Docstoc

2007 Continuum of Care Plan v10-31-07

Document Sample
2007 Continuum of Care Plan v10-31-07 Powered By Docstoc
					Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care
          Plan for the Homeless
                   2007



         Prepared in partnership with the:

                City of Spokane
           Human Service Department
                      and
         The Spokane Homeless Coalition


                       Prepared by:
                    Helen Jones, Ph.D.
                     Jones Consulting

        Human Service Department, City of Spokane
                      Jerrie Allard
                       Amy Jones


          For information about this plan contact:
                      City of Spokane
                Human Service Department
                   Jerrie Allard, Director
                808 W Spokane Falls Blvd.
                Spokane, WA 99201-3333
                   Phone: 509 625-6130
                     Fax: 509 625-6777
              Email: jallard@spokanecity.org
                                                    Table of Contents



Section I: Introduction .............................................................................................................. 1
  A. The City of Spokane ..................................................................................................... 1
  B. The Economic Challenge .............................................................................................. 1
  C. Definition of Homelessness .......................................................................................... 1
  D. Homelessness In Spokane ............................................................................................. 1
  E. Accomplishments .......................................................................................................... 2
  F. 2007 Objectives and Action Steps ................................................................................ 3

Section 2: The Spokane Homeless Coalition ............................................................................ 5
  A. Spokane Homeless Coalition ........................................................................................ 5
  B. Mission Statement......................................................................................................... 5
  C. Core Values of the Homeless Coalition ........................................................................ 5
  D. Coalition Organizational Structure ............................................................................... 5
  E. Homeless Coalition Meetings ....................................................................................... 7
  F. Participating Homeless Coalition Organizations, Businesses & Citizens .................... 7

Section 3: Community Resources & Linkages ...................................................................... 10
  A. Fundamental Components in Continuum of Care System .......................................... 10
  B. Prevention Components within the Continuum of Care System ................................ 10
  C. Outreach Components Within the Continuum of Care System .................................. 13
  D. Supportive Services Within the Continuum of Care System ...................................... 16
  E. Housing Inventory within the Continuum of Care System ......................................... 30

Section 4: Homeless Management Information System Statistics ......................................... 36
  A. Spokane Homeless Database System.......................................................................... 36
  B. Database Assessment Forms ....................................................................................... 37
  C. Programs Participating the Regional Homeless Database System ............................. 38
  D. Spokane Homeless Statistics....................................................................................... 39
  E. Information on the Total Homeless Persons (Adults and Children) Who Received
       Services within the City of Spokane ........................................................................... 40
  F. Information on Total Homeless Households That Received Services within the City
       of Spokane .................................................................................................................. 46
  G. Discharge Information Pertaining To Homeless Households That Were Discharged
       From Services in 2006. ............................................................................................... 54
  H. Information on Chronic Homeless Seeking or Receiving Services within the City of
       Spokane ....................................................................................................................... 58

Section 5: The Continuum of Care Planning Process ............................................................. 59
  A. The Lead and Convening Agency............................................................................... 59
  B. Continuum of Care Planning Process ......................................................................... 59
  C. Priorities ...................................................................................................................... 60



                                                                                                                                        i
Section 6: Continuum of Care Gaps Analysis and 18-Month Goals ...................................... 61
  A. Gaps Analysis ............................................................................................................. 61
  B. Continuum of Care 18-Month Goal ............................................................................ 64
  C. Obstacles to Meeting Goals ........................................................................................ 64
  D. 2007 Objectives and Actions to Address Chronic Homelessness and Move Families
       and Individuals to Permanent Housing ....................................................................... 65

Section 7: Review of 2006 Accomplishments ....................................................................... 72




                                                                                                                                 ii
                                       Section I: Introduction
A. The City of Spokane
The City of Spokane is located on the eastern border of Washington. Spokane is the largest city
between Seattle and Minneapolis and is presently listed as the third largest city in the state. The City
of Spokane serves as the economic hub of the Inland Northwest, a 36-county region covering eastern
Washington, northern Idaho and Oregon, western Montana and the southern sections of British
Columbia and Alberta, Canada.

B. The Economic Challenge
The economy of the City and surrounding region tends to be somewhat less vigorous than the state
and national average. According to data from the U.S. Census Bureau, poverty rates are higher,
estimated at 16% as compared to 10.5% within the state, and median household income lower than
the state averages.1 Within the City are significant clusters of households with extremely low median
incomes2.

Although, ―wage levels suggests [sic] that Spokane is becoming less dependent on low-wage
and part time employment than it has in the past,‖ low-paying jobs, under-employment and part-
time employment continue to challenge the region.3 The labor market has been improving somewhat
with gains in construction, retail sales and health services. The manufacturing that has dominated in
the past has rebounded somewhat, although still accounts for a same segment of employment and is
not expected to make significant gains in the future. The economic sectors that are expanding may
bring growth in the workforce but not necessarily an increase in average income. For example in
recent regional history, there has been growth within the lowest paying area of the retail sector—
eating and drinking establishments. Jobs in this area typically do not pay a living wage.4

C. Definition of Homelessness
The City of Spokane has adopted the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD)
definition of homelessness for the purpose of implementing its Continuum of Care. As per HUD’s
definition, a person is considered homeless when he/she resides as follows:

       In places not meant for human habitation, such as cars, parks, sidewalks, and abandoned
        buildings; or in an emergency shelter; or in transitional or supportive housing (for homeless
        persons who originally came from the streets or emergency shelter).

D. Homelessness In Spokane
The City of Spokane Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) was initiated in 1995.
During the 12 years of operation, the number of programs reporting data has increased and in the last

1
  United State Census Bureau (n.d.) Quick Facts. Retrieved September 14, 2007 from:
http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/53/5367000.html
2
  ERsys (n.d.) Spokane, WA Median Household Income. Retrieved September 14, 2007 from:
http://quickfacts.census.gov/qfd/states/53/5367000.html
3
  Zahir, Jeff (2007). Spokane MSA (Spokane County Labor Area Summary, No. 7. Retrieved September 14,
2007 from: http://www.workforceexplorer.com/admin/uploadedPublications/8441_spo_707.pdf
4
  There are differences in the level of income considered a ―living wage.‖ However, ―Cost of Basic Needs‖ has
been defined as ―the minimal costs for each of the basic needs for a Spokane [County] family of four with two
adults and two children for food, housing, utilities, transportation, child care, health care, and personal and
household expenses‖ (Facing Spokane Poverty, 2002, p. iii).


Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                                        1
three years, leveled off. However, with recent changes in the database and efforts for greater regional
collaboration, the number of participating organizations is expected to increase over the next few
years. Data used for this plan was collected in 2006. Thirty-three (33) homeless-serving programs
contributed data.

The changing number of programs reporting data over the years creates a challenge when identifying
trends in homelessness. From the perspective of the years 2000 through 2004 there seems to have
been a steady increase in the number of homeless persons. In data collected throughout 2000
indicated there were a total of 5,989 homeless individuals, in data collected throughout 2002 there
were 6,238 homeless individuals and in data collected throughout 2004 there were 7,294 homeless
persons counted.

In the latest count from data collected throughout 2006, the number increased slightly from 2005
(6,024 homeless persons constituting a total of 4,702 homeless households) to 6,188 homeless
persons constituting 4,547 households. HMIS staff continues to research the data for indications that
might help us understand the reasons for this decline in the total number of homeless persons and
households between 2004 and 2005. Questions remain about whether the decline represented a true
decline in homelessness or reflected changes in data collection.

In 2006, homeless households with children appear to have increased from 2005. The number of
homeless households with children counted in 2006 was 710 (15.6% of the total homeless
households). In 2005, 561 (11.9%) households with children were counted. While these numbers
still represent a significant decline from the earlier years, as mentioned above, questions remain about
whether the lower count represents a true decline from 2004 to 2005 in homeless households.

Similar patterns appear in the number of homeless households without children. Homeless
households without children counted during 2006 totaled 3586 (78.8% of the total homeless
households counted). In 2005 the totaled was 3852 (82% of the homeless households). In data
collected throughout 2000 there were 4770 homeless households without children (79% of the total
homeless households) and in data collected throughout 2003 there were 6009 homeless households
without children (82.4% of the total homeless).

The third segment of the homeless population is independent youth. Independent youth households are
defined as youth ages 13-17 and unaccompanied by an adult. Data from 2006 indicate 251 (5.5% of the
total homeless households counted) were youth living on their own or with a child. In the data
collected throughout 2005, 289 households (6% of the total homeless households) were independent
youth. The data collected throughout 2004 indicated 320 such households. Again, the reason for the
decline between 2004 and 2005 is, at this point, not clear.

Of the total homeless population (6,188 persons), 214 (3.5% of the total homeless persons counted)
were classified as per the Housing & Urban Development (HUD) definition, as chronic homeless. Of
the total homeless population, 67.8%) were males and 32.2% were female. The count for 2005 was
338, which constituted 5.6% of the total homeless population. The primary difference in the chronic
and other homeless populations is that the chronic homeless are by HUD definition, individuals with
disabilities, not families. A detailed presentation of the homeless data collected throughout 2006 is
included in Section 4. H.

E. Accomplishments
Significant changes have occurred in the HUD requirements for assessing fulfillment of objectives.
As of 2007 jurisdictions are required to either achieve HUD established percentage improvements



Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                                2
(i.e., ―increase percentage of homeless persons staying in PH over 6 months to 71%) or set numeric
measures for accomplishments that will lead to addressing homelessness within the federally
prescribed 10-year time frame (as done in this plan for Objective 1: Create new PH beds for
chronically homeless persons). Accomplishments are reported based on the intended outcome in
detail in Section 7: Review of 2006Accomplishments.

Throughout 2006, the City of Spokane has worked with the Spokane Homeless Coalition and
individual organizations listed as lead for actions in the 2006 Continuum of Care Plan for the
Homeless. For every objective listed there was been progress. Key examples follow.

With the first 2006 objective, ―Create new Permanent Housing beds for chronically homeless
persons,‖ accomplishments include development of 10 of the anticipated 34 units. The One-Stop-
Housing website was completed, which provides information on available housing units for both
landlords and tenants. Long-term, it is anticipated that this resource will enhance use of existing
housing stock. Data collection on the conditions of homeless and their needs was also improved with
broader agency participation in the point-in-time count conducted in January. This data will enhance
the region’s ability to target services.

The second objective focused on increasing the percentage of homeless persons stabilized in
Permanent Housing (PH). The best news on this objective is that City of Spokane presently has
achieved the federally mandated level of 71% of homeless persons staying in PH over six months.
Activity to further enhance the percentage of homeless stabilized in PH included development of PSH
units, state legislation that results in significant funding which has been allocated for housing
stabilization programs and a county sales tax increase that will fund mental health treatment.

The third objective is to, ―Increase [the] percentage of homeless persons moving from Transitional
Housing (TA) to Permanent Housing to 61.5%.‖ Presently, City data indicates that 50% of homeless
persons move from TH to PH. While this is strong mid-course progress towards the 10-year
outcome, several actions were undertaken in 2007 to strengthen outcomes. The Home Choice
Voucher program was reopened, programs achieving less than the 61.5% outcome were assessed and
technical assistance provided to 2 of the 5 programs.

Achievement on the fourth objective, ―Increase percentage of homeless persons becoming employed
by 11%,‖ exceeded federally mandated levels. According to City data, homeless persons employed
increased from 9% at entry into the homeless-providing system to 175% at exit. Actions to further
enhance success in this area include researching barriers to employment and resources available.

There was also progress on the final objective listed in the 2006 plan, ―Ensure that the Continuum of
Care has a functional HMIS system.‖ A major system upgrade was completed with the purchase of
new software. Implementation will continue through 2007. A higher accuracy rate for data filed was
also achieved. The system will also expand in number of agencies contributing data.

F. 2007 Objectives and Action Steps
Section 6: Continuum of Care Gaps Analysis and 18-Month Objectives of this plan details the
objectives and action steps to be taken in the coming months. The organization of the objectives and
actions in this plan is a shift from past years where chronic and other classifications of homelessness
were addressed separately. In this plan, the first objective addresses chronic homelessness
exclusively. The remaining four objectives address all forms of homelessness. All objectives and
actions are listed one the same chart.




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                                3
An additional shift is the reduced number of objectives. There are five objectives. The objectives
listed for future action are the same objectives for which the past 12-month accomplishments are
reported.

Actions to address the first objective, ―Create new PH beds for chronically homeless persons,‖
include a number of homeless-serving organizations adding units. Because the need for additional
units is one of the key challenges regionally, there are also actions planned to more efficiently use
existing resources by increasing the number of landlords willing to rent to this sub-population of
homeless. A regional housing inventory is planned and a stakeholder group will be convened to
identify housing challenges for this sub-population and avenues for addressing the challenges.

The second objective, ―Increase percentage of homeless persons staying in PH over six months to at
least 71%,‖ is being further supported by homeless-serving organizations developing new and
enhancing existing alumni programs, and expanding aftercare services to assist currently and formerly
homeless persons stabilize in their housing. Training will continue to be provided for property
owners and managers on services available to increase stability of residents, and funding options for
additional stabilization services will be researched.

Several actions are also being taken to address the third objective, ―Increase percentage of homeless
households moving from TH to PH to at least 61.5%.‖ There will be an increase in the number of
hard-to-place family cases staffed through a multi-agency wrap-around model with intensive client
support. Enrollment in a curriculum designed to (and with a track record of) assisting homeless
persons recognize the circumstances that have led to their homelessness and address those
circumstances will be increased. Two additional agencies will receive technical assistance to improve
performance with the intended outcome of achieving the national standard within 12 months. Efforts
will also be taken to share expertise and knowledge of community resources among homeless-serving
organizations.

Actions to gain progress on the fourth objective of increasing employment include mapping of current
employment resources, identification of best practices for assisting homeless persons with
employment, and researching how employment services and training for youth might be enhanced. A
collaborative initiative to establish social enterprises that will provide job training and employment
for homeless women will also be launched.

The final objective of ensuring a functional HMIS system will be supported through several actions.
Outreach to increase the number of homeless-serving organizations contributing to the HMIS will
take place. Additional agencies will be trained on data collection and recording, as well as use of the
HMIS for assessment and reporting. Finally, performance pertaining to data collection and recording
of all McKinney-funded projects will be completed and a plan for technical assistance to address
under-performance will be developed and implemented.




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                                 4
                      Section 2: The Spokane Homeless Coalition
A. Spokane Homeless Coalition
The Spokane Homeless Coalition (SHC) has been in existence since 1985. The Coalition is a
collaborative effort including more than 50 organizations, agencies, and individuals representing for-
profit and nonprofit agencies, city, county, state and federal governmental departments, educational
institutions, health providers, interested citizens and the media. This group meets monthly to share
and educate themselves on utilizing community and mainstream resources, inform each other of the
availability of resources, identify unmet needs of the homeless and plan new strategies for meeting
those needs. The Spokane Homeless Coalition mailing list is 200 individuals with 30 to 50 attending
each meeting. Their website can be accessed at: http://www.spokanehomeless.org/ The City of
Spokane Human Services Department provides staff support for the Coalition.

B. Mission Statement
The Coalition mission statement reads as follows:

        Spokane Homeless Coalition is a collaborative effort of individuals and agencies that address
        the challenges of homelessness in our community. Through education, legislative advocacy,
        mutual support and the sharing of resources we strive to prevent homelessness as well as
        increase the ability of the community to respond to individual needs.

C. Core Values of the Homeless Coalition
The Coalition also adopted a set of core values. The following is a list of the values that were
approved by the Coalition. These values are reviewed on an annual basis.

       Client centered service delivery
       Treating persons with dignity and respect
       A focus on working with people who have problems rather than ―problem people‖
       Adopting a holistic approach while working with client strengths
       Reliance on collaboration and partnerships; working together we value each other as
        providers
       Empowering clients through a comprehensive service delivery model
       Acknowledging and dealing with the root causes of homelessness
       Giving voice to people who have none
       Being non-judgmental
       Working with all populations, single adults, youth, families, people with mental illness, dual
        diagnoses and chemical dependencies
       Dealing with system barriers
       Practicing cultural values
       Dispelling myths about homeless people, educating the public and working to create better
        system access and responsiveness

D. Coalition Organizational Structure
The Coalition conducts its year-round activities through a variety of standing and ad hoc committees.
The standing committees are as follows:

Leadership Standing Committee: The Spokane Homeless Coalition has a leadership committee that
is composed of 3 elected individuals and committee chairs. Their roles are to: further the Coalition


Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                               5
mission and support the ongoing development of the Coalition; provide public spokespersons for the
Coalition; make public statements and advocate for the homeless community; plan agendas, conduct
monthly meetings and appoint committee chairs.

In addition to the Leadership Committee, the standing and current ad hoc committees are:

Executive Committee: Assist the Leadership Team in any way necessary, but in particular making
public statements and advocating for the homeless community.

Continuum of Care: Ensure timely progress with the yearly update of the 18 month objectives and
action steps in the Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless, provide input on its interface with the
Spokane Regional 10-Year Plan to Address Homelessness and follow-up on tasks assigned to various
Coalition members for implementation of either plan.

Education Committee: Identify members’ educational needs and develop programs to meet those
needs through the use of expert speakers, other community/state resources, etc.

Employment Committee: Research and develop resources for training and employment opportunities
for homeless persons.

Family Shelter Committee: Ensure ongoing and effective communication among service providers
for this key component of the Continuum of Care.

Homeless Preference Voucher Committee: Establish a quick and simple process of homeless
voucher delivery whereby homeless individuals/families can receive preference and be moved from
the bottom to the top of the waiting list by the Northeast Washington Housing Solutions, previously
known as the Spokane Housing Authority.

Interagency Outreach Committee: Coordinate outreach activities to help secure housing/shelter and
mainstream resources to the homeless living on the street or other locations not fit for human
habitation.

Legislative Committee: Follow relevant federal and state legislation, keep membership informed and
develop proposed positions for the Coalition as needed.

Membership Committee: Conduct orientation of new members, recruit organizations, businesses and
other community interests not represented and maintain the membership roster. Develop membership
packets and build consensus for coalition foci.

Washington State Homeless Coalition Committee: Attend the Washington State Homeless Coalition
meetings and keep the SHC informed of statewide efforts and concerns.

Feed Spokane Committee: Provide a forum for meal providers to network, share resources, rescue
useable food, provide information and work together to make providing meals more effective and
efficient.

Homeless Family Protection Committee: Assist in providing the best services for chronic homeless
families with children who would otherwise ―fall through the cracks‖ and continue to deteriorate.

One Day Count (Homeless Connect) Ad Hoc Committee: Plan and organizes the count of homeless
as mandated by HUD and the State of Washington.


Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                              6
Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week Ad Hoc Committee: Plan and organize the SHC
activities for the National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week, which heightens awareness
within the community.

Retreat Planning Ad Hoc Committee: Plan and organize the annual retreat.

E. Homeless Coalition Meetings
The SHC, which is the centralized planning and coordinating organization of the continuum, meets
the first Thursday morning of every month. The agenda for each Coalition meeting consists of: 1)
information sharing from each member organization present; 2) planning activities that include
reports on recommended strategies and implementation activities from the various standing and active
ad hoc committees; 3) a presentation from an agency; 4) public forum that includes discussions
pertaining to advocacy, news or any other information relevant to the homeless population. Meetings
of the Coalition are open to the public and agendas/minutes are published on the Spokane Homeless
Coalition website, and mailed to Coalition members and interested individuals.

F. Participating Homeless Coalition Organizations, Businesses & Citizens
The private for-profit, nonprofit, business and governmental agencies that participate in the Spokane
Homeless Coalition include:

           American Indian Community Center
           Anna Ogden Hall
           ARC of Spokane
           Advanced Registered Nurse Practitioners (ARNP)
           Mobile Medical Clinic
           AWD Enterprises, LLC
           Bureau of Indian Affairs
           Campus Kitchens at Gonzaga University
           Catholic Charities
           Center for Justice
           Central Valley School District (CVSD)
           Community Health Association of Spokane (CHAS)
           Christ the Redeemer Church
           Christmas House
           Citizens Utility Alliance
           City Gate Ministries
           City of Spokane Council
           City of Spokane Fire Department
           City of Spokane Human Services
           City of Spokane Police Department
           Common Ground
           Community Colleges of Spokane
           Community Detox Services of Spokane
           Community Frameworks
           Coalition of Responsible Disabled (CORD)
           Cup of Cool Water


Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                               7
          Eastern Washington University
          Eleanor Chase Work Release
          Family Services of Spokane
          Feed Spokane
          Goodwill Industries, CES Office
          Greater Spokane Substance Abuse
          Habitat for Humanity – Spokane
          Hate Incident Response Team of Spokane
          HCHV/VAMC
          Healing Hearts Art
          Hope Partners
          House of Charity
          Household of Faith
          Inland Northwest Community Foundation
          Intercollegiate Center for Nursing (ICN)
          Intercommunity Peace & Justice Center
          Interfaith Hospitality Network
          Jones Consulting
          Latter Day Saints (LDS) Church
          Life Center Four-Square Church
          Life Services of Spokane
          Lutheran Community Services Northwest
          Mass Mutual Financial Group
          New Horizons Care Centers (Sun Ray Court)
          New Washington Apartments
          North Idaho Homeless Coalition (Region 1)
          Northeast Community Center Association
          Northeast Washington Housing Solutions, dba Spokane Housing Authority
          Northwest Fair Housing Alliance
          Ogden Hall
          Partners with Families & Children
          P-CAP
          People 4 People/Spokane Housing Ventures
          Petrusek Consulting
          Pioneer Center East / Pioneer Human Services
          R. E. Prime / Christmas House
          Rising Times, Gonzaga University
          Sacred Heart Medical Center – EO Case Management
          St. John’s Cathedral
          St. Margaret's Shelter
          St. Vincent de Paul Coeur d’Alene
          Salem Arms
          Salvation Army
          SATTS
          Spokane Community College



Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                 8
          Shalom Ministries
          SPC of Spokane
          Spokane Aids Network
          Spokane County Community Services
          Spokane County Housing & Community Development
          Spokane County Regional Support Network (RSN)
          Spokane County Supportive Living Program
          Spokane Housing Ventures
          Spokane Human Rights Union; formerly People 4 People
          Spokane Low-Income Housing Consortium
          Spokane Mental Health
          Spokane Neighborhood Action Program
          Spokane Public Schools
          Spokane Regional Health District
          Spokane Valley Community Center
          Spokane Valley HEART
          Spokane Valley Partners
          Spokane Valley Police Department
          Transitional Programs For Women dba Transitions
          Transitional Programs For Women dba Transitions Miryam’s House
          Transitional Programs For Women dba Transitions Transitional Living Center
          Women’s Hearth
          Union Gospel Mission
          United Behavioral Health
          U.S. Department of Housing & Urban Development (HUD)
          U.S. Department of Social Security Administration
          Union Gospel Mission
          United Behavioral Health
          Volunteers of America (VOA), Aston-Bleck Apartments
          VOA, Crosswalk
          VOA, Hope House
          VOICES
          Washington State Department of Child & Family Services
          Washington State Department of Corrections
          Washington State Department of Social &
          Health Services (DSHS)
          Washington Department of Veterans
          Westminster Congregation UCC
          Women & Children’s Free Restaurant
          YFA Connections
          YWCA




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                      9
                    Section 3: Community Resources & Linkages
A. Fundamental Components in Continuum of Care System
The public forum provided by the Coalition’s monthly meetings, encourages new and strengthens
existing linkages between homeless service providers and a wide variety of resources available to the
homeless population. The open exchange of information provides those in attendance a regular
opportunity to familiarize themselves with the various financial and human resources, which may not
always be associated with the homeless. This forum is especially valuable for identifying financial
resources, which are not distributed, administered or overseen by the City.

