives                              50-94

Part 3 – Building and External Area Requirements          95-132

        Annex 1 – Statutory Requirements                 133-138

        Annex 2 – Local Authority Policy Requirements       139

        Annex 3 – School Area Schedule                   140-152

        Annex 4 – Commentaries School Area Data Sheets   153-181
Index

Introduction

1.1 Note to Authorities

1.2   Note to Contractors

1.3   Structure of the Authority‟s Requirements

1.4   Introduction to the BSF/ACADEMIES Programme

1.5   Programme Objectives




PART 1 - GENERAL CONDITIONS


A3.1 Introduction

A3.2 Permissions and Consents

      A3.2.1   Detailed Planning Consent

      A3.2.2   Building Regulations

      A3.2.3   Principal Contractor - CDM Regulations

      A3.2.4   Other Consents

A3.3 Statutory Compliances

      A3.3.1   General

      A3.3.2   Education (school Premises) Act 1999

      A3.3.3   Disability Discrimination Act

A3.4 Survey Information

      A3.4.1   Planning Issues

      A3.4.2   Access and Transport

      A3.4.3   Condition Surveys and Plans

      A3.4.4   Latent Defects

      A3.4.5   Topographical Surveys

      A3.4.6   Ground Investigation Reports

      A3.4.7   Other Investigations
                                                  1
Index

PART 1 - GENERAL CONDITIONS (CONT’D)
A3.5 Design and Construction Information

     A3.5.1     Contractors Proposals

     A3.5.2     Works Programming

     A3.5.3     Design Development

     A3.5.4     Progress Reporting

                A3.5.4.1     Progress Meetings

     A3.5.5     Progress Photographs

     A3.5.6     Monitoring

     A3.5.7     Record Drawings and Documentation

     A3.5.8     Operating and Maintenance Manual

     A3.5.9     Quality Assurance and Monitoring

     A3.5.10 Supervision and Co-ordination of the Works

     A3.5.11 Communications

     A3.5.12 Risk Register

     A3.5.13 Adverse Weather

     A3.5.14 Measurement

     A3.5.15 Work by Others

     A3.5.16 Insurances

     A3.5.17 Snagging of Construction Works Defects

     A3.5.18 Standards of Materials

     A3.5.19 Product Guarantees

A3.6 Managing Construction Works

     A3.6.1     Construction Activities Generally

     A3.6.2     Protection of Work

        Index
PART 1 - GENERAL CONDITIONS (CONT’D)
    A3.6.3   Adjoining Properties, Roads, Paths and Boundaries

    A3.6.4   Stability

    A3.6.5   Use of the Site

             A3.6.5.1    Control of the site

             A3.6.5.2    Temporary Fences

             A3.6.5.3    Temporary Screens

             A3.6.5.4    Temporary Roofs

             A3.6.5.5    Scaffolding

             A3.6.5.6    Temperature and Humidity

             A3.6.5.7    Temporary Telephones

             A3.6.5.8    Identity Cards

             A3.6.5.9    Site Name board

             A3.6.5.10 Fire Access

             A3.6.5.11 Fire Precautions

             A3.6.5.12 Route Signage

             A3.6.5.13 Work Beyond Boundary of the Site

             A3.6.5.14 Working Hours

             A3.6.5.15 Trees, Hedges, Shrubs and Lawns

             A3.6.5.16 Control of Noise and Pollution

             A3.6.5.17 Traffic Arrangements

             A3.6.5.18 Protective Clothing

             A3.6.5.19 Health and Safety
             A3.6.5.20 Dust Control

             A3.6.5.21 Pest Control

Index

PART 1 - GENERAL CONDITIONS (CONT’D)
             A3.6.5.22 Debris
               A3.6.5.23 Demolition Works

               A3.6.5.24 Site Hazards

               A3.6.5.25 Water for the Works

               A3.6.5.26 Utilities Used During the Works

                           A3.6.5.26.1 Location of Existing Services

                           A3.6.5.26.2 Continuity of Existing Services

               A3.6.5.27 Protection of the Public and the Environment

               A3.6.5.28 Site Security

               A3.6.5.29 Safety of Pupils, Staff and the Public

               A3.6.5.30 Temporary Accommodation

               A3.6.5.31 Occupancy and Decanting

        A3.6.6 Site Contaminants

               A3.6.6.1    Asbestos

               A3.6.6.2    Other Site Contaminates

        A3.6.7 Other information
               A3.6.7.1    Making the case for higher recycled content

               A3.6.5.2    Commissioning

               A3.6.5.3    Induction

               A3.6.5.4    Persons employed direct

               A3.6.5.5    Work by Statutory Authorities




Index

PART 2 – STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES

2.1   Current Authority Strategies And Policies

2.2   Educational Vision
        2.2.1   School Organisation


        2.2.2   School Improvement


        2.2.3   School Workforce remodelling


        2.2.4   ICT – e-learning and administration


        2.2.5   Special Education Needs & Inclusion


        2.2.6   Extended school & Community Links


        2.2.7   14-19 Education


        2.2.8   Curriculum


        2.2.9   Behaviour & Attendance



2.3   School Design


        2.3.1   Site, Location, Layout, Aspect and Orientation


        2.3.2   Flexibility and Adaptability

                2.3.2.1      Flexibility

                2.3.2.2      Adaptability

        2.3.3   Safety and Security

        2.3.4   Mechanical and Electrical Installations

                2.3.4.1      Lighting




Index

PART 2 – STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES (CONT’D)
              2.3.4.2     Temperature and Ventilation

              2.3.4.3     Water

      2.3.5   Access and Inclusion


      2.3.6   Furniture and Equipment


      2.3.7   Decorations and Finishes


      2.3.8   Acoustics


2.4   High Level Design Objectives


      2.4.1   The learning environment


2.5   Detailed Accommodation Requirements

      2.5.1   Internal

              2.5.1.1     Entrances

              2.5.1.2     Internal Circulation and Social Spaces

              2.5.1.3     Supplementary Areas

              2.5.1.4     Group Spaces

              2.5.1.5     Large Spaces

              2.5.1.6     General Teaching Spaces

              2.5.1.7     Practical Teaching Spaces - Science Laboratories

              2.5.1.8     Practical Teaching Spaces – Technology

              2.5.1.9     Practical Teaching Spaces - Art and Design

              2.5.1.10    Information and Communications Technology



Index

PART 2 – STRATEGIC OBJECTIVES (CONT’D)
              2.5.1.11   Performance Teaching Spaces

              2.5.1.12   Halls

              2.5.1.13   Dining Areas

              2.5.1.14   Learning Resource Areas

              2.5.1.15   Sports Hall

              2.5.1.16   Non-Teaching Spaces / Staff and Administrative Areas

              2.5.1.17   Support Areas

              2.5.1.18   Storage

              2.5.1.19   Kitchen, Plant and Service Areas

              2.5.1.20   Toilets


      2.5.2   External
              2.5.2.1    Playgrounds and Recreation

              2.5.2.2    Sports Facilities

              2.5.2.3    Artificial Sports Pitches

              2.5.2.4    Landscaping and Layout

              2.5.2.5    Vehicle and Pedestrian Access, Circulation and Parking

              2.5.2.6    Fencing


2.6   Sustainable Development

      2.6.1   Developing an Environmental Assessment

      2.6.2   Water Conservation

      2.6.3   Energy Conservation

      2.6.4   Reducing Waste during Construction

      2.6.5   Renewable Energy

      2.6.6   The Case for Higher Recycled Content



Index

PART 3 – BUIDLING & EXTERNAL AREA REQUIREMENTS

Section A     -   General Notes

Section B     -   Building Fabric Requirements
Section C   -   External Area Requirements

Section D   -   Mechanical and Electrical Requirements

ANNEX 1     -   Statutory Requirements

ANNEX 2     -   Local Authority Policy Requirements

ANNEX 3     -   School Area Schedule

ANNEX 4     -   School Area Data Sheets
The Authority’s Requirements - Introduction

1.1    Note to Authorities
Throughout this Authority‟s Requirements there are notes, comments and particular areas of text
that are included specifically for the Authority. These are intended to provide guidance and to
highlight particular issues of relevance/importance when compiling an Authority‟s Requirements
tailored to the specific needs and individual requirements of a scheme but also maintain the
standardised approach inherent in the BSF/ACADEMIES Programme. These notes and highlighted
areas should be considered by the Authority and removed as appropriate prior to issuing the
completed Authority‟s Requirements.


Notes/specific commentary are highlighted in this way.


The commentary notes identified ie commentary 44 refer to the commentary being part of the
standard BSF Output Specification as Volume 1, Annex 4 and this can be found on the PfS website
under „Standard Documents‟. Comments in the commentary relating to Payment Mechanisms,
SPA, SP, Operational Services and Facilities Management not apply to these Authority‟s
Requirements.


1.2 Note to Contractors
The Scheme Contract will take precedence over any conflicting item stated in the Authority‟s
Requirements.
Section 1.3 of this introduction sets out the structure of the Authority‟s Requirements and advises
which Parts are for guidance and information only, and those Parts that are „Contractual
Requirements‟ ie the Authority‟s Requirements under the terms of the Scheme Contract.
There will be instances where there are conflicts between different „Contractual Requirements‟ or
where „Contractual Requirements‟ cannot be met due to the Scheme being refurbishment opposed
to new build. In these instances, the Contractor will seek acceptance of a relaxation to the
Authority's Requirements by way of submitting a list of degredations with his Contractor‟s Proposals.
This is with the exception to Statutory Requirements / Consents where all matters need to comply.


1.3    Structure of the Authority’s Requirements
This Authority‟s Requirements has been produced in order to identify the requirements for the
delivery of school accommodation and is central to achieving BSF/ACADEMIES objectives.
It is presented in three parts. The content of each Part is outlined below and summarises the
purpose, relativity and contractual status of each one.
The Authority’s Requirements - Introduction




Part 1: General Conditions
Contains details, information and protocols that outline conventions, practices, restrictions relevant
throughout the design and construction periods.
Status: Contractual Requirements.




Part 2 – Strategic Objectives
Part 2 provides the high level aspirational objectives of the BSF/ACADEMIES programme.                 It
includes guidance that Contractors should respond to in developing their Contractor‟s Proposals.
Its purpose is to convey educational and social issues and objectives that impact upon the design
and operation of an educational facility. This provides both important context and guidance as to
priorities, which should be taken into account in the design development.
Status: For guidance and information only, not Contractual.




Part 3 – Building and External Area Requirements
It sets out the technical specification for all school accommodation to be built under the
BSF/ACADEMIES programme and sets out the standards for the design and construction of the
facility.
Status: Contractual Requirements.




Part 3 Annex 1 – Statutory Requirements
Annex 1 contains a list of statutory codes, standards, regulations etc., current at the time of printing.
These are not necessarily full, accurate or complete but provide guidance on the scope and range
of compliance with advisory, legal and statutory documentation and legislation that will be required.
The Contractor will be required to comply with current legislation throughout the duration of the
Scheme Contract


Status: Contractual Requirements.
The Authority’s Requirements - Introduction




Annex 2 – Local Authority Policy Requirements
This annex contains all of the policies, codes of practice, procedures and protocols the Local
Authority require to be adopted by the Contractor.


Status: The Authority / Contractor will agree which aspects are for guidance and those that will be
mandatory.




Annex 3 – School Area Schedule
Annex 3 will be completed by the Contractor with advise from the Authority during the design stage,
post local competition and selection of preferred bidder. A draft schedule will be provided by the
Local Authority as part of their OBC.


Status: The completed schedule will become Contractual requirements.




Annex 4 – Commentaries School Area Data Sheets
Annex 4 will be completed by the Contractor with advise from the Authority during the design stage,
post local competition and selection of preferred bidder.


Status: The completed schedule will become Contractual requirements.
The Authority’s Requirements - Introduction

1.4   Introduction to the BSF / Academies Programme
Building Schools for the Future is a national programme to transform educational provision and lift
achievement through a complete transformation of England‟s secondary schools, including SEN
provision in schools. It is a programme of rebuilding and renewal to ensure that secondary
education in every part of England has 21st Century facilities within 10 to 15 years from 2005-06,
subject to future public spending decisions.
School buildings are important to pupils‟ education. Significantly, they should support the
educational vision of high expectations, specialism and excellence, inclusion, local collaboration,
community involvement and high-quality teaching and learning.
There has been a considerable period of consultation and preparatory work, involving the DCSF,
other government bodies, Pathfinder Authorities, Partnerships for Schools, Partnerships UK, The
4P‟s and advisers which has resulted in:
     Recognition of the need for strategic thinking around innovation and transformational change;
     The development of a new model of procurement and estate management to enable the
      rebuilding or refurbishment of schools to be delivered more quickly and at a lower cost, and to
      ensure they are maintained over their whole lives; and
     The development of innovative and thought-provoking „exemplar designs‟ to encourage people
      to challenge thinking about what schools are and how they should be built.
      This Authority‟s Requirements has been developed to include information from Exemplar
      Designs, BB98, Transforming Schools – an Inspirational Guide to Remodelling Secondary
      Schools and the Educational Vision, as well as the role of the Design Evaluation Tool,
      comments from the insurance industry and feedback from users.


Exemplar Designs
A further part of the BSF/ACADEMIES Programme has been the development by the DCSF of
Exemplar Designs for both new and remodelled school buildings. These designs represent visions
of the schools of the future – innovative, attractive and fit for the future buildings with modern, state
of the art fittings and equipment within in a controlled and welcoming environment accessible to all.
Exemplar Designs have been produced with the intention that they should aim to challenge
conventional thinking on what schools are for and how they should be built and managed. As such,
they are a central tool in helping to achieve the overall Programme objectives and are intended to:
     Develop a shared vision of schools for the future;
     Create benchmarks for well designed schools;
     Push forward the boundaries of innovation and inspiration;
     Support the delivery of Building Schools for the Future; and
     Encourage industry to develop new ways of delivering school buildings.
The Authority’s Requirements - Introduction

Local Authorities and Contractors are encouraged to use these designs as a starting point to
encourage forward thinking in what the school of the 21st century could and should incorporate. It is
not intended that they should be adopted in totality but that they are used to provoke thought and
inspire good ideas that aim towards transformational change. The Authority should therefore aim to
include reference to them wherever possible in the guidance section of the Authority‟s
Requirements in order to assist in highlighting the high level of design required.


1.5   Programme Objectives
The overall BSF/ACADEMIES objectives can be summarised as:
     Transformational change - the end objective is about creating radical improvements in
      educational outcomes and contributing to raising educational achievement;
     Education vision - it is vital that schemes developed locally are driven by a vision of how to
      accomplish this;
     Sustainability – this investment must be protected by ensuring that schools are well cared-for
      throughout their useful lives;
     Well designed school buildings – the substantial investment in new and refurbished buildings
      must be used to create buildings that are inspirational to all users, particularly pupils and staff,
      and that encourage and facilitate high educational achievement.
     Effective delivery – a new approach to procurement will simplify and speed up the
      procurement of future schemes; and
     Value for money and long-term economic viability – a long-term national programme will
      create economies of scale by allowing new approaches to design and construction.


In addition, and in conjunction with the Authority‟s objectives, the project aims to:
     Improve standards in the environment of the schools and their grounds;
     Provide a safe and secure environment for teaching and learning;
     Contribute to raising of educational standards;
     Achieve an affordable programme of planned and preventative maintenance, replacing the
      existing backlog of maintenance and repair;
     Achieve value for money and long-term economic viability;
     Optimise running costs;
     Provide Services that effectively support the educational objectives of the school;
     Incorporate current technology, and in particular non-curriculum-related ICT, into the design
      and operation of the school to enhance its performance and produce management
      efficiencies; and
     Apply environmentally sustainability issues in relation to all schools.
The Authority’s Requirements - Introduction

Key policy developments that BSF/ACADEMIES is intended to support are:
    Personalised learning
    ICT and e-learning
    The secondary strategy (this is to be published in 2005), building on the Key Stage 3 Strategy
     and Specialist Schools (a new specialist system-transforming secondary education)
    14-19 strategy (Extending Opportunities, Raising Standards)
    Inclusion and SEN (special educational needs, including meeting DDA requirements
    Strategy for Children and Young People (published December 2004)
    Extended schools
    Workforce Remodelling


COMMENTARY 1
Part 1 - General Conditions

A3.1   Introduction
Part 1 contains details, information and protocols that outline conventions, practices, restrictions or
site-specific requirements relevant throughout the design and construction periods.


Project Particulars

The Project

Name of school and brief description of work
Authority

Name of Authority


Authority’s Representative

Name and contact details of Authority’s Representative


Planning Supervisor

Name and contact details of Planning Supervisor


Contract Documents

These are detailed in the Contract.

THE SITE / EXISTING BUILDINGS

Site particulars

The Authority shall enter here any site specific issues for example site boundaries or any restrictions
appertaining to the site

Schedule 5 of the Contract provides a Site Plan. This shows the site boundaries in which the
Contractor will undertake the Works. Permission for access to areas outside the marked boundary
will need to be obtained by the Contractor form the owner of the property or land before the
Contractor breaches the boundary. The Contractor should be aware that the owner of such land
may, withhold permission for access.

The Contractor shall be deemed to have made due allowance for local conditions, the nature and
accessibility of the site, the nature and extent of the operations and storage space for materials,
including all additional handling and transporting, due to site conditions and the nature of the
ground.

The Contractor shall not use the site for any purpose other than that of carrying out the Works.
Part 1 - General Conditions



Existing buildings on or adjacent to the site.

The Contractor is deemed to have made due allowance for any affect that existing buildings or
structures on or adjacent to the site have on his design and the Works.


Specialist surveys required for design development eg Acoustic, Fire strategy etc

The Contractor shall procure all specialist surveys needed for the development of design and
construction in order for the design and construction to comply with the Authority Requirements.


Existing mains/services

The Contractor shall contact the relevant statutory authorities and ascertain the extent and positions
of all existing services and drains running over and under the site and immediately adjacent to it in
order that the design and construction can be developed with out detriment to the functioning of
such services and drains


Scope / Description of Works

The Scope of Works is comprised as follows:

The Authority to insert description for a school or group of schools including for each school a scope
of works and information, for example:-

1.1    To progress the design and construction of the school scheme /or schemes, the design of
       which has already been developed by the Authority and documented by the following:-

       1.1.1   Drawings

       1.1.2   Specifications

       1.1.3   Cost Plan

       1.1.4   Survey information

       1.1.5   Proposed accommodation schedule

       1.1.6   Etc

1.2    Demolition of existing buildings/structures where required to facilitate siting/layout of new
       scheme.

1.3    Design, supply and installation of mechanical, electrical and plumbing services. 1.4 Design,
       supply and installation of ICT infrastructure including cabling and containment.
Part 1 - General Conditions

Scope / Description of Works (Cont’d)

1.4     Design, supply and installation of new fixed furniture, fixtures and equipment including all
        new fixed furniture, fixtures and equipment detailed in the Furniture & Equipment and Room
        Data Sheets. Space planning for fixed furniture and equipment which is to be transferred
        from existing facility.

1.5     Supply and installation of new loose furniture and equipment including all new loose furniture
        and equipment detailed in the Furniture & Equipment Data Sheets. Space plan for loose
        furniture and equipmen,t which is to be transferred from existing facility.

1.6     Design and construction of following external sports facilities:-

        1.6.1   All weather floodlit?

        1.6.2   All weather floodlit?

1.6.3   Porous macadam multi-use games area – to accommodate 8 tennis courts/6 netball courts
        (markings for tennis/netball can overlap). MUGA area to be floodlit.

        1.2     Three senior grass pitches – one number to be

        1.3

1.7     Design and construction of all site preparation/site earthworks including regarding, terracing,
        stabilisation where required etc.

1.8     Design and construction of all buildings and site drainage including connections into existing
        drainage systems, watercourses etc.

1.9     Design and construction of all external hard landscaping including hard play areas and
        footpaths.

1.10    Design and construction of all on site car parks and roads including remodelling of existing
        layouts where required. Design and construction of new main entrance road junction.

1.11    Design and installation of all external street furniture, equipment, fencing (internal to site and
        perimeter fencing where required), external lighting, signage etc.

1.12    Design and construction of all minor building works.

1.13    Design and installation of all external soft landscaping including any necessary works to
        existing trees and hedgerows. Twelve and twenty four months maintenance following
        practical completion to be priced separately as options outside the Contract Sum.

1.14    Design and construction of all utilities (water, gas, electricity, telecoms) installations including
        connections to existing on-site/off-site infrastructure, site wide distribution etc.

1.15    Design and construction of all temporary works needed to complete the project.
Part 1 - General Conditions

Items not included in this Contract

The following are an example of items, are not included in this Contract: -

         (i)     IT hardware installations for school educational and administrative use – eg
                 servers, desktop computers and monitors, laptop computers, printers,
                 scanners with the exception of computer hardware required to run CCTV/BMS
                 systems and other M&E installations (cashless catering, access controls,
                 Registration and attendance).

         (ii)    IT software installations for school educational and administrative use - with
                 the exception of computer software required torun CCTV/BMS systems and
                 other M&E installations. (See above).

         (iii)   Supply of stationery consumables, stationery equipment, books, CD’s and DVD’s all
                 operational and educational consumables, cleaning equipment, mobile projectors,
                 hand tools, televisions, interactive whiteboards (infrastructure to be provided),
                 musical instruments, crockery and cutlery, medical supplies, balls, cricket bats,
                 hockey sticks, fax machines, photocopiers, grounds maintenance equipment, loose
                 fans, safes & drinks and snack vending machines.
         (iv)    Facility Management and Operational Services.


A3.2        Permissions and Consents
A3.2.1      Detailed Planning Consent
The Contractor will be responsible for obtaining Detailed Planning Consents where appropriate, for
compliance with all associated statutory processes and for payment of all fees and charges in
connection. It is also the Contractor‟s responsibility to comply with any Conditions or Reserved
Matters attached to the Consent. Conditions may also relate to traffic, vehicular access, noise
control, and other environmental matters. Although the Local Authority will deal with any planning
applications, no special treatment will be accorded this project by planning officers, or by relevant
Committees of the Authority in deciding upon planning matters. The Authority can give no
guarantee of approval.
A3.2.2      Building Regulations
The Contractor shall comply with all current Building Regulations in respect of new school
construction and refurbishment and remodelling works to existing buildings, and must also still meet
the terms of all the DCSF Constructional Standards 1997 and as amended (2001). The
Constructional Standards override the current Building Regulations on Ramps Steps and Handrails
(sections F, K & M). It is the Contractor‟s responsibility to make payment of the appropriate fees and
to ensure that the work is carried out in compliance with the Regulations and Standards and that
written approval is received.
A3.2.3      Principal Contractor - CDM Regulations
The Contractor shall undertake the role of principal contractor under the Construction (Design and
Management) Regulations 1994 and shall allocate resources to enable him to comply with the
requirements and prohibitions imposed on him by or under the relevant statutory provisions.
Part 1 - General Conditions

A3.2.4   Other Consents
The Contractor is responsible for obtaining all other statutory consents required for any aspect of
the works and for compliance with all relevant legislation, covenants, easements or other rights
affecting the site. The Contractor shall also be responsible for negotiating any further covenants,
easements or other rights that may be required on any of the Sites, for example for statutory
undertakers. The Contractor shall consult with the Authority relating to the granting of such rights
and shall reimburse the Authority for its reasonable costs and expenses in conjunction with such
issues.


A3.3     Statutory Compliances
A3.3.1   General
The Contractor shall, throughout the project, conform to all current Statutes, Statutory Instruments
and Amendments, and European Union Directives. Many of these are included in Part 3, Annex 1 of
this document, however this list is not guaranteed as complete.
A3.3.2   Education (school Premises) Regulations 1999
The Contractor shall ensure that all accommodation complies with the requirements detailed in the
Education (schools Premises) Regulations 1999. Minimum standards for both new and existing
schools are set out in these Regulations.
A3.3.3   Disability Discrimination Act
The Contractor must comply fully with all relevant good practice, with the Disability Discrimination
Act 1995 and the Special Educational Needs and Disability Act 2001 including the “Code of Practice
for schools – New duties from 2002”, so far as they apply, for the design all new construction works
in accordance with current Regulations.
The Contractor shall ensure that existing buildings have one classroom at each key stage that is
fully compliant together with generic areas for pupils. This includes at least one pupil toilet if unisex
or one boy‟s and girl‟s toilet otherwise. The Contractor shall also provide a technical solution for all
other areas of existing school facilities which avoids physical barriers, and enables schools to put in
place a corresponding management plan to ensure that all parts of the building comply with the
relevant legislation, not just those areas which are to be used by the community.
The Contractor shall take note of the DDA audits that have been prepared by the Authority. The
Authority provides no warranty as to the accuracy or completeness of information obtained or
commissioned, and it is not to be treated as contractual documentation.
Part 1 - General Conditions

The following guidance also provides specific advice and information:
              DCSF Building Bulletins BB91 “Access for Disabled People to school Buildings –
               Management and Design Guide”;
              BB94 “Inclusive school Design - Accommodating Pupils With Special Educational
               Needs and Disabilities in Mainstream schools ”;
              BS 8300:2001 “Design of buildings and their approaches to meet the needs of
               disabled people – Code of practice”;
              BS 5588-8:1999 “Fire precautions in the design, construction and use of buildings –
               Part 8 Code of practice for means of escape for disabled people”; and
              The published findings of “Project Rainbow” by the University of Reading on Colour
               and Contrast for the visually impaired.


Notwithstanding the above, all statutory minimum requirements must be met for all schools.


Commentary 44


Commentary 45


A3.4   Survey Information


The Local Authority should add, delete or amend as appropriate the contents of this section.


Site conditions are at the risk of the Contractor, subject to the terms of the Scheme Contract.


A3.4.1 Planning Issues
The Authority has obtained Outline Planning Permissions or „letters of Planning Comfort‟ for scheme
proposals. It is the responsibility of the Contractor to negotiate any changes to this approval, and to
enter into discussions with the Local Planning Authority for that purpose.


Commentary 46
Part 1 - General Conditions

A3.4.2 Access and Transport
       OPTION
       [The Authority has provided school travel plans for the Sites which Contractors should
       comply with. The Authority shall be responsible for any works required outside of the
       delineation of the site, however the Contractor shall be responsible for any works within the
       site that are required under the travel plans.]


Commentary 47


A3.4.3 Condition Surveys and Plans
The Contractor has been provided with AMP condition surveys and plans of the existing buildings.
A3.4.4 Latent Defects
In respect of the school Sites the Contractor is required to take responsibility, subject to the terms of
the Scheme Contract, for addressing pre-existing and the emergence of any new latent defects to
the existing and new school facilities, and their resulting financial or other consequences.
The Contractor is required to assume full responsibility for all defects, latent or otherwise, in respect
of new school facilities.

Commentary 48


A3.4.5 Topographical Surveys
The Contractor has been provided with topographical surveys. Should the Contractor wish to
undertake further surveys, the Contractor may request permission from the Authority to undertake
further surveys on the Sites. The Authority provides no warranty as to the accuracy or completeness
of information obtained or commissioned, and it is not to be treated as contractual documentation.
The Contractor shall have included for the risk of site conditions within its pricing of the Contract,
and as such the Contractor shall take responsibility for any additional funding or variations relating
to unknown ground conditions save as provided for in the Scheme Contract.


A3.4.6 Ground Investigation Reports
The Contractor has been provided with site information procured by the Authority. The Authority will
arrange or permit the commissioning of further ground investigation once Contractors have
determined the potential location of new building footprints. The scope of such surveys will be
agreed by the Authority to ensure that they are not overly intrusive and damaging to the school
grounds. The costs shall be included in the Contractor‟s pricing. The Authority provides no warranty
as to the accuracy or completeness of information obtained or commissioned, and it is not to be
treated as contractual documentation.
Part 1 - General Conditions

       OPTION
       [The Contractor should be able to obtain a Warranty from the surveyor to obtain a duty of
       care in relation to these investigations. The Contractor may also wish to give consideration
       to conducting additional investigations deemed necessary to have included for the risk of site
       conditions within its pricing of the contract, and as such the Contractor shall take
       responsibility for any additional funding or variation requests relating to abnormal ground
       conditions, land contamination or the discovery of any further Services located on the site.]


A3.4.7 Other Investigations
       OPTION
       [The Contractor will have received the Survey information as detailed earlier, but may wish
       to give consideration to conducting additional investigations such as level surveys, deemed
       necessary to have included for the risk of site conditions within its pricing of the Contract,
       and as such the Contractor shall not approach the Authority for any additional funding or
       variation requests relating to the presence of methane, beneath existing or new facilities.]


A3.5   Design and Construction Protocols
The Authority requires clear protocols to be laid down to address design development,
programming, reporting, the provision of construction information and defects rectification
procedures.


A3.5.1 Contractor’s Proposals
Developed from the bidder's proposals at Local Competition, the Preferred Bidder shall submit the
following as Contractor‟s Proposals for Comment by the Authority‟s Representative at least 6 weeks
in advance of the proposed date for signing the Scheme Contract. The Contractor‟s Proposals will at
least comprise the following:


CDM Regulations
In accordance with the requirements of the Construction (Design and Management) Regulations
1994 the Contractor shall submit the following: -
1.     All necessary information to show his competence to prepare a design for the Works (so far
       as he has prepared or will prepare such design) in accordance with the relevant statutory
       provisions.
2.     All necessary information to show that he has allocated or will allocate adequate resources
       to enable him to comply with regulation 13 (Requirements on designer) and that he has
       allowed for such resources in his Contract sum analysis.
3.     Before works commence on site the Contractor shall develop the Health and Safety Plan to
       the satisfaction of the Authority to comply with Regulation 15(4) of The Construction (Design
       and Management) Regulations 1994 as amended.
Part 1 - General Conditions

Programmes, reports, schedules, plans etc
The Contractor shall prepare and submit the following as a minimum:
1.     A Project Execution Plan incorporating contact details, roles and responsibilities, lines of
       communication between all parties, project organograms, design development procedures,
       control of correspondence and meeting procedures and handover procedures during the
       design and construction phases.
2      A Quality Plan.
3.     A detailed Method Statement describing the techniques, equipment, plant, access and
       protection the Contractor intends to use during the Contract.
4.     A Design Programme (co-ordinated with the Construction Programme) which shall include
       sub-contract design and identifying dates by which orders are to be placed with sub-
       contractors, suppliers and statutory authorities.
5.     A Construction Programme, sufficiently detailed to show the Contractor's sequence of
       working compatible with his Method Statement. The Programme shall identify all major
       construction activities including work by sub-contractors and statutory authorities.
       Appropriate allowance shall be made for adverse weather conditions, holidays, etc.
6.     A master decant programme where needed.


The Programmes shall take account of the period of time required by the Contractor for completing
the design and such production drawings as are necessary and for satisfying the Review Procedure.
The Contractor shall in his programming and pricing of the Works make adequate allowance for
dealing with the features contained in the pre-construction Health and Safety Plan, together with
further development of the Plan which may be required by the Contractor and which may
reasonably be foreseen pre contract to enable compliance with the relevant statutory provisions
relating to health and safety.
The Contractor shall state the period he requires to complete his design and such production
drawings as are necessary prior to start on site.
The Contractor shall provide a statement detailing how he shall interface and assist the Authority
with the familiarisation and training process for the operation of the facilities particularly with regard
to the operation of the mechanical and electrical installations.


PfS Cost Proformas and contract sum analysis

The Contractor shall provide any amplification of the PfS Cost Proformas and contract sum analysis
as required by the Authority‟s Representative.

Costs relating to items that are not priced shall be deemed to be included.

For the avoidance of doubt, the costs submitted on the PfS capital cost proformas and in the
contract sum analysis shall be a fixed price lump sum, or a target sum, whichever Scheme Contract
is applicable.
Part 1 - General Conditions

PfS Capital Cost Proformas

These will comprise completed forms from the PfS website, namely:

(a)    Proforma 3 – Summary Whole Life Cost proforma for PFI and Design & Build Schemes

(b)    Proforma 3.1 – School Level Capital Cost proforma for PFI and Design & Build/
       Refurbishment Schemes

(c)    Proforma 3.1.1 – Block Level Capital Cost proforma for PFI and Design & Build/
       Refurbishment Schemes

(d)    Proforma 3.2 – FF&E Cost proforma for PFI and Design & Build Schemes

(e)    Proforma 3.2 – Life cycle Cost proforma for PFI Schemes and New Build Proforma 3.3.1 –
       Life Cycle Costing assumptions.
Contract Sum Analysis
These will comprise:
(f)    An elemental cost plan that aligns with the design submitted with the Contractor‟s Proposals
       reflecting PfS Proformas detailed above.

(g)    A breakdown of Preliminaries specific to the Scheme in the format provided in Schedule 3,
       Part 5 of the Scheme Contract.

(h)    A work package breakdown

(i)    A cash flow analysis coordinated with the Construction Programme and describing the
       Works to be completed by payment stages (Target Cost at Monthly intervals, Lump Sum at
       Milestone intervals). This shall be coordinated with the information to form Schedule 9 of the
       Scheme Contract.

Design information
Design drawings and information shall include as a minimum: -

Architectural Proposals
      1:500 drawing(s) showing the whole site, facilities and grounds;

      1:100 general arrangement floor plans for each level for each building. The ground floor plan
       only shall show details of the external landscape. Each accommodation space is to be
       identified on the floor plans, with the actual area achieved which shall accord with the
       accommodation schedules. All plans to include a „mini‟ block plan to cross reference the
       location of elevations/sections etc;

       NB: Location of existing structures/walls to be shown on drawings as broken lines.

      1:200 roof plans to each building

      1:200 site sections – a minimum of three to be provided. Each section should show the
       topography along the profile line and levels across the site. All sections should include a
       „mini‟ block plan to cross reference the location of plans/elevations etc;
Part 1 - General Conditions

     1:100 sections – a minimum of five to the school building, communicating the relationship of
      finished levels both internally and externally. The spaces should be suitably labelled to show
      the intended use of each space via a „Key‟ that should relate directly to the accommodation
      schedule. All sections should include a „mini‟ block plan to cross reference the location of
      plans/elevations etc;

     1:100 elevations relating to each geographical orientation for all buildings. Elevations shall
      communicate the aesthetic qualities of the proposed design and shall be sufficiently
      annotated and/or coloured to communicate the proposed external finishes. All elevations
      should include a „mini‟ block plan to cross reference the locations of plan/sections etc;

     Construction sections – 1:20. A minimum of four sections to the school buildings;

     An elemental materials and components specification/commentary (i.e. an outline building
      fabric specification) for all new build works including external works elements. This is to
      enable easy understanding for non-technical readers/reviewers of the documentation.

     Detailed specification for all building components in National Building Specification (NBS)
      format.

     Construction details to articulate the specification – as a minimum drawings showing typical
      sections through different types of the following construction elements are required: -

            floors

            external walls

            glazing

            roof

            internal partitions

            ceiling and service zones

            notional structural layouts

     Schedule of Finishes for all rooms in relation to walls, floors, ceilings, door facings etc – this
      can be incorporated in the Room Data Sheets (see below) if preferred but should indicate
      the specific type of finish to be provided rather than generic information i.e.
      make/manufacturer and specification of carpet/vinyl/suspended ceiling system etc should be
      stated (or equal approved). This is required to clearly define the quality of the finishes to be
      used in the construction.

