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					Writing a Narrative
      in Fourth Grade
 at Davis Drive Elementary School
                          Overview:
•   Basic Facts about the test
•   Test Administration
•   Facts about the scoring process
•   Definition of Levels I-IV
•   Personal vs. Imaginative
•   Example Prompts
•   Writing Process
•   Brainstorming/Planning
•   Revising
•   Editing
•   Sample Checklist
•   Sample Papers
   Basic Facts about the General Writing Assessment at
                         Grades 4

• Students at grade 4 and grade 7 take a writing assessment in March.
• Scoring of the assessment is comprised of a content component and a
  conventions component.
• The North Carolina General Writing Assessment measures the
  following in content: focus, organization, support and elaboration, and
  style.
• In conventions the writing assessment measures sentence formation,
  usage, and mechanics, which includes spelling.
• Students at grade 4 write an extended narrative response (personal or
  imaginative).
• Approximately one and one-half hours are allotted for the tests at grade
  4.
• This includes time for test administration duties and, where
  appropriate, scheduled breaks.
              Test Administration:

How long will the Test Administration last?
  Students at grade four will have 75 minutes to complete the writing
  assessment.
Will the prompts be read aloud? Does that include any text, which
  may be provided?
  All information located on page two of the student test booklet (the
  prompt, specific directions and reminders, any text which may be
  provided) will be read aloud to the students by the test administrators.
Will students receive a stretch break during the operational test
  administration?
  Students will receive a stretch break during the test administration.
 Facts about the scoring process:
• A student’s paper receives a score in both
  content and conventions.
• They receive a content score of 1-4.
• They receive a convention score of 0-2.
• Content is weighted more heavily than
  conventions.
• Two different trained scorers score the
  paper.
   Facts about the scoring process:
                            Part 2

• The scorers’ scores are then calculated as follows:

Content score + Content Score = Total Content score
Total Content Score x 2 = Student’s Content Score

Convention Score + Convention Score = Student’s
  Convention Score

Student’s Content Score + Student’s Convention Score =
Student’s Total Writing Assessment Score
  Facts about the scoring process:
                                    Part 3

 Scores are then translated into an Achievement Level Score:

Achievement Level Ranges for the 4th Grade Writing Test:

           Levels:     Level I      Level II    Level III    Level IV

        Point Range:    4–7         8 – 11       12 –16       17 -20



* Level 3 is considered at grade level. In order to pass the test a student
   needs to be a Level 3 or 4. This means they would score between 12
   and 20 points.
                    Achievement Level Descriptors for the
                              North Carolina
                    General Writing Assessment at Grade 4
                                         HSP-C-018–March 2, 2006
                  http://www.dpi.state.nc.us/docs/accountability/testing/writing/writinggr4ald_04_05.pdf


Achievement Level I
   Students performing at this level do not have sufficient mastery of knowledge and skills
   in this subject area to be successful at the next grade level. Students performing at
   Achievement Level I have made an attempt to address the task and provide some sense
   of story. The narrative lacks a sense of logical progression, the topic/subject is not
   developed, and there is a lack of control of organizational structure and details. The
   students display an insufficient knowledge of vocabulary and skills in conventions
   necessary to be successful at the next grade level.
Achievement Level II
   Students performing at this level demonstrate inconsistent mastery of knowledge and
   skills in this subject area and are minimally prepared to be successful at the next grade
   level. Students performing at Achievement Level II have unevenly developed narratives
   with some lapses in the logical progression and the connections between and among
   ideas. There are some inappropriate and/or sparse details and elaboration provided and
   readability may detract and/or interfere with the focus on the topic/subject of the
   narrative. The students display a lack of ability to appropriately use vocabulary and
   conventions and are minimally prepared to be successful at the next grade level.

                                                       Page 1
                  Achievement Level Descriptors for the
                            North Carolina
                  General Writing Assessment at Grade 4
                                        HSP-C-018–March 2, 2006
                 http://www.dpi.state.nc.us/docs/accountability/testing/writing/writinggr4ald_04_05.pdf


Achievement Level III
   Students performing at this level consistently demonstrate mastery of grade
   level subject matter and skills and are well prepared for the next grade level.
   Students performing at Achievement Level III have effectively employed a
   strategy that connects the beginning, middle, and end of the narrative. The
   ideas presented are relevant and the elaboration is sufficient, resulting in a
   reasonable sense of completeness. The students display an appropriate use of
   vocabulary and conventions and are well prepared for the next grade level.
Achievement Level IV
   Students performing at this level consistently perform in a superior manner
   clearly beyond that required to be proficient at grade level work. Students
   performing at Achievement Level IV have effectively crafted a narrative that
   demonstrates a strong sense of story that progresses logically from one
   developed idea to another, resulting in a sense of overall completeness. The
   students display a skillful use of precise and purposeful vocabulary clearly
   beyond that required to be proficient at grade level work.
        Personal vs. Imaginative:
• Personal narratives are often one of the first types of
  writing that you do. You write about yourself and
  experiences that you have encountered, read, or heard
  about. You can become much more engaged when your
  write about yourself in personal narratives because you are
  the expert on the topic of your life.