The Spokane region has access to many programs, which both directly and indirectly provide support
to the delivery of services and provision of housing for homeless persons in need. The Coalition
ensures that all Continuum of Care partners are aware of these various resources and that they are
considered as part of the year-round-planning process. This enables our community to maximize both
financial and human resources from all local, state and federal funding sources, and social service
organizations; ensures the best possible use of resources; and avoids duplication of services.

Spokane has placed a special emphasis on improving the communication and coordination among
those organizations heavily involved in homeless service provision as well as among organizations
having only indirect contact with homeless issues. This effort has enabled the City to make great
strides in leveraging scarce community resources. It has also encouraged inclusion of new and
diverse voices in the development of local strategies to combat homelessness. The City of Spokane is
especially proud of its ongoing success in forging new partnerships and linkages, and ever expanding
each component of the Continuum of Care. All of the components within Spokane’s Continuum of
Care are listed in the next section. This listing was updated for the 2006 plan.

B. Prevention Components within the Continuum of Care System
Rental/Mortgage Assistance:
  Coalition of Responsible Disabled (CORD) provides non-cash mortgage and rental assistance
   for all persons with disabilities and the homeless. Serves approx 100 families per year, Mon –
   Fri, 9 a.m. – 5 p.m., 612 N. Maple; Phone 326-6355 and 1-877-606-2680.
  Habitat for Humanity: With applicants providing sweat equity and meeting other requirements,
   Habitat for Humanity provides mortgage assistance for affordable homes for low-income
   individuals/families.
  St. Vincent de Paul provides partial rental assistance ($50 - $100) on a once-only basis, with
   need/situation assessed at the time with verification of need from the landlord. Referral may be
   made for the rest of the rent. This program is funded from donations.
  Salvation Army serves walk-ins. They help about 150 households per year, depending on
   availability of funding; 2020 N. Division
  Spokane Neighborhood Action Program (SNAP) provides Mortgage Default Counseling.
   Limited funds are available for rental assistance annually. Walk-ins are welcome. 500 S. Stone,
   Mon - Fri, 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. Phone: 456-7106
  Volunteers of America (VOA) Helps about 20 families per month. Eligibility is based on
   Federal guidelines and must qualify through TANF or Washington State GAU. About 800
   families are served each year at the nearest CSO office. ―Emergent needs‖ qualifiers get further
   help.

Heat and Utility Assistance:
  Avista Utilities provides heating assistance through SNAP.


Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                             10
   SNAP, Avista, and the City of Spokane provide heating and utility assistance. Funding is from
    LIHEAP, citizens and business donations.
   St. Vincent de Paul provides limited heating assistance. Funding from donations.
   Washington State DSHS provides limited heat and utility assistance to TANF clients.
   Citizen’s Utility Alliance – A Washington State grassroots, non-profit group working to
    organize, educate and advocate for residential natural gas, electric, water, and
    telecommunications customers. The Alliance promotes public policies that ensure affordable
    access to phone service, energy and clean water for all of Washington’s residents, especially low-
    income and vulnerable households.

Protective Payee Program:
  American Indian Community Center: Family services and protective-payee programs for
   American Indian individuals and families.
  ARC of Spokane serves developmentally disabled and mentally ill persons who receive
   Supplemental Security Income (SSI). Walk-ins are welcome. ARC sets up budgets, assists in
   opening checking accounts and pays bills for clients under the Washington State public assistance
   mandatory protective payee program. 127 W. Boone, Mon – Fri, 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m. Phone: 328-
   6326
  CORD: Protective-payee program assistance for persons with disabilities.
  Goodwill Industries: Provides a protective payee program for recovering substance abusers and
   the mentally ill.
  Pre-Vocational Training Center: The Pre-Vocational Training Center provides services for
   low-income disabled adults. General services include representative payee services.
  Spokane Mental Health: Provides protective payee services to specific active Spokane Mental
   Health consumers.

Telephone Services:
   CORD: CORD has voice mailboxes available to the homeless and disabled.
   Voice Mail, SNAP: SNAP has 980 voice mailboxes available for distribution to homeless and
    other phoneless card users. Clients must qualify under low-income guidelines and must be case
    managed by SNAP. This program allows individuals without a telephone to have voice mail so
    that employers, case managers and therapists can leave messages for the individual. Phone: 456-
    7111
   WTAP through DSHS –Funded by a Seattle foundation, people who are qualified enroll in the
    phone assistance program. Clients must be receiving assistance from DSHS or receiving partial
    income, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m., Mon – Fri; Phone: 744-3370, ext. 247

Medical Services:
 Christ Clinic: Primary care clinic for uninsured and under-insured qualifying under federal
  guidelines with sliding scale fee. Appointment required - no walk-ins. Mon – Thurs, 9 a.m. – 12
  p.m. and 1 p.m. – 5 p.m. and Fri 9 a.m. – 12 p.m.; Phone: 325-0393
 Community Health Association of Spokane (CHAS): This program provides health and dental
  care as well as prescriptions to low-income individuals and the Homeless. Denny Murphy
  Medical Clinic 1001 W. 2nd Ave. 835-1205; Healthcare for the Homeless 835-1205; NE Medical
  Clinic, 4001 N. Cook, 487-1604; Maple St. Medical and Dental Clinic 3919 N. Maple, 444-7801,
  242-1821. Hours vary by clinic.
 East Central Community Organization (ECCO) Primary Care - Primary care with a nurse
  practitioner 3 days each week for low-income as determined by federal guidelines with a sliding
  scale for those who are insured. 500 S. Stone, Wed, Thurs, and Fri, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.; Phone: 536-
  9031



Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                             11
   House of Charity Clinic: Free open clinic, walk-ins with valid I. D., 32 W. Pacific, 12 – 2 p.m.,
    Tues and Fri; Phone: 624-7821
   N.A.T.I.V.E. Health of Spokane: N.A.T.I.V.E. Health is a primary-care facility that provides
    comprehensive healthcare to people in need. No one is turned away due to inability to pay.
   People’s Clinic: General health services – sliding scale for those who are insured – no
    emergencies. Dental health by referral. 829 W. Broadway (YWCA Bldg.) Mon – Fri, 9 a.m. – 5
    p.m.; Phone: 323-7600
   Project Access through Public Health Clinic (Spokane County Medical Society): Referrals
    only by emergency, doctors or hospitals. Administrative services; i.e., screening and enrollment
    are provided for low-income people with no insurance or are not on Medicaid. Funding goes to
    prescriptions. Other administrative services include helping to arrange appointments, but do no
    billing for clients.
   Spokane Falls Health and Dental Clinic: Contract services for SFCC students only at the ICN
    Bldg., 2917 W. Fort George Wright Dr., Mon – Tues – Wed, 9:30 a.m. – 12:30 p.m.; Phone:
    324-7273
   Union Gospel Mission: A weekly primary care clinic operated by 5 volunteer physicians for
    low-income and homeless resident men and walk-ins, referrals provided when appropriate, 1224
    E. Trent, Wed, 12 – 5 p.m.

Home Repair for low-income individuals and families:
 Community Development Department, City of Spokane: Implemented through SNAP with a
  contract to fund minor home repair. Homeowner must be within 50 percent of median income
  (AMI) or below. 8 a.m. – 5 p.m., Mon – Fri. Phone SNAP
 SNAP: Programs are provided at the nearest neighborhood SNAP office for low-income
  homeowners who qualify under federal guidelines for minor home repair. East: 500 S. Stone,
  456-7106; Northeast: 4001 N. Cook, 487-1114; Downtown: 212 S. Wall, 456-7169

Clothing:
  Anna Ogden Hall: Clothing bank for female hall residents only, 2825 W. Dean, Phone: 535-
   8510
  Better Living Center: Clothing bank
  Calvary Baptist Church: Clothing and food bank with items donated available to those in need,
   207 E. 3rd, Mon – Wed and Sat, 9 a.m. – 12 p.m., Phone: 747-8793
  Catholic Charities CAPA Program: Children’s clothing bank
  Central Lutheran Church: Clothing bank
  City Gate Fellowship: Clothing and food bank for street people, homeless, low-income people,
   170 S. Madison by appointment, 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. and 1 p.m. – 3 p.m., Tues – Fri; Phone: 455-
   9670
  Cup of Cool Water: Clothing bank for homeless youth under 22 years of age, 1106 W. 2nd Ave.,
   Phone: 747-6686.
  Goodwill Industries: Clothing bank
  Health Care for Homeless Veterans: Clothing bank
  Hope House – Clothing bank for women
  House of Charity: Clothing bank
  Manito Presbyterian: Clothing bank
  Mission Outreach: Clothing bank
  Our Place: Clothing bank
  Peaceful Valley Community Center: Clothing bank
  Pre-Vocational Training Center: Clothing bank
  St Vincent de Paul: Clothing bank
  Salvation Army: Clothing bank


Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                             12
   Spokane Regional Health District: Clothing bank for clients
   Transitional Living Center: Clothing bank
   Union Gospel Mission: Clothing bank for anyone, 24 hours per day, 1224 E. Trent, Phone: 535-
    8510
   VOA Crosswalk: Clothing bank for youth, 525 W. 2nd Ave., 24 hours per day
   YWCA (Our Sister’s Closet): Women’s clothing women for interviews and jobs.
   YWCA: Heart Program provides clothing for K-12 (Spokane School District 81 only) new shoes
    for kids; ―Coats For Kids;‖ clothing for independent youth and school supplies for K-12 students.

Meal Sites:
   A listing of downtown meals sites is maintained by the Spokane Homeless Coalition
    (SHC) as part of the Feed Spokane initiative. It is available at
    http://www.spokanehomeless.org/.

How persons access/receive assistance:
Individuals or families needing services go to the identified agencies, other social service agencies,
United Way-funded help line, the Spokane Homeless website/resource finder or City Human
Services. Prevention service programs handle walk-ins. Individuals who access agencies/case
managers/outreach workers will receive assistance by the staff in connecting to the needed resources.
This may involve a phone referral, a referral form, or a personal escort to appointments.

C. Outreach Components Within the Continuum of Care System
The following are outreach activities for homeless persons who are living on the streets.

Interagency Homeless Outreach Team: Outreach workers who are mental health and substance
abuse counselors, nurses, social workers, AIDS workers, veterans, minority outreach and youth
workers. The workers attempt to reach single homeless individuals, most of whom are chronic
homeless (homeless for over one year), who are living on the streets, under bridges, in parks, in
campgrounds, or in vehicles. These homeless individuals may not have knowledge of the resources
available or may not trust the system. The Outreach Team attempts to build trust and educate
homeless individuals about the resources available to them. Until that trust is formed, workers supply
the homeless person with socks, toiletries, food, first aid and other necessities. Once the homeless
individuals make the decision to enter the Continuum of Care System, the process of connecting them
to the resources and mainstream resources that fit their needs begins. If the homeless choose not to
access an agency, they will still have regular contact with Outreach workers. The Interagency
Homeless Outreach Team is composed of the following:

   American Indian Community Center: This program connects homeless Native Americans to
    Native American and mainstream services. Outreach is to both singles and families. They work
    closely with shelters to make sure that the individual is connected to resources for Native
    Americans. Conveniently located in the heart of downtown Spokane, this agency offers walk-in
    services to homeless Native Americans.
   CORD – REACH Program: Serving a total of 7 surrounding counties including Spokane,
    services include outreach on the street, helping the disabled with financial aid only for HIV
    positive individuals.
   Community Health Association of Spokane (CHAS) –The CHAS clinics are primary practice
    clinics serving homeless individuals of all ages. For many of the chronic homeless, the CHAS
    clinic is the first contact they have with social services. Any homeless individual, using the
    CHAS primary care clinic or who needs mental health care is also seen by a mental health nurse
    practitioner, psychologist, and when needed, their psychiatrist. Those with medical conditions



Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                             13
    receive their needed prescriptions at this agency. Most homeless individuals go into the CHAS
    downtown clinic for management of chronic illnesses, treatment for minor injuries and infectious
    diseases, and outreach services. No one is denied services because of an inability to pay.
   Community Detox Services: Through a van service, the program reaches out to substance
    abusers. Those who are inebriated are taken by van to a sobering and detoxification unit.
    Community Detox works to engage the homeless in seeking sobriety. Housing is provided for
    those engaged until inpatient treatment becomes accessible.
   Cup of Cool Water: Both on-the-street and facility services for homeless youth under age 22.
    Referrals are made for special needs. 1106 W. 2nd Ave., day drops-ins on Tues – Wed - Thurs, 1
    – 5 p.m. with laundry and shower facilities, lunch served at 2 p.m.; evening drop-in on Tues 7 –
    10 p.m. with dinner served from 7 – 8:30 p.m.
   ENChristo – Whitworth College (ASWC): Saturdays on the streets and at hotels – sandwich
    and muffin handouts – build relationships with follow up and help with rides, cleaning and
    moving tasks by special volunteer arrangement.
   Health Care for Homeless Veterans Program: This program provides outreach services and
    health care for homeless veterans. It provides surplus military clothing, limited opportunity for
    day labor, and medical services. This agency has an office co-located with SNAP and close to
    other social service agencies that work particularly with chronic homeless individuals.
   House of Charity/Catholic Charities: This program provides outreach services through day-
    shelter, breakfast, lunch and free limited medical care to all homeless. Overnight shelter is
    provided during the winter months. Free laundry and shower facilities are provided for adult men
    and women. On-site outreach workers attempt to engage homeless with other services such as
    GAU. House of Charity’s mental health/substance abuse counselor has been successful in
    connecting the homeless with substance abuse services. This program includes HIV/AIDS
    individuals in its outreach. House of Charity works very closely with the Homeless Veteran’s
    Program to make sure veterans have access to veteran services. Hours: 7:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. Mon –
    Sat in the summer and in the winter Sundays and evenings are added 6 – 8 p.m. Phone: 624-
    7821
   Intercollegiate Center for Nursing Education (ICNE): As a member of the Interagency
    Homeless Outreach Team, this program provides initial nursing services to the homeless living in
    the rough.
   REM Association dba Hope Partners: Provides outpatient treatment services to adults with
    mental illness and/or co-occurring disorders (mental illness and chemical dependency/abuse).
    Treatment consists of group, individual and family therapy, as well as case management services,
    which are geared to meet the individual’s needs and goals. Outreach services are provided to
    homeless individuals on the street and from various other agencies, 1117 W. 1st Ave., Mon – Fri,
    8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Referrals are made when appropriate. Phone: 838-3599
   Ronald McDonald Care Mobile: A clinic on wheels that provides traveling medical services
    within Spokane County to homeless and low-income families regardless of insurance status for
    youth age 0 to 21. The program also provides some dental services. Partners with various
    medical professionals, schools--their programs and counselors--community centers, nonprofit and
    religious organizations.
   Shalom Ministries: Provides group, individual and couples counseling, information and referral,
    crisis intervention, peripheral case management and bus tokens as the budget allows. There is
    ―on-the-street‖ contact, but most is at 518 W. 3rd Ave., Mon 6 a.m. – 6 p.m. with breakfast from
    6:30 – 8 a.m., lunch 11 a.m. – 12 p.m. and Mon – Thurs, 6:30 a.m. – 1 p.m. with breakfast and
    lunch, dinner on Mondays at 4:00 and 5:00 pm. Phone: 455-9019
   Spokane Mental Health Outreach: Spokane Mental Health Outreach is a lead agency in
    outreach in Spokane. Several full and part-time team members make several hundred contacts
    each month with primarily chronically homeless or mentally ill homeless. Intensive follow up of
    individual contacts provide an effective way to build rapport with the hardest to serve population.


Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                              14
    Workers go throughout the metro area and are familiar with areas where homeless may be living
    in the rough. They provide assistance and transportation for those who are willing to apply for
    services.
   SNAP: Through its weekly sack dinner program in the inner-city core area, SNAP is able to
    identify homeless persons who would be unlikely to respond to other types of outreach. It
    provides an ongoing point of contact until trust can be established and the person enrolled in
    services. SNAP also provides street and rural outreach activities. The organization is a leading
    component of the Interagency Outreach Team.
   Spokane Regional Health District: The Outreach Center provides AIDS education, condoms,
    lubricants, bleach, alcohol pads, one-for-one needle exchange, toiletries and some clothing. Items
    are free and anonymous—no questions asked.
   VOICES: Advocate for low-income and disadvantaged. VOICES work on the street in
    conjunction with other agencies for assessment and appropriate referral targeting the low-income,
    homeless, indigent, unskilled, disabled, and teaches them how to be advocates for themselves.
    VOICES provides off-site advocacy focus groups with legislature, city and county community
    service councils and many others, to give clients a direct forum for their own advocacy issues.
    1428 W. Broadway, walk-ins are accepted Mon – Fri during varying hours; Phone: 326-4135
   VOA – Crosswalk: Word of mouth and volunteers walk streets and talk to kids letting them
    know shelter, clothing and meals are available at 525 W. 2nd Ave., Phone: 838-6596
   Women’s Hearth/Transitions: This walk-in program provides outreach services to women who
    are mentally ill, have HIV/AIDS, substance abuse issues, and domestic violence victims. This
    program connects female victims to services and shelter.

Outreach Activities for Other Homeless Persons (not on streets):
 American Indian Community Center (AICC) participates on the Interagency Homeless
   Outreach Team. This program connects homeless Native Americans to Native American and
   mainstream services. Outreach is to both singles and families. AICC works closely with shelters
   to make sure that individuals are connected to resources for Native Americans. This agency
   provides walk-in service to homeless Native Americans.
 CHAS – Downtown Clinic: CHAS is a member of the Interagency Homeless Outreach Team.
   The CHAS clinics are primary practice clinics serving homeless individuals of all ages. For
   many of the chronic homeless, the CHAS clinic is the first contact they have with social services.
   Any homeless individual who uses a CHAS primary care clinic can access mental health care,
   seeing the mental health nurse practitioner, psychologist, and when needed, a psychiatrist. This
   agency provides prescriptions for those with AIDS. Homeless individuals go into the CHAS
   clinic for management of chronic illnesses, treatment for minor injuries and infectious diseases,
   and outreach services. No one is denied services because of an inability to pay.
 First Presbyterian Church provides counseling and referral service for homeless people. They
   have some grocery and restaurant coupons available, clothing when donated and bus token as the
   monthly budget allows. Location: 318 S. Cedar. Phone: 747-1058.
 Second Harvest Food Bank collects and stores food, and distributes it to 22 network
   organizations providing food assistance to homeless and low-income individuals and families.
 Spokane AIDS Network (SAN) provides client advocacy, case management and support
   services to HIV+ individuals. Referrals can be made for housing, support groups, counseling,
   medical care, chemical dependency treatment programs and federal and state resources.
 Spokane County AIDS Outreach Services is a member of the Interagency Homeless Outreach
   Team. The Outreach Center provides AIDS education, condoms, lubricants, bleach, alcohol pads,
   one-for-one needle exchange, toiletries and some clothing. Items are free and anonymous. No
   questions are asked. This program collaborates with Spokane AIDS Network (SAN).




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                             15
   Union Gospel Mission: Utilizing their shelter and soup kitchen, this agency outreaches to
    veterans and others. They work closely with the Homeless Veterans Program to make sure
    veterans have access to veteran’s services.
   VOA Crosswalk, in conjunction with their breakfast, lunch and dinner programs, provides
    outreach services to homeless youth, ages 12-17. Outreach workers are there to assist the youth
    with substance abuse problems. Multiple service providers (mental health counselors, substance
    abuse counselors, and public health nurses) visit the shelter on a regular basis to get acquainted
    with the youth and assist those who are willing to accept specialized services. This program
    works closely with the police department, which sometimes brings homeless youth to the shelter.
   VOA Hope House is a women’s shelter that provides safe emergency shelter for 34 women, 365
    days a year. It provides night outreach services to single women who are victims of domestic
    violence. As well as providing shelter, the program connects women to needed services (i.e.
    mental health services).
   Women’s Hearth is a walk-in program and a member of the Interagency Homeless Outreach
    Team. It provides outreach services to women who are mentally ill, have HIV/AIDS, substance
    abuse issues or are victims of domestic violence.
   YFA Connections provides outreach services targeting youth ages 13-17 in the downtown city
    bus station. The goal is to connect youth with services, shelter and/or family. This agency is a
    licensed mental health/substance abuse treatment program.
   YWCA Domestic Violence Shelter focuses on women who are victims of domestic violence
    assisting them to make a safe escape to a shelter or to develop a plan to make a safe escape. Staff
    is available 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. The shelter also provides food, clothing and
    emotional support.