     Schedule of Accommodation – completed area schedules to detail all spaces to be provided
      in each building and cross-referenced back by Room numbering to the 1:100 general
      arrangement floor plans. Schedule to include for all areas (including plant, circulation and
      internal wall areas) so as to summate to total as drawn Gross Internal Floor Area. Areas
      shall be measured in accordance with the Code of Measuring Practice (5th Edition)
      published by the RICS.
Part 1 - General Conditions

     External Works:

            1:200 External Works Plans showing finished levels;

            External Works Schedule and

            1:200 Planting Plan

            1:200 details of proposed site access/egress and parking/waiting arrangements for
             all vehicles, bicycles and pedestrians

     The 1:200 plans will allow the Authority to have a clear understanding of the proposals in
      relation to the external works (including hard and soft landscaping, external furniture,
      external fencing and sports areas) to allow the Authority to gain comfort in relation to the
      proposed final site layout including appearance, access routes, compliance with DDA
      requirements, landscaping etc.

     The Schedule shall include external structures, materials and finishes and should cover all
      external works, footpaths, car parking and hard and soft landscaping.

     The planting plan should provide details of species, size and quantities.

     An Artist‟s impression of the main entrance area and other key architectural features, which
      demonstrate the design quality of the proposal.

     1:50 scale fully loaded room layouts of all typical classrooms and specialist rooms (including
      library) that show:

            room size and useable floor space;

            room shape and compliance with ergonomic data and minimum critical dimensions;

            room elevations;

            access points/locations of doors and windows;

            location of utilities and engineering services;

            FF&E and

            Floor areas

     Typical seating plans to main school hall & dining hall/refectory

     1:200 plans showing fire safety strategy for all buildings

     Circulation diagrams – A3. Coloured diagrams to explain clearly strategy for movement
      within each building including access and egresses, horizontal and vertical movement,
      access to WC‟s, dining areas etc from external play areas.

     Phasing plans.
Part 1 - General Conditions

Structural and Civil Engineering Proposals

     Design Philosophy and structural general arrangement schematics for all floor levels and
      roof, 1:200 structural elevations and typical sections to show proposed structural form and
      principal features of:-

            stability;

            flexibility

            loadings

            provisions for structural movement

            column positions

            plant rooms and any basements

            foundation layouts

            retaining wall layouts

     Scale details of roads/footpaths         including   adaptations    to   existing   and   off-site
      highways/footpath works.

     1:500 scale details of proposed main service infrastructure strategy for the site, including
      principal service routes external to the buildings and the design strategy for foul and surface
      water drainage. Services connection strategy to be detailed.

     1:500 scale details of land drainage strategy to whole site.

     Detailed specification for all civil and structural components in National Building Specification
      (NBS) format

     Plans and sections – general arrangements drawings and typical sections illustrating
      earthworks on sites, showing areas of cut and fill.

     Proposals for dealing with existing services on site – e.g. overhead cables etc

Mechanical and Electrical Proposals

     Design Philosophy coordinated with architectural and structural design.

     1:200 scale drawings of proposed zoning philosophy for major mechanical and electrical
      systems. This shall include internal services; concept schematics and zoning plans
      indicating where rooms require forced ventilation and/or cooling if proposed.

     Details of the proposed heating, cooling and ventilation systems, domestic hot and cold
      water services, above ground drainage, distribution of electrical and small power installation,
      lighting systems, emergency lighting, CCTV (internal & external), specialist services, building
      management systems and other service installations, location and size of main plant and
      equipment including locations of service risers, ducts and service routes
Part 1 - General Conditions

     Drawings/details to indicate the environmental control philosophy (including details of natural
      ventilation systems where applicable) to enable clear understanding of the scale, level and
      locality of control for the heating, ventilation and cooling systems.

     Drawings/details to indicate the lighting system control philosophy to teaching, non-teaching
      and circulation areas. 1:50 drawing to indicate lighting layout to typical standard and
      specialist classroom.

     Detailed proposals for providing acoustic treatment/separation between spaces and facilities
      within the buildings.

     Acoustic strategy for scheme including proposals for minimising plant room/roof plant/kitchen
      plant/other plant noise. A statement and brief details from an acoustician stating that they
      have reviewed the design and confirm that the proposal does or does not meet the
      requirements of the Building Bulletins.

     plant room drawings

     An elemental materials and components specification/commentary for all mechanical &
      electrical works including external works elements. This is to enable easy understanding for
      non-technical readers/reviewers of the documentation.

     National Engineering Specification (NES) for principal mechanical & electrical systems and
      components to be provided.

     List of proposed manufacturers of major M&E fittings and equipment.

     Draft BREEAM assessment.

ICT Infrastructure Proposals

     Commentary, details and specifications of proposed ICT infrastructure provision including
      cabling, containment, wireless infrastructure, data points, interface details etc.

     Schedule indicating 1) What is included 2) What is excluded with regard to interface details,
      hubs, cabinets etc

Room/Area Data Sheets

     Fully developed and completed Room/Area Data Sheets on the PfS Proforma included as
      Annex 4 in Part 3 of these Authority‟s Requirements.

Developed Furniture Schedules (FDS) for all room / accommodation / space types

     Fixed and Loose Furniture, Fittings and Equipment specifications with photographs/
      illustrations of the major types of furniture/equipment to be supplied (i.e. pupil/teacher chairs/
      tables etc)
Part 1 - General Conditions

Personnel information

      The Contractor shall submit: -

       a)     The names and CVs of senior management personnel (on and off-site) whom the
              Contractor will appoint for this Contract, together with a site organisation chart

       b)     The names of designers and other consultants whom the Contractor will employ for
              the Contract.

       c)     The names of sub-contractors to whom the Contractor will sub-let, identifying the
              scope of work for each.

Planned Maintenance Programme

      The Contractor will issue a 25 year planned maintenance programme for each school with
       their Contractor‟s Proposals.

Insurance

      The Contractor will provide a copy of insurances applicable to the Scheme Contract
       proposed for the Scheme.



A3.5.2 Works Programming
The Phased Works Programmes are required to detail the phasing of works activities in relation to
each school and shall contain:
      Presentation in the form of a bar chart or similar graphical presentation;
      The sequence and phasing of work package and sub-contract work package operations
       including training and commissioning and handover periods;
      The periods of occupation of works areas and associated dates for decant and transfer
       operations;
      Dependencies of all major work activities; and
      Detailed representation of the critical path


A3.5.3 Design Development
The Contractor shall prepare detailed drawing and specification information for each of the schools,
which are to be submitted as part of the Contractor‟s Proposal requirements outlined above prior to
commencement of the works. Revised and supplementary details are to be submitted in accordance
with the Review Procedure in the Scheme Contract.
Part 1 - General Conditions

A3.5.4   Progress Reporting and Communications
The Contractor shall prepare systems and procedures to comply with the lines of communication
and reporting procedures to be contained in the Scheme Contract. Such procedures shall be
presented in the Contractor‟s Proposals as part of the Project Execution Plan described above.


A3.5.4.1 Progress Meetings
The Contractor shall hold regular progress meetings to co-ordinate the works. Representation at the
progress meetings will be afforded to the Authority to be kept abreast of all aspects of the scheme
development and construction progress.
The Contractor will hold progress meetings at not less than monthly intervals throughout the
duration of the Contract. The meetings will generally be held on site and will be chaired by the
Contractor's representatives. The meetings will be attended by the Authority's representatives, and
the Authority from time to time. The Authority‟s Representative may from time to time request the
attendance of representatives from sub-contractors or principal suppliers, and the Contractor will not
withhold a reasonable request.


Prior to each meeting the Contractor‟s Representative shall:-
1)       Prepare and agree with the Authority‟s Representative the timing and agenda for each
         progress/co-ordination meeting.
2)       Publish the agenda giving adequate prior notice of each meeting.
3)       Be responsible for chairing and minuting the meetings


The Contractor‟s Representative shall hold regular design meetings. He shall ensure that the
meetings are properly attended by his own design team. The Contractor, if requested, is also
required to inform the Authority‟s Representative in advance of the timing and the Agenda for these
meetings and is to provide minutes of meetings to the Authority‟s Representative.


A3.5.5   Progress photographs
The Contractor‟s Representative shall take digital photographs of the Works at key construction
stages and approximately 30 photographs at monthly intervals to record progress. Photographs
shall be issued to the Authority‟s Representative electronically or by disk. All photographs shall be
treated as confidential information unless otherwise directed by the Authority.
Part 1 - General Conditions

A3.5.6 Monitoring
The Contractor shall prepare and submit Progress Reports at monthly intervals, including but not
limited to the following:


       (a)    The Contractor shall monitor progress by "marking-up", at not more than monthly
              intervals, the site copy of the master programmes to indicate the actual progress of
              all activities shown thereon. If any circumstances arise which may affect the
              progress of the Works the Contractor shall put forward proposals or take other action
              as appropriate to minimise any delay and to recover any lost time.


       (b)    Review of the Risk Register.

       (c)    Any matter affecting completion.

       (d)    With regard to Schemes under the Target Cost Contract, matters affecting the cost of
              the works.

       (e)    Summary details on the issue and status of design development documentation; and
              status of all required approvals;

       (f)    A schedule of Reviewable Design Data and status

       (g)    Health and Safety Report

       (h)    Any grounds for dispute that have occurred or are foreseeable including their
              progress and measures to resolve such issues

       (i)    Progress of any variation works;

       (j)    The anticipated dates for completion of the school and variation works.

       (k)    A written statement confirming that all construction issue design and production
              information for the relevant period is in accordance with the Authority's Requirements
              and Contractor‟s Proposals except in so far that the design and production
              information has been altered by a Change in the Authority's Requirements.

One copy of each report and programme prepared by the Contractor shall be kept on site and 5
copies shall be supplied for the use of the Authority.

Reports and programmes shall be prepared, monitored and maintained by a suitably qualified
person who is to retain close contact with the site until completion of the Works.

Submission of Progress Reports, etc will not relieve the Contractor of his obligations under the
Contract, will not constitute the agreement of any delays etc. shown thereon, will not affect the
Contract Completion Date and will not relieve the Contractor of his responsibility to complete the
Works by the due date.
Part 1 - General Conditions

A3.5.7 Record Drawings and Documentation
At completion, the Contractor must provide the following documents to the Authority:
        Operating and maintenance manuals for all building and engineering service elements;
        Electrical and mechanical commissioning and test certificates;
        COSHH assessment of material used and equipment installed;
        The Health and Safety File in accordance with the Construction Design and Management
         Regulations 1994;
        As-built and as-installed drawings;
        All other diagrams, instructions and emergency procedures pertaining to the operation and
         maintenance of the building, plant and equipment; and
        Latest Fire and Health & Safety plans.

The Contractor will be required to provide two hard copies of this information and two electronic
copies in AutoCAD format (or as requested by the Authority).

A3.5.8   Operating and Maintenance Manual
At Completion, the Contractor will prepare an Operating and Maintenance Manual. The manual
must effectively provide a comprehensive fact file of all building elements and systems, and shall
include:
        Plan/site layout, showing in particular protected areas, fire doors, alarms, fire-fighting
         equipment, escape routes etc;
        Functional diagrams of major systems/processes;
        Locations of utilities/Services;
        Manufacturers and installers data and recommendations for the maintenance of building
         elements;
        Data regarding any hazardous substances, including location and handling advice etc;
        Contact details of all relevant manufacturers, specialist installers, consultants and service
         suppliers etc; and
        Copies of all consents, approvals, guarantees/warranties, test certificates and condition
         reports in connection with the schools.
        Written confirmation from the Fire Brigade that the completed building meets their
         requirements
        Written confirmation from the Contractor‟s design consultants that the works have been
         carried out in accordance with the Contract.
        The exact information to be provided for the Health and Safety File shall be as detailed in
         the Pre-Construction Health & Safety Plan (submitted with the Contractor‟s Proposals) or
         as may be directed by the Planning Supervisor at the commencement of the Works.
Part 1 - General Conditions

A3.5.9 Quality Assurance and Monitoring
A system shall be established by the Contractor in accordance with the Scheme Contract to enable
the Authority‟s monitoring of the design and the Works. This process is required entirely for review
purposes and shall not constitute a commenting procedure on the Contractor‟s design. For the
avoidance of doubt, the entire design and construction responsibility shall remain with the
Contractor.
Where it deems it appropriate, the Authority itself may review the following:
   Design and construction drawings and documentation of all types and at all stages;
   Any changes to agreed designs and specifications;
   All construction and installation works, including off-site fabrications;
   The Contractor‟s Project Control Systems and Procedures, insofar as they relate to compliance
    with the Contract;
   Any testing or commissioning of structure, systems or equipment;
   Compliance with the agreed programme;
   Compliance with the Authority‟s Requirements.


A3.5.10   Supervision and co-ordination of the Works

The Contractor‟s Representative shall fully co-ordinate the design, procurement and construction.
The Contractor shall be responsible for the co-ordination, supervision and administration of
the Works, including all sub-contracts. The Contractor shall arrange and monitor a
programme with each sub-contractor, supplier and statutory authority and obtain and supply
information as necessary for co-ordination of the work.

The Contractor shall be responsible for notifying and co-ordinating all statutory authorities as and
when he requires their services on the site. The co-ordination shall include for providing the
statutory authorities with sufficient information regarding line, level, etc, to enable them to provide
and lay mains, cables, etc, to suit the progress of the Works, irrespective of whether payments are
made direct to the statutory authorities by the Authority.

The Contractor shall be responsible for co-ordinating the sequencing and setting out of the work on
site, having particular regard to any conflicts, which may arise as a consequence of the
interpretation of drawings by operatives.
The Contractor shall make regular visits to the premises of all his sub-contractors to inspect the
quality of the work and to check on progress and delivery in relation to the programme.
The Contractor shall provide facilities and necessary equipment for inspection of the Works by the
Authority and their representatives at all times prior to the issue of the Notice of Making Good
Defects. This will include for the Contractor facilitating off site visiting for plant testing etc., and to
manufacturing bases of suppliers
The Contractor shall notify the Authority in advance of the date on which lifts, fire protection,
mechanical, electrical and security installations will be ready and available for inspection by the
Authority's insurers. The Contractor shall provide all facilities and necessary equipment for such
inspections.
Part 1 - General Conditions

A3.5.11   Communications
The Authority shall require the Contactor‟s Representative to be the „single point of contact‟ with the
Authority‟s Representative. Such a member of the Contractor‟s organisation should have jurisdiction
over both the design and construction disciplines and chair all progress and design meetings,
thereby maintaining close contact with the project as a whole.


The Contactor shall provide an emergency telephone number at which the contractor‟s
Representative may be contacted out of normal working hours.


A3.5.12 Risk Register
The Contractor shall maintain, develop and adapt a Risk Register. Such a register shall include
potential risks to the performance of the works and their likely probability, financial estimates as
appropriate, risks that are within the control of the Authority, Contractor or members of the
Contractors supply chain.



A3.5.13   Adverse weather
The Contractor shall use all reasonable and suitable building aids and methods to prevent or
minimise delays during adverse weather conditions.


A3.5.14   Measurement
The Contractor shall give reasonable notice to the Authority‟s Representative before covering up
work.


A3.5.15   Work by Others
In the event that the Authority requests his own Sub-Contractor to carry out works during the
Contract, the Contractor shall retain responsibility for co-ordinating the works providing he is given
adequate notice of their arrival and is prepared to accept their presence.


A3.5.16   Insurances
If any event occurs which may give rise to any claim or proceeding in respect of loss or damage to
the Works or injury or damage to persons or property arising out of the Works the Contractor shall
immediately give notice to the Authority and Insurers.


A3.5.17   Snagging of Construction Works and the Defects Liability Procedures
A specific time period shall be allowed in the construction programme for the commissioning of the
Building Services. This period will be prior to Completion.
Part 1 - General Conditions

A3.5.18   Standards of materials and work
Where samples of the standard of workmanship or the quality of goods and materials are provided
by the Contractor they shall be retained on site as directed by the Authority‟s Representative and
the Contractor shall remove them when no longer required by the Authority‟s Representative.
Samples are to be provided as detailed in the contracts Review Procedure.
The Contractor shall provide one number „mock-up‟ general teaching (English, Mathematics etc)
classroom. This „mock-up‟ room shall be provided sufficiently in advance to enable the Authority to
make final comments/decisions with regard to colours, textures, patterns and finishes to be used for
other rooms without causing any delay to the Contract. „Mock-up‟ rooms shall be provided to the
standard required for Completion for the building as whole, with the exception of fully commissioned
services and any loose furniture to be provided by the Authority.
Where and to the extent that materials, goods and workmanship are not fully specified they shall be
suitable for the purposes of the Works, stated in or reasonably to be inferred from the Contract
Documents and in accordance with good building practice, including relevant British Standards and
Codes of Practice.
Materials where described to be obtained from a particular manufacturer, shall be used or fixed
strictly in accordance with that manufacturer's printed instructions.
The Contractor shall supply written evidence of sources of supply of any materials to be used in the
Works when requested by the Authority‟s Representative.


A3.5.19   Product guarantees
The Contractor shall obtain for the benefit of the Authority, Trustees or Governors product
guarantees or the like where these are available from manufacturers, suppliers or sub-contractors.


A3.6   Managing Construction Works
A3.6.1 Construction Activities
All construction work shall be undertaken in accordance with Legislation, relevant codes of practice,
Contractor‟s Proposals, Authority Policies and Good Industry Practice. The Contractor shall
produce Method Statements detailing how it intends to deal with these issues.
New materials only are to be used in carrying out the Works (unless the Authority agrees otherwise
in writing) and all goods used or included in the Works will be of satisfactory quality and no
Prohibited Materials will be used or included in the Works.
Part 1 - General Conditions

A3.6.2    Protection of work
Everything, which is liable to damage, shall be properly protected and cased up as necessary. The
Contractor shall accept responsibility for any damage to the Works or property to be retained in the
vicinity of the works.


The Contractor shall anticipate the arrival of and protect all work from damage by inclement
weather. He shall accept responsibility for all work damaged or soiled by weather including the
work of any sub-contractor and the work of others directly engaged by the Authority and pay all
costs and expenses in taking down and re-executing or otherwise making good or replacing to the
satisfaction of the Authority‟s Representative.


A3.6.3    Adjoining Properties, Roads, Paths, Boundaries
The Contractor is so to arrange and carry out the Works and take adequate precautions so as to
cause no interference or interruption to the use of any adjoining, adjacent properties including
roads, footpaths, soft and hard landscaping.
Prior to commencement of construction works to the school Sites the Contractor shall prepare a
schedule of conditions of retained, adjacent buildings, excluded buildings, roads, hard standings,
landscaping, playing fields, paths, paving and boundaries and other site features.
The Contractor will repair any damage over and above that identified within the survey caused by
the work.
In particular, the Contractor shall use all practical means to prevent mud or rubbish of any kind
being carried onto the roads, footpaths or pavings. Where, however, in spite of such precautions,
mud or rubbish is carried onto the roads, footpaths or pavings, the Contractor must immediately
clean up such mud or rubbish and remove to authorised tips. Special attention must be given to
prevent mud becoming embedded in road and footpath surfaces.
It is anticipated that there may be Services on the site, which are not correctly identified on existing
records. The Contractor shall take all reasonable precautions to minimise the risk of damage to any
such Services. Where such Services are encountered the Contractor shall notify the Authority.
The Contractor shall be responsible for all costs associated with alterations to or additional provision
of any Services made necessary by the Works whether specifically identified or not unless
prohibited by law or inconsistent with Good Industry Practice.
Any existing drainage systems and Services to be retained are to be fully maintained during the
progress of the Works and the Contractor shall take all necessary steps to prevent any interruption
to such.
The Contractor shall adequately protect, uphold, maintain and prevent damage to all existing
Services.
Should any works be required on or from any adjoining property, the necessary permission must
first be obtained by the Contractor
Part 1 - General Conditions

Should it be necessary for any plant, machinery or equipment to project or operate over adjoining or
adjacent property or rights-of-way the Contractor shall obtain the permission of the adjoining or
adjacent owner or occupier and obtain legal licence as necessary. The Contractor shall be deemed
to have allowed for the payment of any fees and charges in connection therewith. The Contractor
shall indemnify the Authority against any claim or action for damages arising from the use of any
plant, machinery or equipment. The Contractor shall ensure that the security of the adjoining or
adjacent properties shall not in any way be impaired by the carrying out of the Works.


A3.6.4    Stability
The Contractor shall be responsible for the stability and structural integrity of the Works during the
Contract, providing all necessary support. He shall prevent overloading.


A3.6.5    Use of the Site


A3.6.5.1 Control of the Site
The Contractor shall confine all workpeople (including sub-contractors' and statutory undertakers'
workpeople) to the site of Works.

The Contractor shall ensure that management and supervision is maintained for the works on the
school Sites during normal working hours when the site is open. All significant types of work must
be under the close control of competent trade supervisors to ensure maintenance of satisfactory
quality and progress. The site organisation staff must include persons with appropriate knowledge
and experience of mechanical and electrical engineering Services to ensure compatibility with the
works in general.

The Contractor must not use or occupy or permit the site or any land upon which the works are
being undertaken to be used or occupied for any purpose other than the carrying out of the works.
He shall also not deposit or manufacture or permit to be deposited or manufactured on the site or
any land upon which the works are being undertaken any materials which are not required for the
carrying out of the works.

The Contractor shall also not permit or suffer the storage of materials or the parking of vehicles in
the immediate external vicinity of the boundaries of the sites by the Contractor, or any Building Sub-
Contractor other than for reasonable periods necessary for loading and unloading or as set out in
the Contractors Proposals.

Outside normal working hours the Contractor shall ensure that the site is closed and secured.

The Contractor shall ensure that all operatives and Contractors parties shall be fully clothed at all
times whilst on site, refrain from playing music, smoking and swearing. The Contractor shall be
required to remove persons who breach these requirements from the site immediately.
Part 1 - General Conditions

A3.6.5.2 Temporary fences, hoardings, fans and gantries
Hoarding and access gates of good quality shall be provided, if required.
The Contractor shall be deemed to have allowed for maintaining hoardings in good condition, for
maintenance of lighting, for alterations and adaptations necessitated by the carrying out of the
Works, and for taking down and clearing away when no longer required.


A3.6.5.3 Temporary screens and walls
The Contractor shall provide, maintain (including taking down and re-erecting from time to time as
necessary), clear away and make good all necessary temporary screens and walls, etc., for the
proper execution of the Works.


A3.6.5.4 Temporary roofs
The Contractor shall provide, maintain (including taking down and re-erecting from time to time as
necessary), clear away and make good all necessary temporary roofs, etc., for the proper execution
of the Works.


A3.6.5.5 Scaffolding
If the Contractor strikes scaffolding before ascertaining whether it is required by any statutory
authority or the Authority‟s Representative, they will be responsible for re-erecting the scaffolding if
so required at their own expense.

A3.6.5.6 Temperature and humidity
The Contractor shall provide all temporary protection required for drying out and controlling the
temperature and humidity of the Works in an efficient manner.
The Contractor shall dry out the Works, maintain an adequate temperature and control the humidity
levels in all parts of the Works as necessary to facilitate the progress and satisfactory completion of
the Works including work of sub-contractors and persons directly engaged by the Authority.

The drying out and humidity of the Works and the application of heat shall be so controlled as to
prevent any excessive movement, blistering or failure of adhesion and to prevent any damage due
to trapped moisture or other causes. A control system shall be provided for whatever method of
drying is adopted to limit the temperature and humidity range and provide all necessary monitoring
equipment.

The Contractor shall be deemed to have allowed for all costs in connection with drying out and
controlling the temperature and humidity of the Works.

The Contractor will not be permitted to use the permanent heating/air conditioning system for drying
out and controlling the temperature and humidity of the Works.
Part 1 - General Conditions

A3.6.5.7 Temporary telephones
The Contractor‟s own telephone and fax facilities shall be made available to the Authority and his
representatives and the Contractor shall be deemed to have allowed for the cost of the calls made
by and on behalf of the Authority and his representatives.

A3.6.5.8 Identity Cards
The Contractor shall provide identity cards for all its operatives (including sub Contractors). Such
operatives shall wear identity cards at all times when on the Site or working on the project.

The Contractor will not employ operatives or managers working on site or visiting site who have a
Criminal Record relating to paedophile crimes. The Contractor will vet his staff and sub contracting
and sub-consultants staff to ensure compliance with this requirement. Where requested by the
Authority, the Contractor will submit all names of people working or visiting site so that they can
undertake their own additional checks.

A3.6.5.9 Site Name board
The Contractor shall provide a name board for the duration of the works at the school Sites subject
to the agreement of the Authority‟s Representative as to the design and position, but of sufficient
size to display the scheme name and description, the Authority‟s and the Contractor‟s names and to
enable the erection of professional name boards for all the consultants involved, including those
consultants employed by the Authority. The Contractor shall be responsible for including any logo or
other signage required by DCSF or other funding bodies.
The Contractor shall not erect or exhibit or permit or suffer to be erected or exhibited on any part of
the site any signs or trade boards save those previously approved in writing by the Authority (such
approval not to be unreasonably withheld or delayed).
The Contractor shall allow for fixing professional name boards and for removing on completion of
the Works.
A3.6.5.10 Fire Access
The Contractor shall ascertain the required access routes for the fire brigade and those routes are
to be kept open and maintained throughout the Contract Period including nights and weekends.
In refurbishment schemes, emergency exit routes from existing buildings must be maintained at all
times and changed as necessary. The Contractor shall liaise with the Authority‟s Representative
when defining such exit routes.
A3.6.5.11 Fire Precautions
The Contractor shall comply with the Code of Practice entitled Fire Prevention on Construction Sites
published by the BEC/LPC. He shall appoint a Site Fire Safety Co-ordinator and implement any
temporary fire strategy before commencing work as required by the Local Authority.
The Contractor shall take all reasonable precautions to prevent the outbreak and spread of fire and
shall provide and maintain suitable and adequate fire fighting equipment at points adjacent to the
Works and unfixed materials and shall observe strict fire prevention measures throughout the
Works.
Part 1 - General Conditions

Potential hazards shall be discussed and fire precautions shall be agreed with an appropriate Fire
Officer from the Fire Brigade, the Authority‟s Representative prior to commencement of work.
The Contractor shall allow facilities for any visits the Fire Officer may make, to inspect the site and
buildings in order to ensure that fire precautions are adequate and shall comply with any reasonable
request made by the Fire Officer in this connection.
No smoking or bonfires shall be allowed on the school Sites.


A3.6.5.12 Route Signage and Site Delineation
The Contractor shall provide adequate signage and barriers to the school Sites for the purposes of
separating the works operations from those of the schools and the separation of vehicles from
pedestrians.
A3.6.5.13 Work Beyond the Boundary of the Site
Where work is described as being executed beyond the boundary of the school Sites or in the public
highway, the Contractor shall be responsible for all watching and lighting, traffic signalling,
temporary barricades, walking platforms and warning notices to ensure the safety of all persons.
The Contractor shall also remain responsible for removing the same on completion, giving all
notices to the relevant Authorities, paying associated fees and charges and carrying out the work to
their satisfaction.
A3.6.5.14 Working Hours
Working hours are normally 8.00 a.m. to 6.00 p.m., Monday to Friday. No work shall be executed
outside these times unless in exceptional circumstances and then only with the written approval of
the Authority‟s Representative. Planning restrictions may also apply. Where the Contractor intends
to work outside agreed „normal working hours‟ a minimum of 2 working days notice and detailed
reasons are required for consideration by the Authority‟s Representative.
A3.6.5.15 Trees, Hedges, Shrubs and Lawns
The Contractor shall adequately protect and preserve all trees, hedges, shrubs and lawns on the
school Sites, except those to be removed. If damage or removal of species occurs that is not in
accordance with the Authority requirements then the Contractor is required to treat or replace such
species. The Contractor must not unnecessarily disturb trees or planted areas either by the disposal
of surplus spoil or excavation of topsoil.
A3.6.5.16 Control of Noise & Pollution
The Contractor‟s attention is drawn to statutory requirements regarding the control of noise and
pollution in relation to the demolition and construction works and to the need to obtain all necessary
prior consents from the relevant Authorities. All Works must be carried out in accordance with the
Construction Programme so as to minimise disruption to Educational Services. Noisy works must be
avoided during lessons generally and absolutely during examination periods. Where unavoidable
noise may occur during the school day in an operational school, the Contractor shall give at least 24
hours notice of the time and duration of the impending disturbance to the school‟s Representative.
Part 1 - General Conditions

The Contractor shall at all times prevent any public or private nuisance (including, without limitation,
any such nuisance caused by noxious fumes, noisy working operations or the deposit of any
material or debris on the public highway) or other interference with the rights of any adjoining or
neighbouring landowner, tenant or occupier or any statutory undertaker arising out of the carrying
out of the Works and shall assist the Authority in defending any action or proceedings which may be
instituted in relation thereto.
The Contractor shall be responsible for and shall indemnify the Authority from and against any and
all expenses, liabilities, losses, claims and proceedings whatsoever resulting from any such
nuisance or interference.
The Contractor shall take all necessary precautions to prevent nuisance from smoke, dust, rubbish,
vermin and other causes.
The Contractor shall be deemed to have allowed in his prices for complying with the requirements of
local authorities and the Health and Safety Executive with regard to control of noise, pollution and
all other statutory obligations.
The Contractor's particular attention is drawn to the rights of restrictive action which exist by virtue
of the Environmental Protection Act 1990 and of Sections 60, 61 and 68 of the Control of Pollution
Act 1974 and he shall comply with any statutory notices, conditions or limitations that may be
imposed on him or on the Authority by any local authority.
The Contractor shall make all applications and obtain all such consents as are required under the
said Acts.
Without prejudice to his duty to comply with the Control of Pollution Act 1974, the Contractor shall
allow for complying with BS 5228 "Code of Practice for Noise Control on Construction and
Demolition Sites" including the recommendations on community relations, planning and supervision.
The Contractor shall inform the Authority‟s Representative in writing of any contravention of the said
Act or British Standard within three days of such. The Authority‟s Representative shall have power
thereupon or upon the said contravention coming to his notice to issue such instructions as he may
think fit to abate, avoid or halt any further contravention and the Contractor shall comply with such
instructions at his own cost.
If the Contractor shall be guilty of any offence under the said Act or British Standard, he shall
himself pay all fines imposed by the court by which he has been convicted and shall not be entitled
to be indemnified by the Authority in respect of any such fines.
The Contractor shall not be entitled to reimbursement by the Authority of any costs, damages, loss
or expense to which the Contractor has been or may be put, which have been occasioned or
caused by compliance with any such notice, consent, limit, condition or instruction as
aforementioned. The Contractor shall not be entitled to any extension of time for delays caused by
such compliance.
The use of explosives will not be permitted unless expressly agreed with the Authority‟s
Representative.
All plant, tools and vehicles shall be fitted with effective silencers of a type recommended by the
manufacturers of the plant, tools and vehicles.
The Contractor shall not permit radios or other audio equipment to be used on site in ways or at
times which may cause nuisance.
Part 1 - General Conditions

The Contractor shall take all necessary measures to ensure that no oil, grease or deleterious,
dangerous, poisonous, explosive or radioactive matter are discharged from the site into any rivers,
ditches, watercourse or services media on the site and/or any adjoining property. The Contractor
shall not permit or suffer the blockage of any such rivers, ditches, watercourses or services media
by reason of anything done or omitted on the sites or any land upon which the works are being
undertaken, and shall comply at his own expense with any requirements of the Environment Agency
or any other relevant authority so far as such requirements relate to or affect the Works.
The Contractor shall take all necessary measure to ensure that no oil, grease or deleterious,
dangerous, poisonous, explosive or radioactive matter are discharged from the site into any rivers or
any ditches or services media on the site and/or any adjoining property and/or existing school. The
Contractor shall not permit or suffer the blockage of any of such rivers, ditches and services media
by reason of anything done or omitted on the sites or any land upon which the works are being
undertaken, and shall comply at the his own expense with any requirements of the Environment
Agency or any other Relevant Authority so far as such requirements relate to or affect the works.


A3.6.5.17 Site Access
Temporary and permanent access to and from the Sites, internal highway arrangements and
movement and parking of traffic within the site boundary shall be agreed with the relevant school
and the Authority‟s Representative prior to commencing work on site.
The Contractor shall not gain or allow access to and egress from the Sites except as set out in the
Contractors Proposals.


A3.6.5.18 Protective Clothing
The Contractor shall provide and maintain protective clothing, footwear and headwear as required
by the Health and Safety Executive for all personnel engaged on or visiting the works and for the
sole use of persons acting on behalf of the Authority.


A3.6.5.19 Health and Safety
In relation to all demolition and construction works, the Contractor shall take all necessary steps in
accordance with Legislation with regard to ensuring that the health and safety of all occupants of the
sites, individuals invited onto the sites, occupants of existing schools and occupants of adjoining
properties is not adversely impacted upon by the undertaking of the Works.
The Contractor‟s attention is drawn to statutory requirements regarding the health and safety of all
personnel engaged on or visiting the works and to members of the public and to the need to obtain
all necessary prior consents from the relevant Authorities. The Contractor will also note that where
existing Sites continue to be occupied by children during the construction works particular care must
be taken to safeguard them.
The Contractor shall comply with all current safety, health and welfare legislation, all current
approved Codes of Practice issued by the Health and Safety Commission, all current guidance
issued by the Health and Safety Executive and the Code of Welfare Conditions of the National Joint
Council for the Building Industry.
Part 1 - General Conditions

The Contractor shall ensure that assessments are made such that all significant risks likely to arise
throughout the construction phase are anticipated and that appropriate steps are taken to eliminate,
reduce or control the risk in accordance with the Management of Health and Safety at Work
Regulations 1992.
The Contractor shall make specific site rules dealing with the wearing of PPE, drinking, smoking and
general housekeeping discipline on site.
The Contractor shall prepare an overall emergency plan for the site, which shall include details of
how fires will be dealt with throughout the construction phase. The Contractor will share these plans
with the Authority. He will also undertake induction course in reference to the plan with the school
and all affected parties where the content of the plan has an affect on the safety of people and
pupils in retained buildings in close proximity to the works.
A3.6.5.20 Dust Control
The Contractor should note that in many cases the neighbouring properties to the school Sites will
be residential property, and without prejudice to its liabilities and responsibilities in the Scheme
Contract, the Contractor should take full responsibility for any complaints or claims resulting from
their failure to control dust on the site.
The Contractor shall provide and remove on completion such screens, dustsheets, etc, as it
considers necessary to minimise the nuisance caused by the distribution of dust including the
prevention of damage to the schools‟ equipment etc.
A3.6.5.21 Pest Control
All reasonable precautions shall be taken to avoid infestation of the Works by rats and mice.
When drains are being laid, precautions shall be taken to avoid the entry of rodents, including
providing temporary stoppers to pipe ends and setting manhole covers in position as the work
proceeds. Pipes and cables passing through the foundation walls shall be properly built with
appropriate seals.

A3.6.5.22 Debris

The Contractor shall not sell or dispose of any earth, clay, sand, gravel, chalk or other material from
the sites or any land upon which the works are being undertaken or permit or suffer the same to be
removed, except so far as shall be necessary for the proper execution of the works, without the
consent of the Authority which shall not be unreasonably withheld.
The Contractor shall, at his cost, transport all surplus materials arising from the Works and arrange
for the tipping of the same at such places as may lawfully be used for tipping. The Contractor shall
(until such time as such material is lawfully tipped) ensure that such materials will not cause or give
rise to pollution of the environment as defined by section 29(3) Environmental Protection Act 1990.
Part 1 - General Conditions


The Contractor must take all necessary measures to prevent damage, loss, injury or nuisance
caused by:

   Mud, dirt stones or other materials used or generated whilst carrying out demolitions. This
    includes, but is not limited to, ensuring that no fuel or lubricant, mud, dirt, stones or other
    material is spilled or deposited on the highway whether or not it is open to traffic;
   Smoke or dust generated whilst carrying out the demolition works; and
   Bonfires, which will not be permitted.


