Victoria Barracks Melbourne, Victoria

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					     Victoria Barracks
    Melbourne, Victoria
   HERITAGE MANAGEMENT PLAN

           PUBLIC VERSION

Final report for comment in accordance with
s.341S(3) of the Environment Protection and
    Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999
This Heritage Management Plan for Victoria Barracks, Melbourne, Victoria has been prepared for the Directorate of
      Heritage and Biodiversity Conservation (DH&BC), Department of Defence through Woodhead Pty Ltd

                        Distribution of this Plan is at the discretion of the Director, DH&BC
VICTORIA BARRACKS, MELBOURNE, VICTORIA
Heritage Management Plan ~ Public version – For comment, 11 September 2009




DEFENCE CONTACT

Peter Navaretti
Heritage Officer, DSG-Southern Victoria                                      E peter.navaretti@defence.gov.au
Defence Plaza Melbourne                                                      T 03 9282 7638
Level 8, 661 Bourke Street                                                   F 03 9282 7650
MELBOURNE VIC 3000


CONSULTANT CONTACT

Woodhead Pty Ltd                                                             E adelaide@woodhead.com.au
26 Chesser Street                                                            T +61 (8) 8223 5013
Adelaide SA 5000                                                             F +61 (8) 8232 0028




DOCUMENT HISTORY

Authors – Woodhead                                                   Nicole Dent
Project Director                                                     Jason Pruszinski
Client Name                                                          Directorate of Heritage and Biodiversity
                                                                     Conservation and DSG – Southern Victoria
Name of Project                                                      Victoria Barracks, Melbourne, Victoria
Name of Document                                                     Heritage Management Plan
Document Version and date saved                                      Final – August 2007
                                                                     Copy for notification – 11 September 2009
Consultant Project Number                                            06626001AR & 09808008AR
Defence Project Number




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TABLE OF CONTENTS
               EXECUTIVE SUMMARY                                                                                    1

       1       BACKGROUND                                                                                            3

     1.1       Purpose of the Heritage Management Plan                                                               3

     1.2       Location                                                                                              3

     1.3       Methodology                                                                                           3

       2       HERITAGE ASSESSMENT                                                                                  5

     2.1       Historical Summary                                                                                    5

     2.2       Heritage Status and Legislative Framework                                                            11

     2.3       Key Heritage Assets                                                                                  15

     2.4       Comparative Analysis                                                                                 31

     2.5       Assessment of Significance                                                                           34

     2.6       Statement of Significance                                                                            36

       3       HERITAGE MANAGEMENT                                                                                  37

     3.1       Operational & Planning Issues                                                                        37

     3.2       Risks to Heritage Values                                                                             39

     3.3       Heritage Policy Guidelines                                                                           43

     3.4       Interpretation and Other Opportunities                                                               61

     3.5       Summary of Key Works                                                                                 64

       4       IMPLEMENTATION                                                                                       71

     4.1       Action Plan – Defence Support Group (DSG – SV)                                                       71

     4.2       Action Plan – Base Personnel                                                                         71

     4.3       Action Plan – Comprehensive Maintenance Contractors (CMC’s)                                          72

     4.4       Action Plan – Directorate of Heritage and Biodiversity Conservation (DHBC)                           72




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TABLE OF CONTENTS
       5       SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS                                                                           73

     5.1       Condition of Bluestone Buildings                                                                     73

     5.2       Conservation and Maintenance Works                                                                   73

     5.3       Landscape                                                                                            73

     5.4       Nomination to National Heritage List                                                                 74

     5.5       Future Office Accommodation                                                                          75

     5.6       Interpretive Opportunities                                                                           75


               APPENDICES
               APPENDIX A        BIBLIOGRAPHY AND SOURCES

               APPENDIX B        HERITAGE LEGISLATION

               APPENDIX C        EPBC ACT COMPLIANCE TABLE

               APPENDIX D        SITE DEVELOPMENT PLAN

               APPENDIX E        SIGNIFICANT TREE ASSESSMENT PROCESS

               VOLUME 2          HERITAGE HANDBOOK




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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY


The Heritage Management Plan (HMP) for Victoria Barracks Melbourne has been prepared by
Woodhead through the Defence Environment and Heritage Panel for the Directorate for
Heritage and Biodiversity Conservation (DHBC) and the Defence Support Group (Southern
Victoria).

Assessments and management recommendations concerning heritage landscape elements
have been provided by John Patrick Landscape Architects.

The HMP has reviewed the importance of Victoria Barracks and confirmed it is of high heritage
significance. It retains exceptional examples of bluestone buildings from the 1850’s/1860’s
period.

The previous Conservation Analysis and Management Plan prepared by Allom Lovell in 1999
has informed the historical content contained within this HMP, with a physical site assessment
confirming the current status of the assets at the site. A number of previous reports on Victoria
Barracks are available and should be referred to for further specific information about parts of
the site. These are listed in Section 1.3.

The key heritage assets have been summarised within Section 2.3 with general management
guidelines provided in Section 3.3. Heritage Asset Management Schedules (HAMS) on
individual buildings and landscape elements have been provided within Volume 2 Heritage
Handbook. These are designed to assist both planners and contractors to manage and
maintain the heritage values of each building and landscape element.

There are some concerns with the condition of the bluestone buildings. A detailed survey of
these buildings should be undertaken by a heritage professional in conjunction with a review by
a structural engineer, to assess recommendations provided in previous stonemason’s reports.