D. Supportive Services Within the Continuum of Care System
Case Management:
  American Indian Community Centers: this comprehensive social service agency focuses on
   outreach and supportive services to assist American Indian individuals/families in transitional
   housing or homeless situations. The case manager works with the individual/family to assist
   them in accessing housing, financial resources, treatment and jobs. They also assist the
   individual/family enroll in a substance abuse program.
  Anna Ogden Hall: Case management is available to each resident at Anna Ogden Hall.
  CORD: An independent living center, case managers assist disabled homeless individuals to
   access specialized services and accessible housing.
  Community Detox Services/Cub House: Cub House provides transitional living housing.
   Residents receive case management services. This service assists individuals recovering from
   substance abuse enroll in AA/NA meetings, relapse prevention, and connects them to needed
   services.
  Health Care for Homeless Veterans: The case manager assists veterans in enrolling in the
   veteran’s health programs and housing.
  HOPE Partners: The case manager assists individuals in accessing needed mainstream services
   and assists in stabilization services. Most of the clients they serve are dually diagnosed adults
   (mentally ill/chemically dependent), who are receiving outpatient treatment, domestic violence
   perpetrator treatment and family reconciliation services.
  House of Charity/Catholic Charities: Provides case management services to assist homeless
   individuals in accessing mainstream resources; i.e., GAU, GAX, and SSI/SDA; etc., mental
   health and substance abuse counseling, housing, and housing stabilization. 32 W. Pacific, Mon –
   Fri 7:30 a.m. – 3 p.m. Phone: 624-7821
  Interfaith Hospitality Network: The case manager assists homeless families who are being
   sheltered by the network of churches and who spend the day at the day shelter to find permanent


Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                              16
    solutions so they can regain their independence. They also refer families to agencies providing
    health care, job training and other services that work to solve underlying causes of homelessness.
   Miryam’s House/Transitions Program: Miryam’s House provides transitional housing and case
    management for homeless single women in recovery from domestic violence, addictions, past
    abuse/loss, mental health issues, or any life crisis for accessing education/job-training needs,
    counseling, treatment groups, and permanent housing. Aftercare case-management services are
    provided for as long as they are needed.
   St. Margaret’s/Catholic Charities: This homeless program is structured to provide safety,
    stability and support in a home-like atmosphere as residents prepare for their future. Within this
    supportive environment, case management is provided to empower residents to move toward
    more independent living and achieve personal goals. Phone: 835-1255
   Salvation Army Family Emergency Center (S*A*F*E): A case manager assists families that
    are residing in the shelter. The intense case-management program focuses on the individual
    needs of clients.
   Salvation Army Transitional Housing: A case manager assists families that are residing in
    transitional housing. The case-management program focuses on the individual needs of clients.
   SNAP-Asset Banking –Resource that allows low-income individuals to open bank account(s).
    Services are offered through collaboration with 2 local credit unions. SNAP provides a downtown
    office and credit union staff offers memberships and set up savings and checking accounts to
    those who qualify. Financial counseling is required.
   SNAP Homeless Office: SNAP’s homeless case managers work with families to identify and
    remedy the underlying causes of homelessness. Working in cooperation with a network of social
    service organizations, the homeless program moves families from emergency and transitional
    shelters to permanent housing.
   Spokane Mental Health (SMH), the major mental health program funded with mental health
    block grant funds, currently has 8 locations across the City of Spokane. This program provides
    mental health assessment, counseling services, case management as well as a variety of
    therapeutic groups. In a collaborative program of SMH, City of Spokane, YWCA, Spokane
    Schools, SMH intervention specialists provides referral, brief counseling and outreach to families
    who are living in the City of Spokane with youth in grades K-8.
   The N.A.T.I.V.E. Project: (Native American Treatment Intervention & Education):
    Provides services for adolescents. General services include mental health/substance abuse
    counseling, intensive outpatient for youth for 16 weeks. 1803 W. Maxwell, 325-5502. Their 24
    hour/7 day a week crisis line is 880-1889.
   Transitional Living Center/Transitions Program: Case-management services are provided to
    all residents of this transitional living program. An individualized treatment plan is created for
    each family. Residents are expected to be actively involved in their case management and all
    program components. On-site services include 24-hour staffing, intensive case management,
    group therapy, life skills training, parenting classes and AA meetings.
   Union Gospel Mission: For any homeless man willing to abide with Mission rules, case-
    management services are provided to those requesting assistance. Services include counseling,
    support groups and a long-term rehabilitation program.
   VOA Alexandria House: Alexandria House provides transitional living for pregnant and
    parenting teens. The transitional living program provides case management, life skills training,
    and parenting skills and networks with educational and vocational programs.
   VOA Crosswalk Program: This agency is a multi-service center for street kids, homeless and
    high-risk youth aged 13 through 17. Social service organizations and law enforcement refer
    young people to the shelter. Services include case management, shelter, meals, clothing, school,
    medical care, counseling, job assistance, family unification and recreation. Case managers assist
    the youth in accessing needed health care, housing and family unification when possible.



Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                             17
   VOA Flaherty House: Transitional housing and case management for those 18 – 24 years of
    age—489-4043, located at 947 E. Augusta; Phone: 624-2378
   VOA Hope House: 18 years and older emergency shelter for women, permanent supportive
    housing, case management, 111 W. 3rd Ave. Phone: 455-2886, Mon – Fri 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.; Sun –
    Sat 8 p.m. – 8 a.m.; after hours 455-2885.
   VOA Aston-Bleck Apartments: VOA’s transitional apartments provide transitional living for
    pregnant and parenting teens. The program provides case management, life skills training,
    parenting skills, and networks with educational and vocational programs.
   Women’s Hearth/Transitions Program: Weekly case management for women 18 and over.
    Assistance with housing and social services referrals. 920 W. Second, Mon – Fri 10 a.m. – 5
    p.m.; Phone: 455-4249
   Youth, Family, Adult (YFA) Connections (Crisis Residential Center): This program provides
    case management and shelter to youth ages 13 through 17 who run away from home. The
    average length of stay is 3 to 8 days. The goal is to reunite youth with their families. Individual,
    group and family counseling is provided.
   YWCA Domestic Violence Shelter: Case management and support services centered on
    domestic violence issues are available to homeless women staying at the shelter. Staff is
    available 24 hours, 365 days a year. The shelter also provides food, clothing and emotional
    support.
   YWCA Homeless Children’s Educational Resource Program: In collaboration with Spokane
    Mental Health, YWCA and Spokane School District 81, this program provides case management
    to homeless children and their parents to assist them in accessing needed mainstream services and
    education. It provides clothing, backpacks, new shoes and more for some 500 school children
    through an intake assessment program. Connections and follow-up are done for food, clothing,
    and furniture, medical, and insurance referral. 829 W. Broadway, Mon – Fri, 8 a.m. – 4 p.m.;
    Phone: 326-1190

Life Skills:
   American Indian Community Center: Assists American Indian individuals and families in
    transitional housing or homeless situations with life skill classes, such as budgeting and parenting
    classes.
   Anna Ogden Hall: Life-skills classes and an accountability group are available to residents at
    Anna Ogden Hall. Each resident participates in household chores.
   CORD: An independent living center, this program provides life skills to homeless individuals
    with all disabilities, serves all ages. Limited driving training (life skills).
   Community Detox Services/Cub House: This program provides life skills training.
   Goodwill—Offenders and Disadvantaged Youth: Goodwill contracts with the Dept. of
    Corrections for the ―Going Home Initiative,‖ which uses many ways of providing a smooth
    transition from incarceration and return to local communities. Clients are 15 – 35 years of age.
    Awareness campaigns and efforts to avoid recidivism are important. This agency contracts out
    for case management. Phone: 939-9427
   Interfaith Hospitality Network: Provides life skills program to the residents of their shelter.
   Miryam’s House/Transitions: All residents participate in their life skills program.
   St. Margaret’s/Catholic Charities: This program is structured to provide life skills classes as
    well as a mentor program for homeless women residing at St. Margaret’s and in after care.
   Salvation Army: The Salvation Army provides life skills training to residents.
   Spokane Community Colleges Women’s Life Skills Programs: This program provides
    intensive vocational education and job-readiness courses Sept – June for single parents, displaced
    homemakers and other women in transition. Outside of class hours, personal vocational
    counseling is offered Mon – Fri, 8 a.m. – 9 a.m. and 1 p.m. – 3 p.m., 3305 W. Ft. George Wright
    Dr., Phone: 279-6060


Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                               18
   Spokane County Community Services - Supportive Living Program: Works with mentally ill
    adults 18 years and older who are referred by the RSN (mental health). The Supportive Living
    Program is an ancillary service to case management, which teaches independent living skills.
    1725 N. Ash, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m. Mon – Fri with special activities sometimes on Sunday; Phone:
    477-4383
   SNAP Homeless Office: SNAP’s homeless staff provide homeless adults with life skills such as
    home maintenance, budgeting and parenting.
   Transitional Living Center/Transitions Programs: On-site services include case management,
    life skills training and parenting classes.
   VOICES: Advocate for low-income and disadvantaged and make appropriate referrals if help is
    needed with any TANF issues, for energy assistance and for food assistance. Clients are trained
    to handle their own advocacy and provide focus forums for direct contact; i.e., with the
    legislature, County and City of Spokane.
   VOA Alexandria House: The transitional living program provides case management, life skills
    training and parenting skills.
   VOA Crosswalk Program: Case management and life skill classes such as parenting and money
    managing.
   VOA Aston-Bleck Apartments: VOA’s transitional apartments provide case management, life
    skills training and parenting skills.
   Women’s Hearth/Transitions Program - Portfolio Program: Provides classes that include
    money management, renters’ rights and responsibilities, and education on finding a home.
    Participants must be successful in the program for a pre-determined period of time and then
    landlords will be requested to recognize a certificate of participation that shows success and to
    rent to those people who are trying to turn their lives around.
   Women’s Hearth/Transitions Program: Dedicated to self-determined and timely growth of
    women in a safe, welcoming community; a wide range of classes and support groups are
    available; a monthly calendar of events is available at the center or online at
    http://www.help4women.com; housing program.
   YWCA: Job skills training for adults and programs for middle and high school students.

Alcohol and Drug Abuse Treatment:
  ABHS—American Behavioral Health Services: Alcohol and drug treatment inpatient program
   for males and females ages 18 and older up to 24 hours per day. 44 E. Cozza Dr., Mon – Fri, 8
   a.m. – 5 p.m.; Phone: 325-6800
  American Indian Community Center: Adult alcohol and drug outpatient treatment for
   American Indian individuals and families in transitional housing or homeless situations.
  Community Detox Services/Cub House: This program provides case management, life skills
   training, relapse prevention and appropriate support services.
  Daybreak: Inpatient alcohol and drug treatment for adolescents 12 – 17. Adolescents with
   mental health diagnosis are treated 11707 E. Sprague, Phone: 927-1491. Outpatient treatment is
   offered for age 12 – 17 and 18 if still in high school, 628 S. Cowley, Phone: 624-3227; 960 E. 3rd
   Ave., Phone: 444-7033
  Excelsior Youth Center: Inpatient and outpatient alcohol drug treatment with chemical
   dependency treatment and a separate recovery inpatient treatment, ages 12 – 18 with parental,
   state, and court referral, 3754 W. Indian Trail Rd., Phone: 328-7041
  Health Care for Homeless Veterans: This program provides therapeutic transitional housing
   for veterans receiving substance abuse and psychiatric care, and who are participating in a job
   search or vocational rehabilitation.
  House of Charity: Drug and alcohol counseling by referral only, 32 W. Pacific, Phone: 624-
   7821



Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                            19
   N.A.T.I.V.E. Project: Provides services for adolescents including mental health/substance abuse
    counseling, intensive outpatient treatment for 8-15 youth per week for 16 weeks, and an offsite
    Juvenile Rehabilitation Administration (JRA) site for sex offender treatment.
   New Horizons/Isabella House: Clients primarily by referral.
   New Horizons: Housing with residential treatment component and other supportive services for
    homeless men with chronic substance abuse or a combination of substance abuse and mental
    illness.
   Isabella House: Drug, alcohol, and mental health counseling provided for women 18 years and
    older, 24 hours per day to residents participating in the program, 2308 W. 3rd Ave.
   SPARC Addiction Recovery Center: Provides outpatient substance abuse treatment. Program
    located at 520 S Walnut.
   YFA Connections: Using federal poverty guidelines, YFA offers home-based counseling and
    family crisis resolution. YFA offers drug and alcohol, as well as co-occurring mental health
    treatment through an intensive outpatient program, prenatal, post partum and battered women
    treatment is also available at 901 E. 2nd Ave., Mon – Fri, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m., Phone: 532-2000

Mental Health Treatment:
 American Indian Community Center: Mental health counseling for American Indian
  individuals and families in transitional housing or homeless situations.
 Catholic Family Services: Catholic Family Services is a certified mental health treatment
  program funded under mental health block grant funds that provides counseling services for all
  ages and for various reasons: family counseling, group counseling, post-abortion counseling, etc.
  Educational workshops are also provided.
 Community Health Association of Spokane (CHAS): The CHAS clinics are primary practice
  clinics serving homeless individuals of all ages. For many of the chronic homeless, the CHAS
  clinic is the first contact they have with social services. Any homeless individual, using the
  CHAS primary care clinic, who needs mental health care is seen by CHAS’ mental health nurse
  practitioner, psychologist, and when needed, their psychiatrist. Those with medical conditions
  receive their needed prescriptions at this agency. Most homeless individuals go to the CHAS
  downtown clinic for management of chronic illnesses, treatment for minor injuries and infectious
  diseases, and outreach services. No one is denied services because of an inability to pay.
  Downtown: 238 W. Sprague, 7:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m., Mon – Fri., Phone: 835-1205; Northside:
  3919 N. Maple, Phone: 444-7801.
 Children’s Home Society: Children’s Home Society is a certified mental health treatment
  program funded under mental health block grant funds that serves all ages with assessment,
  individual, group and family counseling, parent support groups, anger management for children
  6-12 years of age as well as various parenting classes.
 Daybreak Residential: Through a Washington State Level II Secure Program, chemically
  dependent, mental-health diagnosed adolescents are treated in conjunction with drug and alcohol
  programs for ages 12 – 17 through an inpatient program. 11707 E. Sprague, Phone: 927-1491.
  Two outpatient programs include 18 year olds if still in high school. 628 S. Cowley, Phone: 624-
  3227; 960 E. 3rd Ave., Phone: 444-7033
 Excelsior Youth Center: Excelsior Youth Center is a mental health funded residential treatment
  program that provides services for adolescents.
 Family Service of Spokane: Family Services of Spokane is a certified mental health treatment
  program funded under mental health block grant funds providing various services for all ages;
  i.e., individual counseling to children, adolescents and adults as well as parenting and anger
  management classes. Support groups; i.e., Children of Divorce Support Group, Epilepsy Support
  Group, and Grief Group are also provided,
 Health Care for Homeless Veterans: This program provides psychiatric services to veterans.



Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                          20
   House of Charity/Catholic Charities: A mental health professional is available to homeless
    men and women who need mental health counseling.
   Lutheran Community Services Northwest: Lutheran Community Services Northwest is a
    certified mental health treatment program funded under mental health block grant funds that
    provides trauma-focused treatment to victims of sexual assault and/or domestic violence.
   Miryam’s House: Helps identify needs of women 18 years and older. Provides 24-hour staffing
    for crisis intervention and referral, or ―in-program,‖ one-on-one counseling. 1805 W. 9th Ave.,
    Phone: 455-4249
   N.A.T.I.V.E. Project: The N.A.T.I.V.E. Project provides services for adolescents. General
    services include mental health/substance abuse counseling, intensive outpatient treatment for 8-15
    youth per week for 16 weeks, and an offsite JRA site for sexual offender treatment.
   REM Assoc. dba Hope Partners: Outpatient treatment services for adults with mental illness
    and/or co-occurring disorders (mental illness and chemical dependency/abuse). To qualify for
    treatment, an individual must be a Title XIX enrolled consumer. Referrals are made when
    appropriate. 1117 W. 1st Ave., Mon – Fri, 8 a.m. – 5 p.m., Phone: 835-3599
   Sacred Heart Medical Center: Psychiatric inpatient services, psychiatric triage services, and
    partial hospitalization.
   Spokane Mental Health: Spokane Mental Health, the major mental health program funded with
    mental health block grant funds, currently has 8 locations across the City of Spokane. This
    program provides mental health assessment, counseling services, medical clinic as well as a
    variety of therapeutic groups for children, adults and the elderly. In a collaborative program of
    SMH, City of Spokane, YWCA, Spokane Schools, SMH intervention specialists provides
    referral, brief counseling and outreach to families who are living in the City of Spokane with
    youth in grades K-8.
   St. Margaret’s/Catholic Charities: St. Margaret’s has a support group for women residing at the
    facility who have mental health issues.
   Tamarack Center: The Tamarack Center is a certified mental health treatment program funded
    under mental health block grant funds that provides psychiatric inpatient and outpatient treatment
    for children and adolescents.
   Transitional Living Center/Transitions: Mental health care for pre-school children with
    special needs referred by DSHS ages 2½ - 5 years. 3128 N. Hemlock, Mon – Fri, 9 a.m. – 12:30
    p.m.
   VOA Crosswalk Program: The Crosswalk program collaborates with Spokane Mental Health to
    provide mental health services to independent youth.
   Youth, Family, Adult (YFA) Connections (Crisis Residential Center): This certified mental
    health and substance abuse treatment program provides individual, group and family counseling.
   YWCA Homeless Children’s Educational Resource Program: This is a collaborative
    program with Spokane Mental Health, and Spokane School District 81 that provides a child
    mental health specialist who offers counseling services to children in K-8 grades.

Other Medical or Vision/Dental Services:
  Bethel AME Church – Health & Wellness Program: Seeks to collaborate with existing health
   care providers to disseminate culturally-appropriate information related to preventable and
   treatable health-related issues. Ronald McDonald Care Mobile provides medical services for
   newborns through age 21 on Fridays at the church, 600 S. Richard Allen Court, Phone: 534-3077
  Community Health Association of Spokane (CHAS) – Downtown Clinic: Services include:
   prenatal and obstetrics, well-child checks and immunizations, women’s health care, management
   of chronic illnesses, treatment for minor injuries and infectious diseases, health education, case
   management and outreach services. Dental services include emergent and preventive care,
   primary and restorative care, and outreach. The Children’s Health and Oral Maintenance
   Program (CHOMP) is a mobile unit that provides screening and sealants for children in locations


Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                             21
    throughout the community. CHAS has a pharmacy program providing free or low-cost
    prescription services at three sites, one of which has a pharmacist on site. No one is denied
    services because of inability to pay. CHAS accepts medical coupons or payment based on a
    sliding fee scale.
   EWU: Provides services for ages 6 and up. Free dental evaluation; fees for cleaning, x-rays, and
    limited restorations upon authorization from regular dentist. Costs are about 1/3 to 1/2 less than a
    regular dentist. No emergencies, caps, crowns, extractions, dentures or root canals. Services are
    provided at varying times during the EWU semesters. 310 N. River Point, Phone: 368-6544
   Lions Clubs: Ten local Lions Clubs provide exams and glasses for the indigent who qualify
    through data supplied on a brief application form. Through a nationwide agreement with Lens
    Crafters, services are performed at Lens Crafters in Northtown Mall. Used hearing aids are also
    gathered and reconditioned for local distribution to indigents. Lions Club will pay for the $100
    fee for the ear mold. Walk-in 1212 N. Howard, Phone: 328-6900
   People’s Clinic (YWCA Bldg.): This program provides primary health care to residents of
    Spokane regardless of their ability to pay. Services include: well-child exams, immunizations,
    mental health counseling and referrals, assistance with Washington Basic Health insurance
    applications, female and male health exams, breast cervical health program, pregnancy detection
    and referral, sexually transmitted disease screening and treatment, acute and chronic health care,
    and selective on-site lab testing. Located on the second floor at 829 W. Broadway, services are
    provided Mon - Thurs, 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. and Fri, 9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m., Phone: 323-7600
   Project Access: Primary and specialized medical care and prescription drugs. Individuals
    without insurance or Medicaid are eligible.
   Ronald McDonald Care Mobile: Provides physicals, sports checkups, immunizations, minor
    injuries treatment, vision and hearing care, diabetic screening, health education and dental
    services. The Ronald McDonald Care Mobile can be found at schools and churches throughout
    the year. Some weekend events are covered. Hours: 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Mon – Fri, Phone: 324-
    7340
   Spokane Falls Family Clinic: Quality medical care for all ages. Serves the underserved and
    uninsured. Sliding fee scale. Provide help getting state insurance, 120 W. Mission Ave., M-F, 8
    a.m. - 6:30 p.m., by appointment only. Phone: 326-4343
   Spokane Falls Health and Dental Clinic (ICN): Walk in services for students only
   Union Gospel Mission: Eye and medical clinics open for men, noon - 5 p.m. on Wednesdays. A
    professional optometrist and volunteer retired optometrists provide eye care to the public.
    Evaluations and glasses can be obtained. 1224 E. Trent, Thurs 9 a.m. – noon, Phone: 535-8510

AIDS-Related Treatment
  CORD: Reach Advocates at CORD provide emergency funding for housing, referral to HOPWA
   vouchers at Northeast Washington Housing Solutions (NEWHS) for permanent housing,
   advocacy and referrals to needed services.
  Spokane Aids Network: This agency provides counseling, case management, food, funding of
   prescriptions, advocacy, and referrals for needed services; i.e., housing and medical care. This
   program is funded with federal and state funds.
  Spokane County AIDS Outreach Services and Center: The Spokane County AIDS Outreach
   Services provides free AIDS classes, awareness education and testing to homeless individuals,
   on-the-street community referrals, and spaces for AA, NA, and AIDS support groups to meet.
   Free condoms, needle exchange, and certified mental health programs are funded under mental
   health block grant funds. Emergency client advocacy is also available. They also have a mobile
   van visiting homeless individuals at risk for HIV/AIDS.