The Contractor shall take the necessary measures to ensure that all vehicles leaving the Sites are
adequately cleaned to prevent the deposit of waste materials and debris on any Adjoining Property
and/or the Existing schools and if any such material or debris is so deposited the Contractor shall
forthwith employ such measures as shall be necessary to remove the material and debris and to
clean and reinstate any Adjoining Property and/or Existing schools to the reasonable satisfaction of
the owners or occupiers of any Adjoining Property and/or Existing schools as the case may be.


A3.6.5.23 Demolition Works
The Authority will not permit any demolition work to be carried out on Saturdays, Sundays, Statutory
Bank Holidays or during specific times designated by the school such as examinations without
specific prior approval by the Authority‟s Representative.
The Building Act 1984 Section 80 (Duty to give Local Authority Notice of Intended Demolition) will
apply.
The Contractor‟s attention is drawn to the “Code of Practice for the Control of Noise, Vibration and
Dust from Major Civil Engineering Projects” April 1996 published by Environmental Protection
Services.


A3.6.5.24 Site Hazards
The Contractor must prevent fire or explosion caused by gas or vapour.
The Contractor must prevent nuisance from dust by appropriate methods of working, by the use of
water as appropriate, by screening, enclosure or extraction using appropriate equipment. The
Contractor shall ensure that all sensitive equipment owned by the schools‟ is protected from dust
during such works.
The Contractor must take adequate precautions to protect pupils, staff, the general public and site
operatives from dangerous fumes and dust arising during the demolition works.


A3.6.5.25 Water for the Works
Prior to the commencement of the demolition works, the Contractor must ensure that reasonable
measures for dust suppression are in place.
Part 1 - General Conditions

Should the use of water for dust suppression result in a drop in pressure to other users in the
vicinity, then the Contractor shall programme the works to prevent this, or provide an alternative
means of supply.


A3.6.5.26 Utilities Used During The Works
A3.6.5.26.1    Location of Existing Services
Whilst the Authority has sought and will be making available details of existing Services routes on
the school Sites the information is not warranted and therefore the Contractor should take all
reasonable steps to ascertain the accuracy of such information including where necessary any
additional surveys.


A3.6.5.26.2    Continuity of Existing Services
The Contractor shall ensure that all power, energy and water supplies used during the works are
separately metered where utilising the schools supplies unless a separate supply is procured by the
Contractor. The Contractor shall provide meter readings to the relevant school‟s Representative
and Authority‟s Representative at the commencement and completion of each phase of the works.
The Contractor shall reimburse the relevant school for all power and water utilised. For the
avoidance of doubt this shall include a proportion of all heating bills relating to works areas until the
Works are handed back to the school.


COMMENTARY 51


A3.6.5.27 Protection of the Public and the Environment
The Contractor must take steps to protect the public against harm due to the demolition works.
These steps shall include the provision and adaptation maintenance and removal as required of all
necessary temporary fences, barriers, hoardings, guard-rails, screens and the like.
The Contractor must take steps to prevent dust, smoke, debris, artificial lighting, stockpiles,
temporary works and the like from causing unnecessary inconveniences or becoming a nuisance.
The burning of materials on site is prohibited. The Contractor‟s attention is drawn to the provisions
of the Clean Air Act 1933.


A3.6.5.28 Site Security
Adequate temporary hoardings and security fences shall be erected and maintained around the
works to prevent unauthorised persons from gaining access to the works at all times; especially
pupils.
Part 1 - General Conditions

The Contractor shall be deemed to have included all costs associated with the maintenance of the
lighting installations within the site, including all temporary power supply requirements, particularly
during periods of interruption to the mains power supply.

The Contractor shall safeguard the Works, materials and plant against damage and theft, including
all necessary watching and lighting for the security of the Works etc. and the protection of the Public
and the Authority.

All materials shall be kept in safe compounds so as not to allow access for vandalism.

A3.6.5.29 Safety of Pupils, Staff and the Public
The Contractor shall take all precautions necessary to ensure the safety of pupils, staff and the
public. The Contractor shall ensure that plant and equipment is not left unattended and is secured
during periods when the site is vacated. Access to scaffolding and entry points to the works and its
buildings shall be prevented to unauthorised personnel. In particular the Contractor shall ensure
that access to the works, whether this be via scaffolding, ladders, gates or temporary doors are not
left unattended when open such that pupils and other Authority parties can gain access.

A3.6.5.30 Temporary Accommodation
The Contractor shall not without the written consent of the Authority erect or permit or suffer to be
erected on the site any temporary structure except site accommodation.

Provision of temporary school accommodation identified as being required during construction of a
school shall ensure each school is able to deliver the curriculum to all its students, and to meet its
administrative, pastoral and other needs throughout the Work. The Contractor will be responsible for
providing this accommodation including, but not limited to, obtaining all consents, the supply and
erection of the school facilities, including all necessary ICT and utilities connections and the removal
and Site reinstatement following completion of the Works.

Where existing temporary accommodation at a site is re-used the standards applying to it will be to
the originally design-ed standards for that accommodation. The Authority will be responsible for the
provision of the accommodation to the relevant standard.

In any event, all temporary accommodation will be required to meet the following performance
requirements;
   To meet all current legislation and regulations;
   Take into account and where mandatory comply with all European and British Standards, Codes
    of Practice, DCSF guidance and DCSF Constructional Standards 1997 and approved
    documents as at 31 March 2004;
   To be sensitive to the local environment including neighbours;
   To provide an internal and external environment that is, safe and secure for all its users;
   To contribute to the overall smooth operation of the school during the main construction works;
   To ensure the entire curriculum, administrative and pastoral requirements of the school are not
    interrupted;
   To be timely having regard to the timescales in the Agreement; and
   To maintain existing open space as far as possible.
Part 1 - General Conditions

The Contractor shall provide, maintain (including heating, lighting and cleaning and taking down and
re-erecting from time to time as necessary) his own temporary accommodation for his use and the
use of site meetings during the construction phase. On completion, the Contractor will clear away
temporary buildings and reinstate external areas.


A3.6.5.31 Occupancy and Decanting
This responsibility applies to the transfer of the schools by the Contractor including all their
equipment, books, materials and pupils‟ work in progress. This requirement shall apply to the new or
refurbished school facilities and additionally for all schools at which temporary accommodation is
required during construction. It is to include commissioning of the Services, provision of crates,
removal and transfer to new designated locations.


The general performance requirements applicable to the occupancy and decant service are:
   To meet all current legislation and regulations;
   Take into account and where mandatory comply with all European and British Standards, Codes
    of Practice, DCSF guidance and DCSF Constructional Standards 1997 and approved
    documents as at 31 March 2004;
   To protect the health, safety and security of the Contractors employees, the Authority, Authority
    Related Parties, school staff and users, adjacent occupiers and the general public;
   To prevent or minimize to acceptable levels disruption, inconvenience and nuisance to the
    Authority, Authority Related Parties, each school and its users, adjacent occupiers and the
    general public;
   To prevent damage to or loss of property belonging to the Authority and that of its users,
    adjacent occupiers and the general public;
   To maintain the integrity and security of all data held by each school; and
   To ensure the curriculum, administrative and pastoral requirements of each school are not
    interrupted by works that are within the control of the Contractor.


A3.6.6     Site Contaminants

Where buildings are being demolished and/or refurbished, the Contract will need to set out who
assumes the risk for contaminants in and around those buildings.


A3.6.6.1    Asbestos
The Contractor is required to comply with the Control of Asbestos at Work Regulations, together
with its associated Approved Code of Practice. In so doing, the Contractor shall become the “duty
holder” and therefore responsible for managing asbestos for these Sites and take action to develop
and implement an Asbestos Management Plan, monitor the condition of asbestos by regular
inspection and update the asbestos register records. No materials or products containing asbestos
shall be used in the Works and during the operational phase.
Part 1 - General Conditions

The Contractor will be responsible for visiting the site to ascertain the means of access, nature,
content, condition and extent of any asbestos based materials and to any rubble, surface or buried,
resulting from previously demolished buildings.
The Contractor shall carry out all necessary removal or remedial works and shall allow in its pricing
for undertaking the Works and operations in accordance with its specification and all current and
foreseeable legislation, and associated practical guidance, leaving the site safe.
When the Contractor undertakes any work to existing buildings/Services, it is essential that it
proceeds with caution, taking care to establish whether or not there is a hazard arising from the
presence of asbestos. The Scheme Contract sets out the allocation of risk between the Contractor
and the Authority in respect of the financial consequences of Asbestos being discovered in existing
buildings during or after construction.
The Contractor shall report to the Authority Representative any suspected asbestos based material
discovered during demolitions / refurbishment work. The Contractor must avoid disturbing such
materials and inform the Authority Representative of the methods proposed for safe removal or
encapsulation in accordance with legislation and good industry practice.
In the event of any suspected leak of asbestos contaminated dust into adjacent areas, that area
shall be evacuated immediately and the Contractor required to collaborate in this matter as may be
appropriate, including the provision of an immediate warning to the Authority about the possible
hazard and the prompt provision of suitable air and / or dust samples for laboratory examination.
In addition to the new Control of Asbestos at Work Regulations and associated Approved Code of
Practice the Contractor shall be responsible for ensuring compliance with all statutory requirements.


Commentary 50


A3.6.6.2   Other Site Contaminants
The Contractor shall report to the Authority Representative the presence of any high levels of site
contaminants found during the works. The Contractor must agree with the Authority Representative
remedial measures to undertake for the Sites in accordance with legislation and good industry
practice. The Contractor‟s attention is drawn to Building Regulation Approved Document „C‟
containment section and also to the BRE report entitled „The Construction of New Buildings on Gas
Contaminated Land‟. Both documents provide details on the control and excavation of gaseous
contaminants and the necessary action on site.


A3.6.7     Other information
A3.6.7.1   Making the case for recycled content
The Authority may wish to adopt the recommendations made by the Government‟s Sustainable
Procurement Group, the Sustainable Buildings Task Group and WRAP and to specify a minimum
target for recycled content (as a percentage of the vale of materials) and are encouraged to do so
under the broad aims of this OS. It must be noted, however, that, at the time this guidance was
produced, no specific allowance has been made for these provisions within that allocated to the
Authority and no additional funding is currently available should additional costs arise.
Part 1 - General Conditions

A3.6.7.2   Commissioning
The Contractor will submit a commissioning strategy with the Contractor‟s Proposal‟s for comment
by the Authority‟s Representative. This will detail the extent of commissioning and the process to
ensure that full commissioning align to manufacturers installation and commissioning requirements.
The commissioning strategy will include involvement and representation by the Authority‟s
Representative for witnessing commissioning and being informed throughout the process.


A3.6.7.3   Induction
The Contractor shall provide induction training to the Authority‟s Facilities Management staff and
contractor in the operation of the completed building and equipment. The Contractor will also do the
same for catering staff in connection with the kitchen equipment.


The Contractor shall provide an induction to any new or refurbished building for all teachers, staff
and students at the dates and times identified in the Construction Programme in the manner set out
in the Contractors Proposals.


A3.6.7.4   Persons employed direct
The following works are not included in this Contract and may be executed by the Authority or
persons employed or engaged by the Authority contemporaneously with this Contract: -


A3.6.7.5   Work by Statutory Authorities
Work to be executed by local authorities and statutory undertakers
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

Introduction
Part 2 of of the Authority‟s Requirements provides the high level aspirations for the Project in terms
of the BSF/ACADEMIES Programme as well as from the Local Authority‟s perspective. It includes
guidance that Contractors should respond to in developing their proposals.
Its purpose is to convey educational and social issues and objectives that impact upon the design
and operation of an educational facility. This provides both important context and guidance as to
priorities which should be taken into account in the design development and service solutions for all
schools.
The overriding intention of this section is to assist bidders in developing proposals that exceed the
Authority‟s Requirements and provide accommodation that will aim to assist in achieving the
transformational change that is the central goal of the BSF/ACADEMIES Programme. This
information is provided with the express intention of prompting the Contractor to consider not just
the issues highlighted but others that are currently in the realm of educational thinking, those that
could become future issues affecting educational provision and those that are as important to all
stakeholders at a local level. It is also the intention to highlight the requirement for first class, 21st
century-fit accommodation that promotes effective teaching and learning, including use of
personalised learning approaches, facilitates for use by others, including pupils, their families and
community services, utilises technologies, both in the construction and operation of the facility,
promotes sustainable use and gives educational providers the best facilities in order to deliver their
goals.


Commentary 13
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.1 Current Authority Strategies And Policies

The Authority has prepared an Outline Business Case (OBC), which identifies this project as a
priority. This is available for inspection.


Contractors are advised that no warranty is given for accuracy or completeness of the information
provided.


Commentary 5
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.2 Educational Vision

A key requirement of BSF/ACADEMIES is that Authorities have an educational vision which drives
the local redevelopment programme. This vision is summarised in the OBC. The vision addresses a
number of key policy areas which all have influence on the requirements for school facilities. Those
policy areas which impact on building operations and design are set out in the following section. The
text in this Part 2 should serve as a guide for Authorities who should adapt it to their circumstances


Commentary 6


Achieving a transformational change in the way education is delivered is central to the Building
schools for the Future Academies programme. It seeks to move away from the old traditional
notions of schools, challenge them and champion a new way of thinking. Old ways and methods
shall be questioned and tested against new ones to be introduced to facilitate the major change to
education the 21st century demands. In order to assist the Contractor in understanding what could
be considered as “old” and “new”, the following table suggests words, concepts and approaches
that could be associated with both:


 Old                                                New



    Fixed class sizes;                                Variable class sizes on daily/weekly basis;

    Fixed school days/terms/year;                     Flexible school days/terms;

    Fixed curriculum;                                 Individualised learning, “virtual” schools;

    school as sole provider of education;             Links with other forms of educational
                                                        provider;
    Fixed complement of staff;
                                                       Integration with other services;
    Single site, formal education only;
                                                       Offsite teaching and learning;
    Culture of competition between providers;
                                                       Full community access and integration;
    Fixed classroom layouts;
                                                       Adaptable and flexible room layouts;
    The Authority should insert additional terms
     it associates with old ways and wishes to         The Authority should insert additional terms
     see changed.                                       it associates with transformation and
                                                        wishes to see incorporated.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives


2.2.1 School Organisation
A wide range of types of secondary schools has existed for many years. They may currently cater
for different age ranges, for example:
        11-16 secondary schools
        11-18/19 secondary schools
        12-16 secondary schools
        12-18/19 secondary schools
        9-13 middle (deemed secondary) schools
        13-18/19 secondary schools
        11-14 junior highs
        14-18/19 senior highs


Schools may operate within a system of selection, with one or more of the secondary schools being
grammar schools. There may also be single sex schools alongside co-educational schools, faith
schools and special schools catering for the secondary age range.
A large number of secondary schools also make wide-ranging provision for the community, and a
number have resourced units for special educational needs.
In addition to this, over recent years greater diversity of provision in the Secondary sector has been
and is being encouraged. Academies, Voluntary Aided schools, Specialist Schools, Foundation
Schools, extended schools, co-located schools and federations of schools all offer ways in which
pupils can be given a wider choice and a greater opportunity to attend schools which best suit their
needs, talents and interests. These school types have different requirements in terms of design and
operations.
There are also secondary special schools alongside mainstream secondary schools with resourced
units for Special Educational Needs. LEA‟s are developing ideas around co-locating special schools
on secondary school sites.

2.2.2 School Improvement
LEAs are responsible for school Improvement strategies in their areas. This includes identifying
strategies to address pupil underperformance and/or weaknesses in school management. These
may well impact on school design and operation and the Contractor shall make themselves aware
of them at the local level.

2.2.3 School Workforce remodelling
The quality of the working environment is essential for the whole of the workforce - support staff as
well as teachers and head teachers. school design needs to reflect the implications of the
Government‟s Workforce Reform Agenda and the contractual elements of the National Agreement
'Raising Standards and Tackling Workload', which will impact on all schools.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives


2.2.3 School Workforce remodelling
The core of this Agenda is creating capacity for teachers to focus on teaching, helping schools
deliver more effectively personalised teaching and learning. The central element is more support
staff undertaking activities that free teachers to concentrate on their core professional
responsibilities. Accommodation will increasingly need to reflect the implications of more adults in
schools. It must also provide teaching spaces that can be adapted to different models of curriculum
delivery, and space that enables teachers to get the most out of time they will be guaranteed for
preparation, planning and assessment.
Proposals should therefore consider:
          The Workforce Reform Agenda and in particular the contractual elements arising from the
           National Agreement: For example, each school building must take account of the fact
           that from September 2005, all teachers will be guaranteed time for planning, preparation
           and assessment;
          The impact of significantly more support staff in the school, e.g. staff rooms, toilets, office
           and storage space, car parking. This will not always mean more/larger facilities, but a
           more flexible, dynamic and creative use of space, which the potential impact will need to
           be considered; and
          The need for flexible accommodation to deliver different patterns of teaching and learning,
           e.g. larger and smaller groups or individuals.


2.2.4 ICT – e-learning and administration
ICT is already transforming the shape of teaching and learning across all subjects and ages. Not
only are children being taught in new and exciting ways, but they are learning new skills to enable
them to participate in our changing society and economy. Teachers are also seeing significant
changes beyond the classroom.
New school buildings must have the right physical spaces, these must be correctly configured for
the different requirements of whole class teaching and individual learning, with accessible power
and ICT networks and with appropriate environmental standards - heating, lighting, ventilation,
window blinds etc.

2.2.5 Special Education Needs & Inclusion
All teachers should expect to teach children with Special Educational Needs and all schools should
play their part in educating children from their local community, whatever their background or ability.
Though pupils with severe learning difficulties, disabilities, severe autism or more complex needs
will usually attend a special school (which may be co-located), they may attend mainstream school
on a part time inclusion basis or for social activities programmed by arrangement and as appropriate
for the individuals concerned.
One of the key effects of greater inclusion is an increase in pupil support, whether educational,
social or medical. Pupils with special needs require assistance from a number of people including
specialist teachers and health and social care professionals whose needs must also be considered.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

Access to the entire curriculum is essential for all pupils. Designs, should consider not only
circulation and access for disabled people, but also the suitability of workstations, the layout of the
school and the whole physical environment in relation to the likely population of pupils and adults,
allowing for full wheelchair accessibility. Designs should allow full participation in everyday life at
school as an enjoyable experience and promote pupils‟ self esteem, social ability and learning
achievement. This includes specialist provision and other facilities such as dining and social areas.
Facilities should ensure full accessibility and more resourced provision for Pupils with SEN and
disabilities in mainstream schools, including facilities that place SEN at the heart of the school - not
the far end of a corridor. Accessibility is not just about wheelchairs, but the whole range of
disabilities – visual impairment, hearing impairment, autism etc, all of which have their own
implications on building and external space design.

2.2.6 Extended school & Community Links
Involving and benefiting the community is a key role for the school of the future, it is already one of
the guiding principles behind Specialist Schools. Schools should be able to offer sports and other
facilities to others out of school hours, and may be linked to local regeneration. The Green Paper
„Every Child Matters‟ envisages the integration of children‟s‟ services, most likely on school sites.
The school may wish to stand out as a readily identifiable building and as a significant contribution
to the community and surroundings. The architecture of the school may usefully express the value
of education in the community and give a positive, welcoming image of the school. Attractive
landscaping around the buildings can create an inviting entrance frontage, with a welcoming
reception area that is immediately identifiable and feels safe and secure when visitors, pupils and
staff arrive.
Proposals should therefore:
          Identify the best way to provide the flexibility of space that will be required over time with
           changes in community use;
          Cover the additional access/security issues that community use will involve - both to the
           school building itself as well as the grounds, playing fields and car parking;
          Reflect an awareness of the diversity issues for community user groups, e.g. Muslim girls
           cannot use communal showers, toilets cannot face south-east etc;
          Consider any future community use in schools that have no immediate plans for it. The
           overall design should allow for future community use, either by conversion of space or by
           the easy addition of new facilities;
          Consider what different services the community will need e.g. a room with a sink for a
           health care worker; rooms for confidential discussion.


Commentary 7
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives


2.2.7 14-19 Education
A coherent 14-19 phase of learning will provide all young people with the opportunity to continue
their education in different settings, including schools, colleges, and the workplace. Through
collaborative working and greater curriculum flexibility, young people will follow a wider range of
both general and specialist courses that meet their individual needs and aspirations. Proposals
should ensure that all 14-19 year olds have access to a broad range of high-quality curriculum
options, including vocational options. However, it will not be possible to provide each secondary
school with the full range of facilities required for vocational courses and each LEA, in collaboration
with their local LSC, will need to plan together with the schools and local colleges how the different
specialist facilities for vocational education are to be distributed across the different sites providing
post-14 education.

2.2.8 Curriculum
The National Curriculum represents the basic educational entitlement for all pupils. Schools need to
be able to offer all pupils a stimulating environment which recognises the contribution each and
every subject makes to personal development and to overall levels of attainment. If schools are to
deliver personalised learning for all pupils, they must understand their needs and aspirations and
the wide variety of environments that will stimulate individuals and allow them to fulfil their potential.
In addition to teaching space, schools will want to consider the range of quiet space available for
individual or group study.
Recent research has shown that improvements to buildings and learning environments can have a
significant impact on educational performance. The formal curriculum will require a range of
appropriate, well-equipped teaching spaces and these are listed in the Area Data Sheets.
Equally important factors to consider in the design are the more subtle curriculum issues. The
learning that takes place outside the formal timetable – in the playground, the dining area or the
corridor – has been described as the „informal curriculum‟. The way such spaces are designed and
managed can have a significant impact on opportunities for informal learning. For instance, seating
areas and quiet corners encourage social interaction, and easy supervision can reduce bullying.
The message you get as you enter the school – described by the Learning Through Landscapes
Trust as the „hidden curriculum‟ – is another crucial influence on learning. The presence or absence
of enthusiasm for and opportunities for learning can be sub-consciously „read‟ in the frontage, the
foyer or the corridors of a school, as well as in its classrooms. The school should be able to present
an individual ethos and professional atmosphere, avoiding an institutionalised appearance, through
welcoming entrances and interesting display.

2.2.9 Behaviour & Attendance
Pupils‟ satisfaction with their environment can affect behaviour and self-esteem, and ultimately the
willingness and ability to learn. All pupils, including those with SEN and disabilities, should feel that
their needs are respected – not only in teaching areas, but in toilets, circulation, playgrounds and in
the provision of social spaces.
The design and disposition of spaces can be used to enhance and extend the pastoral support
structure in order to create a sense of belonging, especially among younger pupils. A secondary
school can feel intimidating, particularly for pupils in their first year. It is therefore important to
develop ways for pupils to get to know the buildings and each other gradually. The design should
allow a variety of organisations, to allow pupils to be grouped in various ways at different times,
offering them the opportunity to discover new friends, interests and places within the school.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives


2.2.9 Behaviour & Attendance (cont’d)
A particular issue in the secondary sector is the need for internal areas for pupils to gather, socialise
and access resources during breaks and before and after school. This might use circulation space
to create a unique, memorable place at the heart of the school, which celebrates the school‟s
individual, identity and character. Alternatively it may be achieved through the joint use of teaching
spaces throughout the school, by allowing easy supervision and open access to some areas,
allowing a variety of different types of activity.
Schools should be designed so that they avoid creating hard to monitor places where bullying can
take place and/or where pupils can hide away from lessons.


2.3 School Design

The following section sets out a number of key issues which should be considered in the design and
operation of schools. This should be adapted for specific project circumstances.
Contractor‟s proposals must demonstrate not only that the specific technical and aspirational
requirements of the schools, communities and other relevant bodies have been met or exceeded,
but that the historic, cultural and environmental context of the individual schools and sites are
reflected in designs. Alongside this, functionality in use, build quality, efficiency, sustainability and
aesthetic quality are all other key criteria. A sense of ownership by school Governors, staff and
pupils as well as the community will be central to the success of individual schools projects and
proposals will be expected to include ways of facilitating this in the design process.
All new and refurbished buildings shall be designed to reflect individual school aims and to give the
strong message of high expectation from the school and its other users. Designs should positively
influence the behaviour and enthusiasm of pupils and staff. They should not in themselves dictate a
school‟s approach to teaching and learning nor its organisational arrangements, but instead allow
the school‟s own ideas to be realised and implemented. These should also be within the context of
the LEA‟s priorities and Authority-wide plans, as well as national policy developments.
A summary of some of the priority issues to be addressed within the schools‟ design for building
fabric and services provision include:
     A sustainable, resource-efficient school with low environmental impact;
     Maximising the potential of the site and thoughtful location of new buildings;
     Clarity in the arrangement and location of entrances, main circulation routes and key spaces;
     Creation of spaces, where appropriate, that combine functionality within an environment that
      will stimulate and inspire young people;
     Imaginative design of internal circulation areas and external landscaping to allow informal
      and social use;
     Making creative and maximum use of natural light and materials;
     Designs that are aesthetically pleasing;
     Use of suitable materials and finishes;
     A safe and secure school, that remains flexible and adaptable;
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.3 School Design (cont’d)

     Appropriate use of resources which shall be up-to-date, safe, in good working order and
      accessible for all pupils and staff;
     A stimulating and pleasing environment, being clean and well maintained;
     Materials and components that ensure minimum inconvenience and disruption from
      breakdowns, repairs and maintenance activities;
     Consideration of the requirements of end users and the wider community;
     Spatial relationships that seek to maximise integrated Service provision and facilitate single
      site management;
     Designs that allow schools to provide efficient and effective staffing and management
      procedures with high levels of space utilisation;
     Responsive and effective facilities management Services; and
     An approach that takes account of national and local inclusion policies.

Commentary 8

2.3.1 Site, Location, Layout, Aspect and Orientation
The location of the school will have an important impact in achieving inclusion, community use,
security and sustainability. Where possible the site should be in the heart of the community so
minimising transport use, allowing safe routes to school and easy access to public or school
transport. When constructing a new school the location and aspect of the building are relevant
factors as are the context and surroundings. A full site survey and analysis should include:
       Orientation;
       Sun paths;
       Views into and from the site;
       Use of existing local movement patterns and traffic and pedestrian routes;
       Car parking and access;
       Local Safe Routes to schools policies;
       Ease of pedestrian access;
       Impact on security;
       Use of materials, cultural and social imagery and symbols to maximise acceptance from the
        community;
       Surrounding geology, geography and archaeological and historical features and buildings;
        and
       The natural environment – flora/fauna, protected natural habitats, wind direction and noise.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives


2.3.1 Site, Location, Layout, Aspect and Orientation (cont'd)
Early consultation should be carried out with the Planning and Highways Authorities and, in order to
minimise potential objections at a later stage in the process, local residents and wider the
community. This has the added advantage of being a source of valuable information such as site
characteristics and previous usage.
Whilst this is an easier process to carry out and resolve on green field sites, the same process and
analysis should be adopted for all projects including refurbished schools, and the optimum solution
identified in each case.

2.3.2 Flexibility and Adaptability
School buildings will need to be flexible enough to allow for short-term changes, for instance
different layouts in a room to suit various teaching styles, and adaptable enough to suit longer term
changes arising from developments from ICT to innovations in curriculum delivery, ideas for
extended school provision, integrating children‟s services in and around schools, and changes in
the size of the school population.
The activities that happen in schools are likely to change substantially over the longer term. Only the
dedicated specialist spaces – kitchens, halls, plant rooms and primary circulation areas, are unlikely
to move. However, they should be positioned carefully to allow for future change around them.
Every other space, from offices and classrooms to highly serviced laboratories is likely to be
reorganised to some extent over time. Although there is no statutory requirement, flexibility and
adaptability have been intrinsic in guidance on school buildings for many years.
Depending on the inherent design limitations and capacity, it is possible that circulation spaces may
need to change over the life of the building (if that change will be economically viable) and it is
therefore important to ensure that they are designed to standards that will endure for the required
term. In particular they must be designed to adequate space standards and their quality must be
such that they will be regarded as a positive feature. They must also operate as pleasant social
areas and should have good daylighting and ventilation.


Commentary 9


2.3.2.1 Flexibility
The flexibility to change the use of space or the activities accommodated on a day to day basis is
very important. The design implications of this requirement, however, need not be complicated or
costly. Flexibility is also essential to enable the needs of individual pupils to be met. For example, a
pupil who uses a wheelchair or works with an assistant may need a different furniture layout within
the space, and perhaps also adjustable furniture, to work alongside others and to move around the
room easily.
Most teaching rooms should provide a space that is sufficiently flexible to accommodate a broad
range of activities and a variety of furniture and equipment. This can generally be achieved by
keeping any fixed furniture and equipment to the perimeter and leaving the centre clear for loose
furniture.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.3.2.1 Flexibility (cont'd)
Designers will be expected to show initial furniture and equipment layouts for key example teaching
spaces. These can then be used to test the suitability of the design proposal within the available
space. It is essential to consider the particular activities taking place in each subject area,
particularly for practical subjects such as design and technology, art, music and science, in order to
refine the initial layout.


2.3.2.2 Adaptability
Secondary schools may have the freedom to change and extend patterns of teaching during the
school day to make the most efficient and effective use of the premises. Various models for
restructuring the school day, week and year include an extended school day with structured further
study, clubs and other activities and staggered lunch breaks.
Adaptability in designs is paramount, for instance:
       for longer term change from traditional classroom „boxes‟ that are likely to be preferred now
        to larger semi-open plan areas that may be preferred for some curriculum delivery in the
        future;
       To allow a variety of different curricula demands, particularly in line with proposals for 14 to
        19 delivery, and organisational changes, both when the school is first built and over time.
The ICT strategy will differ in each school and over time. As technology develops, schools may
move from ICT resources in specialist rooms, to more dispersed resources, and in the future to ICT
that is mobile, wireless and perhaps personally owned and carried around the school by pupils.
At present, schools tend to be used only during certain times of the day. In the future, ICT will
enable the school building to be used more flexibly. Some pupils may learn from home or elsewhere
for some aspects of their learning, and may not be required to be present in the building everyday,
so the patterns of access have the potential to change radically.


Commentary 10

2.3.3 Safety and Security
Safety and security begin with the positioning and aspect of new buildings, their entrances and
access routes, and are enhanced by, for example considering at an early design stage:
       Avoiding overly complex external building envelope forms which may create areas which
        cannot be easily supervised;
       Ensuring clear lines of sight exist along all pathways and accesses;
       Locating entrances so they are visible from public areas;
       Avoiding pedestrian routes surrounded by high vegetation or outbuildings;
       Providing obvious, well lit and visible pathways;
       Ensuring car parks are open and visible with bays close to main entrances;
       Entrances with secure lobbies, with controlled access to the main building;
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives


2.3.3 Safety and Security (cont'd)
       Locating cloak rooms and toilets in areas where they can easily be supervised;
       Fire and emergency escape routes and access for emergency vehicles;
       Placing waste materials and recycling facilities in secure compounds away from buildings;
        and
       Providing well organised internal circulation routes with clear signage. Corridors should have
        good visibility for supervision.


Access into the school should be well controlled through a secure, central reception area that
should be apparent to pupils and visitors. Some form of access control system, such as swipe cards
or remote unlocking may be required and in any event there should be a policy of access control in
force at all times, especially during out of hours use. Unauthorised access to the main school
buildings should not be possible through the reception area and some form of control should be
incorporated. Movement around the school of non-school staff should be managed through clear
and simple spatial arrangements with additional appropriate signage. Good sight lines should be
created between internal and external areas in order to safely monitor visitor and pupil movement.
Around the building perimeter, security can be enhanced by:
   Careful positioning of drainpipes and canopies that may otherwise provide unwanted access to
    high level windows and rooflights;
   Avoiding building in recessed doors and alcoves that offer refuge;
   Using sloped rather than flat roofs to make access more difficult;
   Good lighting;
   Considered use of security cameras;
   Avoiding thick planting areas close to the building that could provide cover from security
    cameras and users inside the building;
   Providing a perimeter walkway clear of furniture and obstructions; and
   Grounds perimeter fencing.
The use of security technology should be a considered option, not an automatic inclusion. The
individual school circumstances and security policy should be incorporated into the proposals and
the potential risks weighed against the detrimental impact of high level security measures. Early
dialogue with the school and the Community Liaison Officer from the local Police Force will provide
valuable information and advice when formulating a proposal for security. Where it is used it must
be discrete wherever possible with more visible methods restricted to selective and targeted areas.
School users should be made to feel safe but not overwhelmed or encumbered by high profile
security.
Whilst security of both buildings and occupants is clearly paramount it should not be to the detriment
of the overall appearance of buildings. In particular a “fortress” appearance to the buildings should
be avoided as this can adversely affect the occupants‟ perception and can discourage use by the
wider community. Any security provided should therefore be well designed, discreet and as
attractive as possible.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.3.3 Safety and Security (cont'd)
Thought shall be given to particular circumstances when deciding the type of alarm signalling, i.e.
audible or remote. The area in which the school is situated, proximity of occupied property and
particularly the presence of an on-site caretaker are factors to take into consideration. For instance,
if there is an on-site caretaker and other property adjacent with supportive occupants, the Police
shall be approached to permit an instant audible alarm (as opposed to a 10-minute delay on most
remote signalling systems) and, if high decibel sounders are installed internally, the chances of an
intruder staying long are minimal. Alternatively, a large site, surrounded by playing fields, with no
caretaker living on site and houses some distance away, a remotely signalling alarm with the usual
delay of 10 minutes on bells would suffice.
It is likely that any new systems will require confirmation technology before being granted Level 1
Police response. Further, any systems, which lose Level 1 response due to the number of false
alarm activations experienced will require the addition of confirmation technology before Level 1 is
reinstated. (Confirmation technology means the ability to confirm that alarm activation is actually
due to an intruder, through either internal CCTV pictures or microphone detected sound, both
transmitted to the alarm receiving centre, or the sequential activation of detectors tracking an
intruder‟s progress through the premises).