• When you write stories from your own experience, you
  already have a plot. Your job will be to make the story
  interesting - as interesting for your reader as it was for you
  when it happened. Lots of description, lots of action, and
  lots of dialogue will help your reader feel what you felt.
       Personal vs. Imaginative:
                            Page 2

• An imaginative narrative is a made up story. Instead of
  being about real things, this story is about things you
  imagine. Creativity is the most important thing in making
  an imaginative story. You don't need to be afraid to go
  above and beyond reality. For example, instead of
  including events that can happen to you everyday, create
  unusual events that could never happen in real life.

• When you write stories from your imagination, you get a
  chance to make up what happened - who the people were,
  what they looked like, and how they acted. Again, putting
  in lots of convincing details will help your reader imagine
  what you are imagining.
                         Example Prompts
•       Think about a time you went to a friend’s house. Write a story about what you and that friend did.
•       Think about a time you went to visit a relative. It could have been a long trip or a short trip. Tell a
        story about that trip.
•       Tell a story about a time you helped somebody. Explain what you did that was helpful.
•       Think about a time you had Thanksgiving dinner with your family. Tell a story about the
        celebration.
•       Think about a time that it snowed. Tell a story about what you did in the snow.
•       Imagine that you woke up and discovered that you were home alone during a snowstorm. Tell a
        story about what happens.
•       Imagine that in the middle of class you see something happen to your teacher. Tell a story about
        what happens.
•       Imagine that you were home watching a movie and you were suddenly sucked into the screen.
        Tell a story about what happens.
•       Imagine that you wake up and discover that you have been turned in to a box of chocolates. Tell a
        story about what happens.
•       Imagine that you discover that you are locked alone in the school. Tell a story about what
        happens.


*The following page is the prompt from the 2005 writing test. It is set up similar to how the test looks for
        the students.
                2006 North Carolina General Writing Assessment Grade 4
Imagine you looked under your bed. You found a large green egg with silver spots. You
pulled the egg out into the middle of the room, and it began to shake and crack. Write a story
about what happened the time the egg began to shake and crack.

As you write your story, remember to
���� Focus your story on what happened the time the egg began to shake and crack.
���� Use details to support the topic/subject of your story.
���� Make sure your story is complete and has a beginning, middle, and end.
���� Check to be sure that you are writing good paragraphs.
���� Use your best grammar, spelling, punctuation, and capitalization.

Use the blank sheet of paper given to you by your teacher to plan your story. Anything you
write on the blank sheet will not be scored. You must write the final copy of your story on
pages 3 and4 of your test booklet.

Write the final copy of your story on pages 3 and 4 of your test booklet.
 What are the five writing traits?
               (Being scored on the Narrative Writing Test)


Focus: Topic is established and           Style: Precise, purposeful
maintained throughout the response.       vocabulary and sentence variety are
                                          appropriate to the purpose, audience,
                                          and context of writing task.

Organization: Ideas are                   Conventions: Correctness of
complete, related, and progress           the response is defined by sentence
logically.                                formation, usage, and mechanics
                                          (spelling, capitalization, punctuation).

Support and Elaboration:
    Topic is developed through relevant
and specific details. There must be
sufficient elaboration to effectively
develop the topic.
         Writing Process:

Stages of the Writing Process:
1. Brainstorming/Planning
2. Drafting
3. Revising
4. Editing/Proofreading
5. Publishing
Steps to Writing:

UNDERSTAND
BRAINSTORM
   CHOOSE
   COMMIT
TELL/RETELL
  ORGANIZE
    PLAN
    DRAFT
 EDIT/REVISE
                    By: Susan Mosher
                Brainstorming/Planning

Planning is one of the most difficult and important steps in the writing process.
This is where students have to :


•   Interpret the prompt
•   Brainstorm/Chose an idea
•   Lay out their story
•   Work through their story from beginning to end

         Below is just one example of a type of plan students could use.
Beginning   M1   Ending




            M2




            M3
               Revising is . . .

• making decisions about how you
  want to improve your writing
• looking at your writing from a different point of
  view
• picking places where your writing could be
  clearer, more
  interesting, more informative and more
  convincing.
                   Editing is . . .