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                               22
Education Services:
  American Indian Community Center: Offers GED classes. Educational support for American
   Indian individuals and families in transitional housing or homeless situations.
  Anna Ogden Hall: Program provides a learning center to residents.
  Bethel AME:
       A GED program is offered for teens. 600 S. Richard Allen Ct, Phone: 534-3007.
       The church is an official test site for the GED program Mon – Thurs, 10 a.m. – 4 p.m., Phone:
        533-2683.
  Career Path Services: An on-site program for resume preparation, GED acquisition, job hunter
   modules, market research, how to keep and have success in a job, etc. Targeted for drop-outs and
   ―at-risk‖ students, for those seeking high school re-entry and credits, those seeking help with
   applying for financial aid, home school assessments, ―career intent‖ seminars, and more. Income,
   age and assessment results determine for which programs clients qualify. Walk-ins and referrals
   are accepted. 905 N. Washington, Ste 300, Mon – Thurs, 7:30 a.m. - 5:30 p.m., Phone: 326-7520
  Community Colleges of Spokane (CCS): Work closely with homeless service providers and
   organizations to assist the homeless in accessing and acquiring education and job training. The
   GED program is free for all adults lacking a high school education or English as a Second
   Language (ESL). State and federally funded free education for job skill development is also
   available for all TANF and former TANF recipients. In addition, the Community College has free
   programs available for persons with disabilities through a variety of federal and state-funded
   sources, such as the SEER program, which is an RSN-contracted-supported education program
   for persons with mental illness.
  East Central and Northeast Community Center: 2 computer labs are offered when enough
   people have signed up, Mon, Tues, Thurs, and Fri, 6 p.m. - 8:30 p.m. Tutoring is provided Mon –
   Fri, 9 a.m. – 6 p.m. Children ages 3 - 6 are taught as well. There is a $10 use fee good for one
   year. The Community Center also provides a program entitled, ―Effective Black Parenting.‖ 500
   S. Stone, Phone: 625-6699.
  Fulcrum Inst. – An Ombudsman service, this agency performs court-ordered mediation,
   arbitration and workplace reconciliation; training for sexual harassment and violence in the
   workplace, anger management, customer service, theft awareness, administrative procedures,
   cultural competency, contract negotiations, interpretation of land-use conflicts, landlord/tenant
   reconciliation; and an interchange program assisting divorced families for contact point
   exchanges where the parents do not see each other, and supervised parental visitations. The
   interchange program is offered 7 days per week. They are open to all citizens, but work mostly
   with low-income families and coordinate with Gonzaga Law School and DSHS Child Protective
   Services on referrals at 905 W. Riverside, Ste 304, Phone: 838-2799. Regular hours are 8:30
   a.m. -5 p.m., Mon - Fri. Evening and some Saturday training are offered with varying hours.
  Goodwill: ―Onward and Upward‖ certificated training is for medical billing and coding and
   transcription. Contact: Jennifer Weber. Clients are referred for ―PAYS‖ Program and for work
   assessment, computer training, retail sales, vocational testing, short-term counseling and more.
   The agency can provide some subsidy. The Clover Park Technical College in Pierce County runs
   the ―PAYS‖ Program for youth 17 - 21 years old and offers job-seeking skills, support services
   for documented and verified disabilities, placement and more. They work in conjunction with
   Work Source Spokane. Contact: Sarah Siedel; Phone: 444-4302. Goodwill is located at 130 E.
   3rd Ave., 9am - 4pm, Mon - Fri.; Phone: 444-4379
  Life Skills Institute: Programs are geared for re-entry after dropping out of high school or for
   adults who need to improve their academic skills for better scores in English, math and reading.
   They help individuals prepare for and obtain one’s GED. Tutoring for math and English is at
   IEL, 3305 W. Fort George Wright Dr., Phone: 279-6060




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                            23
   Miryam’s House/Transitions: The agency offers budgeting, life skills training, parenting, and a
    computer room for women 18 years and older. These are in-program classes or by referral 24-
    hours-a-day. 1805 W. 9th Ave, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., Mon – Fri, Phone: 747-9222
   Spokane School District 81: Provides K-12 education for all children including the homeless.
    All 3 or 4-year high school students are eligible to attend the Skills Center. Homeless children
    and youth are bused or bus tokens are provided (depending on age) to their home school.
   Transitional Living Center/Transitions: Offers vocational testing, counseling for GED, SCC
    programs and vocational programs at the Living and Tech Center on-site, teaching computer
    skills, life skills instruction and parenting. 3128 N. Hemlock, Phone: 325-2959
   Union Gospel Mission: A learning center includes a computer lab to assist those only involved
    in the long-term programs at the Mission. 1224 E. Trent, Phone: 535-8510.
   VOA Crosswalk Program: Through a program with Spokane School District 81, this multi-
    service center provides high school education or classes for the GED program to homeless youth.
   Women’s Hearth/Transitions: General tutoring in basic education, budgeting, a domestic
    violence support group, parenting, life skills training, health-related self-testing. 920 W. 2nd
    Ave., Phone: 455-4249
   YWCA Homeless Children’s Educational Resource Program: On behalf of homeless
    children, this comprehensive, collaborative, community effort, which includes Spokane
    School District 81, provides transportation to 26 homeless children to the after school programs at
    various elementary schools. 829 W. Broadway, 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. Mon – Fri, Phone: 326-1190

Employment Assistance:
 American Indian Community Center: Employment and training classes for American Indian
  individuals and families in transitional housing or homeless situations.
 Anna Ogden Hall: Program provides job training to residents.
 Career Path Services: An on-site program for resume preparation, GED acquisition, job hunter
  modules, market research, how to keep and have success in a job, etc. Targeted for drop-outs and
  ―at-risk‖ students, for those seeking high school re-entry and credits, those seeking help with
  applying for financial aid, home school assessments, ―career intent‖ seminars, and more. Income,
  age and assessment results determine which programs clients will have in their package. Walk-
  ins and referrals are accepted. 905 N. Washington, Suite 300, Mon – Thurs, 7:30am - 5:30pm.;
  Phone: 326-7520
 Goodwill Industries: ―Onward and Upward‖ certificated training is for medical billing and
  coding and transcription. Contact: Jennifer Weber. Clients are referred for ―PAYS‖ Program
  and for work assessment, computer training, retail sales, vocational testing, short-term counseling
  and more. The agency can provide some subsidy. The Clover Park Technical College in Pierce
  County runs the ―PAYS‖ Program for youth 17 - 21 years old and offers job-seeking skills,
  support services for documented and verified disabilities, placement and more. They work in
  conjunction with Work Source Spokane. Contact: Sarah Siedel; Phone: 444-4302. Goodwill is
  located at 130 E. 3rd Ave., 9am - 4pm, Mon - Fri.; Phone: 444-4379. Services include: resume
  development, interview preparation, job finding services, work liaison with Work Source
  Spokane, employment, vocational and skill development testing and training, vocational,
  independent living programs, welfare to work programs, and McCarron-Dial Evaluations to
  adults. 130 E. 3rd Ave.; Phone: 444-4379
 Division of Vocational Rehabilitation (DVR): Provides funding for vocational rehabilitation
  for persons with disabilities. These funds are administered through the local DVR field office.
 ESD 101: Center for School-to-Work Programs has many facets.
  1. ―School-to-Work Connections‖ is a Workforce Investment Act (WIA) Title IB funded
      program for youth 16-21 years of age who meet federal income guidelines. The program
      provides individual assessment, job-search education, pre-employment and work maturity
      competency development and work experience and private sector internships for eligible


Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                              24
        students in all Spokane County School Districts. Placement into private sector unsubsidized
        employment is the primary goal of participation. Students far behind in high school are
        encouraged to participate and catch up through Employment Specialist/Counselors assigned
        to high schools for alternative educational programs which serve 300-350 youths each year.
        ESD 101’s main location is 1025 W. Indiana Phone: 456-7660. A second location is 4202 S.
        Regal: 789-3800.
   2.   ―Washington Reading Corps,‖ an AmeriCorps national service program funded in
        conjunction with Washington State’s Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction and the
        Washington Service Corps. In partnership with 17 schools, ESD 101 has assigned
        AmeriCorps members and AmeriCorps VISTA volunteers to provide direct instruction and
        tutoring to struggling readers in grades K-6. VISTA members also recruit and train
        community volunteers to tutor students. WRC AmeriCorps members receive a living
        allowance and a $4,725 education award upon completion of one year of service. Thirty-
        one positions are available for AmeriCorps and VISTA members in the ESD 101 service area
        Phone: 456-7660.
   3.   ―Spokane Service Team.‖ This is an AmeriCorp national service program completing
        housing for low-income residents, and construction projects that serve the disadvantaged in
        the greater Spokane area. Young adults aged 18-25 are eligible to apply, and a monthly
        living allowance is provided along with an education award of $4,725 upon completion of
        one year of service. Approximately 30 young adults are enrolled annually Phone: 456-7660.
   4.    ―Youthbuild Spokane.‖ This is a HUD program for youths aged 18-24 who are high
        school dropouts or educationally ―at risk‖ and economically disadvantaged. They work in
        construction crews to build housing for low-income residents of Spokane County while
        attending high school classes to complete their diploma or GED certificate. Life skills
        training and post-program transition follow-up is provided to all who finish. The goal is to
        move participants into construction technology training resulting in employment,
        apprenticeship training, employment or post-secondary education.
   5.   An Americorps education award in the amount of $2,362.50 is provided to Youthbuild
        Spokane members who complete their term of service. Phone: 456-7660.
   6.   ―The NET- Alternatives for Education and Training.‖ Funding is through a Workforce
        Investment Act (WIA) Title IB program: Governor Set Aside and fee-for-service
        agreements with all 12 school districts in Spokane County. The NET targets ―at risk‖ youth
        and high school dropouts to provide rapid high school re-entry. Students are assigned to The
        NET as an alternative experience. Individual plans are developed for each student in
        conjunction with their home high school. It serves roughly 200 youth per school year.
        Phone: 456-7660.
   7.   ―The NET Summer Session.‖ This program offers student credit retrieval and credit
        maintenance through online courseware in coordination with their home high schools.
        Students must pre-register online for up to 2 courses selected from 46 course offerings with
        the approval of their high school guidance counselor. Students must self-pay fees and
        complete all their coursework during an 8-week period. Class instructors are available 8-
        hours-a-day to assist students through email, phone, and face-to-face conferencing. Students
        must have access to a computer and ISP. ESD 101 has a limited number of computers to
        issue on a short-term basis for students who do not have a home computer or access to one
        through a neighborhood center, library or school. Phone: 456-7660.
   8.   ―Washington Reading Corps,‖ an AmeriCorps national service program funded in
        conjunction with Washington State’s Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction and the
        Washington Service Corps. In partnership with 17 schools, ESD 101 has assigned
        AmeriCorps members and AmeriCorps VISTA volunteers to provide direct instruction and
        tutoring to struggling readers in grades K-6. VISTA members also recruit and train
        community volunteers to tutor students. WRC AmeriCorps members receive a living


Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                           25
         allowance and a $4,725 education award upon completion of one year of service. Thirty-
         one positions are available for AmeriCorps and VISTA members in the ESD 101 service area
         Phone: 456-7660.
   Prevocational Training Center: Provides skill development and training, independent living
    and welfare to work programs.
   Salvation Army: The Salvation Army provides job training to homeless families.
   SL Start -Job Resource Center: The Job Resource Center provides consumer advocacy,
    grievance, and as well as problem solving and mediation assistance to all ages.
   Union Gospel Mission: A work program and other help are available.
   Veteran’s Administration: Uses DSHS for employment assistance and Vocational Rehab at VA
    Hospital - 434-7000. It’s for walk-in male and female military veterans. 705 W. 2nd Ave.
    Phone: 462-2503.
   VOA Crosswalk Program: This multi-service center provides employment assistance for
    independent youth.
   Work Source Spokane: The Federal Workforce Initiative Act (WIA) program provides
    economically disadvantaged adults and youth with training assistance and tuition for schooling,
    on-the-job training and work experience. Career Path Services or Work Source Spokane
    determines appropriate client eligibility for available resources. An employment plan is created
    for the mix of service and soft skills. These agencies serve as point of contact and case
    management and actual training can happen at either of these two agencies, Community Colleges
    of Spokane, or at an employer site. Career Path Services Phone: 326-7520 and Work Source
    Spokane, Mon – Fri, 7:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.; Phone: 532-3120.
   YWCA: Provides computer and job skills training.

Child care:
 Bethel AME Church–Richard Allen Youth Academy: The Richard Allen Youth Academy,
   part of Bethel AME Church, is a state-licensed childcare facility capable of providing for 74
   children from 6 weeks old to 12 years old. Families receiving DSHA subsidies to pay their
   tuition are welcome. 600 S. Richard Allen Court, Mon - Fri from 6:30 a.m. - 8:30 p.m., Phone:
   534-3007.
 Domestic Violence Consortium Drop-In: Free drop-in childcare ages 1-12 for those conducting
   business in the Spokane Courthouse Complex at the Broadway Center Building. Priority is given
   to domestic violence cases; DV persons may make reservations. 721 N. Jefferson, 8 a.m. – 5
   p.m., Mon - Fri--closed during the noon hour.
 ECCAP Preschool Program: Sites are located throughout Spokane and services are free to
   qualifying low-income families.
 Sacred Heart Cuddles and Care/Valley Hospital "Hugs to Health" Drop In: Childcare for
   sick children-by appointment. $3 hour - professional staff-nurse always available and isolation is
   available (i.e. for chicken pox). Cuddles & Care is located at the St. Anne's Family Center at 25
   West Bernard, just two blocks north of the medical center. For more information on the Cuddles
   & Care call (509) 474-4615. 6 a.m. – 6 p.m., Mon – Fri, 12606 E. Mission, Phone: 473-5496.
 St. Ann’s: Sponsored by Catholic Charities, St. Ann’s provides daycare for children age 1 month
   – 6 years. Low-income parents who qualify for state subsidies are accepted; St. Ann’s has a new
   facility in which they can serve up to 188 children.
 Sally's House - Salvation Army: A 24-hr. emergency childcare receiving center--must be
   referred by Child Protective Services. Takes children ages 2-12 and they can stay up to 90 days.
   Maximum capacity is 18. 222 E. Indiana, Phone: 325-6810.
 SNAP: Families not eligible for DSHS assistance can receive pay for 90 days of licensed day
   care.
 Transitional Living Center/Transitions: Specialty mental health childcare is offered for pre-
   school children with special needs who are referred by DSHS, ages 2½ - 5 years—services are


Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                            26
    accessed only through the Transitional Living Center program. 3128 N. Hemlock; 9 a.m. - 12:30
    p.m. Mon –Fri., Phone: 325-2959.
   Vanessa Behan Crisis Nursery: Crisis and respite care for birth to 6 years old with maximum
    capacity of 12--referred by CPS, social workers or self-referral, 24 hrs-a-day. 1004 E. 8th Ave.;
    Phone: 535-3155.

Transportation:
  Most of the homeless providers make a limited number of bus tokens available to homeless
   individuals and families.
  Spokane School District 81: Cabs/bus tokens/passes for children to go to school. Must be
   enrolled in HEART program. Provides daily transportation service for over 800 special education
   students and 6,000 regular students. Access www.spokaneschools.org click on departments and
   services, then transportation, then transportation home page. Phone: 354-7320.

Domestic Violence:
 Anna Ogden Hall: A process group is available to female residents of Anna Ogden Hall who are
  victims of domestic violence.
 Lutheran Community Services Northwest: This program is a certified mental health treatment
  program funded under mental health block grant funds and provides many services including
  trauma-focused treatment to victims of sexual assault and/or domestic violence.
 St. Margaret’s/Catholic Charities: Provides shelter and support to victims of domestic
  violence.
 Salvation Army SAFE Center: Serves those denied by the DV program such as men with
  children for shelter services. There is no male child age restriction. 1403 W. Broadway, Phone:
  325-6814.
 SNAP Emergency and Transitional: Housing assistance is provided for domestic violence
  situations with emergency shelter for single males and females and families with children. There
  is no age restriction for male children. Transitional and permanent supportive housing is
  available as follow-up for those who qualify. Three SNAP office locations—East: 500 S. Stone,
  Phone: 456-7106; Northeast: 4001 N. Cook, Phone: 487-1114; Downtown: 212 S. Wall, Phone:
  456-7169; Mon - Fri from 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
 VOA Hope House: Provides shelter and support to victims of domestic violence.
 Women’s Hearth/Transitions: Support groups are available for women who are victims of
  domestic violence
 YFA Connections: Provides perpetrator treatment to indigent court-referred cases.
 YWCA Alternatives to Domestic Violence: Case management, transportation, advocacy and
  clothing are provided. Support services centered on domestic violence issues are available to
  homeless women.
 YWCA Domestic Violence Shelter: Support services centered on domestic violence issues are
  available to homeless women staying at the shelter. Staff is available 24 hours, 365 days a year.
  Have made arrangements with hotels and motels for victims of domestic violence.
 DSHS: When on Medicaid. Those who qualify under federal income guidelines can fill out an
  application at the Community Service Office (CSO) nearest them. Qualifying clients will see a
  financial worker, a social worker that obtains medical records, and medical coupons may be
  provided. Financial assistance for families with children is provided only for those in the
  Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program or (TANF). Ways to qualify for medical
  coupons include children in the home, or a couple with moderate income experiencing a
  pregnancy. Applicants may still qualify under certain conditions for medical coupons, which
  entitles them to the transportation provided by calling ―Special Mobility‖ Phone: 534-9760.
  DSHS arranges transportation depending on the circumstances. ―Special Mobility‖ can provide
  bus tokens, a bus pass, a taxi, or even reimbursement for a friend driving a client to Seattle if the


Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                              27
    medical need requires seeing a specialist located there. Clients may qualify through Medicare,
    Medicaid or General Assistance or the Temporarily Unemployable or (GAU) program, which is
    when there are no children in the home. Minors 19 and younger working with Crosswalk may
    not qualify for a grant but may qualify for medical coupons, providing them access to the
    transportation program. Spokane Valley, 8517 E. Trent; Phone: 227-2700; North, 1925 E.
    Francis, Phone: 227-2200; Southwest, 1313 N. Maple, Phone: 227-2400.

After Care Program:
   Catholic Charities/House of Charity: A counselor performs follow-up counseling for those
    served from 8 a.m. – 1 p.m. Mon - Fri. Case management follow-up is also provided, as needed.
    Phone: 624-7821.
   SNAP administers an aftercare program that provides the opportunity for homeless families with
    children to successfully move from homeless transitional housing to permanent housing.
   St. Margaret’s/Catholic Charities: Provides a mentoring program for alumni of their homeless-
    living programs.
   Transitional Living Center/Transitions: Provides alumni programs for individuals moving to
    permanent housing and offers food bank and clothing services, special events, childcare when
    moving, after school and summer school programs, and transportation. Mon - Thurs 3 p.m. – 5
    p.m. Summer school hours are 1 p.m.- 5 p. m. with transportation. 3128 N. Hemlock; Phone:
    325-2959.
   Miryam’s House/TLC/Women’s Hearth/Transitions: Aftercare services are provided for as
    long as needed, one-on-one and group sessions with programmed activities are offered on-site at
    920 W. 2nd Ave., Phone: 747-9222.
   Women’s Hearth/Transitions: Women can continue groups and classes as long as needed.
    Informal counseling is also available. 920 W. 2nd Ave., Mon – Fri, 10 a.m. – 5 p.m., Phone:
    455-4249.

Legal Services:
 Gonzaga Law Clinic including Domestic Violence Services: Legal services by law students
   working with attorneys for low-income elderly and vulnerable adults and victims of domestic
   violence with some civil rights work. Walk-ins welcome. 721 N. Cincinnati, Rm 101, Phone:
   323-5791.
 Northwest Justice Project: Provides general civil legal services to low-income people of the
   State of Washington. They receive some of the referrals for this area. Mon – Fri, 9:30 a.m. -
   12:30 p.m. and Tues afternoon from 4:00 p.m. - 6:45 p.m., Phone: 1-888-201-1014
 Volunteer Lawyers: Volunteer lawyers are available through the ―Clear Line‖ locally and
   statewide. Services include bankruptcy clinics, the housing justice project and several family law
   clinics. Phone: 324-2789.
 Clear Line – Evictions: This statewide intake line is for those at 125% of the poverty level and
   below for limited representation on almost any civil issue. Phone: 1-888-201-1014, 9:30 a.m. -
   12:30 p.m. Mon – Fri. Seniors, who need not be at or below the poverty level, can call 1-888-
   387-7111 (for senior issues exclusively).

Other:
 Spokane Human Rights Union (formerly: People 4 People): Advocates for the homeless.
   Phone: 838-1431.
 Rising Times – Gonzaga’s Homeless Newspaper: The newspaper is sold on the street by low-
   income and homeless vendors who are allowed to keep the proceeds. The purpose of the paper is
   to help educate and inform the disadvantaged about issues and problems that concern them. It
   promotes advocacy for the disadvantaged, provides a forum for the Homeless Artisans and
   Writers Coalition, and work for some in creating and delivering the paper. AmeriCorps and


Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                             28
    VISTA are involved and costs are covered by Gonzaga University and advertisers using the
    newspaper. The Spokane Homeless Coalition agency contact information is published along with
    other needed access information targeting the disadvantaged, 8:30 a.m. - 5 p.m., Mon – Fri,
    Gonzaga University, MSC #2472, 502 E. Boone Ave., Phone: 323-5524.
   Spokane Community Voice Mail: SNAP administers this collaborative effort with 29 other
    providers. By providing participants with seven-digit telephone numbers that are connected to
    voice mailboxes, it assists participants in finding employment and housing, provides access to
    social services, medical care and a variety of other services to which a telephone allows access as
    well as safety from domestic violence. This service provides one of the most needed tools for a
    homeless person to feel in control of his or her life. The service is free of charge to participants.
   VOICES: VOICES teaches its clients to become advocates for themselves and their follow-up
    then becomes ―advocates teaching advocates.‖ This organization is for all income strata but
    primarily low-income and disadvantaged. There are off-site advocacy focus groups with the
    legislature, city and county community service councils, as well as others to give clients a direct
    forum for their own advocacy. 1428 W. Broadway, Phone: 326-4135.
   Children’s Home Society: The local society coordinates with the residential home located in
    Seattle and the Foster Care Program in Wenatchee. For children in placement from Spokane,
    CHS works with both the children and the families while care is being given and during the
    follow-up period. Appropriate referrals are made for any kind of children’s need. 2323
    Discovery Place in the Spokane Valley, Phone: 747-4174.