Commentary 11


2.3.4 Mechanical and Electrical Installations

Issues to be addressed within the schools‟ design for building services provision include:

   Creation of spaces, where appropriate, that combine functionality within an environment that will
    stimulate and inspire young people;
   Making creative and maximum use of natural light and materials;
   Use of suitable materials and finishes;
   A safe and secure school, that remains flexible and adaptable;
   Appropriate use of resources which shall be up-to-date, safe, in good working order and
    accessible for all pupils and staff;
   A stimulating and pleasing environment, being clean and well maintained;
   Materials, services selection and management ensuring minimum inconvenience and disruption
    from breakdowns, repairs and maintenance activities;
   Consideration of the requirements of end users and the wider community;
   Spatial relationships that seek to maximise integrated service provision and facilitate single site
    management;
   Responsive and effective facilities management Services; and
   An approach that takes account of national and local inclusion policies.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.3.4.1 Lighting
Good lighting, both artificial and natural, can have a powerful effect on the atmosphere of a space
and reinforce positive attitudes towards the learning environment. It is obviously of functional
importance as well and reference shall be made to the relevant guides and standards to ensure
compliance. Proposals shall demonstrate that lighting, both artificial and natural, will be harnessed
and controlled to best practice in terms of effective illumination, form, colour rendering, shading,
glare and heat gains and losses.
Room layouts shall be considered to ensure that the teacher or speaker does not face glare or be
seen against glare. Day lighting shall be designed to be integrated with the artificial lighting to take
advantage of energy saving measures such as automatic daylight level sensors where possible.
Designers need to focus on the need to provide substantially day lit rooms. Eye level and high level
windows need careful detail design and possible shading devices to ensure minimum glare and
avoid localised solar penetration, both of which can cause over-heating and computer display
screens and interactive white boards to become un-viewable.
The use of natural lighting shall be maximised but enhanced in areas where light levels change
abruptly to overcome shadows. This may be particularly relevant in areas such as changes of level
in stairwells and above ramps to avoid shadow risers and clearly illuminate treads and surface
changes. Windows and skylights in teaching areas and corridors shall also be positioned to avoid
glare and excessive heat gain.
Consideration shall be given to multi-use areas which will demand different levels of performance
from lighting. All teaching areas will need to provide lighting suitable for use with visual aids such as
projectors, electronic whiteboards and televisions and rooms such as science laboratories,
performance halls, drama and art spaces may require total exclusion of light at certain times. The
flexibility of lighting within multi-use spaces needs to be considered with regard to the type of usage
and range of users these areas may be subject to.
The specific needs of pupils and staff with impaired vision must be respected as lighting type is
especially important for lip-reading for example – down lighting shall be avoided because of the
shadows it can cast. Glare and reflections can also imbalance some hearing impaired pupils, and
cause discomfort and visual confusion in general to those with any sight difficulties.
Multi-switching, movement detectors, heat switching and auto switch-off capabilities will offer
greater potential for community use and utilise efficient, cost saving systems. However, careful
consideration of the use of the particular area is necessary when assessing the actual suitability of
that feature, for example the use of movement sensitive switching in rooms where the use is mostly
sedentary such as exam rooms would not be suitable.
There shall be careful control of lighting in spaces where the use of ICT is planned and with the use
of projectors and interactive whiteboards becoming more extensive, lighting arrangements shall be
adaptable.
External and emergency lighting is important, particularly to ensure safety and security at all times
including during out of core teaching hours when members of the public are likely to be within
perhaps unfamiliar surroundings in dark conditions.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.3.4.2 Temperature and Ventilation
Temperature and ventilation are two issues that are inextricably linked and that are essential to
providing a comfortable and fresh environment. Good indoor air quality is a key design issue, which
also has a direct bearing on the well-being of all users of the school premises. Whilst natural
ventilation is always preferred it is user dependant, subject to the local air quality and conditions and
has an impact on energy usage and acoustics. Proposals shall include the provision for effective
ventilation at all times to provide a wholesome environment and shall encourage the use of natural
ventilation wherever practical but consider the incorporation of automatic controls, heat recovery
methods and acoustic attenuation in the overall design to address these points.
Solutions to heat a building are relatively simple to affect and generally widely appreciated. The
source of far more user complaints than low room temperatures is that of high and excessive room
temperatures. It is therefore essential that proposals address the issue of keeping the building within
acceptable temperature ranges and ensuring that levels of coolness are maintained.
Compliance with acoustic performance requirements shall not be overlooked. Mechanical ventilation
may be necessary to satisfy statutory and health and safety needs such as in areas of high heat
load and/or pollution or to assist in avoiding excessive noise intrusion from external sources.
All systems shall be capable of dealing with localised conditions and responding swiftly to changes
in demand. The heating medium, whilst consuming the minimum of prime energy, must provide
good comfort levels in all spaces through innovative design, and simple to operate controls, which
harmonise with the user needs and the ventilation provision. Some pupils with particular needs or
disabilities may require different room temperatures, either warmer or cooler.
Toilets will require good ventilation and mechanical extraction may be required, especially in rooms
with no opening windows. In instances such as this, it may be beneficial to consider the use of
extract/supply units with combined heat recovery to improve energy efficiency and conform to
efficiency targets.
Air conditioning is not generally required or recommended except perhaps in localised
circumstances such as IT server rooms with a substantially high heat gain. Such systems are
generally high maintenance, high cost and high energy usage so their installation should be strictly
limited.
Certain pupils are more at risk than others from very hot surfaces. In schools with special needs
pupils or nurseries for example, the surfaces of radiators and exposed pipes within pupils' reach
shall not be hot enough to cause pain or physical injury. Pipework and radiators in such situations
shall be enclosed or guarded, or their temperature restricted to the specified maximum.
Good design shall look to engineer the building to avoid wide thermal variations where possible and
the selection and location of equipment can also help. For example by choosing flat screen monitors
for ICT suites that produce substantially less heat and locating servers (high heat producers) away
from public areas.
Consideration shall be given to multi-use areas, which will require different Performance Standards.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.3.4.3 Water
Wholesome water supplies and hygienic waste systems are required around the school, both
internally and externally and measures to conserve the use of water are also important, such as
harvesting and grey water use and the evaluation of proposals using BREEAM awards points for
conservation measures. The type and availability of supplies shall be chosen to fit with the school
requirements, considering such issues as storage availability, pressure, emergency provision etc.
Externally, water supplies will be needed for grounds maintenance, landscaping and fire fighting
and inside the building for catering, toilets, first aid rooms, changing facilities etc. Some departments
such as science may need dedicated or specialist supplies. Some schools may even have highly
individual needs such as those with Pupils with SEN and disabilities.
Should individual schools require drinking water supplies provided around the building rather than in
toilets then care must be taken in locating these stations to avoid misuse, spillages and waste.
Consultation with each school shall take place in order to locate these.

2.3.5 Access and Inclusion
All new buildings, and as far as possible refurbished schools, should seek to promote equal
opportunities by being fully accessible to all people including those with impaired movement or other
disabilities. This applies to students and staff as well as visitors and other members of the wider
community. People with disabilities should not be placed at a disadvantage by the design of the
building and should be able to use the same entrances and access routes as able bodied users.
The design of access points and circulation routes should assist people with impairments such as
mobility, sight or hearing.
Designs should therefore provide the following design features and facilities:
     Circulation
       Provide safe internal and external circulation for accessibility by people with disabilities and
       special needs. This will include readily identifiable routes („way finding‟ schemes) with colour
       contrast, tactile surfaces and good quality lighting and decoration to include visual contrast
       and clarity of changes in direction, levels and surfaces. They must also be wide enough for
       wheelchairs and other movement aids.
     Signage
       Appropriate size lettering with visual contrast to the background installed at an appropriate
       height where it is clearly visible to users, with tactile signage provided as appropriate.


Commentary 12


     Doors
       Easy to identify and user friendly to operate and allow for full wheelchair accessibility, with
       space for approach and operation of doors. Single leaf doors shall be wide enough to allow
       access, with good visibility maintained on both sides of the door. Alternatively, doors can be
       held open on electromagnetic catches linked to the fire detection system.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives


2.3.5 Access and Inclusion (cont'd)
     For all school premises
       Ramps and stairs now have shallower gradients and pitch, respectively, than under the
       previous Building Regulations, which are more suitable for children. (The DCSF
       Constructional Standards override the Building Regulations on Ramps Steps and Handrails
       in schools). Provide suitable handrails, balustrades and guards, which are attractive and
       easy to use by everyone. Lifts are to be sufficiently large and user friendly with some form of
       restriction on user types.


Designs should allow suitable arrangements to be made for pupils or staff who cannot escape
unassisted, particularly from upper floors. This is principally a management issue, but the usual
requirement for alternative directions of escape should apply, with adequately sized refuges
provided to allow pupils to wait in relative safety. These should be positioned either within all escape
staircases or leading directly into them.
The provision of good quality lighting and blinds throughout to avoid glare for those with visual
impairments is required which will also support the use of ICT. Down lighting should be avoided at
reception and in teaching spaces, where cast shadows make lip reading difficult.
Consideration should be given to choice of materials for finishes. Ceilings should have good light
reflectance, acoustic absorption and low maintenance. Walls should have smooth surfaces, which
have acoustic absorption qualities but are resistant to heavy use and are easy to maintain. Floors
should allow for safe, ease of movement, with suitable slip resistance, acoustic absorption, be
hardwearing and easy to maintain. Avoid acoustically hard surfaces, which create unwanted
background noise. Appropriate choice of materials and finishes encourage good behaviour of
pupils.
Proposals shall identify furniture needs and allow for the appropriate space, size and height furniture
for pupils with disabilities or special needs with adjustable height benching, tables and workstations


2.3.6 Furniture and Equipment
The selection of all furniture, indoors and out, shall consider the age and relative size and ability of
the main users. Furniture can be key to the delivery of effective flexible spaces and play a vital role
in facilitating good teaching and learning. It must therefore be considered at an early stage in the
design process. Early consideration of how best to integrate these elements into the design of the
building and ongoing operational Services is essential. Equipment shall be appropriate to the
teaching, learning, management and administration of the school as well as the demands of
community and other use.
In order to promote inclusion and allow all pupils to study in comfort, great care is needed in the
selection of furniture. Wherever possible, furniture shall provide flexibility, for example by being
adjustable in height, so that pupils of differing statures and those with disabilities can be
accommodated.
High quality F&E is expected in all schools. Quality of school furniture shall be considered a key
aspect of a school‟s interior. A school of the future accommodating a range of users shall
incorporate something more attractive than standard school furniture, to fulfil the aims of inclusion
and community use. All furniture shall be ergonomically designed and built for heavy use from a
range of users.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.3.6 Furniture and Equipment (cont'd)
Proposals for F&E provision and installation have to resolve a considerable number of elements,
some competing for priority and others that are conflicting. The strategy devised must therefore
consider very carefully the impact of these issues in each school and select the most appropriate
items in each case. All F&E, however, shall:
     be robust and sturdy;
     be considerate of the users including the disabled or those with mobility difficulties;
     provide Value for Money;
     offer flexibility and choice;
     have minimum maintenance requirements;
     be ergonomically designed;
     support the learning process; and
     accord with industry best practice and in compliance with all statutory regulations related to
      maintenance and management as well as provision.


The selection of outdoor furniture and equipment is also important and contributes to the learning
process and place within the facility as a whole. Many of the issues noted are similar, with the
additional considerations such as exposure to extremes of weather, the possibility of theft and
vandalism, use in heavy and group play, season-specific items and movement over distances (for
example moving rugby posts to storage at the close of season).
The following are basic examples of issues to consider when selecting and locating furniture and
equipment, specifically to facilitate and promote inclusion and wider community use:
     Widespread provision of adjustable furniture for those with SEN or disabilities;
     Using standardises colour schemes and systems to allow interchange between rooms;
     Use F&E specifications to inform the actual room sizes through design;
     Gas lifts for ease of adjustment;
     Seating in a playground area could have armrests, and heel space underneath, to help
      someone with impairment to rise;
     Gaps next to each seat in a playground area for wheelchair space;
     Well sited litter bins to encourage use; and
     Semi-permanent fixings for removal or repositioning due to change of use or seasonal
      variation.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.3.7 Decorations and Finishes
The type and level of finishes within a building will set the mood of a school and can have a
significant impact on the attitude and conduct of those using the facilities. It can therefore be used
as an educational tool, to increase the will and ability to learn, to improve behaviour and attract
community use.
The Authority would like to see a move away from traditional institutional aesthetics towards the
provision of an environment that is welcoming and stimulating internally and externally. Variations of
colour and texture will add to the excitement and appreciation of space but can also be used to
assist users to orientate themselves.
Selection of finishes shall:
     take account of safety and fitness for purpose;
     be modern and lively;
     fit with the school ethos;
     be relevant to the area, use and age of occupants;
     be able to withstand heavy usage and potential vandalism;
     be resilient to impact and minimise noise;
     be slip-resistant (floors); and
     provide joints and seals between different floor finishes that are level and provide a
      continuous surface for wheelchairs and the like.
Proposals shall recognise that whilst higher quality finishes, fixtures and fittings may increase initial
expenditure they may better serve the needs of the users (including third parties who will be
attracted by a high-quality environment) as well as reducing maintenance and life-cycle costs, thus
producing better Value for Money.
Some form of artistic input to the project design team at an early stage could contribute substantially
to achieving the appropriate environment for a school for the future. For example it might be
possible to incorporate a particular form of artwork that promotes a particular feature or ethos of the
school such as a stained window in a Church school. Some local schemes may benefit form
engagement with the school and community to integrate some form of artistic work within the
building design. Each school shall be consulted throughout the design process.


2.3.8 Acoustics
Education is an acoustically demanding activity involving competing objectives in different environs.
Good acoustic properties are essential to learning and teaching alike.
Some activities demand the same clear sound transmission properties within a particular room for
those participating yet superior air and impact-borne sound insulation in rooms such as music,
drama and dance, to prevent transmission to adjacent rooms. Presentations and discussions with a
group of pupils or quiet study also need far better sound insulation than more informal individual or
group work.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.3.8 Acoustics (cont'd)
For these reasons there will be a need for a variety of spaces in a school catering for different uses
and providing different acoustic qualities. Open plan areas can be very successful but only for some
activities and they rely on a reasonable level of behaviour by occupants to avoid disturbance. Noisy
activities can disturb quiet ones, and the location of spaces shall be considered at a very early
design stage.
Speech intelligibility can also govern attention spans and it is essential to understanding and
learning. Hearing impaired pupils need good acoustics in order to access the national curriculum
and may find they cannot discriminate between noise and speech as well as people with full
hearing. They cannot distinguish speech where there is too much echo, and hearing aids amplify
background noise that is within a room, or that enters it from outside. This further reduces the use a
hearing-impaired pupil can make of their available hearing, when developing oral communication
skills. The range of pupils and indeed people from the wider community using the building will
include not just those that have difficulty in hearing but also those where English is a second
language, who have Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) or who have gaps in oral
language skills.
As schools develop wider integration with the community, the range of people using the school
diversifies and the building and facilities will need to cater for this and in some cases legislation will
demand it. This range of users and uses puts pressure on the acoustic performance of the building
and many elements of the fabric need to be assessed. For example, external noise may limit the
chances of opening windows and therefore acoustically attenuated air vents or mechanical
ventilation methods will become necessary. Consequently, acoustics shall be regarded as a very
high importance issue within the design process and the early appointment of an Acoustic
Consultant essential. Advice shall be obtained regarding such things as site and internal room
layout, provision of noise attenuation barriers and choice of ventilation systems.



2.4 High Level Design Objectives

2.4.1 The learning environment
Environmental design in the broadest sense, includes the sensory environment (light, air,
temperature and sound), building aesthetics and functionality (furniture, fixtures and finishes and the
external environment). A good learning environment should be functional, humane and attractive.
By raising pupil and staff morale, such an environment can have a number of benefits including:
       Contributing towards more effective learning and working;
       Contributing to the good health and well being of the building occupants;
       Reducing poor behaviour and stimulating positive behaviour;
       Encouraging older pupils to stay on to further education;
       Attracting community and business use;
       Encouraging adults returning to education;
       Attracting and retaining staff; and
       Helping very young children learn.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.4.1 The learning environment (cont'd)
The following is a list of high level design objectives, which the Authority should amend and adapt
and expand upon to suit their circumstances.


Some of the Authority‟s main design objectives for the learning environment for proposals are:
       Provide sufficient places for [increasing/falling] school rolls;
       Maximise the potential use of each site;
       Locate new buildings on the sites in a manner that will permit possible future extensions;
       Create buildings which are accessible for all staff, pupils, governors parents and members of
        the community including those with disabilities and the design solutions offered are expected
        to be examples of good practice in design, to promote social inclusion (see Site, Location,
        Layout, Aspect and Orientation above);
       Promote the Authority‟s existing policy of inclusion of children with special educational
        needs;
       Address maintenance backlog at the schools;
       Address accommodation deficiencies at the schools;
       Embody the schools‟ vision statements;
       Have imaginative design of social spaces, both internal and external;
       Are appropriate to accommodate listed buildings or conservation areas where applicable;
       Allow for repair to existing buildings, if appropriate, in sympathetic materials;
       Ensure sustainability by balancing the use of materials which are initially costly but which
        provide reduced lifecycle and energy costs;
       Create opportunities for recycling both in the construction and operation of the building; and
       Provide appropriate security measures for pupils and staff (see Security below).
The Authority‟s aim is for schools to be „schools of the Future‟ through:
       Incorporating the latest design principles of good practice as promoted by the DCSF (in
        BB95), CABE and others;
       Providing a focus for the community and a commitment to Lifelong Learning, offering a wide
        range of recreational and educational facilities (i.e.: library, sports, health, etc);
       To incorporate flexibility in design to accommodate future uses and changing demands of
        the curriculum and inclusion; and
       To support environmental sustainability issues in relation to the schools.
The Authority, wishes the Contractor to deliver, through design, the optimum configuration for the
accommodation, whilst providing the appropriate balance of teaching, administration and social
areas to promote the schools vision, a healthy school ethos and to ensure that their curriculum is
delivered efficiently and effectively.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.4.1 The learning environment (cont'd)
The Authority will be looking to promote and assess proposals against the following key points for a
good school design based on current CABE guidance:
       Good clear organisation, an easily legible plan, and full accessibility.
       Spaces that are well proportioned, efficient, fit for purpose and meet the needs of the
        curriculum;
       Circulation that is well organised, and sufficiently generous, and in particular a main entrance
        that can be clearly “read” as such, with good arrival space. (see Movement and Navigation
        below);
       Main and secondary entrances should incorporate some form of controlled access and allow
        manual supervision with clear sight lines in order to manage the movement of pupils and
        visitors on the school site;
       Good environmental conditions throughout, including appropriate levels of natural light and
        ventilation;
       Attractiveness in design, comparable to that found in other quality public buildings, to inspire
        pupils, staff and parents;
       Good use of the site to promote a public perception as a civic building and engender local
        ownership;
       Attractive external spaces with a good relationship to internal spaces and offering
        appropriate security and a variety of different settings.
       A layout that encourages broad community access and use out of hours, where appropriate;
       Robust materials that are attractive, that will weather and wear well and that are
        environmentally friendly (see Materials and Life Expectancy section); and
       Flexible design that will facilitate changes in policy and technology and which allows
        expansion or contraction in the future, where appropriate.
The Contractor should consider how the designs address the following “watch points” which
represent typical design and construction issues:
       Teaching and circulation areas should make the most of opportunities for natural light to
        avoid an institutional character;
       Ensure that there is adequate, easily controlled ventilation which is not obstructed or
        hindered by mechanisms to control solar glare;
       Similarly, ensure there is sufficient temperature control measures, especially in spaces
        experiencing high heat gain;
       Local control for ventilation, heating, glare and light levels is preferred to centralised control;
       Ensure that there are no leftover or unplanned outdoor spaces with little function. They
        should be overlooked by internal spaces or have access to them;
       Designs should co-ordinate mechanical and electrical services, including exposed conduits,
        alarm boxes, fire hydrants and emergency notices;
       Spaces between wings of buildings should be designed to avoid dank, sunless areas;
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.4.1 The learning environment (cont'd)
       The detailed design should pay attention to disabled access including provision of level
        thresholds; and
       The acoustic performance of the building is informed by early design decisions as well as the
        proposed construction and should comply with the relevant Building Bulletins and Part E of
        the Building Regulations.


2.5 Detailed Accommodation Requirements

2.5.1 Internal

The Authority requires school designs that will facilitate the successful delivery of the curriculum,
and meet all other educational and non-educational requirements as set out in the Authority‟s
Requirements.
Reference should be made to Part 3, Annex 3 & 4, which covers school-specific design
requirements in the form of Area Data Sheets for:
   teaching space requirements;
   non-teaching requirements including sanitary, medical, storage and canteen preparation areas;
   administrative accommodation;
   community facilities;
   external space.


Area Data Sheets are not provided for existing accommodation. Should Contractors propose to
retain existing spaces, output requirements and all performance criteria must be met in full as if they
were new build.
Contractors‟ attention is drawn to DCSF Building Bulletin 98, which provides guidance on the design
of school accommodation, available at: http://www.teachernet.gov.uk/sbareaguidelines .
Area relationships, must be as required by the Authority. Spaces must also perform as required by
Area Data Sheets. Contractors are expected to pay particular attention to the need for different
types of storage in the school, which should be well-integrated and contribute to the overall
performance of the building. Area Data Sheets refer to the particular requirements per space.
More details on building performance requirements are given under Part 3 of this Authority‟s
Requirements.

Commentary 14

Further design guidance on individual spaces is given in the following section.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives


2.5.1.1 Entrances
All school entrances should be highly visible from all access routes – pedestrian and vehicular and
easily accessible from car parks and drop off points.
A clearly defined, accessible and welcoming main entrance should compliment the functions of the
school, during and outside of the school day, and out of core teaching times. The image of the
school should be hospitable to the whole community in order to encourage a sense of ownership,
and accessibility.
Each school will require a reception desk located within clear view of the visitor entrance. This
usually provides for the first point of contact with visitors, prior to gaining access to the site. Suitable
visitor waiting areas should be provided away from pupil circulation areas. Reception arrangements
will vary between school sites, depending upon levels of community access and security strategies.
Co-location of administration and office functions should be considered to give easy access to
administration staff.
Entrances will provide an important interface between the security and comfort of the school and the
wider community and designed to provide for high quality interpersonal contact without
compromising security and inclusion. Each school will have their own requirements for the level of
security, but the solution must represent a balance between risk and intrusion.
It should provide enough space for disabled users, including those in wheelchairs, and parents with
pushchairs and prams to be welcomed and to move comfortably and freely at peak times and during
times of dual usage. Excellent levels of lighting, environmental and acoustic management are
necessary to provide social interaction and communication.
Separate access should be provided for deliveries, maintenance vehicles and personnel and waste
removal.
Some form of intermediate shelter may be required at main entrance points, particularly if access
control is incorporated.

2.5.1.2 Internal Circulation and Social Spaces
A clearly organised building layout shall enable ease of circulation for pupils, visitors and teachers.
This must be achieved at an early design stage and utilise the building architecture as well as just
signage. However, appropriate signage or way finding shall be provided where necessary to enable
new visitors to understand the layout of the school. In larger buildings the use of colour can help to
distinguish between different departments, identify specialist teaching areas, highlight specific
doorways and even help to visually locate switches and handles.
The layout of spaces within the school shall be simple with a clearly defined layout to aid orientation.
Especially important is ease of movement to external areas, particularly at times of emergency and
for those with restricted mobility.
There shall be ease of access to central spaces such as the hall, ICT suites and specialist resource
rooms from all areas of the school. Circulation shall be generous, and within class areas it shall also
function as work/activity/resource space with areas for moving, waiting, and learning. As far as
possible, long and narrow corridors shall be avoided.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.5.1.2 Internal Circulation and Social Spaces (cont'd)
Providing signage throughout the schools and their surroundings will give clear indications of
directions for all users but must be fully integrated into the design of the buildings and signs shall be
of a uniform type and be positioned in a similar manner throughout. The final strategy for the level of
signage, directional information and distinguishing features as well as the approach to general
movement through the building shall be prepared in conjunction with each individual school. The
schemes devised may be highly individual depending on the schools‟ size, pupil make up, and level
of community involvement but must still conform to the relevant guidelines.
The layout of spaces within the school shall be simple with a clearly defined layout to aid orientation.
As far as possible, long narrow corridors shall be avoided. In many schools single function corridors
are not considered the best use of space. In addition to the core function of providing adequate
circulation at peak times, they can also be designed to provide places where people can meet,
socialise, discuss, and work. The design of corridors, general and specific circulation routes, vertical
and horizontal circulation, entrances and doors shall ensure that for example:
     all areas are aesthetically designed using colours and materials to facilitate people with sight
      impairments;
     closers and hinges are of a quality to be easily opened and to close safely and slowly;
     there is ease of orderly movement and supervision is facilitated particularly at peak “traffic”
      times; and
     they are pleasant to use – light and decoration are important considerations.


The DCSF Building Bulletin 95, “Schools for the Future”, section 2A.5 suggests what constitutes
good design of circulation and social spaces, in particular it identifies a need for spaces that can:
     Act as meeting places for pupils;
     Be used for private study outside of formal lessons;
     Be used as informal eating areas to reduce pressure on dining rooms; and
     Ease pressure and help prevent congestion in high circulation areas.


In summary, both social and circulation areas should;
     Be well lit with natural daylighting wherever possible;
     Be constructed from and decorated with, carefully selected materials that are attractive,
      durable and easily cleaned and maintained;
     Have good acoustic properties;
     Be well ventilated;
     Suitably sized to avoid congestion;
     Consider access and use by all;
     Be easily supervised; and
     Have a simple layout to assist way finding orientation.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.5.1.3 Supplementary Areas
Where provided, they may be Parent or community rooms used for discussions with teachers,
carers and outside agency support workers and may need to provide comfort and security for all
users. They may also require a degree of privacy and will need to be non-institutional and non-
confrontational in appearance and layout. An enhanced level of acoustic separation may be
required in some instances for these reasons. These areas may be used exclusively for community
use.
The range, diversity and scope of such spaces will be part of a particular school‟s policy and
provision within new or re-designed schools will need careful consideration at local level.

2.5.1.4 Group Spaces
Group spaces play a pivotal role in the method of teaching and wider space use. They should be
designed to accommodate:
       A variety of different uses from small group/individualised learning to whole class
        teaching/large presentations;
       Use by groups of varying sizes;
       Different teaching and learning methods;
       The possibility of being equipped for practical work during the school day;
       Shared use by the community and others; and
       Use during or outside of the school day.

2.5.1.5 Large Spaces
Large spaces tend to be either for large gatherings of people, such as assemblies, performances or
sporting activities. The provision of such large areas has to be justified by reasonable utilisation,
multi-purpose design and use, sharing facilities with other schools or use by the community. Sports
halls in particular can make a significant contribution to community involvement in the life of a
school if the spaces are of an appropriate competition standard. It is particularly important, as in
many other spaces in the school, that whilst flexibility is encouraged, it must not be at the expense
of either safety or acoustic appropriateness.
Meeting and performance spaces are required for assemblies, religious worship, performances and
exams. By designing these spaces to support a range of activities and providing, for example
specialist lighting or more sophisticated furniture, community and business use can be encouraged
and promoted.
The majority of the comments in the section addressing Group Spaces apply here also but with a
different emphasis. Whilst the flexibility of these spaces is important, the acoustic provision is
particularly sensitive and will need modelling to ensure the correct range of reverberation time.
Planning of these spaces should bear in mind the relationship to the other spaces in the school and
the likely problems caused by large numbers of transferring students, which result in severe noise
and distraction difficulties.
These spaces will be at the social, recreational and cultural heart of the school.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.5.1.6 General Teaching Spaces
The challenge of creating an excellent teaching environment is to design spaces that successfully
balance the need for day-lighting, good natural ventilation, appropriate acoustics and stable
temperatures. At the same time there is the need to avoid solar glare and overheating. A common
fault is to have large windows that give good daylight but which allow overheating and glare
problems in sunny weather. Internal blinds are then fitted to eliminate direct sunlight but when
windows are opened to provide fresh air ventilation or reduce temperatures, blinds block this
ventilation or rattle around in the breeze.
The quality of environmental and acoustic management and control is essential to ensure the user
comfort, concentration and motivation necessary for individual learning, interpersonal
communication and group work. Since most of the school day is spent in these spaces it is
especially important that the highest standards of environmental and interior design are applied. In
addition to this, it is necessary to ensure that all users including the hearing-impaired are able to
distinguish clearly any speaker‟s address and/or media display through the appropriate design of
room layouts. This should include the materials within these spaces to create appropriate acoustic
properties and the incorporation of hearing induction loops, quality amplification and speaker
systems.
Clustering classrooms may help enhance a feeling of belonging within a year group, house group,
department, etc.
Teaching rooms should normally be of square or rectangular plan (of proportion approximately 4:5)
unless there are special reasons for designing otherwise. Rooms should have adequate storage
space for routine teaching materials. The bulk of a department‟s storage space will preferably be
located immediately outside the teaching spaces.
All rooms should have access to services such as gas, water, electricity and ICT, consistent with
their function. Wall space should be capable of being utilised for display and visual teaching aids.

2.5.1.7 Practical Teaching Spaces - Science Laboratories
In addition to the above, Contractors should show how their proposals meet the criteria set out in
BB98 and BB80 (Science Accommodation in Secondary Schools) for science accommodation
including the provision of laboratory preparation rooms. It is normally expected that proposals meet
the guidelines on laboratories as laid down by the Association for Science Education (ASE).

2.5.1.8 Practical Teaching Spaces - Technology
Contractors should show how their proposals meet the criteria set out in BB98 and BB81 (Design
Technology in Secondary Schools) for technology accommodation.

2.5.1.9 Practical Teaching Spaces - Art and Design
These practical teaching spaces should have good natural lighting (North facing rooms provide ideal
light quality for this purpose) and an abundance of space for both horizontal and vertical display of
two and three-dimensional artefacts. A kiln room will be required for pottery and ceramics, in
addition to suitable sinks and drainage facilities.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.5.1.10 Information and Communications Technology
Reference should be made to the ICT Infrastructure specification provided as part of this Authority‟s
Requirements and to the separate ICT Services Specification. The Contractor will be expected to
understand the full implications of these requirements on all other elements of the building and
Services such as lighting, heating, furniture layout, security, maintenance, building materials etc.
The Contractor shall ensure that they are incorporated as appropriate in order that the design fully
supports and compliment the ICT requirements and at the same time fulfil the requirements
associated with the design and performance of the individual element.

2.5.1.11 Performance Teaching Areas
The Drama/Dance area should have a sprung floor suitable for dance purposes.

2.5.1.12 Halls
The Hall should have a stage and facilities to produce performing arts including lighting and sound
equipment operated from a control room. Demountable staging units allow a greater flexibility in the
use of these areas and permit different stage and seating locations and configurations. Refer to the
furniture sheets for details of the equipment to be included.
A multi-functional space to accommodate school assemblies, dining, some PE and community use.
The curriculum drama facility could also be a part of this space. The design and/or facilities
management arrangements should enable the hall‟s function to be changed quickly and efficiently in
response to the curricular and other needs of the school. Contractors must demonstrate
cognisance of the various environmental and health and safety issues that result from multiplicity of
use.

2.5.1.13 Dining Areas
As dining tends to be concentrated into a short period of time, the area required for dining is
potentially under-utilised, particularly in secondary schools. However, there are solutions that can be
employed to maximise usage such as open café style areas that are available throughout the day
and can provide useful space, for example, for independent learning, social interaction and
meetings. As such, it should be planned and designed as a key part of the school rather than as an
annexe. It can also broaden community use by providing ancillary services to the facilities provided
elsewhere in the school.
Another important consideration is circulation – ease and speed of entry and exit of diners to
facilitate efficient use of short lunch periods and support good behaviour management.
Apart from a central eating area, smaller additional refreshment areas can encourage informal
meeting and social interaction and ease the pressure on the main dining area at crucial peak-
loading times.
Flexibility, comfort and social interchange should be key considerations, through attractive,
welcoming, well-lit and ventilated areas that are capable of rapid changes in function. Materials and
fittings should be robust and easily cleaned.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.5.1.14 Learning Resource Areas
These areas are primarily for learning through non-timetabled lessons and they are critical to the
support of independent learning. Flexibility should allow them to be suitable for other uses, such as
group reading and presentations.
Central library and resource centres are a focus for individual study and research, often equipped
with the most sophisticated IT equipment and software. They may also be areas for larger group
work, presentations and meetings. IT infrastructure adjacencies, suitable furnishings and acoustics
are particular issues to consider. It may be the case that a school library is integrated with a local
branch library allowing access to the general public.
Localised resource areas around the school, perhaps linked to subject areas and equipped with the
appropriate resources can also support independent study and individual educational needs. They
are also valuable to those on vocational courses and those spending part of their time studying
elsewhere. As open-access areas, they can provide space for small-group work and double as
social spaces. Specialist resource areas, for example for unsupervised project work, graphics or
music are best placed near the subject department.
The more quiet, reflective, research based studying that takes place in these spaces, demands that
attention should be given to adequate screening, acoustic treatment and more localised lighting,
including low ambient lighting levels with individual task lighting for evening use. Quiet time needs to
be a natural part of the educational environment and there are times when an open resource area is
not appropriate.
In a secondary school with a sixth form, there may be an area designated for quiet study, either
attached to the school‟s central resource centre or in a separate sixth form base. It may be that
certain schools prefer a division between study and social areas and pupils work quietly in an area
which perhaps has access to refreshments. The attractiveness of such a facility in terms of
environment and specific provision may encourage more pupils to stay on into the sixth form.
Students should have ready access to ICT, although not all study will require it.

2.5.1.15 Sports Hall
Sports areas are likely to continue to have a high level of community use within secondary schools.
This community demand may help to provide a sports space for some schools that may not
otherwise be able to justify such a space. Sports halls used by the community should be large
enough to adhere to local competition standards, which may dictate the level of use it can expect.
Community use for sport, in general will also affect the nature of supporting spaces and social areas
as well as the management of the facility in terms of security, opening hours etc.
The needs of physically disabled people may be met by providing multi-use sports spaces designed
for a range of activities, including those to suit disabled students such as wheelchair basketball. In
some cases it may be preferable to provide a separate, specially equipped fitness centre.
In most schools, sports halls usually double up to provide dining and assembly and performance
areas. This can put pressure on the design solution, but in general, it should remain as a flexible
space with materials and elements that are fit for all purposes. Appropriate flooring is essential as
are robust materials, safety glazing, protected service points and lighting, open obstacle free space
and adequate insulation from noise outbreak. Court markings should be clear and appropriate and
avoid over complication with too many types of sports.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.5.1.15 Sports Hall (cont'd)
Further guidance on the design of sports spaces can be found in Sports England publications and
Designing Space for Sports and Arts.
Separate changing facilities should be provided for boys and girls with adequate disabled access. It
would be desirable for community changing facilities to be kept separate from those used by pupils
and will be essential during agreed school hours. Alternatively a well defined management proposal
may allow dual use outside of school times and the installation of changing cubicles and lockers
may enhance this type of use. Access to such changing facilities by the community should where
possible prevent the need to open up the whole school to enable community use of these sports
facilities and toilet/changing facilities.

2.5.1.16 Non-Teaching Spaces / Staff and Administrative Areas
Staff, require social space and suitable work areas are needed for lesson preparation, marking,
meetings with colleagues and management activities. Most staff work areas will require access to
ICT and an environment that allows concentrated study and be located central to the main
departments. The quality of staff areas can contribute significantly to staff morale.
Parent and community rooms may double to provide support rooms for the delivery of educational,
technical and confidential advice, including that provided by outside agencies i.e. Guidance
Regulations specify one to one closed rooms to maintain parent / pupil confidentiality. Facilities on
site should be reviewed to consider including community policing and representation requirements.
Administration areas require an environment promoting security and comfort and should have a
degree of physical, visual and acoustic separation. These should promote concentration, motivation
and professionalism. Social and professional communication is required at individual and group
levels. Whilst giving a sense of personal space and promoting relaxation, these areas need to
reflect a vibrant, effective and efficient professional organisation.
In addition to group staff areas, some members of staff will require their own office space such as
heads, deputy heads, head of years and departments, nursing staff and technical support staff. In
addition to the main office and reception, various rooms for administration duties will be necessary
such as reprographics, medical, main records and meeting rooms. Many of the subject related
offices will have to be located within the department itself but the general administration functions
should be located together preferably in a quieter area of the building away from sources of
distraction.

2.5.1.17 Support Areas
Support areas for counselling, mentoring, learning support and therapy are essential in order to
support the policy of inclusion. They will be used not only by pupils and teachers but also by support
workers from outside agencies, parents and carers. Some of these spaces will require specialist
equipment and appropriate furniture, for example for therapies and the support of pupils with
learning, emotional and behavioural difficulties.
As with parent and community areas, privacy and security may be qualities required of these areas
and they may require specific visual and physical links to other areas too. Providing doors into
adjoining classrooms such as ICT rich Learning Support Units, could extend the flexibility and
therefore viability of these resources.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.5.1.17 Support Areas (cont'd)
Depending on the individual school circumstances it may be that a dedicated SEN base is required.
This may also extend to several small group rooms, dedicated office and store rooms.

2.5.1.18 Storage
As with all areas, minimum storage requirements are defined in the Statutory Requirements and the
Area Data Sheets that also form part of this Authority‟s Requirements. However, particularly in a
flexible building design, effective storage is central to the success and deliverability of multi-use
spaces.
Storage will be required for items such as:
       Furniture partitions and other equipment used to create flexibility of use;
       Teaching materials and equipment;
       Staff and pupil personal belongings;
       Cleaning and maintenance materials;
       Specialist materials such as chemicals;
       Dining tables and chairs;
       External and internal sports equipment; and;
       Maintenance and daily and routine cleaning equipment both internal and external.