•   spelling
•   capitalization
•   punctuation
•   grammar
•   sentence structure
•   subject/verb agreement
•   consistent verb tense
•   word usage
                            Narrative Writing
    In our classrooms this information is found in a picture the shape of a diamond. It comes from our
                “The Comprehensive Narrative Writing Teaching Guide“
                             By: Empowering Writers
•   Entertaining Beginning - The beginning must "hook" the reader and make them feel compelled to
    read on. The author might use an interesting action, dialogue, the main character's thoughts, raise
    story questions or even use a sound to grab the reader's attention.
•   Description of Setting - A descriptive segment ( 3-4 sentences long ) which describes the setting
    will help draw the reader in and help the reader observe the fictional world through the main
    character's eyes. If the setting is mundane or boring ( an average kitchen, the school yard, etc. ) this
    may be skipped. This is a good reason, however, to set a story in an interesting place!
•   Build Suspense - Here the author moves toward the main event by building suspense. This might
    involve raising worry, concern, doubt, story questions, all of which build tension. This can be done
    through "the magic of three" and the use of "word referents".
•   The MAIN EVENT - This is the most important part of the story - the climax. This is the event that
    the entire story has led up to, it is essentially what the whole story is about. This section involves the
    sequence, or the adventure or interesting peak experience. This "scene" should be told almost in slow
    motion, expanded upon and stretched out through a balance of action, thought, description, and
    dialogue. This is the largest, most important part of the story.
•   The Solution/Conclusion - This is the section that brings the main event to a close. The problem is
    solved or the adventure comes to an end.
•   Extended Ending - The ending summarizes the main character's thoughts, feelings, memories,
    hopes, wishes, or decisions in regard to the main event. It might also include a defining action that
    SHOWS any of the above. It should not be abrupt, rather it should have a feeling of satisfied closure.
           Sample Checklist
Teachers try to help students by giving them
  checklists to use when revising and editing
  their own papers. On the next four pages
  are examples of a editing marks, and two
  checklists that a teacher might use to help
  guide students.
   Editing Marks
  New Paragraph-
 Misspelled word-
   Add words or
    Punctuation-
  Take out words-
    Move words-
 Capitalize letters-
Run-on sentence- RO
 Not a sentence- NS
Name____________________                                    Date______________
Narrative Writing Checklist
Heading
___The paper has a title
Capitalization
___ Each sentence begins with a capital letter
___ Proper nouns are capitalized
___Important words in the title are capitalized
Punctuation
___Each sentence has the proper punctuation
___Paragraphs are indented properly
___If dialogue is used, quotation marks are used properly
Grammar
___The story is written in past tense
___There are no fragments or run-on sentences
___Pronouns are used correctly
General Organization
___The story has a beginning, middle, and an end
___The story stays focused on the main idea
___The story contains enough relevant details
___The events are in the correct order
Narrative Must
___Look neat
___Have author’s name on it
Tips to improve a story
___Vivid verbs and adjectives are used
___Words are not repeated
___Sentence variety (expanding and combining)
___Foreshadowing
___Strong Ending
I understand the prompt.
          –I read the prompt at least 3 times.
          –I know if it is imaginative or personal.
I brainstormed for a topic/main idea of my story.
          –I made a list of 3-5 possible story ideas.
          –I eliminated choices until I was left with the story that…
                    •would best fit the prompt
                    •have a clear wow moment (or problem and solution)
                    •I could add relevant details to, and
                    •I am interested in writing this story
I have told myself the story in my head. I have an organized plan ready to write down.
I completely filled out a plan before I started writing my draft.
          –I used a planning sheet, such as BME to organize my ideas.
          –My plan stays focused on the prompt/my main idea.
          –I used words and phrases (caveman talk) to jot down what will happen in my story from beginning to end.
          –I have noted where and what I will elaborate in my story.
My beginning catches/hooks the reader’s attention.
          –Action
          –Sound
          –Thought/Question
          –Dialogue
          –Feeling
My events are organized into paragraphs that make the actions in my story make sense and flow from beginning to end.
My middle will be the meatiest part of the story.
          –I have a clear and elaborated WOW moment/problem-solution.
          –My story contains advanced writing techniques, such as…
                             –Simile/metaphor
                             –Foreshadowing
                             –Show, not tell (feelings, actions, descriptions)
                             –“College words”
                             –A little bit of Dialogue (with correct usage of quotation marks)
          –I have DESCRIPTIVE and EMOTIONAL reactions to the story critical ACTIONS in my story.



                                                                           Page 1
My ending includes at least three of the following techniques:
         –Memory/reflection
         –Hope/wish for future
         –Feeling/emotion
         –Defining action
         –Restatement of the prompt
         –Lesson learned
I have carefully checked my paper for mistakes:


REVISE
I checked to make sure that…
                 •I stayed focused on the main idea
                 •I answered the prompt
                 •My story makes sense
                 •My story goes in the right order
                 •I have a beginning, elaborated middle, and an end
                 •I have a title
                 •I used transition words
                 •I varied the beginnings of my sentences

EDIT
I have checked for…
                 •Spelling
                 •Grammar
                 •Verb tense is all in the past!
                 •Punctuation
                 •Indented paragraphs
                 •Double words or skipped words (I touched each word as I read.)



        I have carefully checked my paper at least 3 times.
        I am pleased with my work, and I feel proud to turn in my story




                                                                 By: Susan Mosher
 What does a Level I look like in
 comparison to a II or III or IV?




To look at sample papers you can go to the Davis Drive Website or
http://www.dpi.state.nc.us/accountability/testing/writing/