How homeless persons access/receive assistance:
Homeless individuals and families may access services in several ways. They can self-refer by
calling for an appointment or they can walk in. For those individuals residing in a shelter, transitional
living or permanent supportive housing, some services are delivered onsite or at a centralized location
and is arranged by the case manager. The homeless individual/family case managers will also make
personal contact with a service provider where they are referring an individual/family and set an
appointment. In some cases the case manager escorts the clients to the services and directly assists in
accessing the service. In cases where clients need transportation to access the services the referring
agency will provide bus tokens or provide the transportation.




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                                29
E. Housing Inventory within the Continuum of Care System

Emergency Shelter: Fundamental Components in CoC System
                                                                               Target Pop            Year-Round Total    Other Beds
                                              HMIS  Number of
                                                                Geo Code                                        Year-
     Provider Name           Facility Name    Part. Year-Round                                 Fam. Fam. Indiv. Round Seas- Overflow &
                                              Code Beds in HMIS                 A     B
                                                                                               Units Beds Beds Beds   onal    Voucher
Current Inventory                                      Ind.    Fam.
(Available for Occupancy on or before Jan. 31, 2006)
Catholic Charities     House of Charity         A                     531488   SM                                            108
Catholic Charities     St. Margaret’s           A               20             FC               7        20            20
Interfaith Hospitality   Interfaith
                                                A               14             FC               5        14            14
Network
Salvation Army       Family Emergency
                                                A               48             FC               15       48            48
                     Center
Spokane Neighborhood Truth Ministries
Action Programs                                         50                     SM                                 50   50
(SNAP)
Truth Ministries     Shelter for Men            A      120                     SM                             120      120
Union Gospel Mission     Crosswalk for
                                                A       21                     YMF                                21   21
                         Independent Youth
Volunteers of America    Hope House             A       34                     SF                                 34   34
Volunteers of America    Crisis Residential
                         Center-Independent     A       13                     YMF                                13   13
                         Youth
Youth Family, Adult      Domestic Violence
                                                A               16             FC    DV         5        16            16
Connections (YFA)        Shelter
YWCA                                                                   SUBTOT. CURRENT
                                                       238     127                              42      127   238      365   108
                                                                            INVENTORY:




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                        30
                                         SUBTOTALS:
New Inventory in Place in 2006                         Ind.    Fam.
(Available for Occupancy Feb. 1, 2006 – Jan. 31,
2007)
Union Gospel Mission
           SUBTOTALS:
Inventory Under Development                                                 SUBTOTAL NEW
(Available for Occupancy after January 31, 2007)                               INVENTORY:
                                             Anticipated Occupancy
                                                      Date
 SUBTOTAL INVENTORY
UNDER DEVELOPMENT:
Unmet Need
Total Year-Round Beds—Individuals
1. Total Year-                                                        UNMET NEED TOTALS:
Round Individual
Emergency
Shelter (ES) Beds:
2. Number of DV Year-Round Individual ES Beds:                 188 4. Total Year-Round Family Beds:                                   127
3. Subtotal, non-DV Year-Round Individual ES Beds                  5. Year-Round Family ES Beds in HMIS:
(Line 1 minus Line 2):
4. Total Year-Round Individual ES Beds in HMIS:                       6. HMIS Coverage Family ES Beds:
5. HMIS Coverage—Individual ES Beds (Divide Line 4 by Line            Divide line 5 by line 4 and multiply by 100. Round to a whole
3 and multiply by 100. Round to a whole number):                      number.




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                         31
Transitional Housing: Fundamental Components in CoC System – Housing Inventory Chart
                                                                                       Target Pop       Year-Round         Total
                                                                  Number of
                                                    HMIS Part.                Geo Code                                     Year-
        Provider Name            Facility Name                    Year-Round                      Family Family Individ.
                                                      Code                              A      B                           Round
                                                                 Beds in HMIS                      Units Beds     Beds      Beds
Current Inventory                                                Ind.   Fam.
(Available for Occupancy on or before January 31, 2006)
Catholic Charities             Hanson House             A         13                      SM                       13       13
Catholic Charities             St. Margaret’s           A                24               FC          8    24               24
Community Detox of Spokane    Cub House                 A         20                      SMF                      20       20
                              Transitional
Phoenix Apartments                                      A                96               FC         33    96               96
                              Housing
Salvation Army                Scattered Sites           A         4      49               M          18    49       4       53
Spokane Neighborhood Action   Transitional Living
                                                        A                54               FC         16    54               54
Programs (SNAP)               Center
Transitional Programs for     Miryam’s House
                                                        A         10                      SF                       10       10
Women
Transitional Programs for     Anna Ogden Hall
                                                        N                                 M          19    57      30       87
Women
                              Regeneration
Union Gospel Mission                                    A         60                      SM                       60       60
                              Program for Men
                              Health Care for
Union Gospel Mission                                    N         0                       SMF VET                  30       30
                              Homeless Veterans
Veterans Administration       Alexandria’s House        A                12               YFC         6    12               12
Volunteers of America         Flaherty House            A         5                       SM                        5        5
                              Aston Bleck
Volunteers of America                                   A                10               FC          5    10               10
                              Apartments
                              Transitional
Volunteers of America                                   A                 8               FC    DV    2     8                8
                              Housing
                                                                                SUBTOT. CURRENT
YWCA                                                             112     253                         107   310     172      482
                                                                                     INVENTORY:
                                                      SUBTOTALS: Ind.   Fam.
Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                   32
New Inventory in Place in 2006
(Available for Occupancy Feb. 1, 2006 – Jan. 31, 2007)
YWCA
                   SUBTOTALS:
Inventory Under Development
(Available for Occupancy after
January 31, 2007)
                                                                                        SUBTOTAL NEW
                                                                                           INVENTORY:
   SUBTOTAL INVENTORY UNDER DEVELOPMENT: Anticipated Occupancy Date
Unmet Need
Total Year-Round Beds—
Individuals
1. Total Year-Round Individual Transitional Housing Beds:
2. Number of                                                                     UNMET NEED TOTALS:
DV Year-Round
Individual TH
Beds:
3. Subtotal, non-DV Year-Round Individual TH Beds                    4. Total Year-Round Family Beds:
                                                               112                                                                   310
(Line 1 minus Line 2):
4. Total Year-Round Individual TH Beds in HMIS:                      5. Year-Round Family TH Beds in HMIS:
5. HMIS Coverage—Individual TH Beds (Divide Line 4 by Line           6. HMIS Coverage Family TH Beds:
3 and multiply by 100. Round to a whole number):
Transitional Housing: Fundamental Components in CoC                  Divide line 5 by line 4 and multiply by 100. Round to a whole
System – Housing Inventory Chart                                     number.




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                        33
Permanent Supportive Housing*: Fundamental Components in CoC System – Housing Inventory Chart
                                                                          Target
                                                      Number of                               Year-Round             Total
                                               HMIS              Geo    Population
                                                     Year-Round                                                      Year-
    Provider Name          Facility Name       Part.             Code                                  Individual/
                                                        Beds in                       Family Family                  Round
                                               Code                      A      B                          CH
                                                         HMIS                          Units   Beds                   Beds
                                                                                                          Beds
Current Inventory                                    Ind. Fam.
(Available for Occupancy on or before January 31,
2006)
Catholic Charities     House of Charity          A     8               SMF                               8/8CH         8
Catholic Charities     Summit View               A            42        FC              15      42                    42
New Horizons           Sun Ray Court             A     9               SMF                               9/2CH         9
New Horizons           New Horizons-5 Plex       A     5               SMF                               5/1CH         5
                       The Commercial
REM Association                                   S   51               SMF                              51/20CH       51
                       Building
REM Association        The Otis Hotel            A    34               SMF                              34/30CH       34
Salem Arms             Martindale Apts.          A    25               SMF                              25/20CH       25
Salem Arms             West Fall Village         A     4               SMF                               4/1CH         4
Salem Arms             Salem Arms (I)            A     8               SMF                               8/3CH         8
Salem Arms             Newark Apts.              A     6               SMF                               6/2CH         6
                       Chronically Mentally
Spokane Mental Health                            A    26               SMF                              26/20CH       26
                       Ill
Volunteers of America Hope House                 A    31                SF                              31/31CH       31

Volunteers of America                                     207        42   SUBTOT. CURRENT   15   42     207/138CH     249
                                                                               INVENTORY:
Volunteers of America                                     Ind.   Fam.




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                   34
                                                  A       13                      SMF
                       HOSS                                                                                              13/9CH   13
           SUBTOTALS:
New Inventory in Place
in 2006
                       Chronically Mentally
(Available for                                    A       26                       SMF                                  26/15CH   26
                       Ill (II)
Occupancy Feb. 1,
2006 – Jan. 31, 2007)

Volunteers of America                                     39                    SUBTOTAL NEW                            39/24CH   39
                                                                                  INVENTORY:
                                                Anticipated Occupancy
                                 SUBTOTALS:              Date
Inventory Under
Development
(Available for          Good Samaritan             September 2006                  SMF                                  10/10CH   10
Occupancy after
January 31, 2007)
Catholic Charities                                                                                                      10/10CH   10
SNAP
                                                                         UNMET NEED TOTALS:
Volunteers of America                                                4. Total Year-Round Family Beds:
                                                                     5. Year-Round Family PH Beds in HMIS:
      SUBTOTAL INVENTORY UNDER DEVELOPMENT:
Unmet Need                                                           6. HMIS Coverage Family PH Beds:
                                                                     (Divide line 5 by line 4 and multiply by 100. Round to a
                                                                     whole number.)
Total Year-Round Beds—Individuals




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                          35
         Section 4: Homeless Management Information System Statistics
A. Spokane Homeless Database System
As part of a HUD Project that began in 1995, the City of Spokane’s Human Services Department
developed a Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) that consisted of an automated
homeless database and the Spokane Homeless Coalition website. This system was designed to
achieve an unduplicated count of homeless individuals living in the City of Spokane, as well as to
increase understanding of the needs of the homeless population and improve communication among
homeless providers. HUD now requires this system for each continuum receiving HUD funds.

To implement the initial HMIS, the City of Spokane’s Human Services Department collaborated with
Spokane Homeless Coalition members to develop an automated data intake system designed to record
data on the number of clients served and document types of services provided. It also was designed
to produce reports on outcomes achieved by each organization. The result of this collaboration was
the installation of a networked computerized system and the creation of standardized forms (intake,
assessment, discharge, and follow-up) that homeless providers could utilize while working with each
homeless client or household. The City of Spokane Human Services Department uses the data
collected from the completed forms to perform outcome evaluations and provide demographics for
organization programs and community education. This bottom up approach was the driver behind the
successful development and implementation of the initial system for Spokane.

Since its inception in 1995, the number of organizations reporting to the database has increased
steadily, enabling the database to capture an ever-increasing percentage of the overall homeless
population in Spokane. This longevity gives Spokane the ability to identify the chronically homeless
and homeless trends in the local community.

In 2004, improvements included initiating the shift from an existing Access based system into a
Sequel web-based system. The intake, assessment, discharge and follow up forms were updated to
include information as required for collection by HUD, and for increased data collection on
independent youth and children in homeless families. This additional data on independent youth and
children in families enhances the continuums ability to serve this population, especially as these youth
and children progress towards adulthood.

In the winter of 2005, the Spokane Mental Health Homeless Outreach Team PALM Project was
implemented. They now have the ability to upload homeless data from their PALM systems directly
into the HMIS. In the summer of 2005, a swipe card pilot project was implemented at House of
Charity. Both initiatives enhance the efficiency and thoroughness of data collection.

Additional system-wide efforts are being made to collect the most accurate data on the homeless as
possible. Currently, the local HMIS is undergoing a new implementation with the utilization of a
national vendor for the HMIS software, allowing Spokane to increase their data collection and
reporting capabilities.

The City of Spokane’s Human Services Department has received nationwide recognition for its
HMIS. In 1999, the Human Services Department was asked to participate with seven other cities
nationwide in a homeless prevalence report, which was written and published by the University of
Pennsylvania. In 2004, the City of Spokane began its 10-Year Plan to Address Homelessness
utilizing HMIS data to create a model for analyzing housing and service needs of the population. The
plan was later expanded to include the entire region of Spokane County. It is available in its final
form, the Spokane Regional 10-Year Plan to Address Homelessness, on the Spokane Homeless



Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                               36
Coalition Website (www.spokanehomeless.org). The City has contributed homeless data to the State
of Washington’s 10-year plan as well.

In 2005, the City of Spokane received an award from the Department of Housing and Urban
Development for ―Homeless Information System Pioneer‖ in recognition of the implementation,
innovation and contribution to making the HMIS Initiative a success both locally and nationally.
Also in 2005, the City was contacted by Abt Associates to be a contributing site to the first Annual
Homeless Assessment Report (AHAR) mandated by HUD. The City continues to be a part of the
AHAR Report and recently, as one of 13 communities to have all of their homeless data included in
the annual report to Congress, was recognized as one of the AHAR All Stars.

Some of the unique qualities of the City of Spokane homeless database are:
a. Survey forms are not static. A standing committee of both line and management staff with
   extensive ―real world‖ experience review and redesign the survey forms annually.
b. In the beginning, to address automation issues, the project used Microsoft Office Access for
   development of the forms and database. This ensured that the database was highly flexible,
   simple to use, and did not require ongoing consultant support to modify and update it. Currently
   the system is being moved to a Sequel web based system to accommodate the increasing volume
   of records being stored within the system.
c. Confidentiality and trust issues were addressed throughout planning. Consumer information is
   matched by birthday, initials and gender. No names are used in the system.
d. Finally, even homeless persons who are not accessing services are counted. Multi-organization
   outreach teams visit the streets developing relationships, helping individuals connect to services
   and completing an automated contact form specifically designed to identify the needs of those
   who have not accessed services.

B. Database Assessment Forms
A system of forms was produced to enable any organization participating in the program to produce
outcome measures within their programs as well as give the City of Spokane monthly snapshots of
the homeless population. These forms are reviewed by homeless serving organizations on an annual
basis so as to assure quality data is received and documented. The forms used in this system are:
     Contact Log: Used by the Spokane Homeless Coalition Outreach Team, Spokane Mental
         Health Outreach Team as well as other outreach programs, to record homeless persons found
         under bridges, in campgrounds, living on the streets, in cars, etc.
     Intake Survey Form: Used by organizations on the first contact the client has with the
         organization to gather basic demographic information on homeless individuals/families.
         Contact may take place in-person at the organization or over the phone.
     Adult/Parent Assessment Survey: Used by organizations providing case management to a
         homeless individual/family to gather information on housing, income, education, etc.
     Discharge Forms: Used by organizations when an individual/family has completed case
         management or no longer receives shelter services. Information includes housing
         arrangements, changes in employment, education, family status, etc. Data is used for
         outcome-based evaluations.
     Follow-up Forms: Used by organizations to follow the progress of an individual/family after
         discharge from case management and/or shelter. Follow-ups are completed at three, six, nine
         and 12 months after discharge.
     Progress Report Form: Used when clients are going from agency services into treatment
         and then returning to the agency after treatment, or anytime the client may be connected with
         a mainstream resource.




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                             37
C. Programs Participating the Regional Homeless Database System
In 2007, there were 33 programs from 14 organizations participating in the collection of intake and
assessment data. The programs participating in this process were:

     1. Catholic Charities
               a. Hanson House
               b. Summit View
               c. House of Charity/Shelter Program
               d. House of Charity/Transitional Housing
               e. St. Margaret’s/Shelter Program
               f. St. Margaret’s/Transitional Housing
     2. Community Detox
               a. Detox Services
               b. Cub House Transitional Housing
     3. Interagency Outreach Team
     4. Interfaith Hospitality Network
     5. Miryam’s House/Transitions Program
     6. REM/Hope Partners
     7. Salem Arms
     8. Spokane Mental Health
               a. Outreach Team
               b. Family and Child Services
     9. Spokane Neighborhood Action Program (SNAP)
               a. After Care Program
               b. Outreach Team
               c. Shelter Program
               d. Transitional Housing
     10. Spokane School District 81/YWCA Transition Program for Homeless Children
     11. The Salvation Army
               a. Family Emergency Center, S*A*F*E
               b. Transitional Housing Program
     12. Transitional Living for Women
               a. Transitions Program
               b. Women’s Hearth
     13. Volunteers of America
               a. Alexandria House
               b. Crosswalk
               c. Flaherty House
               d. Hope House
               e. Transitional Program for Parenting Teens




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                             38
        14. YWCA
               a. Alternative to Domestic Violence Program
                   1. Outreach
                   2. Shelter
                   3. Transitional Housing
               b. Homeless Education and Resource Team

D. Spokane Homeless Statistics
The City of Spokane’s Homeless Management Information System (HMIS) provides Spokane’s
homeless providers with an up-to-date unduplicated count of the homeless requesting services. Data
from Intake, Assessment and Discharge forms, as well as Contact Logs, for the period of January 1,
2006 to December 31, 2006, has been collected and presented in this Continuum of Care Plan.

Information on the homeless receiving services in the City of Spokane is divided into four Sections
for this report:

         Section E focuses on the number of homeless persons (adults, children living with adults and
          youth under 18 living independently) seeking or receiving services, within the City of
          Spokane, from Homeless providers.
         Section F focuses on homeless households. These homeless households are categorized into
          three types: 1) households with children (two parent households with children, single female
          head of households with children and single male head of households with children), 2)
          households without children (single males, single females and two adults living together), and
          3) Independent Youth (ages 13 – 17).
         Section G pertains to individuals and households discharged throughout 2006.
         Section H deals with the single chronically homeless in Spokane during the year.
          Throughout the report, ―N‖ is used to show the numbers used (group size) for the particular
          data set being reported.

For this report, duplicated data from January 1, 2003 to December 31, 2006 was queried from the
HMIS. These dates were required to determine those individuals who would be classified as
chronically homeless (presented in Section H) according to HUD’s definition; ―An unaccompanied
homeless individual with a disabling condition who has either: a) been continuously homeless for a
year of more OR b) has had at least 4 episodes of homelessness in the past 3 years.” Intakes only
submitted in 2006 were used to determine those individuals who were living in Transitional housing,
Emergency shelters, on the streets or had moved into Permanent housing for this report.




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                               39
E. Information on the Total Homeless Persons (Adults and Children) Who Received
   Services within the City of Spokane

   1. Unduplicated Count Of Homeless Persons Who Received Services within the City of
       Spokane
       Between January 1, 2006 and December 31, 2006, the unduplicated count of homeless
       persons (adults, children living with adults and youth under 18 living independently) who
       received services within the city of Spokane was 6,188.

   2. Breakdown of Total Homeless Persons (Adults, Independent Youth under 18 and
       Children Under 18)
       Of the 6,188 homeless persons who received services within the City of Spokane between
       January 1, 2006 and December 31, 2006, 4,498 (72.2%) were adults, 252 (4.1%) were youth
       under 18 living independently (unattached to families) and 1,438 (23.2%) were children
       under 18 living within adult households.

              Total Homeless Population            # Of Homeless Persons       % Of Homeless Persons
                      N = 6188
    Total Adults                                            4498                       72.7%
    Total Independent Youth Under 18                        252                        4.1%
    Total Children Under 18                                 1438                       23.2%

   3. Breakdown of Homeless Persons (Adults and Children) Living In Households With
       Children
       Two thousand three hundred and ten homeless persons (2310), living in households with
       children, received services within the City of Spokane between January 1 and December 31,
       2006. Of the 2,310 persons, 1,438 (62.3%) were children under 18, 854 (37.0%) were adults,
       and 18 (.78%) were youth under 18 living independently with their children.

     Persons Living In Households With Children # Of Persons In Households     % Of Persons In
                       N= 2310                        With Children        Households With Children
    Total Adults                                            854                     37.0%
    Total Independent Youth Under 18                         18                      .78%
    Total Children Under 18                                1438                     62.3%

   4. Homeless Persons Living in Households without Children
       Three thousand seven hundred and seventy-eight persons (3778), living in households
       without children received services in the City of Spokane between January 1 and December
       31, 2006. Of the 3,878 persons, 3,644 (94%) were adults 18 and over, 234 (6.0%) were youth
       under 18 living independently (unattached to families).

               Persons In Households             # Of Persons In Households        % Of Persons
                  Without Children                    Without Children         In Households Without
                      N=3878                                                         Children
    Total Adults                                            3644                       94.0
    Total Independent Youth Under 18                         234                        6.0
    Total Children Under 18




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                             40
                                 Total Homeless Population:
                  Adults, Independent Youth Under 18 and Children Under 18
                                January 1 - December 31, 2006


   100%                                                            94.0%
                                                 78.0%
     80%        72.7%
                                                                                       Total Adults
                                                       62.3%

     60%
                                          37.0%                                        Independent Youth
                                                                                       Under 18
     40%
                               23.2%

     20%                4.1%                                              6.0%         Children Under 18
                                                                                0.0%
      0%
           Total Homeless Population   Persons in Households   Persons in Households
                                           with Children         without Children



   5. Homeless Persons By Household Types
       Homeless persons living in households with children who received services within the City of
       Spokane for the year 2006 totaled 37.3% (2,310) of the total homeless population. Total
       persons living in households without children totaled 62.7% (3.878) of the total homeless
       population.