Some factors to consider when designing storage areas include:
       It is often at a premium;
       Cleaning materials storage/science preparation rooms will have a need for security;
       Cleaning materials must not be stored in toilets or changing rooms;
       Direct ventilation to external air may be required in some cases;
       Dispersal of storage around the buildings (for teaching equipment and cleaning materials);
        and
       Ease of access.
Teaching storage is often neglected, but it is essential to provide for it adequately, in order to ensure
learning spaces are kept clear and are more flexible in use. Providing sufficient storage space also
reduces the risk of unfit areas such as plant rooms being used. The quantity and type of storage will
need assessment in conjunction with users. Both long-term storage and locally accessible storage
need to be considered.
Pupils‟ personal belongings, outdoor and PE clothing need to be kept clear of classroom activity and
circulation spaces and design to facilitate ease of access and behaviour management.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.5.1.18 Storage (cont'd)
Where practical, new emerging technologies should be considered to reduce space requirements
taken up by storage in schools. Previously, traditional requirements generated by books, learning
aids / materials, plus additional equipment such as video recorders, televisions, cassette recorders /
players and over-head projectors required space in each room and/or collection of rooms often
supplemented with a central /localised resource for safe secure storage and replacement part.
These items along with text books and printers should be considered in conjunction with the
strategy for ICT, as for example, years of video storage can be transferred onto replacement quality
mediums.

2.5.1.19 Kitchen, Plant and Service Areas
Service areas are key facilities and should be given appropriate consideration in terms of location,
size, servicing and security. They are core to ensuring that the facility is efficient and smooth
running and should be designed to allow:
   Access for deliveries;
   Minimal impact on the school and educational operation;
   Adequate access but maximum security;
   Adequate size for storage of diverse materials;
   Minimisation of noise and smell outbreak into teaching areas;
   Location of plant to give maximum energy efficiency;
   A separate area for facilities management staff both managerial and cleaning etc; and
   Recycling.
Catering facilities have a need to be central and adjacent to the dining areas whilst retaining the
capacity to remain independent. This means the capability to prevent unauthorised access when
required, have adequate storage, staff and changing rooms and access for deliveries and also entry
to back of house areas such as refuse.

2.5.1.20 Toilets
Good toilet design includes the following principles:
   Long distances between teaching areas and toilets can make teachers reluctant to let pupils out
    of class to visit the toilet. Toilets located away from classrooms present particular difficulties for
    pupils with special needs;
   Toilets attached to classrooms or cluster of classrooms may be one good solution. These allow
    pupils easier access to toilets during lessons and enable teachers to keep a closer eye on
    pupils;
   In some schools, pupils are not allowed to go to the toilet at certain times because teachers
    don't want them inside the building during break. Toilets which can be accessed directly from the
    playground, as well as from the inside of the building, could solve this problem;
   Toilets located throughout the school makes visiting them easier (particularly for pupils who
    have difficulty 'holding on'). It also means pupils won't be wandering around the corridors;
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.5.1.20 Toilets (cont'd)
   If practical, toilets for specific year groups could be provided, in addition to general toilets. This
    would help tackle bullying;
   Toilets need to be near playing fields and next to playgrounds. Purpose-built „pods‟ (built off site)
    are one solution;
   Rooms where exams may be taken should also have toilets close by. These include assembly
    halls and sports halls; and
   Drinking water facilities should not be sited in a toilet area.


When designing toilets within secondary schools reference should be made to the recommendation
provided at www.bogstandards.org.uk.


Commentary 15


2.5.2 External
Proper planning and landscaping of open outdoor spaces is important, not just for aesthetic and
sport reasons, but also because parts of the curriculum can be delivered within school grounds.
Outside space can provide stimulating alternative learning for all ages, and is an important part of
broadening the educational experience. The design solution should allow schools to use their
grounds throughout the year for the formal, informal and “hidden” curriculum
The Contractor‟s attention is drawn to the following external area requirements, which the Authority
is looking to be reflected in Contractor‟s proposals:
The external areas need to be designed to deliver a range of uses from recreation to sports in order
to support curriculum delivery and community activities. All schools should have the correct balance
of the following facilities:
       Hard Play;
       Soft Play;
       Covered Play;
       External equipment Storage;
       Hard games Courts;
       Playing Fields;
       Habitat Areas;
       Parking.
The design of the buildings‟ external areas shall take account of the character of the area, the
topography of the site, its exposure to wind and sun, and exploit views. Similarly the design shall
mitigate the effects of adverse environmental conditions such as traffic noise, unattractive views, or
neighbours in close proximity.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.5.2 External (cont'd)
Any design solution must be achievable for initial implementation and capable of efficient long-term
management. It should demonstrate sustainable and wherever possible, organic, solutions.
In summary, external environments must be designed with the full range of school users in mind,
which are holistic, participative and sustainable. Welcoming surroundings have a positive effect on
the experience of the school‟s regular users, as well as potentially attracting community and
business users to the school premises. External spaces should be an integral part of the design and
should operate to reflect the wider agenda of education and inclusion.
OPTION [The school is committed to working within the Learning Through Landscapes Initiative
details of which are available from the DCSF school Buildings Design Unit (SBDU). The design
should demonstrate how the potential of the school grounds can be exploited for earning.]
Hard surfacing materials must be varied and attractive and to standards relevant to the proposed
use. Creative planting, varied in form and colour, should provide hardy, year round interest. It should
address the need for shade during the summer months and for outdoor seating during break times.
The Contractor will be expected to undertake a detailed soil condition analysis in the areas of the
playing fields to enable pitches capable of sustaining both summer and winter use.


Commentary 16

2.5.2.1 Playgrounds and Recreation
Physical experience, be it structured curriculum or informal play, is a valuable component of
learning for all ages. All playgrounds and recreational areas must therefore acknowledge this within
the design proposals.
Playgrounds should cater for pupils according to their age and the layout must consider those
wishing to gather, socialise, eat snacks, let off steam, sit, relax or play. The various interests of
pupils should be met by providing a variety of areas with different facilities and a mixture of hard and
soft surfaces. Hard surfaces should be marked out with a variety of courts and games, preferably
within a single enclosed area to assist with supervision.
Pupils also require an area sheltered from the hurly burly of the main playground, which should
appeal to all and provide opportunities for relaxation during break times. This also provides shelter
against all types of weather conditions. It is widely recognised that the design of play areas can
reduce bullying. Designs for playground layouts should include clear lines of sight for good
supervision and avoiding small isolated areas that provide opportunities for bullying to take place.
Issues such as the layout arrangements of circulation areas, the provision of stimulating and
interesting playground activities and the general mood of the school facility can also help to
minimise instances of bullying. They should be laid out to avoid small, enclosed spaces and areas
out of supervisory sight line and be of a size and shape to allow play time games to carry on
unhindered and allow for supervisory staff to deal quickly with any instances of bullying or
undesirable behaviour.
Playgrounds also need to be flat and well drained and avoid physical barriers such as external fire
escapes, which should be sited away from pupil „running‟ areas.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.5.2.2 Sports Facilities
Sports pitches and courts on both hard and grass surfaces should be marked out for the curriculum
needs which will vary according to season during the school year. Permanent markings on hard
surfaces could also be replicated on any synthetic pitches that may be provided although care
should be taken to avoid over complicating surfaces with too many lines. One alternative for
seasonal sports on hard or synthetic surfaces is to provide permanent “nib” marks that locate the
setting out points for lines that can then be painted in with non-permanent materials as they are
required.
Grass areas must be level and well drained and an intense maintenance regime, combined with
effective use management, will be essential for ensuring the surfaces remain playable all year
round. Over draining can cause, as many problems as under draining and the specific ground and
soil conditions will dictate to a great extent what solution is to be applied. Proposals should consider
watering methods for summer periods; sand slitting drainage, aeration and even synthetic high wear
areas such as goalmouths, training grids and cricket wickets. Sports pitches should be thoughtfully
located to avoid damaging wear and tear from unauthorised out of hours use and informal play.
2.5.2.3 Artificial Sports Pitches
Synthetic, all weather surfaces allow outdoor structured physical learning all year round over
extended use not possible with grass pitches. They also lend themselves to income generation and
wider community use out of hours, which can be extended further when multi-switch floodlighting is
also incorporated. In urban areas where outdoor space may be at a premium, they can be a
substitute for greater areas of grass pitches because of the ability to use them more intensely.
Strategically they can also assist with the construction of phased sites, which may use the existing
green areas to build on resulting in the temporary loss of some sports facilities.
There are unfortunately, many instances of substantial amounts of damage being suffered to these
areas through the inundation of large quantities of water. In some instances, total renewal of both
the playing and the sub-surface has been necessary. Damage occurs when the sports surface
becomes covered with water for an extended period of time so that the surface is lifted and silt
deposits get underneath causing a rippling effect. Factors to take into consideration when providing
synthetic sports facilities include:
       Location, bearing in mind ease of access for third party and community use;
       Provision of such a facility on an area previously, and whether this will affect the bed of the
        playing surface;
       Knowledge of prior flooding and “run off” water from adjacent steep banks, slopes and
        hillsides so that adequate drainage with interceptor chambers can be installed to prevent
        water running directly onto the playing surface.


A final consideration regarding the protection of artificial sports surfaces should be given to the
vandalism and malicious damage aspect. A number of incidents are recorded where stolen vehicles
have been driven onto these areas and set on fire, in some cases leading to total renewal of the
surface being necessary.
Potential vehicle access must be considered therefore, along with the protection level afforded to
the perimeter fencing to the area itself it is unlikely that simple ball retention fencing will be
sufficient.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.5.2.3 Artificial Sports Pitches (cont'd)
Playing fields are protected under Section 77 of the School Standards and Framework Act 1998,
which empowers the Secretary of State to protect school playing fields in England from disposal or
change of use. Any authorised body in England wishing to dispose, or change the use of, school
playing fields will require the prior consent of the Secretary of State. Playing fields are defined as
land in the open air, which is provided for the purposes of physical education or recreation.

2.5.2.4 Landscaping and Layout
The landscape and layout should show appropriate and safe vehicular and pedestrian access
circulation both within the site (including between use zones) and within the local context. Such
provision should include access to and through soft landscape areas, (for example, to habitat zones
or sensory gardens) along defined and protected pathways that do not require special footwear and
are easily maintained.
All external areas, including roads, paths, ramps and entrances should be fully negotiable by
disabled users.
Specific features should be thoughtfully located and bear in mind access including for the disabled,
health and safety, maintenance and security.

2.5.2.5 Vehicle and Pedestrian Access, Circulation and Parking
Access and turning facilities should be provided to suit delivery vehicles, buses and cars for staff
and visitors. Advice in respect of road widths, turning radii and adequacy of construction will need to
be sought from the relevant Authority. Roadways should be arranged to eliminate reversing
movements.
Parking should be segregated where possible from other traffic movements. Likewise, the boarding
and disembarkation of school buses shall be sited away from other traffic movements. Parking
space numbers are to be in accordance with current local and national policy and the agreed use of
the buildings.
The design should permit over-spill parking on hard recreation areas for special events and out-of-
hours activities (not court areas).
The parking area should be carefully positioned so that it does not dominate the main arrival area
and entrance points round the building. This area should be landscaped to reduce the visual impact,
thus softening the landscape using tree and shrub planting. An attempt to make the facility visually
interesting should be made.
Parental drop off and pick up point(s) will be specified on a school-specific basis. Works will need to
be acceptable to Highways and Planning Authorities.
Site design should take account of access needs of the Emergency Services and seek to resolve
potential conflicts between different movements. Alternative surfaces to asphalt should be
considered, where such access penetrates the site. All access roads must be of sufficient width and
have geometry to give easy and safe access to all car parking access and delivery points without
inconveniencing students, staff or visitors to the school.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.5.2.6 Fencing
Of all the measures commonly available to provide protection to a school against theft, malicious
damage and any subsequent fire, perhaps the most effective is good security fencing. It is important
that perimeter fencing, however, is carefully considered and not regarded as a fix all measure. High,
obtrusive security fencing should be avoided wherever possible so as not to introduce a “fortress”
appearance.
A combination of security fencing denying access to particularly vulnerable parts of the building
areas and less secure boundary definition to the remainder, may work for some schools.
Every attempt must be made to ensure planning consent is given for appropriate security fencing to
be included in schemes. Should planners refuse permission for such fencing, compensatory
features such as window and external door protection may be required instead.


Commentary 17


2.6 Sustainable Development
The Authority seeks facilities designed, constructed and operated, so far as is reasonably possible,
which will deliver benefits to the environment including those listed below. This list is not intended to
be full and final and some issues in any case will be required by legislation such as health and
safety or environmental;
       Contribution to minimising the following;
             Global warming;
             Ozone depletion;
             Air and water pollution; and
             Non-renewable resource depletion;
       Manage possible radon contamination;
       Minimise the risk of legionnaire's disease and spread of microbiological contamination such
        as legionella;
       Identify, assess the level of risk from and take measures to manage sources of ionising and
        electromagnetic radiation;
       Avoid design features associated with sick building syndrome;
       Provide opportunities for re-cycling;
       Provide opportunities for energy and water conservation;
       Consideration of the environmental impact of choice of materials such as minimising those
        that contain high levels of embodied CO2 and ozone depleting substances etc;
       Enabling maintenance regimes to be used to maintain optimum performance in terms of
        energy efficiency, environmental impact, availability etc;
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.6 Sustainable Development (cont'd)
       Identify and assess the risk of using building products and processes harmful to the
        environment;
       A recognition of the Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP);
       The use, where possible, of natural resources such as daylight and passive solar energy,
        rainfall and wind;
       Instigate policies in respect of sustainability to meet the Authority‟s environmental
        sustainability strategies; and
       Meet the objectives of the Rethinking Construction Agenda, and of best practice in improving
        the delivery and performance of the construction industry.
Designed in energy efficiency by complying with Building Regulations Part L. Where the opportunity
exists, sustainability should be considered in the following aspects of the design and operation of
the facilities to be provided:
       Building envelope – orientation, façade design, building form and layout;
       Daylighting in accordance with BB87. Wherever possible daylight shall be the principle
        means of lighting, and in pursuit of which daylight factors and uniformity will be estimated;
       Ventilation and air-tightness, especially with regard to the fresh air requirements of Building
        Bulletin 87, BB101 and Building Reg‟s Parts F and L;
       The acoustic requirements of BB93;
       Energy-efficient systems and services;
       Choice of materials which are (environmentally) low impact in their erection, maintenance
        and long-term use, and which are environmentally sustainable. Choice of materials should
        consider the “Green Guide to Specification” (3rd edition, Anderson, Shiers, Sinclair – BRE,
        Oxford Brookes, Consignia), or similar, which contains guidance on the choice of such
        materials;
       Utilising materials which minimise embodied CO2 impact;
       Recycling and how it may be maximised in construction and operation. Waste monitoring
        and minimisation during construction and provision of waste separation and recycling
        facilities;
       Adopting the findings of the Waste and Resources Action Programme (WRAP) which
        examines maximising the incorporation into school buildings of materials with above average
        recycled content; and
       The efficient use of water supply and waste water, e.g. Material Recycling Facilities (MRFs)
        for building waste.


Where appropriate, the Contractor should also consider:
     Addressing social and community issues such as conformity with the Considerate
      Contractors scheme and take into account the impacts of the construction phase and the life
      of the building on its surroundings and local community, human, animal and biological;
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.6 Sustainable Development (cont'd)
     The impact of transport routes both temporary and [permanent and use impact assessments
      and sustainable transport plans when finalising these routes; and
     Proposals for landscaping, which interact with the natural environment such as reed beds for
      water treatment, Sustainable Urban Drainage (SUDS) systems and planting of indigenous
      species. Minimisation of ecological impact is highly encouraged as is the improvement of
      land use.


The Contractor shall detail within their Contractor‟s Proposals how they intend to meet each of the
above considerations and other sustainability issues that they intend to address.
The Contractor‟s attention is drawn to the following:
     The Contractor shall be fully conversant with LA21 objectives and targets and address all
      those that are relevant to their submission. Designs should take into account any plans
      developed locally and meet the targets and guidance set out therein.
     Guidance on sustainable development and the DCSF Value for Money Unit‟s “Energy and
      Water Management ; A Guide for schools” publication;
     Approved Document E in support of the Building Regulations applies to schools and quotes
      Building Bulletin 93 as the compliance standard for acoustics in schools. The performance of
      all school designs shall be fully compliant with Section 1 of Building Bulletin 93. This may
      involve employing a specialist acoustic specialist, pre and post design testing and
      rectification of any failing elements. The standard is available on the website
      www.teachernet.gov.uk/acoustics;
     Approved Document L2 in support of the Building Regulations, Conservation of Fuel and
      Power also applies to schools as described in the latest edition of Guidelines for the
      Environmental Design of schools and the associated calculation tool available at
      www.teachernet.gov.uk/energy. The default hours of use for calculating compliance with Part
      L are as follows; 126 days in heating season, 1040 hours of useful miscellaneous power and
      metabolic heat gains, 1500 hours of use of DHWS and miscellaneous power and 1100 hours
      of heating circulators. Latest information on Part L compliance is available on the website
      detailed above;
     Carbon performance targets shall be set according to the current versions of ADL2E and
      ADL2B;
     Compliance with Part F of the Building Regulations and the appropriate Building Bulletin for
      Ventilation shall be achieved by utilising the more demanding (higher performance
      requirement) of the two in the event of a disparity;
     The design and performance of hot and cold water supplies shall also be in accordance with
      BB87;
     Lighting source efficacy shall be demonstrated in accordance with BB87 to be greater than
      65 lumens per circuit Watt. Daylight uniformity shall be demonstrated to be at least 0.3 and
      electric lighting uniformity ratio of 0.8 over task areas; and
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.6 Sustainable Development (cont'd)
     In accordance with BB87, wherever possible the prime means of lighting shall be daylight so
      average daylight factors are to be demonstrated to be at least 2% unless specific site
      considerations make this unachievable. In either case, the contractor shall clearly
      demonstrate the designed performance levels. Building Bulletin 90 Lighting Design for
      schools contains further guidance.


2.6.1 Developing an Environmental Assessment
Designs will be assessed using the BRE Environmental Assessment Method (BREEAM), “BREEAM
schools” version. This will be used instead of Building Bulletin 83, schools Environmental
Assessment Method (SEAM) published in 1996. The schools version of the BREEAM
methodologies covers the functions envisaged for school buildings, and will be used to assess all
construction projects both through the procurement and design stages and again post construction.
BREEAM establishes a set of issue categories under which specific credit requirements are
grouped. Within each category there are a number of credit requirements that reflect the options
available to buildings designers and managers. Credits that are included in BREEAM must meet or
demonstrate progress toward the scheme‟s aims and objectives as outlined earlier. For assessment
it is important to ensure that:
       The information is readily available to enable assessment of the credit;
       The credit is practical to tackle - it must be an issue that the design team/client can address
        and one that leads to a known environmental benefit; and
       The credit is practical to assess from a cost, time and resource point of view.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.6.1 Developing an Environmental Assessment (cont'd)
The table below lists the categories for the BREEAM method for schools:


BREEAM method for Description
schools: Issues
Management.                Overall policy, commissioning and procedural issues. This
                           will link to partnerships and methodologies based on
                           manufacturing industries.
Energy Use.                Operational energy and CO2 issues including M&E systems
                           and controls and type of plant.
Health and Safety.         Issues affecting health and safety including indoor air
                           quality, fire safety and security.
Environmental              Issues affecting the indoor and outdoor environmental
conditions.                conditions, including lighting, thermal comfort, ventilation,
                           and acoustics.
Pollution.                 Air and water pollution.
Transport.                 Transport related CO2 and location related issues including
                           pupil safety and sustainability of home to school transport.
Land Use.                  Greenfield and brownfield site issues.
Ecology.                   Ecological value and use of the site.
Materials.                 Environmental     impact   and    sustainability   of   building
                           materials.
Water.                     Consumption and water efficiency.
Educational and social.    The use of the building as an educational and community
                           resource.


The categories in the table above vary slightly from the standard version of BREEAM and the
detailed criteria will also vary from those in standard versions of BREEAM to take account of the
specific nature of school buildings.
It should be noted, that it is not necessary to achieve all assessment criteria in order to achieve a
specific BREEAM rating. Some credit requirements have the effect of working against the aims of
another and the method is developed to take account of this. The scoring and weighting section of
this report outlines how the scoring process works and details of this will be provided along with the
detailed assessment criteria.
The BREEAM rating for the project will be very good although there are benefits for all to achieve a
higher rating.

Commentary 18
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.6.2 Water Conservation
The Contractor must demonstrate within their Contractor‟s Proposals that they are applying water
efficient measures such as those detailed in recommendations contained in the following DCSF,
Environment Agency (EA) and the Water Regulations Advisory Scheme (WRAS) guidance:
       Energy and Water Management : A Guide for schools – DCSF VfM Unit;
       “Waterwise” Guide – Good for Business and Good for the Environment - March 2002 – EA;
       Water Conservation Fact Cards – EA; and
       Information and Guidance Note 9-02-03 - Conservation of Water – An IGN for Architects,
        Designers and Installers – WRAS.


Active design features could include:
     Install flow regulation and leak detection devices;
     Install / modify sanitary installations with flush volume reduction modifications to WC‟s and
      automatic urinal flush controls;
     Install self-closing and spray taps to basins and showers; and
     Provision of rainwater harvesting systems.



2.6.3 Energy Conservation
The Contractor must demonstrate in their Proposals that they are providing energy efficient design
solutions to the school buildings and their grounds, incorporating and integrating all appropriate
techniques in design, control and engineering in order to operate as energy efficiently as possible.
Designs are to be based upon compliance with Building Regulations Part L and BB87 latest edition
guidance along with other relevant Building Bulletins, BREEAM and CIBSE guides. Higher than the
minimum prescribed requirements of energy efficiency shall be the target, such as those detailed in
recommendations contained in DCSF guidelines, the Government‟s Action Energy Programme and
Chartered Institution of Building Service Engineers (CIBSE) guidance.

2.6.4 Reducing Waste During Construction

In order to contribute further towards achieving a sustainable facility, the Contractor shall propose
methods and procedures for reducing waste during the construction. The Authority will monitor the
volume of waste (m3) removed from site against the final construction price. The Contractor shall
therefore maintain appropriate monitoring and recording procedures and submit these to the
Authority as part of the regular reporting procedures or otherwise as requested. Upon completion of
the building works the Contractor shall summarise these records and submit a final report to the
Authority in a format to be agreed by both parties.
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.6.5 Renewable Energy
The Contractor will be required to demonstrate a commitment to sourcing energy from a renewable
energy supplier.

Commentary 19



Commentary 20



2.6.6 The Case for Higher Recycled Content in schools procurement

Policy Drivers

The Sustainability in Building Act extends the building regulations to cover recycling, and puts a duty
on the Secretary of State to report on the level of recycled content in new buildings.

In response to the Better Buildings Summit a Sustainable Buildings Task Group (SBTG) was set up
by the Office of the Deputy Prime Minister (ODPM) and the Department of Trade and Industry (DTI)
to spearhead efforts in raising the sustainability of buildings. Their report, 'Better Buildings - Better
Lives'1 recommended short and long term improvements in the quality and environmental
performance of buildings.
The recommendations of the Sustainable Buildings Task Group are for a minimum of 10% recycled
content by value. The ODPM intend to examine the cost effectiveness and practicality of
implementing this target using the building regulations.

Paragraph 3.5:

Improving resource efficiency is one area in which the Group considers that the Government should
consult on in revising the Building Regulations. The Group recommends that the revised
Building Regulations should specify a minimum percentage by value (at least 10%) of re-
used/ reclaimed/recycled materials in building projects. The Government would also need to
explore the wider economic impact of this recommendation on other Government commitments.



Source: Sustainable Buildings Task Group Report, May 20042




1
    http://www.defra.gov.uk/environment/energy/betterbuildings.htm
2
    http://www.dti.gov.uk/construction/sustain/sbtg.htm

    http://www.dti.gov.uk/construction/sustain/govres.pdf
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives


2.6.6 The Case for Higher Recycled Content in schools procurement (cont'd)
Subsequent research commissioned by WRAP (Waste & Resources Action Programme) identified
that this target of 10% of the material value of a construction project was achievable at no added
cost; it went as far as suggesting that a target of 12.5% was achievable and recommended this be
included in the Code for Sustainable Building (CSB).

The implementation of the Landfill Tax and the Aggregates Levy lends additional support for the
mounting need to employ higher recycled content. The Landfill tax is chargeable by weight, and
there are two rates: a lower rate of £2 per tonne applies to inactive (or inert) wastes as listed in the
Landfill Tax (Qualifying Material) and a standard rate which applies to all other taxable waste. The
Aggregates Levy tackles by taxation the environmental cost of quarrying operations, and
encourages the use of alternative and/or recycled materials. The levy of £1.60 per tonne is charged
on all virgin sand, gravel and crushed rock extracted including all aggregates incorporated in
components such as concrete products, unless exempt from the levy.

Such regulatory interventions further endorse the use of recycled material by discouraging the use
of virgin materials and reducing the levels of waste sent to landfill sites.


Cost Neutral

Various investigations and market intelligence have concluded that many products used in
construction already have a percentage of recycled content. An example of this is lightweight block,
where the use of recycled is common practice and the % recycled, content is 50% as standard
(WRAP report „Opportunities to use Recycled Materials in Building‟3).
By identifying materials such as these, which afford the greatest opportunity to increase the overall
recycled content by simple product substitution, using established and readily available materials, it
is feasible that an increased use of recycled is achievable at little or no cost.

Results from a study by Davis Langdon of two Exemplar schools designs indicate they achieve a
recycled content of 15.5% and 17.3% without any measures taken to influence recycled content.
Simple product substitution and design options increase the potential still further, and some of these
options are zero cost. This indicates 10% is relatively easy to achieve and would most likely be
achieved in any case.

Identifying cost neutral product substitutions would provide the “Quick Win” scenario offered by
WRAP in achieving the target of 10% recycled, generating an attractive option no matter which
procurement method was being considered.

The work on SLAM MoD housing by Scott Wilson made the case that requiring the recycled content
to be 10% would not increase the cost of MoD accommodation, and that levels well in excess of this
were being achieved in any case4.




3
    http://www.wrap.org.uk/templates/temp_publication.rm?id=698&publication=574
4
    http://www.wrap.org.uk/templates/temp_publication.rm?id=698&publication=181
Part 2 – Strategic Objectives

2.6.6 The Case for Higher Recycled Content in schools procurement (cont'd)
That 10% is not an onerous target in terms of cost begs the question, “Why not more than 10%?”

At this stage of recycled market development the interests of sustainability are not necessarily best
met by a high recycled requirement. Rather the market for construction products should be
influenced by increased demand for recycled product itself and information about recycled content
of products. It is expected this will result in greater use of recycled materials in construction and
better information from suppliers, which will assist the market for recycled materials to mature.
Tougher targets may arise when the market is more developed.

Quality Issues

A barrier against increasing the use of higher recycled content is related to the concerns of durability
and quality. There may be the perception, generally false, that products using recycled materials
would be of a lower standard and hence pose a greater risk of failure than conventional products.

Generally, building products are tested for suitability by compliance with British Standards,
Certificates of Agreement and specified by performance or strength criteria, so such quality
concerns are generally misplaced. Designers will specify buildings elements in accordance with
their performance, whether they have high or low recycled content.

Demonstrating Recycled Content

WRAP, have commissioned the development of a toolkit, which will simplify any calculations by the
use of a matrix of default values for demonstration purposes.

The Contractor will analyse the Cost Plan at Contractors Proposal stage, item by item, to calculate
the recycled content.

Contractors will require the data on recycled content of all their building components and information
about where to source materials with higher recycled content. Some of this is already available on
the WRAP website and the data is being updated and extended for such use.

Conclusions

Legislative drivers and supporting data are being put in place to promote recycled content in
construction. A minimum requirement of 10% recycled content by value in new schools would
stimulate the recycled materials market but not cost more.

Commentary 21
Part 3 – Building and External Area Requirements

Section A – General Notes

Applying these Authority's Requirements to New Build

All new build work - complete new build schools, extensions or part new build on existing
sites will be designed and constructed compliant with these Requirements. A list of
degradations will be issued with the Contractors Proposals for aspect that cannot be
complied with or where a relaxation is sought due to conflicting guidance, or requirements.

The Contractor will issue a 25 year planned maintenance programme for each school with
their Contractor‟s proposals. This will be used to substantiate and evaluate their proposal.



Applying these Authority's Requirements to Remodelling and Refurbishment works

The Contractor will use reasonable endeavours to design and construct to the requirements
of this Authority's Requirements. Any requirements that cannot be complied with shall be
scheduled in the Contractor‟s Proposals with a detailed explanation for the suggested
relaxation.

The Contractor will issue a 25 year planned maintenance programme for each school with
their Contractor‟s proposals. This will be used to substantiate and evaluate their proposal.



All Works

All works shall comply with applicable Statutory Requirements. The Local Authority is
not placed to give any waivers in this respect.




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Section B – Building Fabric Requirements

1 DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION REQUIREMENTS

  1.1   General Design

          1.1.1 General design obligations on the Contractor include:-

          1.1.2 Design shall ensure that projections such as structural columns and piers
                in large spaces such as halls and circulation routes shall be limited. Where
                these are unavoidable appropriate measures shall be in place to ensure
                safety;

          1.1.3 Obtaining all statutory consents for the design and construction of the
                project including but not limited to: any necessary roads construction
                consents for any public roads and footpaths, including adoptions under
                Section 38 of the Highway Act 1980 or Section 104 of the Water Industries
                Act 1991 for highways and drainage;

          1.1.4 Designing building structures and services to Building Regulations, British
                Standards, Building Bulletins and CIBSE guidance in force or as published
                at the date of Contract signature or foreseeable at the date of Contract
                signature;

          1.1.5 Designing facilities to comply with Applicable Laws and Statutory
                Requirements;

          1.1.6 Structural elements of the internal and external areas are physically
                present and sufficiently sound to permit safe occupancy or use by the staff,
                pupils and other persons;

          1.1.7 The Accommodation complies with the Room Data Sheets;

          1.1.8 The design shall give regard to the practicality of maintenance. The two
                aspects always to be considered: 1) standard practical detailing in
                materials and using construction methods that are considered will be in use
                in the foreseeable future and 2) ease of access for maintenance.

  1.2   Compliance with Standards, Guidance and Guidelines

          1.2.1 The Contractor shall comply with all relevant statutory and health and
                safety legislation and other industry standards, including British, European
                and International Standards. The Contractor shall also comply with the
                requirements of other National guidance including publications by the
                DCSF and other National Authorities where applicable.

          1.2.2 Compliance with these regulations, standards and guidelines shall be
                taken as those being in force or published as at the date of Contract
                signature or foreseeable at the date of Contract signature.

          1.2.3   All accommodation and facilities shall meet the standards where
                  applicable in guidance published by the DCSF and other national bodies
                  as indicated in the non-exhaustive list identified in Annex 1.



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Part 3 – Building and External Area Requirements

  1.3   Use of Materials

          1.3.1 The Contractor shall select products and materials for use on the Works
                in accordance with the guidance contained in the publication „Good
                Practice in the Selection of Construction Materials‟ (Ove Arup, 2002, 3rd
                reprint);

          1.3.2 Without prejudice to the foregoing. e Contractor shall not specify in the
                design and use in the Works products and materials that are referred to
                as being hazardous to health and/or safety in “The Control of Substances
                Hazardous to Health Regulations” 2002 as amended or that do not
                comply with:

                (a) The Montreal Protocol;

                (b) The Construction Design and Management Regulations 1994 as
                    amended;

                (c) British Standards or equivalent European industry standards as
                    amended;

                (d) Codes of Practice; or

                (e) Which are generally known within the European Union at the time of
                    specification to be deleterious to the environment, health and/or safety
                    or to the durability of other structures, finishes, plant and/or machinery.

                (f) Asbestos or any products or materials containing asbestos;

                (g) Substances that deplete the ozone layer as identified by the United
                    Nations Development Programme.

          1.3.3 Where cedar/timber cladding is specified the following conditions must be
                met: -

                (a) Cedar/timber cladding must be installed at a high level only;

                (b) There shall be no overhanging eaves adjacent to cedar/timber
                    cladding, to prevent the spread of fire;

                (c) Cedar/timber cladding must be treated to Class O and re-coated in
                    accordance with the manufacturers recommendations for
                    maintenance; and

                (d) Cedar/timber cladding must be on a non-combustible backing.

          1.3.4 Materials shall be selected with due regard to their suitability, for purpose
                and performance, durability, ease of maintenance and repair, resistance
                to accidental or malicious damage and to their environmental impact.
                Minimal maintenance and ready and economical availability of
                replacement parts is also essential for the facility to operate smoothly and
                efficiently.


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Part 3 – Building and External Area Requirements

          1.3.5 The Contractor shall use appropriate and robust materials and finishes
                that stand up well to the prevailing weather conditions, the ingress of
                ground and surface water and heavy use, whilst maintaining appearance
                over the long term. All areas of the building must be easily and safely
                accessible for cleaning and maintenance whilst preventing unauthorised
                access. It is imperative that the building is not aesthetically affected (even
                if only superficially) by the weather and the design must ensure no
                breakdown in the building‟s fabric.

          1.3.6 At Completion, the facilities are in such condition that they will achieve
                their anticipated life span as detailed below under the heading „design
                life. The planned maintenance programme required from the Contractor
                will use anticipated life span information to programme future
                maintenance and replacement regimes by a services provider.

  1.4   Design Life

          1.4.1 The service lifespan assessment shall be as defined in ISO 15686 Part 1
                Buildings and Constructed Assets – Service Life Planning, General
                Principles.

          1.4.2 The structural and non-replaceable components for buildings shall be
                specified as having a life of 60 years or more. Replaceable components
                shall have a life appropriate to the structure.

          1.4.3 The principal elements of the building structure, external envelope and
                external civil engineering elements shall have a minimum life expectancy
                at Date for Completion as set out in the table below.

                 The design life of the building elements as a minimum shall be:

                    Substructure – 60 years

                    Frame, upper floors and stairs – 60 years

                    Roof structure – 60 years

                    Roof covering – 30 years

                    External walls/cladding – 40 years

                    Windows and external doors – 25 years

                    Internal partitions – 25 years

                    Internal finishes – 15 years

                    Ceilings – 25 years

                    Internal doors – 25 years




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Part 3 – Building and External Area Requirements

                     Internal fixtures and fittings – 15 years

                     Sanitary and catering facilities – 20 years

                     Engineering Services (major components) – 25 years

                     Lifts – 15 years

                     Underground drainage – 60 years

                     External finishes – 25 years

                     External fences – 25 years

                     External services – 25 years

                     Site Works – 25 years.

           1.4.4   Planned Maintenance Programme

           1.4.5   The Contractor shall provide a planned maintenance Programme for all
                   elements requiring maintenance.

Where the Contractors proposals do not meet these minimum standards for service life, it
shall be clearly identified by the inclusion of a table, within these proposals, similar to the
above and listing the same building elements along with the required and proposed service
lives. In addition, the contractors proposals shall include a clear and detailed statement of
the reasoning behind this variation on the requirements, proposals for carrying out the
additional maintenance and replacement works without disrupting any school (and third
party) activities, details of any possible risks to the Authority and school and third party
activities associated with these proposals and any additional benefits that may be passed on
to the Authority or school as a result.
For any conversion and refurbishment works to existing buildings, or for buildings retained
unaltered, the Contractor shall also clearly identify where these standards and service life
criteria will not be achieved and provide the details as listed above.
Irrespective of the type of work to be undertaken, the Contractor shall provide full and clear
proposals for programmes of planned maintenance and/or replacement that identify, but
shall not be limited to, timescales, replacement intervals, scope of works etc. These
proposals shall be detailed enough for the Authority to assess the full impact on the delivery
of all Services of any variation from this Specification.