                         Total Homeless Population                           # Of Homeless % Of Homeless
                                 N = 6188                                       Persons       Persons
    Persons Living Within Households with Children                                2310         37.3%
    Persons Living Within Households w/out Children                               3878         62.7%




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                            41
                                 Persons Living In Households
                                  With and Without Children
                                 January 1 - December 31, 2006

              Persons Living
                 Within
             Households w/out
                Children                                                  Persons Living
                  62.7%                                                       Within
                                                                          Households with
                                                                             Children
                                                                              37.3%




   6. Breakdown of Adults by Gender
      Of the homeless persons receiving services within the City of Spokane, females totaled 2,292.
      Of these females, 113 were independent youth females without children, while 8 were
      independent youth females with Children. Of the remaining homeless females, 1,503 were
      adult female without children, and 668 were with children. The male population totaled 2,438
      with 121 being independent youth males without children. Of the remaining homeless males,
      2,120 were adult males without children and 187 were with children. Nineteen (.42%) single
      households had unidentified genders.


                                             Total # of     % of Total      # of Total      % of Total
              Adults by Gender             Indep. Youth    Indep. Youth       Adults         Adults
                                              N=252                          N=4498
   Females in HH's with Children                 8             3.2%            668            14.8%
   Females in HH's without Children             113           44.8%           1503            33.4%
   Males in HH's with Children                  10             4.0%            187            4.2%
   Males in HH's without Children              121             48%             2120           47.1%
   Unknown Gender without Children                                              19            .42%




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                            42
                                               Adults By Gender
                                          January 1 - December 31 2006

                                                              47%         Females in HH's
                                                                          with Children
             50%
                                          33.40%                          Females in HH's
             40%                                                          without Children

             30%                                                          Males in HH's with
                              14.80%                                      Children
             20%
                                                     4.20%                Males in HH's
             10%                                                          without Children

              0%
                                      % of Total Adults




                                          Independent Youth by Gender
                                          January 1 - December 31, 2006
                                                             48.0%
                                          44.8%                            Females in HH's
              50%                                                          with Children

              40%                                                          Females in HH's
                                                                           without Children
              30%
                                                                           Males in HH's with
              20%                                                          Children
                               3.2%                  4.0%
              10%                                                          Males in HH's
                                                                           without Children
               0%
                                  % of Total Indep youth




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007           43
   7. Total Homeless Individuals (Adults and Children) By Ethnicity
       Total minority population of homeless persons who received services within the City of
       Spokane during 2006 was 21.8% (2,571) of the total homeless population. Native Americans
       are the highest percentage within the minority group with 6.3% of the total homeless
       population.

          Ethnicity         Total Number of      # Of Homeless     # Of Persons In    % Of Persons
                            Homeless Persons      Indep. Youth    Household’s With   In Household’s
                                N=6188            Household’s         Children       w/out Children
                                                     N=252            N =2292            N =3644
    White                    3617      58%       158      62.7%    1277     55.7%    2182     59.9%
    African American            300      4.8%     16      6.3%       99       4.3%   185         5.1%
    Native American             389      6.3%     24      9.5%      104       4.5%   261         7.2%
    Asian/Pacific Isl.           48      .77%      1       .4%       20       .87%    27         .07%
    Hispanic                    238      3.8%     12      4.7%      121       5.3%   105         2.9%
    Biracial                    376      6.1%     21      8.3%      214       9.3%   141        3.86%
    Unknown                    1220     19.7%     20      7.9%      457      19.9%   743        20.4%
         (HH’s is abbreviation for Household)




                                Ethnicity/Race of Homeless Population
                                   January 1 - December 31, 2006
                                                                                           White
         90%

         80%
                                                                                           African American
         70%

         60%
                                                                                           Native American
         50%

         40%
                                                                                           Asian/Pacific
         30%                                                                               Islander
         20%
                                                                                           Hispanic
         10%

          0%
                                                                                           Biracial
               Total Homeless    Independent      Persons in       Persons in
                 Population         Youth       Households with    Households
                                                   Children     without Children




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                         44
   8. Disabilities Of Homeless Adults
       The adults and independent youth who reported a disability totaled 2,216 (35.8%) persons.
       Of those 1,848 (83.4%) were adults without children, 333 (15%) were adults with children
       and 35 (1.5%) were independent youth. Individuals that reported more than one disability
       numbered 630 (28.4%). Of these 630, 551 (87.5%) were adults without children, 68 (10.7%)
       adults with children and 11 (1.7%) independent youth. Of the groups of disabilities that were
       reported there was not any grouping types that stood out more than others.

    Disabilities Of Homeless Adults Adult Homeless # Of Homeless          Adults in        Adults in
                                        Population     Indep. Youth HH Households with    Households
                                         N = 4750            N=252        Children     without Children
                                                                           N = 854           N =3644
    Alcohol/Drug Abuse                 711     14.9%       3     1.2%    87     10.2%    621     17.0%
    Mental Illness                     563     11.8%      12     4.7%   100     11.7%    451     12.3%
    Dually Diagnosed                   602     12.6%       3     1.2%    47     5.5%     552     15.1%
    Physical Disability                667     14.0%      11     4.3%    80     9.4%     576     15.8%
    Learning Disability                 43     .91%        4     1.6%    17     1.9%      22     .60%
    Developmental Disability            38      .8%        2     .39%    3      .35%      33     .90%
    Chronic Health Problem             294     6.2%        3     1.2%    62     7.2%     229     6.3%
    No Disability                      619     13.0%      33     13.1%  172     20.1%    414     11.4%
    Unknown/Not Reported              1840     38.7%     183     72.6%   20     2.3%    1637     44.9%
       (Individuals may have reported more than one Disability)




                             Disabilities Within Homeless Population
                                 January 1 - December 31, 2006
                                                                               Alcohol/Drug
     80%
                                                                               Mental Illness
     70%
                                                                               Dual Diagnosis (Alcohol-
     60%                                                                       Drug & Mental Illness)
                                                                               Physical Disability
     50%
                                                                               Learning Disability
     40%
                                                                               Developmental Disability
     30%
                                                                               Chronic Health Problems
     20%
                                                                               No Disability
     10%
                                                                               Unknown/Not Reported
      0%
           Total Homeless   Independent      Adults in       Adults in
             Population        Youth      Households with Households
                                             Children    without Children




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                              45
F. Information on Total Homeless Households That Received Services within the City
   of Spokane

   1. Unduplicated Count Of Homeless Households That Received Services within the City of
      Spokane
      The total number of homeless households that received services within the City of Spokane
      between January 1, 2006 and December 31, 2006 was 4,547. Households with children
      totaled 710 (15.6%) of the total homeless households. Households with children are defined
      as two-parent households with children, single female head of households with children and
      single male head of households with children. Households without children total 3,586
      (78.8%) of the total homeless households. These households are defined as two people living
      together without children (married or unmarried), single male without children and single
      females without children. Independent Youth Households are defined as youth ages 13-17
      and unaccompanied by an adult. Independent Youth Households totaled 251 (5.5%).

   2. Breakdown of Households with Children
      Of the 710 households with children during 2006, 146 (20.5%) were two-parent households.
      The majority of households were single female head of households, which numbered 504
      (70.9%) households, 60 (8.4%) households were single male head of households with
      children.


                                      Breakdown of 710
                                   Households with Children
                                 January 1 - December 31, 2006




                                                                      Two Parent
                                                                      Households
                Single Male                                             20.6%
                 HH's with
                 Children
                   8.5%

                    Single Female
                      HH's with
                       Children
                        71.0%




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                         46
   3. Breakdown of Households without Children
      Of the 3,586 households without children during 2006, 58 (1.6%) were households where two
      people were living together without children (married or unmarried). Single men without
      children numbered 2,051 (57.2%) households and single women without children numbered
      1,436 (40%). Forty-one (1.14%) single Households had unidentified genders.


                                          Breakdown of 3586
                                      Households without Children
                                     January 1 - December 31, 2006




                                                           2 Adults Living
                                        unknown               Together
                                         2.28%                  1.9%


                                                                         Single Females
                                                                             41.6%

                  Single Males
                     54.2%




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                        47
   4. Breakdown of Independent Youth Households
      Of the 251Independent Youth households during 2006, 18 (7.2%) were female head of
      households with a child. Male Independent Youth without children numbered 121 (48.2%)
      and female Independent Youth without children numbered 108
      (43.0%).

                                             Breakdown of 251
                                            Independent Youth
                                       January 1 - December 31, 2006


                                                                        Female
                                                                   Independent Youth
                                                                       with Child
                   M ale Independent                                     7.3%
                    Youth without                                                    Female
                          Child                                                Independent Youth
                         49.0%                                                    without Child
                                                                                     43.7%




   5. Average Income of All Homeless Households
      The average income of the 4,547 total homeless households was $275.82/month or $3,309.84
      annually. The average income of the households with children was $774.40/month or
      $9,292.80 annually. The average income of the households without children was
      $192.32/month or $2,307.84 annually.

                                   Total Homeless                      Households       Households
                                    Households      Indep. Youth      With Children    W/out Children
                                      N = 4547         N=251             N =710          N = 3586
    Ave. Monthly Income               $275.82          $58.43            $774.40          $192.32

   6. Household Size
      The average household size for all homeless households is 1.3 individuals per household. Of
      those there is an average of 3.2 individuals per households with children, 1.01 individuals of
      households without children, and 1.07 individuals in Independent Youth households.

                                   Total Homeless                      Households       Households
                                    Households      Indep. Youth      With Children    W/out Children
                                      N = 4547         N=251             N = 710         N = 3586
    Ave. Household Size                  1.3            1.07               3.2              1.01




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                            48
   7. Households Moved into Permanent Supportive Housing
      The numbers indicated in the chart below reflect the number of households in programs
      participating in the City of Spokane’s HMIS in 2006 that moved into Permanent Supportive
      Housing. This number does not reflect the complete number of households that moved
      into all types of Permanent Housing. For those consumers (households) discharged from
      programs that moved into some type of Permanent Housing, please refer to Section G.

    # of Households who moved
    into HMIS Covered                    Total Homeless                       Households       Households
    permanent Housing                     Households       Indep Youth       With Children    W/out Children
               2003                             56              0                 13                43
               2004                            127              0                 39                88
               2006                             89              0                 31                58
               2006                             55              0                  7                48

   8. Income Sources of Homeless Households
      Of 4,547 homeless households, 28.6% (1,301) homeless households reported no annual
      income. In 2005, the number reporting no income was 64.2% of the population. The
      breakdown of income sources by households was as follows:

    Income Sources                        Total Homeless    Independent        Households      Households
                                            Households          Youth         With Children   W/out Children
                                             N = 4547           N=251            N = 710        N = 3586
    No income                              1301    28.6%     98     37.8%     121     17.0%   1085    30.2%

              TANF/AFDC                     371    8.2%     11     1.5%       311    43.8%      49         1.4%

    GAU/GAX/ADASTA                          282     6.2%     1      0.4%      13      1.8%     268          7.5%
    SSA, SSD, SSI                           591    12.9%     7      2.8%      107    15.0%     477         13.3%
    Full Time Work                          146     3.2%     3     0.42%      75     10.5%      68          1.9%
    Part Time Work                          127     2.8%     2      0.8%      79     11.1%      46          1.3%
    Unemployment                            32      0.7%     0       0%       17      2.4%      15         0.42%
    Veterans Benefits                       32      0.7%     0       0%        4     0.56%      28         0.78%
    Child Support/Alimony                   65      1.4%     4      1.6%      61      8.6%       0           0%
    Temp Work                                3     0.07%     0       0%        1     0.14%       2         0.05%
    Other (includes; Panhandling,
    Student Loans, Private Retirement,     1808    39.8%    128    51.0%       58     8.2%     1622        45.2%
    State Industrial, Not reported,
    Unknown
           (Households may have indicated more than one source of income.)




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                                    49
                                      Income Sources for Homeless Households
                                          January 1 - December 31, 2006                        No income

                                                                                               TANF/AFDC
    85%
    80%                                                                                        GAU/GAX/ADASTA
    75%
    70%                                                                                        SSA, SSD, SSI
    65%
    60%                                                                                        Full Time Work
    55%
    50%
                                                                                               Part Time Work
    45%
    40%
                                                                                               Unemployment
    35%
    30%
    25%                                                                                        Veterans Benefits
    20%
    15%                                                                                        Child Support
    10%
     5%                                                                                        Temp Work
     0%
            Total Homeless   Independent Youth   Households with    Households without         Other
              Population                            Children            Children



   9. Total Homeless Veterans Living in Households
      Of the households included in this report, 390 adults reported as being a veteran. Of those,
      365 were males, and 25 were females. The greatest percentage of veterans was reported as
      living in households without children.

                                          Total Homeless                  Households             Households
                                        Households (Adults)              With Children         Without Children
                                             N =4296                        N = 710                N = 3586
    HH's with Veterans                   390         9.1%                25        3.5%        365        10.2%

    Male Veterans                          357          8.3%             13        1.8%         344            9.6%
    Female Veterans                         33          .77%             12        1.7%          21            .59%

   10. Homeless Households That Have Experienced Domestic Violence
       Domestic violence shelters do not contribute data to the HMIS. Of those non-DV specific
       programs, 316 households documented as having experienced domestic violence. Of those,
       205 (28.9%) were households with children. Within the 205 households with children, there
       were 198 adult females, and 401 children.

                                       Total Homeless          Independent       Households         Households
                                        Households                Youth         With Children      W/out Children
                                          N=4547                 N =251            N =710            N = 3586
    Domestic Violence is a Reason
    for Homelessness
                                         316         6.9%      27    10.7%        205      28.9%       84        2.3%
      Total # Persons in Households
    Females                                    288                  15                   198                75
    Males                                       28                  12                    7                 9



Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                                          50
    Children                                       403                      2              401           0


   11. Total Homeless Households’ Reasons for Homelessness
       The total homeless households identified the following as the top reasons for homelessness
       (households may have indicated more than one reason). The households reporting more than
       one reason for homelessness was 85.4% of the total homeless households.

   Chart 1. Adult

    Reasons for Homelessness                     Total Homeless                   Households       Households
                                               Households (Adults)              With Children    W/out Children
                                                    N =4296                         N =710          N =3586
    Mental Health Problems                       172        4.0%                51        7.2%   121       3.4%
    Alcohol/ Drug Abuse                          232        5.4%                95        1.3%   137       3.8%
    Domestic Violence                            111        2.6%                27        3.8%   84        2.3%
    Evicted from home                            228        5.3%                157      22.1%   71        2.0%
    Lack of Income                               478       11.1%                263      37.0%   215       6.0%
    Family Conflict                              271        6.3%                154      21.7%   117       3.2%
    Lost Job                                     186        4.3%                95       13.4%   91        2.5%
    Lack of Affordable Housing                   355        8.3%                226      31.8%   129       3.6%
    Moved                                        153        3.6%                86       12.1%   67        1.9%
    Physical Disability                          71         1.7%                27        3.8%   44        1.2%
    Jail/Prison                                  77         1.8%                26        3.7%   51        1.4%

    % reporting multiple reasons                  3669          85.4%           413     58.1%    3256     90.8%
       (Households may have indicated more than one reason for homelessness.)

   Chart 2. Independent Youth

    Reasons for Homelessness                              Independent Youth
                                                                N=251
    Mental Health Problems                                 3           1.2%
    Alcohol/ Drug Abuse                                    4           1.6%
    Domestic Violence                                      27          10.8%
    Abandoned                                              17          6.7%
    Asked to Leave                                         0            0%
    Family Conflict                                       102          40.6%
    Arrested                                               11          4.4%
    Run Away                                               11          4.4%
    Parental Substance Abuse                               17          6.8%
    Peer Relationships                                     24          9.6%

    % reporting multiple reasons                153            61.0%
       (Households may have indicated more than one reason for homelessness.)




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                                      51
                              Adult Households Reasons for Homelessness
                                    January 1 - December 31, 2006
                                                                           Mental Health Problems
                                                                           Alcohol/ Drug Abuse
     40.0%
                                                                           Domestic Violence
     35.0%
                                                                           Evicted from home
     30.0%
                                                                           Lack of Income
     25.0%
                                                                           Family Conflict
     20.0%
                                                                           Lost Job
     15.0%                                                                 Lack of Affordable Housing
     10.0%                                                                 Moved
      5.0%                                                                 Physical Disability
      0.0%                                                                 Jail/Prison
             Total Homeless        Households with   Households without
                                      Children           Children




                              Independent Youth Reasons For Homelessness
                                                                            Mental Health Problems
                                     January 1 - December 31, 2006
                                                                            Alcohol/ Drug Abuse

     45%
                                                                            Domestic Violence
     40%                                                                    Abandoned
     35%
                                                                            Asked to Leave
     30%
     25%                                                                    Family Conflict
     20%
                                                                            Arrested
     15%
     10%                                                                    Run Away
      5%                                                                    Parental Substance Abuse
      0%
                               Independent Youth                            Peer Relationships

   12. Location of Last Permanent Residence
       During the time period of January 1 – December 31, 2006, of the last permanent residences
       reported by households, 52.7% were in the City of Spokane, 6.9% were in Spokane County
       and 10.7% were some location outside of the City and County boundaries.

    Location of Last               Total Homeless    Independent Youth       Households              Households
    Permanent Residence          Households (Adults)       N =251          With Children          Without Children
                                      N = 4547                                 N =710                  N =3586
    City of Spokane                2396     52.7%      187      74.5%      454      63.9%          1755     48.9%
    Spokane County                 316       6.9%       24       9.6%       80      11.3%           212      5.9%
    Other County in WA             232       5.1%       14       5.6%       65       9.1%           153      4.2%
    Other State                    256       5.6%        4       1.6%       66       9.3%           186      5.2%
    Other Country                   3        .06%        0        0%        1        .14%            2       .06%
    Unknown                        1344     29.5%       22       8.8%       44       6.2%          1278     35.6%




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                                   52
                                 Location of Last Permanent Residence
                                    January 1 - December 31, 2006
  80%

  70%

  60%                                                                                   Total Homeless
                                                                                        Households (Adults)
  50%
                                                                                        Independent Youth
  40%

  30%                                                                                   Households With
                                                                                        Children
  20%
                                                                                        Households Without
  10%                                                                                   Children

   0%
           City of    Spokane    Other County   Other State   Other Country   Unknown
          Spokane     County        in WA




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                       53
G. Discharge Information Pertaining To Homeless Households That Were Discharged
   From Services in 2006.
   Upon discharge from a homeless service provider, Discharge forms are completed and entered
   into the City of Spokane’s Homeless Management Information System (HMIS).

   1. Destination of those Homeless Households Discharged During 2006
      Seven hundred and seventy-eight (778) homeless individuals were discharged from services
      during the year 2006. Of those 778, 371 (47.7%) had moved into some type of Permanent
      Housing. The Chart 2 indicates the destination of these households upon discharge.

   Chart 1
    # Households Discharged                    # of Households moved into some type of
                                       778                                                371 (47.7%)
                                               Permanent Housing at Discharge

   Chart 2
   # of Households Discharged = 778           # of Households Discharged % of Households Discharged
   Unknown                                               293                       37.7%
   Unsubsidized Rental Housing                           163                       20.9%
   Other Subsidized Housing                               49                       6.3%
   Moved in w/Family-Friend (Temp)                        53                       6.8%
   Moved in w/Family-Friend (Perm)                        64                       8.2%
   Transitional Housing                                   48                       6.2%
   Section 8                                              65                       8.3%
   Emergency Shelter                                      6                        .77%
   Other Supportive Housing                               10                       1.3%
   Inpat Al/Dr Tx Facility                                4                        .51%
   Streets, Car, Camping                                  6                        .77%
   Homeownership                                          1                        .13%
   Psychiatric Housing                                    4                        .51%
   Jail/Prison                                            6                        .77%
   Public Housing                                         6                        .77%




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                        54
                      Destination of Homeless Households Discharged in the Year 2006


                  Public Housing          0.77%

                       Jail/Prison        0.77%

              Psychiatric Housing         0.51%

                 Homeownership        0.13%

            Streets, Car, Camping         0.77%

           Inpat Al/Dr Tx Facility        0.51%

        Other Supportive Housing           1.30%

               Emergency Shelter          0.77%

                         Section 8                        8.30%

             Transitional Housing                      6.20%

 Moved in w/Family-Friend (Perm)                          8.20%

 Moved in w/Family-Friend (Temp)                       6.80%

        Other Subsidized Housing                       6.30%

     Unsubsidized Rental Housing                                                20.9%

                        Unknown                                                                             37.7%

                                     0%           5%      10%     15%     20%       25%    30%      35%      40%


   2. Households that Received Services after Identifying a Need
      Upon discharge, agency case managers report whether the homeless adult(s) identified a need
      for a particular type of service. The following tables show the results on those adults who
      identified a need for one of the four treatments (medical, dental, mental health and substance
      abuse) sometime during their connection with the agency.

    Identified a Need for Medical Services (n=253)                 # of HH's Identified   % of HH's Identified
      Participated in treatment                                           200                   79.0%
      Is on Waiting List                                                    0                    0%
      Did not participate in treatment                                     17                   6.7%
      Unknown                                                              36                   14.2%



    Identified a Need for Dental Treatment (n=209)                 # of HH's Identified   % of HH's Identified
      Participated in treatment                                           134                   64.1%
      Is on Waiting List                                                    2                    .95%
      Did not participate in treatment                                     46                    22.0%



Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                                   55
     Unknown                                                     27                    12.9%



   Identified a Need for Mental Health Tx (n=193)       # of HH's Identified    % of HH's Identified
     Participated in treatment                                 141                    73.0%
     Is on Waiting List                                          4                    2.1%
     Did not participate in treatment                           35                    18.1%
     Unknown                                                    13                    6.7%



   Identified Need for Substance Abuse Tx (n=122)       # of HH's Identified    % of HH's Identified
     Participated in treatment                                  80                    65.6%
     Is on Waiting List                                          2                    1.6%
     Did not participate in treatment                           28                    22.9%
     Unknown                                                    12                    9.8%


   Identified a Need for Job Training/Search (n=156)     # of HH's Identified   % of HH's Identified
     Participated Job Training or Job Search                    108                   69.2%


   3. Income Source Upon Entry and At Exit from a Program
      Of those households discharged from service during 2006, only 710 households discharged
      had a known Intake in the HMIS. The following incomes were reported for those 710
      households at intake and at discharge. There was an 8% reduction in those individuals
      reporting no income, a 2.5 % increase in those employed, and a 3.2% increase in those
      receiving some type of Social Security.

                          # of Households at % of Households At # of Households at % of Households At
                                Entry               Entry              Exit               Exit
   No Income                     164               23.1%               107               15.1%
   TANF/AFDC                     202               28.4%               159               22.4%
   SSI, SSD, SSA                  94               13.2%               117               16.5%
   GAU/GAX                        26                3.7%                39               5.5%
   Part-Time Work                 62                8.7%                45               6.3%
   Full-Time Work                 39                5.5%                74               10.4%
   Child Support                  34                4.8%                21               2.9%
   Unemployment                   11                1.5%                6                .84%
   ADASTA                         8                 1.1%                10               1.5%
   Veterans Benefits              1                 .14%                2                .28%
   Unknown                       125               17.6%               196               27.6%




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                         56
                                              Income Sources at Entry compared to Exit
                                                   January 1 - December 31, 2006

  30.0%




  25.0%




  20.0%




                                                                                                                                     Entry
  15.0%                                                                                                                              Exit




  10.0%




   5.0%




   0.0%
                                         AX




                                                                                rt



                                                                                           t




                                                                                                                           er
                       C




                                                                                                                   s
             e




                                                                                                   TA
                                SA




                                                                     k
                                                          k




                                                                                          en




                                                                                                                fit
                                                                  or
                                                       or
          m




                                                                                 o
                      D




                                                                                                                       th
                                                                              pp




                                                                                                              ne
                                                                                                 AS
                                       /G




                                                                                         m
                               ,S
        co




                                                                  W
                                                   W
                   AF




                                                                                                                       O
                                                                                      oy
                                                                          Su
                                     AU




                                                                                                           Be
      In




                              D




                                                                                               AD
                                                              e
                                                   e
                  F/




                                                              m
                                              im




                                                                                      pl
                           SS
     o



                 N




                                     G




                                                                         ld




                                                                                                        s
                                                                                     m
                                                             Ti
    N




                                               T
              TA




                                                                                                       n
                                                                       hi


                                                                                 ne
                                                          ll-
                                            rt-
                         I,




                                                                                                    ra
                                                                      C
                       SS




                                                        Fu
                                         Pa




                                                                                                   te
                                                                                U




                                                                                                 Ve




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                                                              57
H. Information on Chronic Homeless Seeking or Receiving Services within the City of
   Spokane
   HUD’s definition of Chronic Homelessness is, “An unaccompanied homeless individual with a
   disabling condition who has either: Been continuously homeless for a year or more or has had at
   least 4 episodes of homelessness in the past 3 years.‖ Using this definition, there were 214
   chronic homeless individuals seeking or receiving help from a HMIS-participating homeless
   provider in the City of Spokane. The following tables and graphs reflect the demographics and
   outcome data of the City of Spokane’s chronic homeless.

   1. Gender
     Gender (n=214)                                    # of Chronic Homeless         % of Chronic Homeless
   Males                                                        145                          67.8
   Females                                                       69                          32.2

   2. Breakdown of Disabilities within Chronic Homeless Individuals
   Disabilities of Chronic Homeless (n=214)            # of Chronic Homeless         % of Chronic Homeless
   Mental Ill./Drug/Alcohol Abuse                               152                         71.0%
   Mental Illness                                                11                          5.1%
   Alcohol/Drug Abuse                                            11                          5.1%
   Physically Disabled                                          114                         53.3%

                                   Disabilities of Chronic Homeless Individuals
                                         January 1 - December 31, 2006


                                                                               53.3%
            Physically Disabled

                                        5.1%
           Alcohol/Drug Abuse

                                        5.1%
                 Mental Illness

                                                                                             71.0%
    Mental Illness/Alcohol/Drug


                              0%       10%     20%    30%    40%     50%       60%     70%       80%



   3. Highest Level of Services Received within Chronic Homeless Population
   Highest Level of Services Received (n=214)                # Chronic                       % Chronic
   Outreach Only                                                 90                           42.1%
   Shelter/Case Management                                      119                           55.6%
   Transitional Housing/Case Management                          0                              0%
   Permanent Housing with Support                                6                             2.8%




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                                     58
                Section 5: The Continuum of Care Planning Process
A. The Lead and Convening Agency
The lead entity for the Continuum of Care planning process is the City of Spokane Human Services
Department. The City collaborates with and supports the activities of the Spokane Homeless
Coalition; facilitates the yearly work sessions for the Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless;
maintains Spokane’s Homeless Information Management System (HMIS) and the Spokane Homeless
Website; and evaluates City-funded homeless programs.

B. Continuum of Care Planning Process
The community planning process occurs year-round through the work of the Spokane Homeless
Coalition and includes representatives of service-providing organizations, housing providers, business
and industry, community leaders and other interested citizens. Actions included in the Continuum of
Care further the goals and objectives of the Spokane Regional 10-Year Plan to Address
Homelessness, which was developed in 2005-2006. Updating the City of Spokane’s Continuum of
Care Plan involves the following:

       Collection and compilation of data, including HMIS statistics and field observations from
        professionals.
       Review of aggregate data and completed point in time gaps analysis.
       Development of criteria to be used to establish community priorities. As of the 2007 update,
        priorities for the Continuum of Care will be consistent with the 10-year plan.
       Establishment of action steps to fulfill HUD and 10-year objectives.

The intensive updating process for this plan got underway in March 2007 when the City of Spokane
and the Spokane Homeless Coalition, convened a series of work sessions with service-providers. The
work sessions addressed four specific topics: (1) accomplishments of 2006, (2) resources currently
available within the Continuum of Care System, (3) gaps in the resources, and (4) objectives and
actions for July 1, 2007 through December 30, 2008. The planning process culminated with a review
by Coalition members of the final draft of the 2007 plan.

The work sessions highlighted those issues that continue to influence our community’s Continuum of
Care. These issues include the spread of poverty throughout the City of Spokane; limited availability
of affordable housing; the shortage of jobs that pay a living wage; the needs of chronic homeless, the
needs of homeless persons with mental illness; and the special needs of homeless single women,
families with children, persons with chemical dependencies, independent youth 13-17 years old, and
persons 18-24 who have been homeless since an earlier age.

The Continuum of Care Plan and the 10-year plan are the local road maps for service and housing
providers, and the City of Spokane for addressing the issues of homelessness and affordable housing.
This plan incorporates items relevant for the 2007-2008 timeframe from the Spokane Regional 10-
Year Plan to Address Homelessness, the City Community Development Comprehensive Plan and the
Spokane Housing Authority Plan. It enables program development and partnership between homeless
providers and mainstream supportive services. It helps Spokane’s homeless persons attain the
resources that allow them to obtain permanent housing, develop self-determination and maintain self-
sufficiency.




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                              59
C. Priorities
All aspects of housing and supportive services for the homeless remain priority and will be given
particular focus and effort for both the chronic and other homeless populations. However, the needs
underlined below are of the greatest immediacy.

   Permanent Housing with Support
   1. Maintain existing and develop additional permanent housing with a wide range of supportive
      services.

   Permanent Housing without Supportive Services
   1. Maintain existing and develop additional safe affordable permanent housing without
      supportive services, especially for families living 30% below the poverty line.
   2. Develop strategies around public policy to expand the funding base for housing
      developers/providers.

   Transitional Housing
   1. Maintain existing and expand availability of transitional housing.
   2. Maintain and develop additional housing options for individuals currently substance using.

   Emergency Shelter
   1. Expand to year-round availability of shelter space for individual men.
   2. Expand availability of shelters for chronic homeless families including 24-hour service
      access.
   3. Increase shelter space for families with boys over 10 and men heads-of-households.

   Supportive Shelters
   1. Coordinate services/case management for people transitioning from mental health/substance
      abuse treatment to outpatient treatment.
   2. Increase access to mainstream resources.

   Prevention
   1. Develop strategies for a 24-hour response system with direct interface with law enforcement.
   2. Continue development of funding options to prevent people from becoming homeless.

   Supportive Services including outreach, case management, life skills, employment, mental health,
   substance abuse, medical management, medication management, health care and aftercare
   1. Continue seeking funds for all manner of supportive services that can be used to stabilize
       individuals and families so they can progress into permanent housing.
   2. Create housing stability case managers for low-income safe permanent housing and provide
       resource training for property managers and owners on how to link with services.
   3. Continue developing multiple models for case management and methods of accessing
       mainstream services for prevention through aftercare.

   Communication and Coordination
   1. Improve communication about issues pertaining to homelessness with the community,
      including the business community, political and community leaders, and the general public.




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                              60
       Section 6: Continuum of Care Gaps Analysis and 18-Month Goals
A. Gaps Analysis
In addition to the analysis of unmet need for housing shown on pages 32-36 of this plan, homeless
serving organizations note the following gaps, concerns and recommendations based on their field
observations:

Prevention:
    A central clearinghouse of information and resources may allow more efficient use of
        existing resources, as might other forms of enhanced coordination/communication among
        homeless-serving systems.
    Increased funds for rental assistance could be employed to prevent people from becoming
        homeless.
    Availability of short-term housing stability case managers would help currently housed
        clients prevent evictions and maintain their housing.
    Collaboration among all regional jurisdictions to address issues of homelessness prevention
        would significantly increase system-wide efficiencies.

Supportive Services:
Supportive services are defined as including outreach, case management, life skills, employment
training, mental health, substance abuse treatment, medical management health care and aftercare.
Supportive services are crucial for stabilizing individuals and families who have experienced
homelessness. The following are widely observed as needs for our community:
      Federally, emphasis remains on housing. For many clients to maintain housing stability
         support services must accompany housing. Adequate funding for supportive services remains
         an immense challenge.
      Expanded case management, medical management and mental health treatment would
         ultimately reduce overall costs by created greater stability in housing and reduce reliance on
         emergency rooms and other more expensive last resort interventions.
      Greater coordination of services/case management for people transitioning from mental
         health/substance abuse treatment to outpatient treatment would aid stabilization and reduce
         social and economic costs associated with recidivism.
      Gap funding for support services are needed for people who are awaiting qualification for
         GAX and discretionary funds for interim psychotropic mediation would aid in stabilizing
         clients in transition.
      Access to mainstream resources such as Medicaid, SSI, TANF, mental health and child care
         creates ongoing access to needed services.
      The continuing decrease in support services for the elderly, those with mental illness without
         benefits such as GAU/GAX and Medicaid thwarts efforts to assist these subpopulations.
      Additional improvement of services to individuals with co-occurring disorders of mental
         illness and substance abuse, especially for individuals without benefits such as GAU/GAX
         and Medicaid, is needed.
      Social service dollars for homeless families are not sufficient to provide adequate services.
         Other sources as mentioned above serve as crucial adjuncts.
      The loss of services to non-Medicaid qualifying persons continues.
      TANF sanctions reduce the amount of grants to families and increase the avenues for cutting
         financial aid.
      Current state and federal barriers for people with felony convictions to qualifying for support
         services is counterproductive. Community safety and individual success could be improved
         with changes to regulations.



Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                              61
Outreach:
    The Police Department has requested a 24-hour 7-day/week access/response for direct
       interface with law enforcement/patrol to enhance prevention.
    Outreach has been extremely useful to help homeless families and individual access services
       to minimize duration and extremeness of homelessness. Funding to provide outreach at
       higher capacities is needed.
    Safe places for women (24x7) continue to be limited.
    A men-only drop-in center is not presently available.
    More participation in and coordination for outreach, especially with the unincorporated areas
       within the County, is needed.

Case Management:
    There is a gap in services when people are released from jail/prison, inpatient treatment and
      alcohol/substance abuse. There is a need for transitional plans, greater coordination between
      in-patient/institutional care and out-patient/community-based care and the development of
      treatment options that will provide an unbroken continuum of care.
    Funding for case management is presently not sufficient to address need.
    Transportation continues to be an issue. Transportation for people who do not qualify for
      special mobility is especially lacking. This population has been significantly impacted by
      Spokane Transit Authority (STA) route cutbacks in recent years.
    There is a need for discretionary funds for replacement of identification/birth certificates.

Emergency Shelter: House clients for less than 90 days
    Emphasis has been on transitional and permanent housing with federal funds available for
      these crucial elements in the continuum of care. However, shelter for many chronic homeless
      remains for many the first option for beginning any shift away from homelessness.
    Recently extended hours need ongoing funding to ensure year-round availability.
    A year-round shelter for men who are currently substance abusing, would open an avenue for
      early efforts to stabilize these individuals and enhance community safety.
    Shelter space for single men or women, families and youth does not meet current needs.
      Current data indicates that while existing shelter space is not sufficient for any of these
      populations, single homeless outnumber families 5 to 1.
    Shelter space for families with boys over 10 and with men head-of-households is severely
      limited.
     Shelter space for women that is available 24-hours would provide this subpopulation with a
      safe place and create more accessibility to services.
    There is limited shelter for couples without children.
    There is limited shelter for families with members who are gay, lesbian, bisexual,
      transgendered or questioning their sexual orientation.
    Current public policy requiring a person or family spend one night in an emergency shelter in
      order to qualify for funds set aside to address homelessness, results in greater costs than
      preventing eviction and results in needless risk and potential trauma for children. More
      effective means of assisting individuals and families at a high risk for homelessness need to
      be developed.

Transitional Housing: House clients for 91 days – 2 years
Transitional housing is lacking for:
    Individuals who are currently substance abusing.
    Young adults (18-23).
    Youth living separate from parents.
    Single parents with boys who are age 10 and older.



Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                           62
       Unmarried couples living as a family unit.

Permanent Supportive Housing (PSH): Available housing with the support services sufficient to
create stability for individuals and families is insufficient for the following:
     Affordable PSH (housing in the $160.mo range).
     Affordable PSH for chronically mentally ill adults with children.
     PSH for family reunification. It is noted that there are special (DSHS Child Protective
         Services) vouchers available at Northeast Washington Housing Solutions for family
         reunification services. These vouchers have historically been underused.

There are also challenges in the following areas pertaining to the provision of PSH:
    Dealing with/reducing restrictions for people with bankruptcy, bad credit and criminal
        history.
    Finding ways to provide continuing medical care and support services.
    Funding for housing operations and rental assistance and Rural Rental Assistance Program
        funds.
    While there has been improvement in the availability of child visitation facilities as part of
        the facilities needed for family reunification and in addition to the facilities for that
        population, need still exceed availability.
    Cash for emergent needs with supportive services.

Affordable Permanent Housing without Support: Need exists in the following areas:
     Availability of affordable and safe units.
     Units for persons with disabilities.
     Safe living space for very vulnerable populations, i.e., women who have experienced
       violence against them.
     Housing for individuals with backgrounds of criminal justice involvement.

Additionally, the following are areas for improvement within the community:
    Enhanced linkages among landlords, property managers and a rental clearinghouse to
       facilitate problem solving, assess affordability and other issues, and improve understanding of
       the homeless population and services available.
    Development of a strategy to work on public policy for housing developers/providers to
       expand the funding base available to them through licensing, permits, tax breaks, density
       bonuses, rental assistance for affordable units and other policy-level incentives for
       developing affordable permanent housing.

Legal Services:
    Legal services for emancipated independent youth are not readily available.
    While a legal services attorney has been appointed to represent low-income and vulnerable
        persons who are at risk of eviction, more attention is needed to this issue.

Mainstream System Development Needs:
    Continued progress towards improving coordination/communication among the systems
       engaged in services and housing for homeless individuals and families.
    Countywide participation in the regional HMIS by service providers.
    System-wide consideration of implications of changes in funding and payment structures
       (i.e., payment based on success with client).
    Extend examination of system-wide issues to include private and non-profit landlords and
       rental associations.
    Continued effort to increase accuracy of data and cost effectiveness throughout the homeless-
       serving programs.



Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                             63
       Establish standard protocols for intakes, discharges and other key phases of data collection.
       Expand data collection on qualifying individuals and families to include services or housing
        requested but not provided due to lack of agency resources.
       The current HUD definition of homelessness results in homeless families with significant
        unmet needs.

B. Continuum of Care 18-Month Goal
The National Alliance to End Homelessness and HUD has established a goal of ending chronic
homelessness and moving families and individuals to permanent housing within 10 years. The State
of Washington has asked communities to set a goal of reducing all homelessness by 50% by 2015.
The City of Spokane has adopted these goals for purposes of planning.

Additionally, HUD has asked communities to commit to a strategy that will ―End chronic
homelessness and move families and individuals to permanent housing,‖ and request actions to
achieve five objectives towards this outcome. Section D below is a listing of actions to which the
community has committed.

The Spokane Homeless Coalition acknowledges the active collaboration of the City of Spokane
Community Development Department and their lead role in the creation of permanent housing. The
Community Development Department partners with the City of Spokane Human Services Department
and non-profit agencies to target homeless housing issues and provide supportive housing. This
partnership is crucial to the success of our plan.

C. Obstacles to Meeting Goals
Though we have made some progress in the City of Spokane, like most communities, we face many
challenges if we are to meet the HUD goal of addressing chronic homelessness within a 10-year time
frame and the State of Washington Community, Trade & Economic Development (CTED) goal of
reducing homelessness by 50% by 2015. Regional loss of affordable housing and the need to relocate
individuals has thwarted the community. Insufficient access to funding for ongoing services, such as
GAU, GAX, (benefits for disabled singles) TANF, Medicaid, mental health, substance abuse
treatment and food stamps threaten progress. In addition, the challenge of knitting services and
housing to address the specific issue of chronic homelessness frustrates and exasperates both the
agencies and personnel that live and breathe this issue on a daily basis. As a community, we continue
to be faced with the ever-growing dilemma of people who cannot cope with daily life trying to live
without resources.

There are other issues that limit our ability to meet these goals. As described in the Introduction,
geographically Spokane is located in the midst of a large rural territory and serves as a catchment area
for Eastern Washington, Idaho, Montana and northeastern Oregon. While HMIS data indicates a
relatively small number of homeless live outside the area, field observation indicates that people do
relocate to the City in order to access social services, medical care and employment. They may move
thinking opportunities will be more plentiful in the city, but once here find the situation otherwise.

There are significant concentrations of poverty and there is a paucity of living-wage jobs and training
to help individuals move from welfare to employment. Once employed, upward movement is also
challenging, as there is little vertical and horizontal development within industries. One cannot
simply walk across the street and make application to a competing business/industry. In fact, there is
a lack of robust private industry. The largest economic sector for the region is government. Most
entry-level jobs are in the service sector and many are within the lowest paying segment of that
sector, food service.




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                               64
Amid these difficulties, the homeless agencies continue to make strides in collaboration with each
other and conversations are ongoing with the business community. A hopeful shift is that segments
of leadership within the business and local government arenas are beginning to acknowledge the level
of chronic homelessness among individuals who are mentally ill, substance abusers and living with
co-occurring disorders. They are also beginning to recognize the impact of chronic homelessness on
our community.

However, there remains a lack of community action around these issues. Significant segments of the
community leadership still believe that the answer to homelessness is for these individuals to simply
get a job. There is neither a comprehension of the magnitude of the barriers to doing that, nor of the
intensiveness and diversity of the support services needed to succeed. Among the general population,
there is still a lack of understanding about the social and economic impact of homelessness on the
community.

D. 2007 Objectives and Actions to Address Chronic Homelessness and Move Families and
    Individuals to Permanent Housing
This section includes the five community-wide objectives and the actions to achieve each of the
objectives. These actions are intended to address all forms of homelessness, from chronic to
protracted and unabating, and episodic, short-term and other. The community uses the HUD
definition of chronic homelessness (below) and has also developed definitions for other forms of
homelessness in acknowledgement of the range of conditions and situations that must be addressed in
order to reduce homelessness.

Chronic homelessness is defined, as per HUD, as any unaccompanied individual adult with a
disabling condition who has either been continuously homeless for one year or has experienced 4
episodes of homelessness in the last 3 years. A disabling condition is defined by HUD as “a
diagnosable substance use disorder, serious mental illness, developmental disability, or chronic
physical illness or disability, including to co-occurrence of two or more of these conditions.”
“Homeless” is further defined by HUD as meaning “a person sleeping in a place not meant for
human habitation (e.g., living on the streets) or in an emergency homeless shelter.” Homeless as it
has been defined does not include doubling up or surfing from house/apartment to house/apartment.

The Spokane Homeless Coalition has developed the following working definition for homelessness
among families and individuals who to do fit the HUD definition of chronic homeless. The intent in
including these definitions, is to ensure all forms of homelessness are recognized and are addressed.

        Protracted and Unabating Homelessness— The condition of protracted and unabating
        homelessness is defined as any single individual or family who has been continuously
        homeless for one year or has experienced 4 episodes of homelessness in the last 3 years. This
        definition has been developed in recognition of the need to document the dire circumstances
        and services provided to families (with adult members who are or are not disabled) and single
        adult individuals who are not diagnosed as disabled and therefore do not fall within the HUD
        definition of ―chronic homelessness.‖ Families and individuals in with these conditions are
        classified in the data as ―Other Homeless.‖

        Episodic, Short-term homelessness and Other Forms of Homelessness—For purposes of the
        Spokane Homeless Coalition documentation of homeless, people experiencing these
        conditions are classified in the data as ―Other Homeless.‖

The following chart details the objectives and actions that this community is committed to achieving.