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Part 3 – Building and External Area Requirements

2         Building Fabric - External

    2.1 Generally

              2.1.1 All aspects of the building fabric and installations are to provide resistance
                    to penetration by rain, snow and wind and to moisture rising from the
                    ground and minimise all disturbance from the elements in general.

              2.1.2 There must be no visible signs of entry to weather caused by a breakdown
                    in the building fabric or its installations. There must be no discomfort to
                    occupants as a result of weather penetration due to this cause. Any water
                    penetration will also be measured by electrical conductivity tests.

              2.1.3 The external elements of the building must be of comparable quality
                    demonstrated in the Exemplar Designs as Published by the DCSF and as
                    described in this section.

              2.1.4 The accommodation shall be designed to comply with the School Premises
                    Regulations, the Constructional Standards of Section 4 of BB87 (latest
                    edition) and the relevant sections of the Building Regulations. Day lit
                    spaces as far as possible shall have an average daylight factor of 4%
                    calculated using the BRE average daylight simulation software. Where this
                    condition is not fulfilled, reasons for the shortfall should be clearly
                    identified. A minimum 20% of the internal elevation of the external wall
                    shall be glazed.

    2.2    Substructure

              2.2.1 Design – to support all dead and imposed loadings from the
                    superstructure, internal finishings, fittings and furnishings, services and
                    building use.

    2.3    Roofs

              2.3.1 Materials and construction of roof to provide minimum maintenance to,
                    avoid future disruption to the school.

              2.3.2 Roofs must be designed so that storm water discharge systems comply
                    fully with all acoustic requirements and in any event the discharge of
                    rainwater through these systems shall not be audible inside the building.

              2.3.3 Noise of rain on roofing materials and rooflights must be considered and a
                    solution to abate such noise incorporated.

              2.3.4 Roof drainage shall be free flowing.

              2.3.5 Roofs must be designed to discharge water externally.

              2.3.6 Condensation caused by internal drainage and downpipes or otherwise
                    must be considered and a solution to abate such nuisance incorporated.

              2.3.7 Roof glazing to be provided must have the means to control solar gain and
                    glare if appropriate with safety arrangements incorporated for external
                    access.
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Part 3 – Building and External Area Requirements

         2.3.8 Location of roof-lights to be carefully considered to provide light to rooms
               below and sufficient security for School equipment. Opening mechanisms
               for roof-lights must be carefully considered with controls such that pupils
               are discouraged from operating them. Such openings shall also be robust
               and vandal-resistant from external entry by third parties.

          2.3.9 Overhanging eaves and canopies are not to be designed so as to provide
                an attractive sheltered area for miscreants, animals or birds. The fabric of
                the overhang shall be of non- combustible materials.

          2.3.10 Adequate fire barriers shall be present to ensure an externally set fire
                 cannot enter the roof space through the eaves or elsewhere.

          2.3.11 Access onto roofs shall be strictly controlled and the overall design of roof
                 and surrounding elements shall not allow unauthorised access.

          2.3.12 The roof shall have acoustic properties and performance in accordance
                 with BB93.

          2.3.13 The Contractor shall provide safety and security of access for internal and
                 external maintenance purposes; including boarding, ladders and
                 handrails within roof spaces.

          2.3.14 The Contractor shall ensure the positioning and use of access hatches,
                 inspection points, control gear, valves etc minimises disruption to the
                 everyday running of the school.

          2.3.15 The Contractor shall ensure that measures are incorporated to prevent
                 birds roosting or nesting on the structure, especially around building
                 entrances.

  2.4   Ventilation

          2.4.1 Roof void ventilation shall be in accordance with relevant codes of
                practice.

          2.4.2 Ventilators – installed in accordance with manufacturer‟s instructions and
                in accordance with relevant codes of practice and British Standards at
                date of construction.

  2.5   Insulation

          2.5.1 Shall not impede roof void ventilation.

          2.5.2 Shall be free from damage and breaks in continuity and integrity.

          2.5.3 Thermal insulation to also provide acoustic insulation and fire protection
                no less than that specified by current legislation.

  2.6   Walkways

          2.6.1 Compliant with all Health and Safety and manufacturers requirements.


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Part 3 – Building and External Area Requirements

           2.6.2 Walkways to roof to be adequately secured, free from corrosion, and
                 decorated in accordance with the external decorations section.

  2.7   Chimneys and Flues

           2.7.1 To discharge all products of combustion to the chimney or flues point of
                 termination without allowing any products of combustion to pass into any
                 other areas. The chimney or flue shall also ensure that no water passes
                 back down the chimney or flue through the incorporation of an
                 appropriate termination fitting.

  2.8   Rainwater Goods

           2.8.1 All joints to be sealed, secured in accordance with relevant British
                 Standard. Finishes to rainwater goods to be uniform and not showing
                 signs of oxidation on its external surfaces.

           2.8.2 Guttering detailing and arrangement must be robust enough to withstand
                 accidental damage (eg from ladders) during maintenance works as well
                 as vandalism.

           2.8.3 Guttering detailing shall incorporate measures to minimise build up of
                 leaves, vegetation etc

           2.8.4 Guttering and rainwater pipework to be clean, free of blockages and free-
                 flowing.

           2.8.5 Rainwater pipe detailing and arrangement must be non-climbable and
                 should be designed such that it is not vulnerable to vandalism through
                 being kicked or otherwise damaged.

           2.8.6 The Contractor shall avoid the use of internal down pipes. All internal
                 storm and foul drainage shall be concealed.

           2.8.7 Acoustically, the system should be designed so that no water discharge is
                 audible from within the building.

     2.9   External Walls

           2.9.1 Materials and construction of external walls and cladding to require
                 maintenance that avoids disruption to the school.

           2.9.2 External walls must be designed to be secure, robust, vandal-resistant
                 and suitable for the particular circumstances and superimposed loadings.

           2.9.3 Design and materials shall allow for the easy removal of graffiti.

           2.9.4 Finishes shall conform to Class 0 as defined by Buildings regulations.

           2.9.5 Non-combustible materials shall be used and, if high levels of insulation
                 are required, Loss Prevention Certification Board (LPCB) products
                 approved to LPS1181 Grade A shall be used. These shall have at least
                 30 minutes fire integrity and 20 minutes fire insulation.

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Part 3 – Building and External Area Requirements

          2.9.6 Design and location of walls and cladding shall not allow unauthorised
                access to roofs or secure or restricted areas.

          2.9.7 External Insulated Finish Systems (EIFS) or similar cladding, which
                incorporates combustible materials shall not be permitted.

          2.9.8 Consideration must be given to the insurance implications of using
                external timber cladding

          2.9.9 External walls to achieve U-value and performance requirements set by
                BB87 and the Building Regulations.

          2.9.10 Shall have acoustic properties and performance in accordance with
                 BB93.

          2.9.11 All beading to render finishes shall be appropriate and non-corrosive such
                 as stainless steel

  2.10 External Doors and Windows Generally

          2.10.1 Doors and windows shall have acoustic properties and performance in
                 accordance with BB93.

          2.10.2 All doors, windows and vents shall be positioned with regard to quality of
                 light as well as ventilation regime.

          2.10.3 Where significant areas of external glazing are exposed to direct sunlight,
                 the Contractor must accommodate measures to reduce the affects of
                 direct sunlight within their proposals in accordance with CIBSE prediction
                 techniques and the references to solar gain and glare.

          2.10.4 If external doors or windows are to be protected from intruders by security
                 shutters, grilles or bars these must comply with BS8220 or have LPCB
                 approval.

  2.11 Windows

          2.11.1 Windows to provide sufficient light and natural ventilation (or supplement
                 other ventilation to the required Part) in accordance with current Building
                 Regulations, DCSF Building Bulletins and statutory guidance.

          2.11.2 The Contractor should also refer to Section D Item 2 Lighting and the
                 requirements of the maximum use of natural light.

          2.11.3 Windows and vents shall be selected and positioned with due
                 consideration to the acoustic requirements of this document and with
                 regard to local acoustic conditions.

          2.11.4 Windows in areas where ICT is used, shall have due consideration to
                 establish appropriate lighting levels in order to prevent glare on screens,
                 electronic whiteboards etc.



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Part 3 – Building and External Area Requirements

          2.11.5 All windows must be safe in closed or open positions and must not be
                 hazardous to persons passing by windows internally or externally when in
                 use. Windows must be designed so as to prevent children from falling
                 and / or climbing in / out at all levels.

          2.11.6 Ironmongery and ventilator actuators or mechanisms shall be robust and
                 tamper proof and must be easy to use/operate from floor level.

          2.11.7 Provision must be made for the safe cleaning of windows.

          2.11.8 Materials and construction of windows to provide minimum maintenance
                 to avoid future disruption to the School.

          2.11.9 Windows must not compromise the security of the building and beading
                 should be internal

          2.11.10 All windows to be fitted with restrainers or similar devices.

          2.11.11 Window shading must be of a type that will not create a noise nuisance.

  2.12 Doors

          2.12.1 Doors to be designed robust enough to withstand heavy usage with
                 minimal maintenance and to maintain the safety and security of the
                 facility. Door design shall also take into account the different ages and
                 abilities of all users.

          2.12.2 External doors must be vandal-resistant. They must incorporate
                 appropriate controls and / or fittings to discourage misuse but afford safe
                 operation and adequate security.

          2.12.3 All access doors must be designed to allow disabled access, including
                 access for motorised electric wheelchairs.

          2.12.4 The Contractor shall ensure that door thresholds for wheelchair access
                 are flush

          2.12.5 Where appropriate draught lobbies are to be provided. These shall be
                 configured so that single person passage at normal walking rate does not
                 cause both doors to open at the same time.

          2.12.6 All door components shall be selected with regard to the requirements of
                 BB93

  2.13 External Maintenance Access

          2.13.1 To be designed and installed in accordance with current regulations and
                 allow for all necessary access for cleaning and maintenance safely easily
                 and without disruption to normal school operations.




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  2.14 External Decorations and Finishes

          2.14.1 Finishes to be continuous in colour.

          2.14.2 Design and materials shall allow for the easy removal of graffiti.

          2.14.3 External finishes to be durable and resistant to weathering.

  2.15 Ironmongery

          2.15.1 The Contractor must allow for all doors including those to stores etc to be
                 lockable with a suited key system or otherwise (eg card access) as
                 agreed with the Authority.

          2.15.2 The detail of the locking and suiting requirements must be agreed with
                 the Authority.

          2.15.3 All ironmongery shall be robust and heavy duty

          2.15.4 Letterboxes – provision, location and type (anti-arson) must be agreed
                 with the Authority.

          2.15.5 Door closers should take account of the age and needs of the pupils
                 operating the doors.

  2.16 Signage

          2.16.1 Signage shall be consistent and provided to support safe and efficient
                 movement around the site.

          2.16.2 The facilities shall have appropriate signage to define their purpose. See
                 internal signage.

          2.16.3 Signage shall also be provided to denote departments and for directional
                 purposes whether internal or external to aid way finding and circulation
                 around the buildings and Sites.

          2.16.4 Signage shall be clearly visible, especially for visitors, directing them from
                 the entry to the site to the visitor‟s reception area, giving the visitor no
                 excuse for wandering around the site.

          2.16.5 The facilities shall have a main external school sign, detailing the name
                 of the school and other pertinent information, which the Contractor is to
                 provide in consultation with the school and the Authority. The sign shall
                 be illuminated and of a design that allows the incorporation of changes
                 when necessary.




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3. Building Fabric - Internal
  3.1   Ceilings

           3.1.1 Ceilings to be level and flush at joints, adequately secured and provide
                 surface spread of flame performance in accordance with the relevant
                 statutory codes.
           3.1.2 Ceiling design shall take into account and be sympathetic to the acoustic
                 properties of each installation location.

           3.1.3 Shall have acoustic properties and performance in accordance with
                 BB93.
           3.1.4 Moisture resistant ceilings will be required in areas such as kitchens,
                 changing rooms, showers and toilets.

           3.1.5 Insulation to ceilings shall be non-combustible.

           3.1.6 Ceiling systems shall be designed, specified and installed in a way that
                 they cannot be readily damaged by impact or be defaced.
           3.1.7 Ceilings within toilets and changing rooms shall be specified and
                 designed in mind that they shall not be accessible by students who may
                 otherwise want to hide items within ceiling voids. They must be robust,
                 moisture proof and easy to clean.

  3.2   Internal Walls

           3.2.1 Shall have acoustic properties and performance in accordance with BB93.
           3.2.2 Finishes shall conform to Class 0 as defined by Buildings regulations.

           3.2.3 The Contractor shall ensure that all partitions are sufficiently robust to
                 withstand impact damage from equipment and wheelchairs.
           3.2.4 The Contractor shall ensure that all partitions are fit for their intended use
                 and can suitably support finishes and fixtures where required.

           3.2.5 The Contractor shall ensure that all walls and corners likely to be in contact
                 with mobility and teaching equipment are adequately protected from
                 damage to their finishes.

  3.3   Floors

           3.3.1 Floor finishes shall be slip resistant, durable and easily cleaned.

           3.3.2 Floor finishes shall be slip resistant in areas where water is used, e.g.
                 toilets, changing rooms, showers and kitchens.

           3.3.3 Joints between different finishes shall be flush.

           3.3.4 Suitable barrier matting shall be provided and maintained at external
                 entrances to assist with cleanliness to internal floor coverings.

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          3.3.5 Shall have acoustic properties and performance in accordance with
                BB93.

          3.3.6 Floor finishes shall be appropriate to the activity space they serve in
                terms of:

                  water resistance

                  minimal joints

                  smoothness

                  anti-static

                  slip resistance

                  ease and frequency of cleaning including body fluids

                  impact resistance

                  fire resistance

                  minimal abrasion characteristics against the skin

                  minimal sound absorption and transmission

                  attractive visual appearance

                  minimal surface temperature

                  disability use (eg wheelchair users)

  3.4   Internal Doors

          3.4.1 Doors to be designed robust enough to withstand heavy usage with
                minimal maintenance and to maintain the safety and security of the
                facility. Door design shall also take into account the different ages and
                abilities of all users in terms of weight and suitable opening / closing
                mechanisms.

          3.4.2 Doors shall be of a clear opening suitable to their purpose and sized to
                permit ease of access, egress and escape.

          3.4.3 Doors across corridors, to teaching and social areas and where listed on
                the Room Data Sheets must include vision panel(s) to provide visibility
                suitable for pupils and wheelchair users.

          3.4.4 Double doors in circulation areas must have non-rebated meeting stiles.

          3.4.5 The integrity of doors and frames to stock rooms, strong rooms and the
                like must be such as to withstand malicious entry.



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          3.4.6 Locations and requirements for doors for building compartmentation must
                be agreed with the Fire Authority. Fire standards must be in accordance
                with School Premises Regulations, the DCSF Constructional Standards
                and current Building Regulations.

          3.4.7 Shall have acoustic properties and performance in accordance with
                BB93.

          3.4.8 The Contractor shall ensure that „kick‟ plates are fitted to both sides of
                doors except in storage areas and shall be sufficient to protect the doors
                from damage from wheelchairs.
  3.5   Stairs, Ramps and Handrails

          3.5.1 At the time of publishing this document School premises have certain
                constructional standards that differ from those contained in the current
                Building Regulations. In particular, Approved Documents K and M are
                overridden in places by document DCSF/0142/2001 with respect to some
                elements of stairs ramps and handrails. The Contractor should ensure
                compliance with the correct requirement.

          3.5.2 Provide suitable handrails, balustrades and guards which are attractive
                and easy to use by everyone.

          3.5.3 Shall have acoustic properties and performance in accordance with
                BB93.
  3.6   Signage

          3.6.1 Signage shall be consistent and provided to support safe and efficient
                movement around the buildings.

          3.6.2 The facilities shall have appropriate signage to define their purpose.
                Every room shall have appropriate signing and room numbering plates.

          3.6.3 Signage shall also be provided to denote departments and for directional
                purposes to aid circulation within the buildings.
  3.7   Ironmongery

          3.7.1 The Contractor must allow for all doors to rooms, stores etc., to be
                lockable with a suited key system or otherwise (eg card access) as
                agreed with the Authority.
          3.7.2 The detail of the locking and suiting requirements to individual rooms
                must be agreed with the Authority.

          3.7.3 All ironmongery shall be robust and heavy duty.

          3.7.4 Door closers shall take account of the age of the pupils operating the
                doors.

          3.7.5 Controlled (staff operated) emergency release required for toilet cubicle
                door locks
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          3.7.6 Nameplates and numbers must be fitted to all rooms. Nameplates shall
                include script in Braille. The detailed requirements to individual rooms
                must be agreed with the Authority.

  3.8   Toilet and Changing Cubicles

          3.8.1 All cubicles are to be robust and of a height appropriate to the user but
                with walls and doors of sufficient size to prevent climbing and peering
                over.

          3.8.2 Urinals shall be individually screened and positioned so as not to be seen
                from outside of the toilet.

          3.8.3 The plan size of the toilet cubicles must allow sufficient space for their
                safe usage by the relevant age groups. Disabled toilets shall comply with
                the provisions of the Disability Discrimination Act 1995.

          3.8.4 Separate male and female toilets must be provided.

          3.8.5 Toilets for pupils must be separate from those for staff including those for
                disabled pupils and staff. Female toilets are to be provided with sanitary
                disposal units.

  3.9   Sanitary Fittings

          3.9.1 The Contractor shall comply with the minimum requirements of the
                Education (Schools Premises) Regulations 1999 and the Workplace
                (Health Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992 with regard to the
                minimum number of sanitary fittings required on the site.

          3.9.2 Sanitary fittings shall also comply with the following requirements:

                  (a) Low-level cisterns to WCs concealed where possible and resist
                      unauthorised access.

                  (b) WC seats to have strong fixing to pan. WC seats to be of a size
                      appropriate to relevant user age group.

                  (c) Size and fixing height of sanitary ware must be appropriate for
                      relevant user age groups and location (including taking into account
                      the needs of disabled persons).

                  (d) No plugs required for wash hand basins in pupils‟ toilets.

                  (e) Robust and tamper proof mixer taps with timed delivery.

          3.9.3 Fixtures and fittings in the pupils‟ toilet areas must be sufficiently robust to
                avoid vandalism.

          3.9.4 Showers must be self-draining and allow privacy for users.

          3.9.5   Lobbies to all toilet areas are required.

          3.9.6   Urinals are to be individual to allow privacy for users.
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4. Furniture, Fixtures and Equipment

4.1   The Contractor shall be responsible for the design, supply and installation of all fixed
      furniture, fixtures and equipment detailed on the furniture and equipment schedules
      and room data sheets.

4.2   The Contractor shall be responsible for the supply and installation of all loose furniture
      and equipment detailed on the furniture and equipment schedules and room data
      sheets.

4.3   The positioning and selection of furniture/fittings and equipment must address:

      4.3.1 Health and safety legislation

      4.3.2 Integration with the ICT provision and strategy

      4.3.3 Integration with any school provided or transferred furniture and equipment

      4.3.4 Coordination with all services such as ICT, gas, water, drainage and electricity

      4.3.5 Suitability and sufficiency storage for equipment when not in use

      4.3.6 Mobility - furniture that can be moved around

      4.3.7 Alternatives to fixed furniture to increase flexibility

      4.3.8 Flexibility - to suit a number of different activities

      4.3.9 Consistency across the school to allow interchanging

4.4   All furniture, fixtures and equipment shall:

      4.4.1 be robust and sturdy

      4.4.2 be considerate of the users including the disabled or those with mobility
            difficulties

      4.4.3 have minimum maintenance requirements

      4.4.4 be ergonomically designed

      4.4.5 in accordance with industry best practice and in compliance with all statutory
            regulations related to maintenance and management as well as provision.

4.5   Where adjustable height tables and desks for wheelchair bound users are provided
      they should not have any cross bracing so that the tables can be approached from at
      least two sides. Also, the height adjustment should be via a rotating handle at the side
      of the table/desk that is easily accessible to the desk user. Such tables/desks should
      have wheeled legs with the ability to lock each wheel to avoid movement when this is
      not desired.




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4.6   Furniture, fixtures and equipment shall comply with the following requirements:

      4.6.1 The facilities shall have appropriate furniture and equipment which shall comply
            with British and where appropriate European Standards in force or as published
            at the date of Contract signature or foreseeable at the date of Contract
            signature.

      4.6.2 The Contractor shall ensure that all equipment provided will be suitable for its
            intended use within the facilities.

      4.6.3 The Contractor shall provide advice about the type of appropriate furniture to
            co-ordinate with the Contractor‟s proposed design layouts and service points in
            rooms.

      4.6.4 The Contractor shall ensure that furniture is to be durable in construction, and
            that chipboard furniture will not be provided.

      4.6.5 The Contractor shall ensure that the furniture, fixtures and equipment shall not
            have any sharp edges or corners that would injure staff and pupils who fell
            against them.

      4.6.6 The Contractor shall ensure that Staff desks shall be ergonomically designed
            and suitable for ICT provision (i.e. to contain hidden power and data cable
            trunking). Staff chairs shall be suitable for computer workstation use.

      4.6.7 The Contractor shall ensure that all chairs provided at ICT points shall be
            suitable for ICT usage (i.e. swivel and height adjustable).

      4.6.8 The Contractor shall ensure that all work surfaces that are likely to get wet, and
            those that contain sinks (i.e. those in science, D&T and art rooms), are to be
            constructed of appropriate materials. Where resin based, they should be
            16mm thick solid pheanolic resin panel with a melamine resin decorative face
            on both sides with a chemical resistant transparent melamine overlay. The
            Contractor shall ensure that all drainage channels are factory machine cut into
            these surfaces adjacent to all sinks.

      4.6.9 The Contractor shall ensure that all sinks shall be stainless steel, ceramic or
            cast-epoxy and shall be under-slung beneath the work surface.

      4.6.10 Display boards should be incorporated into integrated display areas, entrance
             halls and other strategic location. The Contractor should restrict the use of
             flame-spread materials in escape routes

      4.6.11 Every room shall contain fixed and loose furniture and equipment provision in
             accordance with the furniture and equipment data sheets and room data sheets
             forming part of the Contractor‟s Proposals.




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4.7   The Authority may:

           vary (upwards and downwards) the amounts of individual elements of furniture,
            fixtures and equipment within an area in relation to the furniture and equipment
            and room data sheets and furniture schedules;

           include additional items of furniture and equipment;

           dispense with items of furniture and equipment.

      The Contractor is required to submit a schedule in the Contractor‟s Proposals
      containing details listing all fixed and loose furniture, fixtures and equipment proposed
      for incorporation and detailing all relevant information including manufacturer,
      manufacturer‟s reference, specification, location, number to be supplied and supply
      rate.

      The Contractor will be required to operate a procedure to enable the school to vary
      selection of the furniture during the design development process. In order to facilitate
      this process the Contractor is required to provide brochures, material samples and a
      „mock – up‟ room including furniture in order to facilitate final selection.


5. Internal Decorations and Finishes

5.1   Selection of finishes shall:

      5.1.1 take account of safety and fitness for purpose

      5.1.2 be modern

      5.1.3 be relevant to the area, use and age of occupants

      5.1.4 be able to withstand heavy usage and potential vandalism

      5.1.5 be resilient to impact and minimise noise

5.2   Finishes shall be as detailed in the room data sheets and drawings.

5.3   Wall finishes shall be durable, easily cleaned and where required fire resistant. Where
      circumstances preclude the use of water-based paints, appropriate risk assessments
      and method statements must be prepared to ensure the safety of pupils, staff and
      operatives exposed to solvent-based materials.

5.4   Finishes shall be chosen with a consideration of their acoustics and noise reduction
      capabilities. Acoustic properties of finishes shall be considered under the
      recommendations of the Building Bulletin BB93 “Acoustics in School Design”.

5.5   Consideration shall be given to the provision of suitable colour schemes and contrasts
      to assist people with visual or hearing difficulties.



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6. Acoustics

6.1    The design of the external envelope shall limit noise intrusion from traffic,
       pedestrians, nearby industry and weather related noise in order to comply with the
       requirements detailed in this section.

6.2    The Contractor will be required to carry out post construction testing and submit other
       details in order to demonstrate compliance with the acoustic requirements.

6.3    For new build and refurbished areas all elements of the accommodation shall comply
       with the guidance detailed in the DCSF Building Bulletin BB93 “Acoustics in School
       Design” which provides both guidance and the legislative requirements to meet the
       Building Regulations Part E. The Contractor should note that at the time of going to
       print Part E applies to sound insulation between dwellings but BB93 overrides all
       other requirements of this document in relation to Schools.

6.4    Indoor ambient noise levels, sound insulation between rooms shall comply with the
       requirements of Building Bulletin 93 Section 1 and the Building Regulations Part E.

6.5    Mid frequency reverberation times measured in seconds shall comply with the
       requirements of Building Bulletin 93 Section 1 and the Building Regulations Part E.

6.6    Speech intelligibility in all open plan areas shall comply with Section 1.1.7 of BB93
       unless alternative performance standards are proposed in accordance with BB93
       section 1.2.1 as described above.

7. Access and Internal Circulation

7.1    Access and internal circulation shall comply with the requirement detailed below.

7.2    Suitable access control mechanisms must be provided externally to all main
       reception areas.

7.3    There must be one easily supervised and clearly identified entry point to the buildings
       for visitors to the Schools with signage directing visitors from Entry of site to the
       Visitor‟s Reception.

7.4    Corridors and circulation areas must comply with Fire Safety requirements (see
       School Premises Regulations, DCSF Constructional Standards including BB100 and
       current Building Regulations).

7.5   A minimum floor to ceiling height of 2.7m (to be underside of any suspended/actual
      ceiling) is required in accommodation areas, though additional volume shall be
      exploited in appropriate places. Lower heights may acceptable in certain locations
      (such as entrance lobbies) but these will need to be clearly identified on the room data
      sheets and drawings.

7.6   Corridors shall be of an appropriate width to support the activities they serve and main
      circulation routes shall not be less than 1.8 m. Narrower widths depending on
      circumstances and traffic flow may be acceptable to access individual rooms but these
      will need to be clearly identified on the room data sheets and drawings.

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8. Storage

8.1   Storage provision shall comply with the following:

      8.1.1 Storage Equipment shall be provided as detailed in the furniture and equipment
            data sheets;

      8.1.2 Separate secure Storage for waste materials, including the facility for
            separation for recycling purposes;

      8.1.3 Internal secure waste storage shall be lockable and form a fire compartment
            with 1 hour fire resistance;

      8.1.4 External secure waste storage shall be separated from the main building by at
            least 8 metres. Other bin-stores shall be at least 8 metres from the main
            building.

      8.1.5 Where materials are stored which may give off toxic gases during fire
            conditions, appropriate measures are to be included for direct ventilation to
            external air (e.g. PE Stores where rubberised matting is stored).

8.2   Lockable storage will be necessary for the following:-

      8.2.1 Explosive and other dangerous material, including gas cylinders and
            radioactive samples where required;

      8.2.2 Cleaning materials;

      8.2.3 Chemicals and other hazardous materials in use in specific teaching areas as
            identified on Room Data Sheets;

      8.2.4 Secure waste. This could be internal or alternatively, a secure compound built
            from incombustible materials and located in accordance with relevant
            legislation;

      8.2.5 Lockable storage will also be required as detailed in the Furniture and
            Equipment data sheets as required under the Scope of Works Section A.




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Part 3 – Building and External Area Requirements

Section C – External Area Requirements

1. Generally

1.1   The Contractor will be responsible for compliance with any Tree Preservation Orders
      and any actions relating to any such orders. In addition the Contractor shall ensure
      that all other trees identified in any Outline Planning consent conditions shall be
      retained and protected throughout the course of the work.

1.2   The external areas must comply with any planning constraints.

1.3   External areas shall be designed to:

      1.3.1 Avoid litter accumulation

      1.3.2 Enable visibility, supervision and enhancement of behaviour management

      1.3.3 Be set to gradients so that drainage is free flowing

      1.3.4    All paths around the site shall be fully accessible for disabled people



2. Entrances, access roads and parking

2.1   Entrances and accesses must be appropriate for type of use, with vehicular traffic,
      deliveries and car parking kept away from pedestrian and cycle routes.

3. Formal and Informal Play Areas

3.1   The Contractor is to refer to Sport England design guidance on external sports
      requirements for the intended sports together with sports pitch design generally,
      namely “Natural Turf for Sport” (2000) and “Turf Pitches – Synthetic” (1996).

3.2   The Contractor is to include hard play requirements in accordance with BB85 including
      enclosure.

3.3   External taps/watering points for irrigation purposes shall be required.

3.4   Playgrounds will generally have drainage falls no more steeply than 1:50.

3.5   External lighting in external areas for safety and security in accordance with or in
      excess of CIBSE LG6 and BB90.

3.6   All pitch marking is to be undertaken using a non-toxic marking medium to the
      requirements of the National Association of the sport involved.




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Part 3 – Building and External Area Requirements

4. All Weather Sports Facilities

4.1   The porosity rate of the surface shall at least conform to that in the relevant British
      Standard 7044 – Artificial Sports Pitches, which stipulates a minimum of 100mm per
      hour, though the recommendation of the International Hockey Federation of 150mm
      per hour is considered desirable. In order to resist mass water inundation, the seams
      where the artificial surface rolls are joined, shall be able to withstand a minimum of
      0.25 Newtons per mm as required under BS7044. Any pitch is to be suitable for
      hockey and football.

4.2   All pitch marking is to be undertaken using a non-toxic marking medium to the
      requirements of the National Association of the sport involved.

4.3   Floodlighting shall be designed and installed in accordance with the requirements of
      CIBSE Lighting Guidance 4 as a minimum.



5. Site Boundaries and Margin Areas

5.1   The design will take into account site safety and security both in terms of preventing
      unauthorised access and hiding spaces, but also pupil safety.

5.2   Adequate margin area is to be provided to permit repositioning of pitches in alternate
      years to prevent under wear and compaction to the playing surface.


6. Furniture, Fittings and Equipment

6.1   External furniture, cycle racks (to be self-policed and in view of the School buildings)
      and litter bins are to be provided. They shall be adequate for the Schools‟ populations
      and manufactured from high quality and durable materials.

6.2   All cycle racks and outbuildings etc shall conform to the requirements of the Planning
      Authority.



7. Fencing

7.1   The Contractor shall provide suitable perimeter walling or fencing following review and
      risk assessment of the individual site conditions. Consideration should be given to
      appropriate aesthetics as well as security functions.

7.2   The specification of fencing shall be suitable to its location, agreed with the Authority
      and comply with planning stipulations and regulations.




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Part 3 – Building and External Area Requirements

Section D – Mechanical and Electrical Installations

1. General

1.1   It is the Contractor‟s responsibility to ensure that all installations comply with all
      relevant Standards and Regulations in the design of building services for schools.

1.2   Schools shall be capable of being metered separately for all utility consumption and for
      end use where required e.g. electricity used for lighting.

1.3   Maximum internal noise levels due to plant and equipment shall comply with the
      requirements of Building Bulletin 93.

1.4   Wherever possible, services should be located and routed in order to maximise
      flexibility and choice for room layout.

1.5   Pipework, cables and equipment, where necessary, must be easily accessible for
      maintenance but, wherever possible, hidden from view and made tamper-proof.

1.6   All connections, distribution systems, components and containment systems shall be
      safely protected, tamper-proof, correctly insulated, free from exposed contacts and
      clearly labelled.

1.7   All visible pipework and cable containment finishes to be uniform in appearance,
      complete, clean and hygienic.

1.8   The Contractor shall provide a centralised testing and monitoring of mechanical
      systems through a Building Management System in buildings greater than 1000m2.

1.9   All equipment controls and switchgear shall be permanently identified with appropriate
      warning notices and safety posters visible, firmly fixed and tamper proof.

1.10 Diagrams and schematics shall be available as required.

1.11 All plant, machinery and switchgear shall be guarded and locked where appropriate.

1.12 Locks and interlocks shall be fitted as required by design and the requirements of the
     appropriate statutory bodies.

1.13 Attention must be paid to the integrity of fire breaks within ceiling and roof voids, as
     fire-stopping is often breached by the installation of services.

1.14 There is a requirement for the consideration of energy saving throughout all aspects of
     design and operation.

2. Lighting

2.1   Good lighting, both artificial and natural, can have a powerful effect on the atmosphere
      of a space and reinforce positive attitudes towards the learning environment. It is
      obviously of functional importance as well and reference shall be made to the relevant
      guides and Standards to ensure compliance. Proposals shall demonstrate that lighting,
      both artificial and natural, will be harnessed and controlled to best practice in terms of
      effective illumination, form, colour rendering, shading, glare and heat gains and losses.

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Part 3 – Building and External Area Requirements

2. Lighting (cont'd)

2.2   Room layouts shall be considered to ensure that the teacher or speaker does not face
      glare or be seen against glare. Day lighting shall be designed to be integrated with the
      artificial lighting to take advantage of energy saving measures such as automatic
      daylight level sensors where possible. Contractors need to focus on the need to
      provide substantially day lit rooms. Eye level and high level windows need careful
      detail design and possible shading devices to ensure minimum glare and avoid
      localised solar penetration, both of which can cause over-heating and computer
      display screens and interactive white boards to become un-viewable.

2.3   The use of natural lighting shall be maximized but enhanced in areas where light levels
      change abruptly to overcome shadows. This may be particularly relevant in areas such
      as changes of level in stairwells and above ramps to avoid shadow risers and clearly
      illuminate treads and surface changes. Windows and skylights in teaching areas and
      corridors shall also be positioned to avoid glare and excessive heat gain.

2.4   Consideration shall be given to multi-use areas that will demand different levels of
      performance from lighting. An example of this is sports halls that require different
      characteristics for sport than for use as an examination room. Most teaching areas will
      need to provide lighting suitable for use with visual aids such as projectors, electronic
      whiteboards and televisions where as rooms such as science laboratories,
      performance halls, drama and art spaces may require total exclusion of light at certain
      times. The flexibility of lighting within multi-use spaces needs to be considered with
      regard to the type of usage and range of users these areas may be subject to

2.5   Lighting shall be designed to suit specific tasks or multi task areas.

2.6   The control and switching must refer to the current ADL and suit the operational
      requirements of the School and controls should be clearly labelled and accessible to
      users both physically and with regard to ease of use;
2.7   The Contractor must provide functional and serviceable emergency lighting to ensure
      safe evacuation in an emergency and/or in the events of mains power failure, to be
      integrated with escape routes and doors. Emergency lighting must comply with DCSF
      Building Bulletins 87 (latest edition) and 90 and BS 5266.

2.8   Illumination levels and luminaries must be in accordance with Building Bulletin 87
      (latest edition), Building Bulletin 90, CIBSE Code for Lighting, Building Regulations
      Approved Document ADL2A and in accordance with the Room Data Sheets and
      prescribed standards. This includes a lamp luminous efficacy of 65 lumens/circuit Watt.
      In addition, the efficacy of lighting systems in classrooms should be at least
      3.5W/m2/100lux.

2.9   Room Data Sheets shall identify required lighting levels for individual areas.
2.10 Photocell and presence detection controls and systems should be considered and
     balanced against the intended occupancy patterns and actual daylight calculations.