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                              65
                                                                                       Lead Person




                                                                                                                              Achievement in 12
                                                                                                          Baseline (Current
                                           2007 Local Action Steps




                                                                                                                                                   Achievement


                                                                                                                                                                 Achievement
  Objectives to End




                                                                                                                                                                  in 10 years
                                                                                    List name and title




                                                                                                                                                    in 5 years
                                                                                                                                  Numeric


                                                                                                                                                     Numeric


                                                                                                                                                                   Numeric
                                                                                                                                   months
Chronic Homelessness




                                                                                                                Level)
                                                                                    or organization of
and Move Families and
                                                                                    one person
    Individuals to    How are you going to do it? List action steps to be
                                                                                    responsible for
 Permanent Housing completed within the next 12 months.
                                                                                    accomplishing each
                                                                                    action step.
                          1. VOA Project New Hope (Good Samaritan project           Rusty Barnett, Hope
                             funded in 2006), operational by fall of 2007 with 11   House, VOA
                             new PSH 1 bedroom units for chronic homeless.
                          2. Catholic Charities is to assume 12 S+C 1-bedroom       Michael Cain, House
                             units from an underperforming McKinney grant.          of Charity
                             These units were not being utilized by the previous
                             sponsor.
                          3. Increase the number of landlords willing to rent to    Cindy Algeo,
                             chronic homeless persons and/or units available to     Spokane Low
1. Create new PH beds        this population through targeted education.            Income Housing
                                                                                                       131                    154                 194            210
for chronically homeless                                                            Consortium (SLIHC)
                                                                                                       beds                   beds                beds           beds
persons.                 4. Increase the number of landlords by 20 that are         Mary Rathert,
                            willing to rent to chronic homeless people through      Women’s Hearth,
                            recognition of Portfolio Project certificates. This     Transitions
                            project provides a curriculum for homeless men and
                            women to address gaps they face in finding and
                            keeping housing.
                         5. Complete a regional housing inventory and               Cindy Algeo, SLIHC
                            incorporate it on the OneStopHousing.org website.
                            Promote as a resource for PH providers to seek
                            additional units for chronic homeless.




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                    66
                                                                                         Lead Person




                                                                                                                                Achievement in 12
                                                                                                            Baseline (Current
                                           2007 Local Action Steps




                                                                                                                                                    Achievement


                                                                                                                                                                  Achievement
  Objectives to End




                                                                                                                                                                   in 10 years
                                                                                       List name and title




                                                                                                                                                     in 5 years
                                                                                                                                    Numeric


                                                                                                                                                      Numeric


                                                                                                                                                                    Numeric
                                                                                                                                     months
Chronic Homelessness




                                                                                                                  Level)
                                                                                       or organization of
and Move Families and
                                                                                       one person
    Individuals to    How are you going to do it? List action steps to be
                                                                                       responsible for
 Permanent Housing completed within the next 12 months.
                                                                                       accomplishing each
                                                                                       action step.
                          6.   Convene community stakeholders to identify current Jerrie Allard,
                               housing challenges for the chronically homeless and City of Spokane
                               develop a plan best suited for our community towards Human Services
                               developing new chronically homeless PH units.
                          7.   Establish a process for the development of a regional Cindy Algeo, SLIHC
                               housing plan to address the shortage in units available
                               for chronic homeless. (NEWHS, SLIHC, City & Co)
                          8.   Develop a map of homelessness-related funds             Jerrie Allard, Human
                               administered by the City of Spokane, Spokane County Services, City of
                               and NEWHS. This information will be used to             Spokane
                               increase coordination of funds used to address chronic
                               homelessness.
                          1.   Develop new, and enhance current, alumni programs Rich Silva, Salvation
                               for formerly homeless families to support their housing Army
                               stability.
2. Increase percentage of
                          2.   Pursue funding for the expansion of alumni and          Maureen Cosgrove,
homeless persons staying
                               aftercare services to assist formerly homeless single   Miryam’s House,      71%                 73%                 77%           81%
in PH over 6 months to at
                               women with their housing stabilization.                 Transitions
least 71%.
                          3.   Expand alumni and aftercare services for formerly       Michael Cain,
                               homeless single men to improve their housing stability. Hanson House,
                                                                                       Catholic Charities




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                      67
                                                                                    Lead Person




                                                                                                                            Achievement in 12
                                                                                                        Baseline (Current
                                           2007 Local Action Steps




                                                                                                                                                Achievement


                                                                                                                                                              Achievement
  Objectives to End




                                                                                                                                                               in 10 years
                                                                                 List name and title




                                                                                                                                                 in 5 years
                                                                                                                                Numeric


                                                                                                                                                  Numeric


                                                                                                                                                                Numeric
                                                                                                                                 months
Chronic Homelessness




                                                                                                              Level)
                                                                                 or organization of
and Move Families and
                                                                                 one person
    Individuals to    How are you going to do it? List action steps to be
                                                                                 responsible for
 Permanent Housing completed within the next 12 months.
                                                                                 accomplishing each
                                                                                 action step.
                          4. Twice yearly, provide training for property owners  Bob Peeler, SNAP
                             and managers, including those with McKinney funded
                             projects, addressing resources available to support
                             housing stability of tenants and how to access those
                             services.
                          5. Twice yearly, provide training for property owners     Grant Stancliff,
                             and managers, including those with McKinney funded Lutheran Family
                             projects. This Multi-Family Crime-Free Housing         Services
                             (MFCFH) training addresses services available to
                             tenants that experience crime in an effort to increase
                             housing stability.
                          6. Convene work group to research and develop a           Patty Norton,
                             strategy towards addressing those barriers for         Leadership Team,
                             maintaining PH.                                        SHC
                          7. Research funding options and models for ―best          Dan Ruddell, DSHS
                             practice‖ stabilization services for persons in
                             permanent housing. Communicate results with
                             appropriate entities with the goal of increasing
                             resources to support McKinney funded projects and
                             those persons in permanent housing.
3. Increase percentage of 1. Increase the number of hard-to-place family cases,     Bob Peeler, Family
homeless persons             staffed by the agencies, utilizing a multi-agency wrap Protection Team,   50%                  53%                 61.5%         65%
[households] moving          around model with intensive client support.            SHC


Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                  68
                                                                                         Lead Person




                                                                                                                                  Achievement in 12
                                                                                                              Baseline (Current
                                           2007 Local Action Steps




                                                                                                                                                      Achievement


                                                                                                                                                                    Achievement
  Objectives to End




                                                                                                                                                                     in 10 years
                                                                                        List name and title




                                                                                                                                                       in 5 years
                                                                                                                                      Numeric


                                                                                                                                                        Numeric


                                                                                                                                                                      Numeric
                                                                                                                                       months
Chronic Homelessness




                                                                                                                    Level)
                                                                                        or organization of
and Move Families and
                                                                                        one person
    Individuals to    How are you going to do it? List action steps to be
                                                                                        responsible for
 Permanent Housing completed within the next 12 months.
                                                                                        accomplishing each
                                                                                        action step.
from TH to PH to at least 2.   Increase enrollment in the Portfolio Project, a          Mary Rathert,
61.5%.                         curriculum designed to assist homeless persons with Women’s Hearth,
                               recognizing the circumstances which have led to their Transitions
                               homelessness, to learn life stabilization skills and to
                               obtain assistance in finding affordable, permanent
                               housing.
                          3.   Initiate quarterly meetings of Transitional housing      Sharon Stadelman,
                               providers to share resources, best practices and         St. Margaret’s
                               provide an avenue for peer to peer technical assistance
                               for case management and housing placement.
                          4.   Expand listings of available housing on                  Cindy Algeo, SLIHC
                               OneStopHousing.org. A website utilized in our
                               community that lists housing units available by
                               specific search criteria (disability, income, etc.) This
                               website is utilized by McKinney funded project case
                               managers to assist their clients with housing
                               placement.
                          5.   Develop a model for use in the community to address Kim Rasp, Spokane
                               barriers to moving from transitional to permanent        Housing Ventures
                               housing. Barriers include; landlord requirements,
                               housing applications and fees, for background and
                               credit checks for persons seeking permanent housing.




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                       69
                                                                                       Lead Person




                                                                                                                              Achievement in 12
                                                                                                          Baseline (Current
                                           2007 Local Action Steps




                                                                                                                                                  Achievement


                                                                                                                                                                Achievement
  Objectives to End




                                                                                                                                                                 in 10 years
                                                                                    List name and title




                                                                                                                                                   in 5 years
                                                                                                                                  Numeric


                                                                                                                                                    Numeric


                                                                                                                                                                  Numeric
                                                                                                                                   months
Chronic Homelessness




                                                                                                                Level)
                                                                                    or organization of
and Move Families and
                                                                                    one person
    Individuals to    How are you going to do it? List action steps to be
                                                                                    responsible for
 Permanent Housing completed within the next 12 months.
                                                                                    accomplishing each
                                                                                    action step.
                                                                                    Amy Jones, Human
                          6. Assess performance of all TH projects in moving        Services, City of
                             participants from TH to PH. Develop a plan for         Spokane
                             technical assistance to improve performance of
                             programs and provide targeted assistance to improve
                             performance of 2 projects so they reach the national
                             standard within 12 months of technical assistance.

                          1. Employment committee will develop a map of               Jack Lilienthal, Chair
                             available employment programs, identify best practices Employment
                             for assisting homeless persons with employment, and Committee, SHC
4. Increase percentage of    assess barriers to develop a strategy to assist homeless
homeless persons             persons with multiple barriers to employment.
employed at exit to at    2. Research feasibility and develop recommendations for Laurel Kelly,
least 18%.                   the CoC towards enhancing employment services and Transitional Living 17.5%                      18%                 19%           20%
                             training for homeless youth.                             Program, VOA
                          3. Career Path Services, St. Margaret’s and Transitions, in Sheila Fitzgerald,
                             a collaborative effort, will develop a plan for the      Transitions
                             establishment of social enterprises that would provide
                             job training and employment for homeless women.
5. Ensure that the CoC    1. Increase the number of regional homeless-serving      Amy Jones, Human       64.9%   85%    90%                                     95%
has a functional HMIS        agencies contributing to the HMIS throughout the year Services, City of       Bed    Bed    Bed                                     Bed
system.                      from 20 to 25.                                        Spokane                Cover- Cover- Cover-                                  Cover-



Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                    70
                                                                                            Lead Person




                                                                                                                                   Achievement in 12
                                                                                                               Baseline (Current
                                           2007 Local Action Steps




                                                                                                                                                       Achievement


                                                                                                                                                                     Achievement
  Objectives to End




                                                                                                                                                                      in 10 years
                                                                                         List name and title




                                                                                                                                                        in 5 years
                                                                                                                                       Numeric


                                                                                                                                                         Numeric


                                                                                                                                                                       Numeric
                                                                                                                                        months
Chronic Homelessness




                                                                                                                     Level)
                                                                                         or organization of
and Move Families and
                                                                                         one person
    Individuals to    How are you going to do it? List action steps to be
                                                                                         responsible for
 Permanent Housing completed within the next 12 months.
                                                                                         accomplishing each
                                                                                         action step.
                          2. Train 5 new agencies on HMIS policies and                   Amy Jones, Human       age                    age               age           age
                             procedures, agency protocols, data entry and how to         Services, City of
                             mine their data for agency assessments and reports.         Spokane

                          3. Initiate use of swipe cards, to expedite the client data    Amy Jones, Human
                             collection process and improve data quality, for 2 high     Services, City of
                             volume agencies.                                            Spokane
                          4. Collect data at intake to assess barriers for progressing   Amy Jones, Human
                             through the continuum of housing, becoming enrolled         Services, City of
                             in mainstream resources and obtaining employment.           Spokane

                          5. Assess performance of all McKinney projects. Develop Amy Jones, Human
                             a plan for technical assistance to improve performance Services, City of
                             of underperforming programs. Provide targeted           Spokane
                             assistance to improve performance of 2 projects so they
                             reach national standards within 12 months of technical
                             assistance.
                          6. Increase community-wide point-in -time counts to        Amy Jones, Human
                             twice yearly. Counts provide data needed to identify Services, City of
                             continuum gaps, and to determine effect of, and need Spokane
                             for, shifts in service and housing mix.




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                         71
                    Section 7: Review of 2006 Accomplishments

 2006 Objectives to
                              12-month Measurable
   End Chronic                                                       Accomplishments
                          Achievement Proposed in 2006
 Homelessness and
Move Families and
   Individuals to
Permanent Housing

                      1. Research best practices for successful 1. Research is currently in
                       models to develop additional permanent progress by Spokane Low
                       housing units for chronic homeless         Income Housing
                       singles with 24-hour onsite and awake      Consortium.
                       staffing.

                      2. Develop new permanent housing         2. Developed 10 of the 34
                       targeted to chronically homeless in 2006 new CH/PH beds proposed
                       McKinney funding competition.             in 2006.

                     3. Establish criteria to identify new
                       sponsors to develop additional new      3. Criteria have been
                       permanent supportive housing for          established. The CoC is
                       chronically homeless and provide them     aware of the need for new
                       technical assistance and housing          CH/PH units and is
                       development education to ensure           developing a strategic plan
                       success.                                  for technical assistance and
1. Create new PH                                                 development during the
beds for chronically                                             summer of 2007.
homeless persons.
                     4. In collaboration with the City of
                       Spokane Building Department, develop 4. Shifted efforts to
                       and distribute marketing material on the completing
                       inclusion of affordable housing for the   OneStopHousing.com that
                       homeless to developers and contractors. provides information on
                                                                 available housing units for
                                                                 both landlords and tenants
                     5. Conduct annual point-in-time count to    Web site is up and running.
                       determine effect of efforts on chronic
                       homeless population and assess          5. The point-in-time count
                       continued need for new housing and        was conducted on January
                       services.                                 25, 2007 with 21 new
                                                                 agencies participating. The
                                                                 count showed 252 CH
                                                                 living on the street and/or
                                                                 emergency shelter during
                                                                 that point in time.


Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                      72
 2006 Objectives to
                               12-month Measurable
   End Chronic                                                           Accomplishments
                           Achievement Proposed in 2006
 Homelessness and
Move Families and
   Individuals to
Permanent Housing

                                                                 Based off 2005/2006 APR
                                                                  data, 71% of homeless
                                                                  persons stayed in PH over 6
                                                                  months.
                       1. Develop safe affordable supportive
                        housing with minimal supportive              1. No new PH units were
                        services for homeless individuals.           developed in 2006 with
                                                                     McKinney Vento funds.
                                                                     However, Spokane
                                                                     Neighborhood Action
                                                                     Programs has developed
                                                                     five 2-bdrm units of PSH
                                                                     for families.
                       2. Expand existing alumni programs for
2. Increase
                        formerly homeless families to help them 2. WA State Legislation,
percentage of
                        remain stable as they adjust to more      ESSHB 2163, provided
homeless persons
                        independent living.                       $70,000 in new funding for
staying in PH over 6
                                                                  the expansion of 2 alumni
months to 71%.
                                                                  programs serving
                                                                  McKinney participants.
                                                                  These alumni programs
                                                                  support PH stability.
                       3. Advocate for the
                        reinstatement/increased allocation of
                        funds for chemical dependency           3. A local Mental Health
                        treatment and mental health.              Sales Tax was voted on and
                                                                  adopted per Resolution 05-
                                                                  1017 in December 2005.
                                                                  This imposed a 1 tenth of
                                                                  1% county wide sales and
                                                                  use tax to be used for
                                                                  mental health treatment.
                                                                Based on 2005/2006 APR
                                                                 data, 50% of homeless
3. Increase
                                                                 persons moved from TH to
percentage of
                                                                 PH. However community
homeless persons
                                                                 wide the figure increases to
moving from TH to
                                                                 61%.
PH to 61.5%.
                       1. Advocate for the reopening of the
                        Home Choice Voucher Program for         1. The Home Choice



Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                        73
 2006 Objectives to
                              12-month Measurable
   End Chronic                                                          Accomplishments
                          Achievement Proposed in 2006
 Homelessness and
Move Families and
   Individuals to
Permanent Housing

                       Spokane County.                               Voucher Program has been
                                                                     reopened however; there are
                                                                     more than 500 currently on
                                                                     the waiting list with an
                                                                     average wait time of 3
                      2. Post available affordable permanent         years.
                       housing units on the Spokane Homeless
                       Coalition website                         2. The Spokane Homeless
                       (spokanehomeless.org).                     Coalition website,
                                                                  maintained by the City of
                                                                  Spokane Human Services
                                                                  department, has a link to
                                                                  www.onestophousing.org.
                                                                  This website currently has
                                                                  3,200 listings and has had
                                                                  11,000 hits in the past 8
                                                                  months.
                      3. Place transitional housing participants
                       on permanent housing waiting lists.
                                                                 3. TH case managers work
                                                                  closely with clients to place
                                                                  them on PH waiting lists at
                      4. Increase follow up reporting by HMIS intake.
                      participating agencies.
                                                                 4. Monthly email reminders
                                                                  are sent to all HMIS
                                                                  participating agencies to
                                                                  complete and submit the
                                                                  required HMIS forms,
                                                                  including follow ups.
                                                                  Follow up reporting
                      5. Assess all of the transitional housing   increased by 5%.
                       programs by reviewing their APRs and
                       determining which needs technical
                       assistance.                               5. Assessed performance of 9
                                                                  McKinney funded TH
                                                                  providers. Five programs
                      6. Provide technical assistance to          were less than 61.5% in
                       transitional housing programs, such as     moving clients to PH.
                       considering more resources, changing



Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                        74
 2006 Objectives to
                              12-month Measurable
   End Chronic                                                         Accomplishments
                          Achievement Proposed in 2006
 Homelessness and
Move Families and
   Individuals to
Permanent Housing

                       services package, increasing case          6. Provided technical
                       management, and/or other potential          assistance to 2 of the 5
                       actions to improve the rate of moving       McKinney funded TH
                       persons into permanent housing.             projects that were
                                                                   underperforming.
                                                                 According to 2005/2006 APR
                                                                 data, Homeless persons
                                                                 employed increased from 9%
                                                                 at entry to 17.5% at exit.

                      1. Increase grantee awareness of           1. Increased grantee
                       employment training programs.               awareness is underway by
                                                                   the establishment of a
                                                                   Spokane Homeless
                                                                   Coalition employment
                                                                   committee. This committee
                                                                   is charged with improving
                                                                   communication,
                                                                   coordination and access to
                                                                   employment programs for
4. Increase                                                        homeless individuals. A
percentage of                                                      resource manual is in
homeless persons                                                   development for case
becoming employed                                                  managers for use in
by 11%.                                                            connecting clients to
                                                                   employment training
                                                                   programs. To be completed
                                                                   in summer 2007.
                      2. Identify need for employment training
                       for homeless persons.

                                                                 2. The employment
                                                                    committee (above) is
                                                                    currently identifying the
                                                                    needs and barriers to
                                                                    employment for the
                                                                    homeless. Research has
                      3. Assess employment barriers for             begun for the types of
                       homeless persons.                            employment programs
                                                                    available to meet these



Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                         75
 2006 Objectives to
                              12-month Measurable
   End Chronic                                                          Accomplishments
                          Achievement Proposed in 2006
 Homelessness and
Move Families and
   Individuals to
Permanent Housing

                                                                     identified needs and
                                                                     barriers.

                                                                3. Employment barriers are
                                                                   currently being researched
                                                                   by the employment
                                                                   committee (above). Also,
                                                                   the City of Spokane
                      4. Explore ways to improve utilization of    Human Services
                        the workforce development programs to department has designed
                        assist homeless individuals to gain        both participant and
                        employment.                                provider surveys to assess
                                                                   barriers to employment.
                                                                   Survey to be implemented
                                                                   in 2007.

                                                                 4. Utilization of workforce
                                                                   development programs has
                                                                   improved as a result of their
                                                                   regular attendance at the
                      5. Create a committee to assess all of the   Homeless Coalition
                         employment programs by reviewing          monthly meetings.
                         options in the community for homeless McKinney funded programs
                         persons.                                  have begun linking clients
                                                                   to WorkSource Spokane,
                                                                   Career Path and other
                                                                   employment programs.

                                                                5. An employment committee
                                                                  researching options for
                                                                  homeless employment
                      6. Provide technical assistance to the      programs has been
                       committee to consider new options and      established (above). A
                       resources and assess barriers to current   resource manual is in
                       employment programs.                       development for case
                                                                  managers to use for
                                                                  connecting clients to
                                                                  employment training
                                                                  programs. To be completed
                                                                  in summer 2007.



Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                          76
 2006 Objectives to
                              12-month Measurable
   End Chronic                                                        Accomplishments
                          Achievement Proposed in 2006
 Homelessness and
Move Families and
   Individuals to
Permanent Housing


                                                                 6. The City of Spokane
                                                                    Human Services
                                                                    Department provides
                                                                    technical assistance to the
                                                                    employment committee on
                                                                    a routine basis. Research
                                                                    has begun on homeless
                                                                    employment needs, barriers
                                                                    and programs.
                      1. Continually upgrade the HMIS            1. Major system upgrade
                        managed by the City of Spokane.             completed with the
                                                                    purchase of new HMIS
                                                                    software. Implementation
                                                                    continues through the end
                                                                    of 2007.
                      2. All homeless-serving organizations
                       within the region of Spokane County    2. The number of homeless
                       contribute data to the HMIS managed by serving programs
                       the City of Spokane including outreach    contributing data to HMIS
                       to service providers to increase data     has increased by 20%.
                       collection points and standardize data
                       collected.
5. Ensure that the
                     3. Initiate the use of swipe cards at up to 3. Due to the switch to a new
CoC has a functional
                       2 new facilities.                            HMIS software vendor, we
HMIS system.
                                                                    have had to postpone the
                                                                    use of swipe cards at any
                                                                    new facilities until fall
                                                                    2007.
                     4. Improve data quality reported to
                      HMIS.                                      4. 2006 goal of 30% of
                                                                    agencies achieving a 95%
                                                                    or higher accuracy rate has
                                                                    been achieved.

                      5. Quarterly reports based on              5. Delayed due to the
                       compilations of HMIS data will be          implementation of our new
                       provided to the Spokane Homeless           HMIS. First report will be
                       Coalition (e.g., 1st Q reports will be     presented to the Homeless



Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                       77
 2006 Objectives to
                              12-month Measurable
   End Chronic                                                          Accomplishments
                          Achievement Proposed in 2006
 Homelessness and
Move Families and
   Individuals to
Permanent Housing

                       presented 3 months after close to allow       Coalition in June of 2007.
                       for compilation).




Draft City of Spokane Continuum of Care Plan for the Homeless 2007                         78

				
DOCUMENT INFO