2.11 Manual over-ride facilities must be provided to any automatic lighting controls.
2.12 Tungsten lamps shall not be used except for display purposes;

2.13 Specialist lighting shall be provided in areas where standard lighting is unsuitable e.g.
     swimming pool, gym etc;
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Part 3 – Building and External Area Requirements

2.14 There shall be careful control of lighting in spaces where the use of ICT is planned and
     with the use of projectors and interactive whiteboards becoming more extensive,
     lighting arrangements shall be adaptable.

2.15 The Contractor must provide “quality of light” designs incorporating a balance between
     surface colours and textures, visual interest, light colour, uniformity and non-uniformity
     of light patterns

2.16 The Contractor shall provide external lighting systems that:-

      2.16.1 Are designed in accordance with DCSF Building Bulletin 90, covering car parks,
             sports facilities, walkways and roads, entrances, particular building features,
             security requirements, etc;

      2.16.2 Incorporates lamps having an efficacy of at least 65 lumens per circuit watt
             fitted with both time controls and daylight level photocell controls

      2.16.3 Achieves safe environments for people, traffic and the building

      2.16.4 Minimises light pollution and ensures light levels are kept within the limits as
             required by BS 5489 and nuisance to the adjacent neighbourhood shall be
             avoided.



3. Glare

3.1   The measures taken to reduce glare shall be clearly described. The CIBSE and CIE
      recommended guidelines are for the glare index not to exceed 19, taking into account
      the effects of natural day lighting, artificial lighting and internal finishes. Visual comfort
      shall be in conformance with best practice identified in EN12464.

4. Heating and Ventilation

4.1   Heating and ventilation are two issues that are inextricably linked and that are
      essential to providing a comfortable and fresh environment. Good indoor air quality is a
      key design issue that also has a direct bearing on the well being of all users of the
      School premises. Whilst natural ventilation is always preferred it is user dependant,
      subject to the local air quality and conditions and has an impact on energy usage and
      acoustics. Proposals shall include the provision for effective ventilation at all times to
      provide a wholesome environment and shall encourage the use of natural ventilation
      wherever practical but consider the incorporation of automatic controls, heat recovery
      methods and acoustic attenuation in the overall design to address these points.
      Compliance with acoustic performance requirements shall not be overlooked.
      Mechanical ventilation may be necessary to satisfy statutory and health and safety
      needs such as in areas of high heat load and/or pollution or to assist in avoiding
      excessive noise intrusion from external sources.

4.2   All systems shall be capable of dealing with localised conditions and responding swiftly
      to changes in demand. The heating medium, whilst consuming the minimum of prime
      energy, must provide good comfort levels in all spaces through innovative design, and
      simple to operate controls, which harmonise with the user needs and the ventilation
      provision.

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4. Heating and Ventilation (cont'd)

4.3   Toilets will require good ventilation and mechanical extraction may be required,
      especially in rooms with no opening windows. In instances such as this, it may be
      beneficial to consider the use of extract/supply units with combined heat recovery to
      improve energy efficiency and conform to efficiency targets.

4.4   The Contractor should be aware of Approved Document ADL2A 2006 for building logs
      and energy performance certificates. Compliance with these requirements or the most
      current requirements shall be mandatory.

4.5   Heating and ventilation systems shall be designed to be efficient as described in the
      current ADL 2006 i.e. at least 80.8% Seasonal Efficiency of gas fired boiler plant and
      Specific Fan Powers of 2W/l/s for fresh air ventilation or 0.2W/l/s for fan coils or
      recirculation.

4.6   Users shall have control over their immediate environment in terms of both heating
      and ventilation. All user controls shall therefore be easily comprehensible, accessible
      and quietly responsive. All controls should be located so as to deter use by pupils.

4.7   Systems shall be designed to comply with School Premises Regulations, BB87 and
      Building Regulations Approved Document L.

4.8   Systems to be capable of providing the required temperatures to all locations in
      accordance with the relevant statutory codes or codes of practice.

4.9   Temperature levels are to be in accordance with those specified in the current edition
      of BB87 and Building Regulations Approved Document L, or as otherwise stated in
      Room or Area Data Sheets.

4.10 The systems shall be robust and durable.

4.11 The Contractor shall make backup and standby facilities available or designed into the
     systems to ensure that the schools can function when minor failures of the system
     occur.

4.12 The systems shall be flexible enough to provide multi-functional use including third
     party use of the buildings without loss of energy efficiency and the use of complex
     control and operating systems.

4.13 Routing of heating pipes shall be co-ordinated with the building appearance and be
     routed such that major disruption to the schools is avoided as a result of minor repairs
     or routine maintenance.

4.14 Piped water services shall avoid rooms or areas where leaks would cause
     considerable disruption and financial loss.

4.15 Systems must also be designed to ensure that temperature variations are confined to
     those specified as acceptable in the Room Data Sheets.

4.16 Multi-purpose spaces must have heating equipment capable of being controlled to
     deliver the required temperature to suit the activity.
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4. Heating and Ventilation (cont'd)

4.17 Surface temperatures of heat and emitters and associated pipework must be safe and
     in accordance with current Building Regulations and Building Bulletins.

4.18 The Contractor must provide zoned systems matched to occupancy areas. These
     zones must have variable temperature controls and to permit extra-curricular activity.
     Individual thermostatic control must be provided to each room or space.

4.19 Space heating controls must be easy to use by untrained school staff, reliable and as
     far as possible automatic. Adjustable components (thermostats) must be tamper-proof
     as required by the current ADL.

4.20 Specific controls may be required to be located to allow use by authorised personnel
     only. Where such requirements exist they shall be identified within Room Data Sheets.
     However, all controls should be located so as to deter use by pupils.

4.21 Control systems to be provided with the facility for remote monitoring of the system.

4.22 For buildings greater than 1000m2 a BEMS or controls of similar sophistication, to
     include automatic meter reading, optimisation, weather compensation, scheduling,
     time extension, frost protection and holiday setting with a simple user interface.

4.23 Ceiling mounted radiant panels will not be acceptable in classrooms or offices (unless
     demonstrated not to create uncomfortable conditions for seated occupants).

4.24 If boilers are used as the source of heating then the design shall demonstrate that the
     total standing losses of the boilers and heating distribution do not exceed 15% of the
     annual heating energy during occupied hours.

4.25 The Contractor shall ensure that the heating systems include the following features:

      4.25.1 Valve isolation such that isolation of circuits/ sub-circuits does not disrupt
             heating to the remaining building.

      4.25.2 Frost and anti-condensation protection.

      4.25.3 All submitted plans shall comply fully with the latest building regulations in
             force, in particular Part L2A (ADL 2006). The Contractor shall also be aware
             and comply with any future legislation, which may come into effect during the
             works, such as a requirement for energy certification under the European
             Energy Performance of a Building (EPBD)

5. Solar Gain

5.1   The Contractor must provide peak solar gain temperature analyses in accordance with
      CIBSE prediction techniques where areas are exposed to direct sunlight to
      demonstrate acceptable solar gain against ambient air temperature.

5.2   The accommodation shall comply with the Health and Safety (Miscellaneous
      Amendments) Regulations 2002, to ensure that "excessive effects of sunlight on
      temperature shall be avoided."


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5. Solar Gain (cont'd)

5.3   The Service Provider shall also take specific note of the guidance relating to
      summertime overheating requirements in the DCSF Building Bulletins BB87 and
      BB101 and Building Regulations Approved Document L.

6. Thermal Performance

6.1   The building fabric shall comply with the current Building Regulations Approved
      Document L2.

7. Ventilation

7.1   Systems shall comply with the following requirements:

7.2   DCSF Building Bulletin 101, Building Regulations Part F and the Workplace
      Regulations. Where kitchens or workshops require mechanical ventilation, the air
      change rates will be dictated by the CIBSE codes, and if necessary filtered make-up
      air shall be provided.

7.3   Toilets and changing areas shall be ventilated at the minimum rate of 6 air changes
      per hour with appropriate time and occupancy controls.

7.4   Room Data Sheets will identify specific air change rates where more onerous than the
      legislation noted here.

7.5   Should the Contractor‟s ventilation strategy conflict with the requirements for acoustic
      performance it shall be identified within the proposals and clearly state the reason for
      and level of non-performance.

7.6   The efficient use of energy and heat recovery along with any other methods must be
      used with electrically operated ventilation systems. The building design must reduce
      heat gains wherever possible hence reducing the need for mechanical ventilation or
      cooling, to offset high room temperatures.

7.7   All methods of ventilation must be integrated into the building whether natural, passive
      or mechanical and co-ordinated with the fire alarm where required. The systems must
      be flexible to allow reduced ventilation rates with low occupancy or out of normal
      hour‟s use.

7.8   Additional ventilation measures – e.g. fume cupboards and local exhaust ventilation –
      will be required in certain areas as identified in the Room Data Sheets and in
      accordance with the Building Regulations Approved Document Part L2 , e.g. science
      laboratories for the removal of noxious fumes, or rooms with equipment that increases
      the process load.

7.9   Controls must suit the operational requirements of the schools and should be
      accessible to users both physically and with regard to ease of use.

7.10 Specific controls may be required to be located to allow use by authorised personnel
     only. Where such requirements exist they shall be identified within Room Data Sheets.
     However, all controls should be located so as to deter unauthorised use by pupils.


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7. Ventilation (cont'd)

7.11 The Contractor shall ensure discharge air terminals are positioned to prevent re-
     circulation into the building.

7.12 If trickle ventilation is used, it must be closable.

7.13 Air infiltration in new premises (and premises that have received major refurbishment)
     shall be proven to be less than 8m3/h/m2 of façade area @ 50 Pascals, or any lower
     figure that may be required by the Building Regulations.

8. Water

8.1   Wholesome water supplies and hygienic waste systems are required around the
      school, both internally and externally.

8.2   Drinking fountains are required as a minimum in accordance with the following
      requirements:

      8.2.1 one number per senior school cluster area per floor

      8.2.2 two number in sports reception area

      8.2.3 two number to main spine corridor per floor

      8.2.4 one number to sports pavilion

8.3   Care must be taken in locating these stations to avoid misuse, spillages and waste.
      Consultation with the Employer shall take place in to establish the exact location of the
      drinking water supplies. Installations shall permit users to recharge water bottles using
      spigots and the supply system shall incorporate a „dead‟ handle system to minimise
      spillages and prevent the water supply being left on. Drinking fountains must have
      appropriate drainage facilities and be sufficiently robust to deter casual vandalism.

8.4   Externally, water supplies shall be needed for grounds maintenance, landscaping and
      fire fighting; inside the building for catering, toilet facilities, first aid rooms etc.

8.5   Water supplied shall be metered by a device with the capability to be read
      electronically.

8.6   The design of fossil fuel based hot water systems must show a system efficiency of
      greater than 50% i.e. heat in the hot water at point of use must be greater than 50% of
      the fuel input.

8.7   Standing losses for electrically heated hot water services for hand washing must not
      exceed 10W/basin.

8.8   Water conservation measures must be applied to minimise urinal water use, over
      pressure and taps left on. Similarly, other water saving measures are encouraged.




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8. Water (cont'd)

8.9   The Contractor must provide water service to outlet points, equipment of the correct
      type, sufficient rate and suitable temperature to meet the prescribed standards and
      relevant Building Bulletins.

8.10 The Contractor must provide suitable systems of water storage and hot water
     production that comply with the relevant Building Bulletins and complement the
     physical layout of the building and ensure energy efficient operation and meet the
     operation and requirements of the school.

8.11 The final discharge temperature of hot water supplies in showers and taps used by
     pupils shall not exceed 43°C.

8.12 The systems must operate in a safe condition appropriate to the process, function and
     specific areas being served.

8.13 Mains water or tanked potable water to be supplied direct to kitchens, staff/rest rooms,
     technology rooms, vending machines, medical rooms, drinking water outlets and any
     other area as detailed in the Room Data Sheets;

8.14 All water services installations must comply with BS6700 and BS6465 and be installed
     and commissioned in accordance with the provisions of the Health and Safety
     Commission Code of Practice for the Prevention and Control of Legionellosis and
     disinfected to comply with current standards.

8.15 Water tanks, where required, shall have the minimum possible capacity to prevent
     stagnation and must be suitably located to allow for cleaning of the water tanks, and to
     comply with the regulations above.

8.16 Where domestic hot water is supplied without local thermostatic control, all taps must
     be appropriately labelled and shall not be located in areas where pupils have
     unsupervised access.

8.17 Water supplies fed from storage tanks not designed for potable water provision shall
     be clearly labelled as “not drinking water”.

9. Mains Distribution

9.1   Main switchboards, sectional switchboards and distribution boards shall be appropriate
      in terms of all electrical and mechanical criteria. The switchgear shall provide for
      future extension affecting cabling and electrical loads up to a minimum of 20% above
      the base load for the completed school.

9.2   Local distribution boards shall have a minimum of 10% spare capacity to allow for
      future extension/expansion of the system

9.3   All switchboards and distribution boards must be installed in secure locations and must
      be tamper and vandal proof.




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9. Mains Distribution (cont'd)

9.4   All equipment must be provided with durable labels, clearly marked with details of the
      equipment‟s function and designation;

9.5   The Contractor shall provide a main switch panel for the incoming supply.

9.6   The Contractor shall ensure that the panel shall be of „form 4‟ construction and consist
      of a main incoming Air Circuit Breaker (ACB), phase failure relays, full metering and
      Building Management System (BMS) connections for monitoring and Controls.

9.7   The Contractor shall ensure that the panel shall have sufficient out going switch fuses /
      Moulded Case Circuit Breaker‟s (MCCB‟s) for submain distribution, lifts, Heating,
      Ventilation and Air Conditioning (HVAC) and fire alarm along with a minimum of 25%
      spare capacity.

9.8   The Contractor shall ensure that panel shall be fitted with an Automatic Power factor
      correction to bring the power factor as close to unity as practicable.

9.9   The Contractor shall provide local panel boards fitted with MCCB‟s for larger loads that
      are remote from the main incoming panel. The Contracor shall ensure that the panels
      are fitted with sub metering and have a minimum of 25% spare capacity and shall have
      Building Management System connection for monitoring and control.

9.10 The Contractor shall provide power and lighting distribution boards to meet the local
     lighting and power needs.

9.11 The Contractor shall ensure that the local distribution boards:

9.11.1 are complete with main incoming switch/ isolator Miniature Circuit Breaker‟s (MCB‟s)
      and Residual Current Devices, and have a minimum of 25% spare capacity.

9.11.2 are located in secure cupboards around the building that give ease of access for
      maintenance.

9.11.3 The Contractor shall ensure that the Information Technology rooms, large offices and
      in particular the communications centres shall have a separate distribution board for
      computer supplies.

9.12 The Contractor shall ensure that where separate boards are required that these shall
     have Uninterruptible Power Supply back up.

10. Power Circuits

10.1 Power Circuit systems shall comply with the following requirements.

10.2 The Contractor must provide suitable RCBO / RCD protection against electric shock
     and circuit overload for all socket outlets.

10.3 The power circuit system shall be designed to minimise interference to computers
     caused by electrical faults or failures. The Contractor shall provide the appropriate
     number and distribution of sockets detailed within the Room Data Sheets together with
     others required for general maintenance and other functions such as cleaning.

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10. Power Circuits (cont'd)

10.4 The Contractor must provide suitable protection against surges caused by both
     lightning and switching electromagnetic impulse to power circuits supplying ICT and
     other sensitive equipment.

10.5 Sockets must be located to support differing furniture layouts and methods of teaching
     and coordinated with room layouts and usage.

10.6 Outlets for computer equipment shall comply with BS7671 section 607 (earthing
     arrangements for high leakage equipment).

10.7 All sockets must be sited safely away from potential dangers.

10.8 Specific proposals for power circuits such as number of sockets in a room, emergency
     cut off switches or a 3-phase supply shall be detailed on the room data sheets.

11. Clock Installation

11.1 Clocks to be provided by the Contractor in accordance with Furniture & Equipment
     Data Sheets. The school shall decant some battery-operated clocks from the existing
     school.

12. Period Bell Systems

12.1 Period bell systems shall provide tones/bells to denote the start of the daily School
     session and to identify the end of various periods. The systems offered shall be flexible
     enough to deal with changes to the timetable. Tones/bells employed shall be easily
     distinguishable from the tones/bells employed on the fire alarm system. The systems
     must have pre-set timings with manual override.

12.2 All systems shall cater for hearing impaired building users.

12.3 Audio systems shall be provided as detailed in the Furniture & Equipment Data
     Sheets.

13. Lightning Protection

13.1 All buildings shall be provided with suitable lightning protection systems in accordance
     with current codes.

13.2 All lightning protection systems shall be tamper proof.

14. Fire Fighting Installation

14.1 All fire fighting equipment shall be designed and installed in accordance with current
     guidelines, legislation and the fire officer‟s recommendations, and certified as such.

14.2 All installations shall be in accordance with BB100.




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14. Fire Fighting Installation (cont'd)

14.3 If sprinkler installations are to be installed then:

      14.3.1 they must not be fed off the drinking water supply;

      14.3.2 the Authority shall require that the system is activated via temperature sensors
             which facilitate a localised response around the fire wall. This should ensure
             protection whilst reducing the risk of malicious miss use and also ensure the
             containment of water damage to the local site of the fire;

      14.3.3 all installations shall be in accordance with BB100;

      14.3.4 sprinkler installations must conform to BS5306 Part 2 Specifications for
             Sprinklers, the British Automatic Sprinkler Association Code of Practice and
             comply with the Loss Prevention Council‟s Technical Bulletin TB34 which
             augments the requirements under this British Standard;

      14.3.5 the design and installation shall be undertaken by contractors certified to LPS
             1048 and meeting Loss Prevention Certification Board approval;

      14.3.6 the system shall comply with all requirements of the Insurance industry
             guidelines and any specifics of the Insurers for the building to allow the
             entitlement to sprinkler discount being applied to insurance premiums.

15. Fire Alarm System

15.1 Fire Alarm systems shall be provided at the School and shall comply with the following
     requirements:

15.2 The Contractor must provide systems to at least the standard of BS 5839 Type L1 or
     L2 as agreed with the Employer;

15.3 The systems of detection, alarm and identification to be integrated with other reactive
     systems.

15.4 Visual fire alarm systems are to be provided at appropriate locations.

15.5 The facilities shall comply with the following requirements for fire protection:

      15.5.1 Means of escape, fire-fighting equipment, automatic fire detection systems and
             fire signage provisions must all be agreed with the Fire Authority.

      15.5.2 The elements of the structure, finishes, fixtures and fittings must comply with all
             relevant legislation, guidance and codes of practice.

      15.5.3 Alarm detection and equipment shall be suitable for visually and hearing
             impaired users.

15.6 Half hour fire doors on corridors and stairwells, which are subject to heavy usage shall
     have the facility to be held open by electro-magnetic contacts wired into the fire alarm
     system.
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Part 3 – Building and External Area Requirements

16. Intruder Alarm

16.1 The Contractor shall provide the buildings with a comprehensive intruder alarm
     systems including access controls, which complement the building‟s functions and
     operations and are enhanced as necessary in designated areas of high risk

16.2 Thought shall be given to particular circumstances when deciding on the type of alarm
     signalling, i.e. audible or remote. The area in which the school is situated, proximity of
     occupied property and particularly the presence of an on-site caretaker are factors to
     take into consideration. For instance, if there is an on-site caretaker and other property
     adjacent with supportive occupants, the Police shall be approached to permit an
     instant audible alarm (as opposed to a 10-minute delay on most remote signalling
     systems) and, if high decibel sounders are installed internally, the chances of an
     intruder staying long are minimal. Alternatively, a large site, surrounded by playing
     fields, with no caretaker living on site and houses some distance away, a remotely
     signalling alarm with the usual delay of 10 minutes on bells would suffice.

16.3 The system shall meet the requirements of BS4737 parts 1, 2 and 3, BS 6799 and
     NACOSS.

16.4 Any remotely signalling alarm shall utilise some form of monitored path to the alarm
     receiving centre – the most commonly used being BT RedCARE.

16.5 It is likely that any new systems will require confirmation technology before being
     granted Level 1 Police response. Further, any systems that lose Level 1 response due
     to the number of false alarm activations experienced will require the addition of
     confirmation technology before Level 1 is reinstated. (Confirmation technology means
     the ability to confirm that alarm activation is actually due to an intruder, through either
     internal CCTV pictures or microphone detected sound, both transmitted to the alarm
     receiving centre, or the sequential activation of detectors tracking an intruder‟s
     progress through the premises).

16.6 The alarm systems shall be capable of remote monitoring

16.7 As the benefit of detection is not just aimed at those breaking in to steal, but at any
     intruder who may just wish to cause damage, detectors shall be provided to cover all
     accessible perimeter areas.

16.8 The installer shall be certified by an UKAS, (United Kingdom Accreditation Service)
     accredited certification body.

17. ICT Infrastructure

17.1 The Contractor is required to provide a structured data cabling network to support the
     ICT systems that will be required within the school. The data cabling network is likely
     to be used to support wireless connectivity, and may also be used for voice and CCTV
     communications.

17.2 The scope of the provision will include all ICT data and telecommunications
     equipment, cabling systems and containment, from connection to the statutory
     undertaker to connection point with the school equipment. Systems and equipment
     will include:-


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Part 3 – Building and External Area Requirements

17. ICT Infrastructure (cont'd)

      17.2.1 data system (including all hubs routers, switches and other similar devices but
             excluding servers) and incoming service connections;

      17.2.2 telecommunications system;

      17.2.3 one payphone in the main entrance area

      17.2.4 PABX equipment

17.3 The Contractor is required to provide telephone systems that use the same cabling as
     the computer network. All PABX will be capable of working with „Voice over IP‟. The
     telephone system shall be as specified in the Area Data Sheets and be capable of
     delivering the full range of functionality.

17.4 All wireless connection transponders shall be of intrinsically safe design and operate at
     “touch-safe” power levels at all times.

18. CCTV

18.1 CCTV is required for a) monitoring of entrances and b) building/site surveillance.

18.2 Systems shall comply with the requirements of EN50132-7.

18.3 Systems must be sympathetic to the adjacent land and neighbours and avoid intrusion
     into the private activities not associated with the school.

18.4 Systems provided for the reason in a) above shall be capable of recording to a quality
     sufficient to afford the Employer the capability to prosecute any persons committing
     unlawful acts.

18.5 The Contractor must provide systems designed specifically to be integrated into the
     architectural designs of the school, surrounding grounds and access control systems.

19. Lift Installation

19.1 Lifts are not required to provide for general pupil and staff movement but for ensuring
     access is available to all areas by those with physical disabilities and assisting with the
     distribution of heavy furniture and equipment.

19.2 The lifts provided must be key protected, protecting use for disabled pupils, staff and
     visitors, and other members of staff only.

19.3 The lifts provided must contain alarm communication devices such that school is
     aware of a trapped person; and communication can be made with a 24 hour help line
     via a direct link to notify an appropriate party of their location and initiate their release.

19.4 Lift capacity shall be appropriate for the population. Where lifts are required, the
     Contractor shall provide a lift traffic analysis identifying the speed of the lift, size and
     waiting time. The minimum waiting time shall not be less than “good” as defined by
     CIBSE lift traffic analysis.


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Part 3 – Building and External Area Requirements

20. Access Control

20.1 All Access Control equipment, cabling, etc shall be securely installed and be tamper
     and vandal proof from both the controlled and uncontrolled zones.

21. TV Installation

21.1 The extent to which TV and satellite installations are required shall be detailed in the
     Room Data Sheets.

21.2 The installations shall be capable of receiving and distributing digital transmissions and
     shall comply with all relevant British Standards.

22. Drainage Installation

22.1 The drainage system provided must achieve hygienic conditions and the effective
     disposal of wastewater, surface water and all liquid waste from the school and its
     facilities‟ activities.

22.2 Designs shall be in accordance with appropriate codes of practices.

22.3 All drainage runs (including land drainage) to be clear of obstructions, set in line to the
     necessary falls and show no signs of pipe displacement. All manholes shall be
     designed to receive the relevant imposed load, whether it is pedestrian or vehicular. All
     internal manholes shall be double sealed.

22.4 The Contractor shall ensure that prior written agreement is obtained from the relevant
     authorities for discharge into the public system. Such written agreement shall include
     confirmation that the existing system has the capacity to accept the increased
     discharge, and should include the negotiation of any wayleaves required.

22.5 The Contractor shall ensure that all necessary detailed surveys, inspections and
     appraisals of all existing systems shall be carried out including the use of CCTV where
     required.

22.6 The Contractor shall ensure that adequate provision is made for the diversion, if
     necessary, of any existing below ground drainage or other services.

22.7 The Contractor shall ensure the efficiency and sound condition of any existing
     drainage, to be utilised.

22.8 The Contractor shall ensure that the Environment Agency have agreed the planned
     methodology for surface water drainage.

22.9 Drainage to playing fields and all weather pitches will be designed and constructed in
     accordance with current guidance and in consultation with Sport for England.

23. Gas and Compressed Air Installations

23.1 Gas and compressed air installations and appliances must be provided where stated in
     the Room Data Sheets and installed in accordance with appropriate legislation
     regulations and guidance.


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Part 3 – Building and External Area Requirements

23. Gas and Compressed Air Installations (cont'd)

23.2 The gas isolation valve for each area of the building shall be situated within a securely
     locked area. If this is not possible, the valve handles shall have a security bracket and
     padlock fitted, or a proprietary system installed where the gas supply for each area is
     regulated through a key operated control panel utilising a solenoid valve. All gas
     installations to be in accordance with relevant regulations and guidance.

23.3 Gas isolation and automatic proving/soundness testing shall be incorporated to
     laboratory and similar classroom areas. Gas supplies to kitchen equipment shall be
     interlocked with the mechanical ventilation system as appropriate. Gas detection
     equipment interlocked with safety shut-off valves shall be installed in internal boiler
     rooms. Gas installations shall be certified on completion to comply with all CORGI
     recommendations and statutory requirements.

23.4 Emergency shut off valves shall be provided as stated in the Room Data Sheets.

24. Building Management System

24.1 The Contractor shall provide a Building Management System.

24.2 The Contractor shall provide a graphic PC workstation to control the Building
     Management System.

24.3 The Contractor shall provide structured security access coding to prevent unauthorised
     access to the system.

24.4 The Contractor shall ensure that the Building Management System shall carry out the
     following functions:

     24.4.1 control and monitor space temperatures on a room-by-room basis as
            appropriate;

     24.4.2 provide individual and automatic temperature monitoring and control for all
            occupied spaces on a room-by-room basis as appropriate;

     24.4.3 provide optimum start, stop control of plant operation and weather
            compensation where appropriate;

     24.4.4 permit time and holiday schedules and scheduled out-of-hours operation to be
            programmed where appropriate;

     24.4.5 provide alarm and a hard copy record of any plant failure giving rise to a high or
            low temperature;

     24.4.6 log domestic hot water flow and return temperatures;

     24.4.7 monitor incoming gas, power and water consumption;

     24.4.8 provide a software based maintenance prompt system to assist planned
            maintenance;



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Part 3 – Building and External Area Requirements

24. Building Management System (cont'd)

      24.4.9 provide lighting controls; and

      24.4.10 monitor water tank storage temperatures.

25. Induction Loops

2.5   Notwithstanding the acoustic requirements set out in BB91, induction loops are
      required to the reception, dining halls and, sports halls assembly halls.

26. Disabled Alarm and Disabled Refuge Alarm

26.1 A disabled toilet alarm shall be installed in all disabled toilets and report to an alarm
     panel located in the general office.

26.2 Each disabled toilet shall consist of a pull cord with reassurance lamp, a wall mounted
     reset button, an over-door illuminated indicator with tone generator.

27. Energy Management and Utilities

27.1 The design shall comply with Building Bulletin 87 and a BREEAM Schools rating of not
     less than „Very Good‟ shall be achieved for the completed building.

28. Electronic Registration System




                                              132
ANNEX 1 – LIST OF STATUTORY GUIDELINES AND REQUIREMENTS

1. Introduction

1.1   Annex 1 contains a list of statutory codes, standards, regulations etc., current at the
      time of printing. These are not necessarily full, accurate or complete but are included
      to provide the Contractor with details on the scope and range of compliance with
      advisory, legal and statutory documentation and legislation that will be required. For
      the avoidance of doubt, this Annex forms part of the Authority's Requirements.

1.2   All accommodation and facilities at the school are to meet the standards in guidance
      published by the DCSF and other national bodies as indicated in the non-exhaustive
      list identified below unless a derogation has been identified and agreed. In addition,
      the Contractor is to comply with all relevant statutory and health and safety legislation
      and other good industry standards, including British, European and International
      Standards. Compliance with these regulations, standards and guidelines shall be
      taken as those being in force or published as at the date of Contract signature or
      foreseeable at the date of Contract signature.

2. Statutory Legislation

2.1   Educational

      2.1.1 DCSF Constructional Standards 1997

      2.1.2 The Educational (School Premises) Regulations 1999

      2.1.3 Special Educational Needs and Disability Act 2001

      2.1.4 All current Education Acts

2.2   Building

      2.2.1 The Building Regulations of England and Wales

      2.2.2 Occupiers Liability Act 1957 and 1984

      2.2.3 Town and Country Planning Legislation 1990 (with 1994 amendment)

      2.2.4 Environmental Protection Act 1990

      2.2.5 Disability Discrimination Act 1995

      2.2.6 Local By-laws

2.3   Health and Safety Regulations

      2.3.1 Fire Precautions Act 1971

      2.3.2 Highly Flammable Liquids & Liquid Petroleum Gas Regulations 1972

      2.3.3 Highly Flammable Liquids & Liquefied Petroleum Gasses Order 1974

      2.3.4 Health and Safety at Work Act 1974

                                             133
ANNEX 1 – LIST OF STATUTORY GUIDELINES AND REQUIREMENTS

2.3   Health and Safety Regulations (cont'd)

      2.3.5 Working at Height Regulations 2005

      2.3.6 Asbestos (Licensing) Regulations 1983

      2.3.7 Occupational Exposure Limits - Health & Safety Executive 1984

      2.3.8 Ionising Radiations Regulations 1985

      2.3.9 Gas Act 1986

      2.3.10 Noise at Work Regulations 1989

      2.3.11 Pressure Systems and Transportable Gas Containers Regulations 1989

      2.3.12 Electricity at Work Regulations- Health & Safety Executive 1989

      2.3.13 Health and Safety Guidance for Schools 1989

      2.3.14 Food Safety Act 1990

      2.3.15 The Construction Products Regulations 1991

      2.3.16 Personal Protective Equipment at Work Regulations 1992

      2.3.17 Display Screen Equipment Regulations 1992

      2.3.18 Manual Handing Operations Regulations 1992

      2.3.19 Workplace (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1992

      2.3.20 Simple Pressure Vessels (Safety amendment) Regulations 1994

      2.3.21 Construction (Design and Management) Regulations 1994 (as amended)

      2.3.22 Food Safety (General Food Hygiene) Regulations 1995

      2.3.23 Disability Discrimination Act 1995

      2.3.24 Reporting of Injuries, Diseases and Dangerous Occurrences Regulations
             (RIDDOR) 1995

      2.3.25 Safety Signs and Signals Regulations 1996

      2.3.26 Construction (Health, Safety and Welfare) Regulations 1996

      2.3.27 Gas Safety (Management) Regulations 1996

      2.3.28 Work in Compressed Air Regulations 1996

      2.3.29 Confined Spaces Regulations 1997

      2.3.30 Provision and Use of Work Equipment Regulations 1998
                                             134
ANNEX 1 – LIST OF STATUTORY GUIDELINES AND REQUIREMENTS

2.3   Health and Safety Regulations (cont'd)

      2.3.31 Lifting Operations and Lifting Equipment Regulations 1998

      2.3.32 Gas Safety (Installations and Use) Regulations 1998

      2.3.33 Control of Asbestos at Work (Amendment) Regulations 1998

      2.3.34 Control of Lead at Work Regulations 1998

      2.3.35 Management of Health & Safety at Work Regulations 1992 (as amended 1994
             and 1999)

      2.3.36 Fire Precautions (Workplace) (Amendment) Regulations 1999

      2.3.37 Control of Substances Hazardous to Health Regulations (COSHH) 1994 (as
             amended 1999)

      2.3.38 Pressure Systems Safety Regulations 2000

      2.3.39 Construction (Design and Management) (Amendment) Regulations 2000

      2.3.40 Control of Asbestos at Work Regulations 2002

      2.3.41 Health & Safety Executive Guidance Notes HG (G) Series 150

      2.3.42 Health & Safety in Construction

      2.3.43 Relevant EU Directives on Health and Safety matters

      2.3.44 Current Relevant British Standards and EU Regulations

      2.3.45 All Relevant British Standards, codes of practice, European Standards and
             Agreement Certificates.

3. National Guidelines

3.1   Educational

      3.1.1 DCSF Publications by the Architect‟s and Building Branch including:

      3.1.2 Building Bulletin 7:    Fire and Design of Schools

      3.1.3 Building Bulletin 58:   Storage of pupil‟s personal belonging

      3.1.4 Building Bulletin 67:   Crime Prevention in Schools: Practical Guidance

      3.1.5 Building Bulletin 69:   Crime Prevention in Schools: Specification,
                                    installation and maintenance of intruder systems

      3.1.6 Building Bulletin 70:   Maintenance of Mechanical Services

      3.1.7 Building Bulletin 71:   The Outdoor Classroom

                                               135
ANNEX 1 – LIST OF STATUTORY GUIDELINES AND REQUIREMENTS

3.1   Educational (cont'd)

      3.1.8 Building Bulletin 72:    Educational Design Initiatives in City Technology
                                     Colleges

      3.1.9 Building Bulletin 73:    A Guide to Energy Efficient Refurbishment

      3.1.10 Building Bulletin 75:   Closed Circuit T.V. Surveillance systems in
                                     educational buildings

      3.1.11 Building Bulletin 76:   Maintenance of Electrical Services

      3.1.12 Building Bulletin 77:   Designing for Pupils with Special Educational
                                     Needs (comply with draft revision)

      3.1.13 Building Bulletin 78:   Security Lighting

      3.1.14 Building Bulletin 79:   Passive Solar Schools: A Design Guide

      3.1.15 Building Bulletin 80:   Science Accommodation in Secondary Schools: A
                                     Design Guide

      3.1.16 Building Bulletin 81:   Design and Technology Accommodation in
                                     Secondary Schools: A Design Guide

      3.1.17 Building Bulletin 83:   Schools‟ Environmental Assessment Method
                                     (SEAM)

      3.1.18 Building Bulletin 85:   School Grounds: A Guide to Good Practice

      3.1.19 Building Bulletin 86:   Music Accommodation in Secondary Schools: A
                                     Design Guide

      3.1.20 Building Bulletin 87:   Guidelines for Environmental Design in Schools (2nd
                                     edition 2003)

      3.1.21 Building Bulletin 88:   Fume Cupboards in Schools

      3.1.22 Building Bulletin 89:   Music Accommodation in Secondary Schools

      3.1.23 Building Bulletin 90:   Lighting Design for Schools

      3.1.24 Building Bulletin 91:   Access for Disabled People to School Buildings:
                                     Management and Design Guide

      3.1.25 Building Bulletin 92:   Modern Foreign Languages Accommodation: A Design
                                     Guide

      3.1.26 Building Bulletin 93:   Acoustic in Schools

      3.1.27 Building Bulletin 94:   Inclusive School Design

      3.1.28 Building Bulletin 95:   Schools for the Future

                                            136
ANNEX 1 – LIST OF STATUTORY GUIDELINES AND REQUIREMENTS

3.1   Educational (cont'd)

      3.1.29 Building Bulletin 98:    Briefing Framework for Secondary School Projects
                                      (incorporating BB82)

      3.1.30 Excellence for all children, Meeting Special Education Needs (MSO) 1997

      31.1.31 Building Bulletin 100: Designing and Managing against the Risk of Fire in
                                     Schools

      31.1.32 Building Bulletin 101: Ventilation of School Buildings

      31.1.33 Design Note 25:         Lighting and acoustic criteria for the visually
                                      handicapped and hearing impaired in Schools

      31.1.34 A & B Paper 15:         Lockers and Secure Storage

      31.1.35 Guide 7:        Furniture and Equipment in Schools: A Purchasing Guide

3.2   Sport England

      3.2.1 Turf Pitches – Synthetic 1996

      3.2.2 Sports Halls: Sizes and Layouts 2000

      3.2.3 Natural Turf for Sport 2000

3.3   School Library Association

      3.3.1 Designing and Planning a Secondary School Library Resource Centre 2002

3.4    Other Guidance

      3.4.1 Safety in Science Laboratories (3rd Edition)

      3.4.2 Guidance Note on Gas Safety in Educational Establishments. Published by DES
            and British Gas 1989

      3.4.3 Accidents to Children on Construction Sites – HSE Guide GS7

      3.4.4 Environmental Code of Practice for Buildings and their Services (BSRIA)

      3.4.5 Code of Practice for Health and Safety in workshops of Schools and similar
            establishments (BS 4263)

      3.4.6 Code of practice for Glazing in Buildings: Windows doors and rooflights BS 8213
            Part.1 1991

      3.4.7 Legionnaires Disease - The Control of legionella bacteria in water systems:
            Approved code of practice and guidance – HSC 2000

      3.4.8 The Cullen Report

      3.4.9 IEE Wiring Regulations 2001 (BS 7671)
                                             137
ANNEX 1 – LIST OF STATUTORY GUIDELINES AND REQUIREMENTS

3.4    Other Guidance (cont'd)

      3.4.10 CIBSE Energy and Lighting Codes

      3.4.11 CIBSE and HVCA Standard Maintenance Manuals

      3.4.12 CABE / RIBA Guide: 21st Century Schools - Learning Environments of the
             Future

      3.4.13 CABE Guide:           Being involved in School Design

      3.4.14 HSE / Sports Council: Safety in Swimming Pools

      3.4.15 MSF Guide on Swimming Pools

      3.4.16 Secured By Design:    SBD – Schools Guidance

      3.4.17 The Green Guide to Specification, 3rd Edition – Anderson, Shiers, Sinclair -
             BRE, Oxford Brookes, Consigna” and “Opportunities to use Recycled materials
             in Building – available at the WRAP website www.wrap.org.uk”




                                           138
Annex 2 – Local Authority Policy Requirements

Annex 2 contains the Local Authority‟s policies, codes of practice, procedures and protocols. This
section shall be completed by the Local Authority. The Local Authority should define the contents
structure to suit their specific requirements.



Contents


A2.1 Introduction
A2.2 Local Authority Policies
A2.3 Local Authority Procedures
A2.4 Local Authority Codes of Practice
A2.5 Local Authority Protocols




                                               139
Annex 3 BSF/ACADEMIES TEMPLATE (School Area Schedule)




                                      140
         This Template is provided to assist the Contractor and Local Authority when
      compiling the School Area Schedule. However, this Template does not purport to be
        a comprehensive assessment of all issues that might be raised by parties or of
              concern to parties and therefore it should be adapted as appropriate.


       PfS and its advisers accept no liability whatsoever for any expense, liability, loss,
            claim or proceedings arising from reliance placed upon this Template.




Each school with the help of the Contractor‟s Design Team should compile an Area Schedule in
order to communicate their individual preferences for distributing the total area available in each
school between departments and facilities. When completing this schedule, reference should be
made to BB98 for guidance on minimum space recommendations.




                                               141
Notes on format and detail of School Area Schedule




                                                                     Total
   Room                                             Average                       BB98        Number
                            Room type                      2       Brief Area                                                 Description and details
 reference                                          area (m )            2      area (m2)    of Rooms
                                                                      (m )




This should     Room name and type e.g. English,   Average         The total    The          Total       This column should include a brief description of the room usage,
be a unique     Kiln room etc                      area req‟d      area         minimum      number of   details of third party use, Availability Priority categorisation and
reference in                                       for each type   available    guideline    each room   information regarding Consequential Unavailability.
order to                                           of room or      for each     area as      type
identify each                                      area within     group of     defined by   required.
specific                                           the group       rooms e.g.   BB98.
room/area.                                         e.g. for each   for the
                                                   English         English
                                                   classroom in    dep‟t.
                                                   the English
                                                   dep‟t.




                                                                                   142
Example School Area Schedule



                                                        Total
   Room                                   Average                    BB98       Number
                           Room type             2    Brief Area                                               Description and details
 reference                                area (m )         2      area (m2)   of Rooms
                                                         (m )




Teaching and Learning Areas




English




             English                                                                      English

             Enhanced English                                                             Teaching, learning and consultation

             Standard/General Classroom                                                   Standard classroom




Modern Foreign Languages




             Enhanced Modern Languages                                                    Teaching, learning and consultation




                                                                     143
                                                         Total
   Room                                    Average                    BB98       Number
                           Room type              2    Brief Area                                                  Description and details
 reference                                 area (m )         2      area (m2)   of Rooms
                                                          (m )

              Languages Group Room                                                         Teaching and learning

              Modern Languages                                                             Teaching and learning

              Standard/General Classroom                                                   Teaching and learning




Humanities




              Humanities                                                                   Teaching and learning

              Standard/General Classroom                                                   Teaching and learning



ICT/Business Studies




              Enhanced ICT Room                                                            ICT individual and group work

              ICT Room                                                                     ICT individual and group work

              IT and Business studies

              IT server room




Mathematics


                                                                      144
                                                         Total
   Room                                    Average                    BB98       Number
                           Room type              2    Brief Area                                                  Description and details
 reference                                 area (m )         2      area (m2)   of Rooms
                                                          (m )




             Enhanced Mathematics                                                          Teaching, learning and consultation

             Mathematics                                                                   Teaching and learning

             Standard/General Classroom                                                    Teaching and learning




Science




             Enhanced Science Room                                                         Teaching and learning, including a range of wet/chemical practical
                                                                                           activity.

             Science Laboratories                                                          Teaching and learning

             Science Prep Rooms                                                            Science preparation work




Design and Technology




             CAD/CAM Room                                                                  Teaching and learning - theory, vocational and practical work

             Design and Technology Areas

             Enhanced Food Technology                                                      Teaching and learning - theory and practical work



                                                                      145
                                                          Total
   Room                                     Average                    BB98       Number
                            Room type              2    Brief Area                                                 Description and details
 reference                                  area (m )         2      area (m2)   of Rooms
                                                           (m )

             Food Technology

             Graphics

             ICT/Data logging science lab                                                   ICT individual and group work

             Materials Preparation Room

             Multi Materials Workshop

             Heat treatment room

             PECT



Art




             Art Room

             Artists Studio Space

             Dark Room                                                                      Teaching of Practical Photography

             Kiln Room                                                                      Firing of work

             Pottery Room

             Textiles                                                                       Teaching, practical construction and theory creative textiles

             Textiles Prep Room                                                             Preparation of fabric for practical lessons

                                                                       146
                                                      Total
   Room                                 Average                    BB98       Number
                            Room type          2    Brief Area                                                  Description and details
 reference                              area (m )         2      area (m2)   of Rooms
                                                       (m )




Music and Drama




             Band Room                                                                  Performance and rehearsal space for extra curricular activities and
                                                                                        enrichment.

             Dance Studio

             Drama Studio

             Music classroom                                                            Performance and rehearsal space for extra curricular activities and
                                                                                        enrichment.

             Music Practise Room                                                        Performance and rehearsal space for extra curricular activities and
                                                                                        enrichment.

             Music Recording Room                                                       Performance and rehearsal space for extra curricular activities and
                                                                                        enrichment.

             Recital Room                                                               Performance and rehearsal space for extra curricular activities and
                                                                                        enrichment.




Physical Education




             Hydrotherapy Pool                                                          Physical exercise and activities for those with physical difficulties.




                                                                   147
                                                                Total
   Room                                           Average                    BB98       Number
                          Room type                      2    Brief Area                                               Description and details
 reference                                        area (m )         2      area (m2)   of Rooms
                                                                 (m )

             Multi-gym room

             PE store

             Pool changing area                                                                   Changing for pupils staff and community

             Pupil changing and showers

             Small Indoor Sports Space                                                            Some gym, dance/movement, table tennis usage.

             Sports, Fitness and Dance Changing

             Swimming Pool                                                                        Swimming



Non Teaching areas




Central Resources




             Access Learning Achievement

             Assembly Hall

             Careers/connections                                                                  Reading, information gathering, ICT work.

             Central Storage                                                                      Central Teaching Storage


                                                                             148
                                                                   Total
   Room                                              Average                    BB98       Number
                                Room type                   2    Brief Area                                                 Description and details
 reference                                           area (m )         2      area (m2)   of Rooms
                                                                    (m )

              Curriculum hubs                                                                        Social gathering, working, project dens and hubs etc

              Cyber Café

              Learning Support unit

              Library and learning Resource area                                                     Reading, information gathering, presentations and small work groups

              Social/Common room                                                                     Relaxing, socialising during breaks and free periods

              Specialist hall                                                                        Curriculum learning and extra-curricular activity




Inclusion Support Suite




              Hygiene Sluice                                                                         Showering, bathing and changing

              Challenging behaviour room                                                             Teaching, learning and counselling

              social/life skills flat                                                                Teaching, learning and counselling

              Interactive Room

              Sensory Theatre                                                                        Virtual reality exercises, stimulation, relaxation and entertainment.

              Therapists' Bases and other visiting                                                   Interviewing, counselling, therapy,         storage    of    equipment,
              specialists                                                                            administrative work, treatment

              Pastoral Base


                                                                                149
                                                        Total
   Room                                   Average                    BB98       Number
                              Room type          2    Brief Area                                                 Description and details
 reference                                area (m )         2      area (m2)   of Rooms
                                                         (m )

              Social inclusion Room

              Police facilities

              SEN Classroom

              SEN office

              SEN Dyslexia



Administration and Catering




              Head Teachers Office

              Meeting Room

              General Office                                                              Interviewing, counselling, therapy, case meetings, administrative
                                                                                          work.

              First Aid/Medical Room

              Medical Facilities                                                          Medical advise, treatment and minor consultations.

              Medical treatment area                                                      To be used for sick students and nursing facilities

              Main entrance

              Reception area                                                              Management and administration of school



                                                                     150
                                                          Total
  Room                                      Average                    BB98       Number
                          Room type                2    Brief Area                                                Description and details
reference                                   area (m )         2      area (m2)   of Rooms
                                                           (m )

            Staff relaxation room                                                           Staff social; semi informal meetings, eating and relaxation

            Staff resources area                                                            Work, preparation, meetings and resource storage

            Reprographics                                                                   Reprographics for teaching, administration, and PR/Marketing related
                                                                                            use

            Dining Hall

            Department / Faculty Base

            Examinations office and store                                                   Examinations administration

            Finance Office                                                                  Management and administration of school

            Senior Staff Office                                                             Meetings, interviews and consultations

            Interview Room                                                                  Interviewing.

            Seminar / Conference Room                                                       Meetings, consultations and training

            Crèche                                                                          Teaching and Learning

            Heads PA

            Bursar                                                                          Management and administration of school budgets etc

            Deputy Heads Office                                                             Meetings, interviews,     consultations,   counselling,   report   and
                                                                                            preparation.




                                                                       151
                                                          Total
   Room                                     Average                    BB98       Number
                                Room type          2    Brief Area                          Description and details
 reference                                  area (m )         2      area (m2)   of Rooms
                                                           (m )

Other




                 Disabled Toilet

                 Staff Shower

                 Staff Toilet




External Areas




                 Pitch

                 Informal Soft Play

                 Informal Hard Play

                 Habitat Area

                 External Dining

                 All Weather Pitch

                 Car Park




                                                                       152
Annex 4 – BSF/ACADEMIES Template School Area Data Sheets




        This Template is provided to assist the Contractor and Local Authority when
       compiling Area Data Sheets. . However, this Template does not purport to be a
        comprehensive assessment of all issues that might be raised by parties and
                       therefore it should be adapted as appropriate.


      PfS and its advisers accept no liability whatsoever for any expense, liability, loss,
           claim or proceedings arising from reliance placed upon this Template.




                                              153
Annex 4 – BSF/ACADEMIES Template School Area Data Sheets


An Area Data Sheet should be compiled for each room or area sharing common details and
requirements. When completing these sheets, reference should be made to documents such as
BB98 for guidance on minimum space recommendations and these Authority‟s Requirements to
ensure that requirements specified are those that are current and do not conflict with the
information given in separate documentation.



It is also important to note the following:



   The data given in the example Data Sheets below is included to show the format and range
    of detail to be provided and does not necessarily represent the extent that may be
    appropriate for every scheme. In addition the information may not necessarily be accurate
    and factually correct in every case;



   Opinion regarding the level and extent of information provided on Area Data Sheets varies
    between many authorities. The Local Authority shall satisfy itself that the details provided
    within their school specific sheets are both correct and sufficient to carry out the task
    required of them; and



   Should an Authority wish to deviate from the example Data Sheets provided it should
    discuss these with PfS to ensure some form of conformity across the Programme.



PfS are currently investigating the use of a form of electronic Data Sheet that will integrate with
other functions involved in the BSF/ACADEMIESBSF/ACADEMIES/ACADEMIES Programme at
national and local level. Local Authority‟s may wish to consider the use of such a system (which
have already been adopted by some schemes) which can prove a valuable tool in evaluating
and comparing contractors proposals as well as monitoring performance of the building and
service provider throughout the contract period.



Example Area Data Sheets are included below.




                                               154
ENGLISH




                       Element                                                    Output                                               Notes




General

Function                                                  General teaching space.

Relationship to other spaces                              Adjacent to other subject rooms.

Availability Priority Category

Consequential Unavailability

Essential Requirements                                    Capable of use for whole group teaching or small
                                                          groups to work together. Attractive, welcoming and
                                                          non-confrontational, ability for all pupils to face the
                                                          teacher, Rooms to have walk in resource store.

Minimum Area (m2)

Third Party Use details

Safety, Security and Access

The area must be accessible by means appropriate to its function. The area must be free from obstruction.

Emergency Access: The area‟s means of escape for fire or other emergency must be functional and free from obstruction.

Permanent structural elements and building fabric to be present and sufficiently sound to allow the provision of education to occur.


                                                                                     155
ENGLISH




                       Element                                                    Output                                                       Notes




The area must be free from flood, penetrating water and damp affecting the structure of the building to the extent that precludes the safe occupation of the area.

The area must be clear from waste and have a safe and constant sewage and drainage system.

The area must be served by an operational security system.

The area must be served by an operational emergency communication system.

Finishes

Floors                                                    Hard-wearing and attractive flooring

Walls                                                     Painted easy clean surface. Bright washable walls.
                                                          Coloured in a manner appropriate to the rooms use.

Ceiling                                                   Light coloured ceilings. Coloured in a manner
                                                          appropriate to the rooms use. Coloured in a manner
                                                          appropriate to the rooms use.


Other

Services

Hot water supply. A sufficient, constant and safe hot     N/A
water supply.




                                                                                     156
ENGLISH




                         Element                                                 Output                                                     Notes




Cold water supply. A sufficient, constant and safe cold   N/A
water supply.

Availability of drinking water.                           N/A

Constant and safe supply of gas.                          N/A




Temperature. The area must be maintained at a             Generally in accordance with the criteria given in the   No fluctuation greater than specified in Building Bulletin
temperature within the range outlined.                    Schools Premises Regulations 1999, DCSF BB87,            87 for winter and summer time temperatures. In
                                                          current Building Regulations and the unavailability      accordance     with    CIBSE    Guide     recommended
                                                          criteria section of the ITN. Temperatures must be        temperatures.
                                                          maintained at 18 degrees Celsius measured at 500mm
                                                          AFFL when external design temperature is –1°C or
                                                          above.

Power. A sufficient and safe electrical supply.           To support the use of specialist, general, ICT and       Sockets must be located to support differing furniture
                                                          cleaning equipment.                                      layouts/ways of teaching.



Specialist power.                                         N/A

Ventilation & airflow levels. The area must be            Room must be ventilated at a minimum rate of 8L/s of     In accordance with Building/School Premises regulations,
maintained at the level of ventilation outlined.          fresh air per person when occupied, in accordance        DCSF Building Bulletin 87, Workplace Regulations and
                                                          with BB87.                                               CIBSE Codes.

Light. The area should be illuminated within the range    Not less than 300 lux at work surface level, in          As recommended by CIBSE Code of Lighting and in
                                                          accordance with BB87. The glare index shall not          accordance with the DCSF Building Bulletins 87 and 90

                                                                                    157
ENGLISH




                        Element                                               Output                                              Notes




outlined.                                             exceed 19.                                          and School Premises Regulations.

Specialist lighting                                   N/A

Maximum noise levels. The area should be maintained   Highest indoor ambient noise level 35dBL(Aeq,       In accordance with Building Bulletin 87, in particular,
within the noise levels outlined.                     30min), Minimum Wall/Floor Sound Insulation         whole of Section A and in accordance with Building
                                                      45Rw(dB), Unoccupied Mid Frequency Reverberation    Bulletin 93 and 94.
                                                      Time (UMFRT) 0.5 - 0.8, in accordance with BB93.

Specialist mechanical installations                   N/A

ICT

Telecom points                                        1 No wired through the ICT network.

Availability of Audio Visual Infrastructure.          Whiteboards only plus ceiling mounted multi-media
                                                      projection facility wiring required.

Availability of Operational ICT Infrastructure.       12 No data points.




Other

PA and class change                                   Must be audible at all times

Other


                                                                                 158
ENGLISH

Furniture and equipment




                      Element                                                    Details                           Quantity




The correct FFE as described below must be present and in a safe and functional condition.

Fixed Furniture

Roller Board                                                                                                  1

Shelf Unit                                              1200 x 1800 high                                      1

Tray Unit                                               1200 x 1800 high                                      1

Worktop                                                                                                       1

Cupboards                                               Under worktop, lockable.                              2

Pin board                                               To all available walls




Loose furniture

General Table                                           1200 x 600                                            14

Table                                                   600 x 600, adjustable height for wheel chair access   4
                                                        and stackable


                                                                                   159
ENGLISH

Furniture and equipment




                   Element                          Details                                          Quantity




Pupil‟s Chair                                                                   32

Teacher‟s Desk               1200 x 600, 1 drawer and 1 deep drawer, lockable   1

Teacher‟s Chair              Office swivel type with arms                       1




Equipment

Vertical Blinds                                                                 To all windows

Clock                                                                           1

Coat pegs                                                                       32

Bag storage unit                                                                To cater for 30 bags (depends on system adopted in
                                                                                school)

Waste bin




                                                       160
ICT ROOM




                      Element                                                   Output                             Notes




General

Function                                                 ICT individual and group work

Relationship to other spaces                             Adjacent to other subject rooms, adjacent to learning
                                                         centre/library. Adjacent to ICT technician's office and
                                                         central server room

Availability Priority Category

Consequential Unavailability

Essential Requirements                                   Attractive,    welcoming    and    non-confrontational,
                                                         stimulating, inviting environment. Space for class
                                                         briefing/desk work. Walk in store for resources. Space
                                                         for printers, scanners etc

Minimum Area

Third Party Use details

Safety, Security and Access

The area must be accessible by means appropriate to its function. The area must be free from obstruction.


                                                                                   161
ICT ROOM




                       Element                                                    Output                                                       Notes




Emergency Access: The area‟s means of escape for fire or other emergency must be functional and free from obstruction.

Permanent structural elements and building fabric to be present and sufficiently sound to allow the provision of education to occur.

The area must be free from flood, penetrating water and damp affecting the structure of the building to the extent that precludes the safe occupation of the area.

The area must be clear from waste and have a safe and constant sewage and drainage system.

The area must be served by an operational security system.

The area must be served by an operational emergency communication system.

Finishes

Floors                                                    Hard-wearing and attractive flooring with anti-static
                                                          qualities appropriate to the room's use

Walls                                                     Painted easy clean surface. Bright washable walls.
                                                          Coloured in a manner appropriate to the rooms use.

Ceiling                                                   Light coloured ceilings. Coloured in a manner
                                                          appropriate to the rooms use.



Other

Services



                                                                                     162
ICT ROOM




                         Element                                                 Output                                                     Notes




Hot water supply. A sufficient, constant and safe hot     N/A
water supply.



Cold water supply. A sufficient, constant and safe cold   N/A
water supply.

Availability of drinking water.                           N/A

Constant and safe supply of gas.                          N/A




Temperature. The area must be maintained at a             Generally in accordance with the criteria given in the   No fluctuation greater than specified in Building Bulletin
temperature within the range outlined.                    Schools Premises Regulations 1999, DCSF BB87, and        87 for winter and summer time temperatures. In
                                                          the unavailability criteria section of the ITN.          accordance     with    CIBSE    Guide     recommended
                                                          Temperatures must be maintained at 18 degrees            temperatures.
                                                          Celsius measured at 500mm AFFL when external
                                                          design temperature is –3°C.

Power. A sufficient and safe electrical supply.           To support the use of specialist, general, ICT and       Sockets must be located to support differing furniture
                                                          cleaning equipment.                                      layouts/ways of teaching.



Specialist power                                          N/A




                                                                                    163
ICT ROOM




                        Element                                                      Output                                                     Notes




Ventilation & Air-Flow levels. The area must be             Room must be ventilated at a minimum rate of 8L/s of        In accordance with Building/School Premises regulations,
maintained at the level of ventilation outlined.            fresh air per person when occupied, in accordance           DCSF Building Bulletin 87, Workplace Regulations and
                                                            with BB87.                                                  CIBSE Codes.

Light. The area should be illuminated within the range      Not less than 300 lux at work surface level, in             As recommended by CIBSE Code of Lighting and in
outlined.                                                   accordance with BB87. The glare index shall not             accordance with the DCSF Building Bulletins 87 and 90
                                                            exceed 19.                                                  and School Premises Regulations.


Specialist lighting                                         N/A

Maximum Noise Levels. The area should                  be   Highest indoor ambient noise level 35dBL(Aeq,               In accordance with Building Bulletin 87, in particular,
maintained within the noise levels outlined.                30min), Minimum Wall/Floor Sound Insulation                 whole of Section A and in accordance with Building
                                                            45Rw(dB), Unoccupied Mid Frequency Reverberation            Bulletin 93 and 94.
                                                            Time (UMFRT) 0.5 - 0.8, in accordance with BB93.

Specialist mechanical installations                         N/A

ICT

Telecom points                                              1 No wired through the ICT network.

Availability of operational Audio Visual Infrastructure.    Whiteboards only plus ceiling mounted multi-media
                                                            projection facility wiring required.

Availability of operational ICT Infrastructure.             Yes Multiple points reflecting a level of future proofing




                                                                                        164
ICT ROOM




                      Element                                                   Output            Notes




Other

PA and class change                                     Must be audible at all times

Other




ICT ROOM

Furniture and equipment




                      Element                                                   Details          Quantity




The correct FFE as described below must be present and in a safe and functional condition.

Fixed Furniture

Roller Board                                                                                 1




Shelf Unit                                              1200 x 1800 high                     1


                                                                                   165
ICT ROOM

Furniture and equipment




                   Element                            Details                           Quantity




Tray Unit                    1200 x 1800 high                                      1

Worktop                                                                            1

Cupboards                    Under worktop, lockable.                              2

Pin board                    To all available walls




Loose furniture

General Table                1200 x 600                                            14

Table                        600 x 600, adjustable height for wheel chair access   4
                             and stackable

Pupil‟s Chair                                                                      32

Teacher‟s Desk               1200 x 600, 1 drawer and 1 deep drawer, lockable      1

Teacher‟s Chair              Office swivel type with arms                          1




                                                        166
ICT ROOM

Furniture and equipment




                   Element   Details                        Quantity




Equipment

Vertical Blinds                        To all windows

Clock                                  1

Coat pegs                              32

Bag storage unit                       To cater for 30 bags (depends on system adopted in
                                       school)

Waste bin




                               167
SCIENCE LABORATORY




                      Element                           Output                                                   Notes




General

Function                         Specialised teaching space.

Relationship to other spaces     Adjacent to other subject rooms. Access to outdoors        Should be in line with advice and guidance in BB80
                                 habitat/environmental area/pond/wildlife                  (second edition)
                                 zone/greenhouse

Availability Priority Category

Consequential Unavailability

Essential Requirements           Capable of use for whole group teaching or small
                                 groups to work together. Attractive, welcoming and
                                 non-confrontational, ability for all pupils to face the
                                 teacher, must be easily accessible to the emergency
                                 services, fume cupboard, large storage areas for
                                 physics equipment.

Minimum Area

Third Party Use Details

Safety, Security and Access


                                                           168
SCIENCE LABORATORY




                       Element                                                    Output                                                      Notes




The area must be accessible by means appropriate to its function. The area must be free from obstruction.

Emergency Access: The area‟s means of escape for fire or other emergency must be functional and free from obstruction.

Permanent structural elements and building fabric to be present and sufficiently sound to allow the provision of education to occur.

The area must be free from flood, penetrating water and damp affecting the structure of the building to the extent that precludes the safe occupation of the area.

The area must be clear from waste and have a safe and constant sewage and drainage system.

The area must be served by an operational security system.

The area must be served by an operational emergency communication system.

Finishes

Floors                                                    Washable, robust, impervious and non-slip flooring

Walls                                                     Painted easy clean surface. Bright walls. Coloured in a
                                                          manner appropriate to the rooms use.

Ceiling                                                   Light easy clean surface. Coloured in a manner
                                                          appropriate to the rooms use.



Other




                                                                                     169
SCIENCE LABORATORY




                         Element                                                 Output                                                    Notes




Services

Hot water supply. A sufficient, constant and safe hot     Hot and cold running water to sinks – high pressure
water supply.                                             required.



Cold water supply. A sufficient, constant and safe cold   N/A
water supply.

Availability of drinking water.                           Required

Constant and safe supply of gas.                          Constant and safe supply of gas. for gas taps plus       All Constant and safe supply of gas. / installation must
                                                          power outlets on pupils benching with automatic gas      be provided in accordance with the appropriate
                                                          shut off.                                                regulations.


Temperature. The area must be maintained at a             Generally in accordance with the criteria given in the   No fluctuation greater than specified in Building
temperature within the range outlined.                    Schools Premises Regulations 1999, DCSF BB87, and        Bulletin 87 for winter and summer time temperatures.
                                                          the unavailability criteria section of the ITN.          In accordance with CIBSE Guide recommended
                                                          Temperatures must be maintained at 18 degrees            temperatures.
                                                          Celsius measured at 500mm AFFL when external
                                                          design temperature is –3°C.

Power. A sufficient and safe electrical supply.           To support the use of specialist, general, ICT and       Sockets must be located to support differing furniture
                                                          cleaning equipment.                                      layouts/ways of teaching.



Specialist power                                          N/A


                                                                                    170
SCIENCE LABORATORY




                        Element                                                     Output                                                 Notes




Ventilation & Air-Flow levels. The area must be             Room must be ventilated at a minimum rate of 8L/s of   In accordance with Building/School Premises
maintained at the level of ventilation outlined.            fresh air per person when occupied, in accordance      regulations, DCSF Building Bulletin 87, Workplace
                                                            with BB87.                                             Regulations and CIBSE Codes.

Light. The area should be illuminated within the range      Not less than 300 lux at work surface level, in        As recommended by CIBSE Code of Lighting and in
outlined.                                                   accordance with BB87. The glare index shall not        accordance with the DCSF Building Bulletins 87 and
                                                            exceed 19.                                             90 and School Premises Regulations.




Specialist lighting                                         N/A

Maximum Noise Levels. The area should                  be   Highest indoor ambient noise level 35dBL(Aeq,          In accordance with Building Bulletin 87, in particular,
maintained within the noise levels outlined.                30min), Minimum Wall/Floor Sound Insulation            whole of Section A and in accordance with Building
                                                            45Rw(dB), Unoccupied Mid Frequency Reverberation       Bulletin 93 and 94.
                                                            Time (UMFRT) 0.5 - 0.8, in accordance with BB93.

Specialist mechanical installations                         Fume cupboard extract                                  In some labs only

ICT

Telecom points                                              1 No wired through the ICT network.

Availability of operational Audio Visual Infrastructure.    Whiteboards only plus ceiling mounted multi-media
                                                            projection facility wiring required.




                                                                                      171
SCIENCE LABORATORY




                        Element                                                 Output        Notes




Availability of operational ICT Infrastructure.         12 No data points.




Other

PA and class change                                     Must be audible at all times

Other




SCIENCE LABORATORY

Furniture and equipment




                        Element                                                 Details      Quantity




The correct FFE as described below must be present and in a safe and functional condition.

Fixed Furniture



                                                                                   172
SCIENCE LABORATORY

Furniture and equipment




                     Element                            Details                                               Quantity




Roller Board




Shelf Unit                     1200 x 1800 high

Tray Unit                      1200 x 1800 high

Lab perimeter benching                                                                    Or similar, depending on system adopted by school.
                                                                                          Options identified in BB80

Fume cupboard                                                                             In some labs only

Built in locker

Pin board                      To all available walls

Health and safety equipment     Near to teacher position, door and, if necessary, water   Such as eyewash
                               outlet

Loose furniture

Table                          600 x 600, adjustable height for wheel chair access        4
                               and stackable

Stacking stools

                                                          173
SCIENCE LABORATORY

Furniture and equipment




                   Element                          Details                                         Quantity




Teacher‟s Desk               1200 x 600, 1 drawer and 1 deep drawer, lockable   1

Teacher‟s Chair              Office swivel type with arms                       1




Equipment

Vertical Blinds                                                                 To all windows

Clock                                                                           1

Coat pegs                                                                       32

Bag storage unit                                                                To cater for 30 bags (depends on system adopted in
                                                                                school)




                                                       174
DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY AREAS




                        Element                                                 Output                             Notes




General

Function                                                 Specialist teaching space.

Relationship to other spaces                             Adjacent to other subject rooms.

Availability Priority Category

Consequential Unavailability

Essential Requirements                                   Capable of use for whole group teaching or small
                                                         groups to work together. Layout that is conducive to
                                                         practical teaching and group working as well as whole
                                                         group collaboration, small library/resource area,
                                                         flexible layout to allow general use of ICT facilities.



Minimum Area

Third Party Use Details

Safety, Security and Access

The area must be accessible by means appropriate to its function. The area must be free from obstruction.


                                                                                      175
DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY AREAS




                       Element                                                    Output                                                      Notes




Emergency Access: The area‟s means of escape for fire or other emergency must be functional and free from obstruction.

Permanent structural elements and building fabric to be present and sufficiently sound to allow the provision of education to occur.

The area must be free from flood, penetrating water and damp affecting the structure of the building to the extent that precludes the safe occupation of the area.

The area must be clear from waste and have a safe and constant sewage and drainage system.

The area must be served by an operational security system.

The area must be served by an operational emergency communication system.

Finishes

Floors                                                    Washable non-slip with flush joints between different
                                                          finishes

Walls                                                     Painted easy clean surface. Colours to be in line with
                                                          rest of the technology area. Coloured in a manner
                                                          appropriate to the rooms use.

Ceiling                                                   Painted easy clean surface. Colours to be in line with
                                                          rest of the technology area. Coloured in a manner
                                                          appropriate to the rooms use.




                                                                                     176
DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY AREAS




                         Element                                                 Output                                                   Notes




Other                                                     Non-flammable/heat resistant heavy benching, stools,
                                                          hot area equipment, storage, fixed and hand power
                                                          tools, smaller tools all as schedule included in
                                                          Appendix 2. Loose furniture, coat and bag storage,
                                                          non-reflective whiteboard/projection screen.

Services

Hot water supply. A sufficient, constant and safe hot     Hot running water to sinks Required T3 anti-scald        To be in accordance with the School Premises
water supply.                                             fittings at point of use                                 Regulations



Cold water supply. A sufficient, constant and safe cold   Cold running water to sinks
water supply.

Availability of drinking water.                           N/A

Constant and safe supply of gas.                          Constant and safe supply of gas. For DT equipment,       All Constant and safe supply of gas. And installation
                                                          dust, Gas shut off valve. Keyed system for gas.          must be provided in accordance with the appropriate
                                                          Industrial gases for welding                             regulations.


Temperature. The area must be maintained at a             Generally in accordance with the criteria given in the   No fluctuation greater than specified in Building
temperature within the range outlined.                    Schools Premises Regulations 1999, DCSF BB87, and        Bulletin 87 for winter and summer time temperatures.
                                                          the unavailability criteria section of the ITN.          In accordance with CIBSE Guide recommended
                                                          Temperatures must be maintained at 18 degrees            temperatures.
                                                          Celsius measured at 500mm AFFL when external
                                                          design temperature is –3°C.



                                                                                    177
DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY AREAS




                       Element                                                  Output                                                  Notes




Power. A sufficient and safe electrical supply.          To support the use of specialist, general, ICT and     Sockets must be located to support differing furniture
                                                         cleaning equipment.                                    layouts/ways of teaching.



Specialist power                                         Electric supply for DT equipment, keyed system for
                                                         power.

Ventilation & Air-Flow levels. The area must be          Room must be ventilated at a minimum rate of 8L/s of   In accordance with Building/School Premises
maintained at the level of ventilation outlined.         fresh air per person when occupied, in accordance      regulations, DCSF Building Bulletin 87, Workplace
                                                         with BB87.                                             Regulations and CIBSE Codes.

Light. The area should be illuminated within the range   Not less than 300 lux at work surface level, in        As recommended by CIBSE Code of Lighting and in
outlined.                                                accordance with BB87. The glare index shall not        accordance with the DCSF Building Bulletins 87 and
                                                         exceed 19.                                             90 and School Premises Regulations.


Specialist lighting                                      N/A

Maximum Noise Levels. The area should              be    Highest indoor ambient noise level 35dBL(Aeq,          In accordance with Building Bulletin 87, in particular,
maintained within the noise levels outlined.             30min), Minimum Wall/Floor Sound Insulation            whole of Section A and in accordance with Building
                                                         45Rw(dB), Unoccupied Mid Frequency Reverberation       Bulletin 93 and 94.
                                                         Time (UMFRT) 0.5 – 0.8, in accordance with BB93.

Specialist mechanical installations                      Dust extraction, heat bay

ICT

Telecom points                                           1 No wired through the ICT network.



                                                                                     178
DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY AREAS




                        Element                                                    Output     Notes




Availability of operational Audio Visual Infrastructure.

Availability of operational ICT Infrastructure.            10 data points




Other

PA and class change                                        Must be audible at all times

Other




DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY AREAS

Furniture and equipment




                        Element                                                    Details   Quantity




The correct FFE as described below must be present and in a safe and functional condition.

Fixed Furniture


                                                                                      179
DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY AREAS

Furniture and equipment




                   Element                             Details                        Quantity




Roller Board                                                                     1




Shelf Unit                    1200 x 1800 high                                   1

Tray Unit                     1200 x 1800 high                                   1

Cupboards                     Under worktop, lockable.                           2

Pin board                     To all available walls




Loose furniture

Work Benches

Pupil‟s stool                                                                    32

Teacher‟s Desk                1200 x 600, 1 drawer and 1 deep drawer, lockable   1

Teacher‟s Chair               Office swivel type with arms                       1




                                                         180
DESIGN AND TECHNOLOGY AREAS

Furniture and equipment




                     Element      Details                      Quantity




Equipment

Clock                                       1

Coat pegs                                   32

Bag storage unit                            To cater for 30 bags (depends on system adopted
                                            in school)

Waste Bin

Tools and associated equipment.




                                    181

				
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