A number of other maintenance items have been identified on individual HAMS sheets in
Volume 2 and a summary of these are provided in Section 3.5.

Defence may wish to consider nominating Victoria Barracks Melbourne to the National Heritage
List (NHL) for its significance as a defence site since the 1850s and as the site of the War
Cabinet Room during World War Two.

It is intended that the HMP will also assist in and inform the decision-making process for any
options for the future use and/or development of the Victoria Barracks site.




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                            FIGURE 1             Location Plan

                            PROJECT TITLE        Victoria Barracks, Melbourne, Victoria

                            SCALE                Not to scale

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SECTION 1             BACKGROUND

1.1      PURPOSE OF THE HERITAGE MANAGEMENT PLAN

Victoria Barracks has been identified as a place of high heritage value.

Heritage values can be defined as the stories of a place, or any tangible evidence in the form of
environmental or physical built items that together give an understanding of our history.

This Heritage Management Plan for Victoria Barracks Melbourne describes and confirms the
previously identified values at the site, and is intended to assist base personnel, site managers,
planners and contractors associated with the place in managing those values appropriately and
in a highly practical way. Policies and guidelines for physical fabric maintenance and works,
promotion of heritage values and the management of the site have been provided, as informed
by a physical and historical assessment.

A Heritage Management Plan provides general information on ways to manage a heritage place
by explaining why the place is valuable. However, not every eventuality can be addressed by
this one report. If a specific issue is not covered, advice should be sought from Defence
Heritage and Biodiversity Conservation (DHBC), the DSG-SV Heritage Officer or the Heritage
Panel Advisory Service.

The Plan has been prepared in accordance with the principles of The Burra Charter, the
Australia ICOMOS Charter for Places of Cultural Significance 1999, the recognised benchmark
document within the Australian heritage industry. A condensed version of this document can be
viewed at the Australian ICOMOS website, www.icomos.org/australia, under the section
‘Charters and Publications’.

The HMP may also be issued to the Minister for Environment and Water Resources for
comment.

1.2      LOCATION

Victoria Barracks is located at 256-310 St Kilda Road in Southbank, Melbourne. Refer to Figure
1 for a Location Plan.

1.3        METHODOLOGY


1.3.1 Previous Reports

Reports that have previously been prepared for Victoria Barracks include:
•   Victoria Barracks Melbourne – Conservation Analysis and Management Plan, Allom Lovell
    and Associates, April 1999
•   Victoria Barracks – A Social History, Agnes Hannan, 1995
•   Victoria Barracks Melbourne – Archaeological Investigations in the Vicinity of the Western
    Perimeter Wall, Du Cros and Associates, September 1994
•   Archaeological Investigation of E-Block Site, Australian Construction Services, April 1989.




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1.3.2 Consultation

This HMP has been commissioned through DHBC and the Environment, Heritage & Risk
Branch for the Department of Defence. Public consultation is not appropriate for a secure
Defence site with stringent operational requirements. However, within Defence, it was thought
appropriate by the Project Managers that Woodhead and its sub-consultants liaise with the
following groups:
•   Defence Support Group
•   Mr Brendon Noonan (Manager Base Services) and Base personnel
•   Comprehensive Maintenance Contractors
•   VBM Heritage Project Officer, Major Mary Reid, and volunteer VBM Tour Guides.

1.3.3 Authors

The Victoria Barracks Heritage Management Plan has been prepared by Woodhead with input
from John Patrick Landscape Architects. The following people have contributed to the
preparation of the document:
•   Jason Pruszinski, National Heritage Manager (Review)
•   Nicole Dent, Heritage Architect
•   Diahnn Sullivan, Heritage Specialist
•   John Patrick, Principal, Landscape Architect
•   Alison Breach, Landscape Architect
•   Andrea Procter, Horticulturalist




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SECTION 2                         HERITAGE ASSESSMENT


2.1      HISTORICAL SUMMARY

Pre-European History

The first people to occupy the area now known as Melbourne were members of the Woiwurrung
language group, specifically the Wurundjeri people. Their lands extended well north to the
Great Dividing Range, east to Mt Baw Baw, south to the vicinity of Mordialloc, and west as far
as the Werribee River. The site later selected for Victoria Barracks was a swampy, low-lying
area, close to the Yarra River. The Yarra River was central to the Wurundjeri people as it
provided a variety of foods such as eels and fish. Along its banks numerous native animals and
plants would be found. The Yalukit-William, one of the five Clans of the Bunurong, known as
the coastal tribe, also inhabited the swampy areas below Emerald Hill (South Melbourne).

To the original Wurundjeri people, the river was "birrarung" - 'river of mists and shadows'. They
camped on both banks of the river, especially near present day Government House and the
Melbourne Cricket Ground. They caught eels in the swamps and lagoons of the river and fished
using funnel-shaped fish pots.

European contact occurred in 1803 when Charles Grimes, Acting Surveyor General of New
South Wales, saw the Yarra during his exploration. In 1835 John Batman enacted his
‘purchase’ of 600,000 acres with the local aboriginal group.

Pre-Defence History

In May 1859, the Government of the Colony of Victoria enacted an order that set aside 168
acres of land to the west of St Kilda Road, most of which was deemed to be unusable swamp,
for a Military Reserve, however development of the site had commenced a few years earlier. It
had been selected as early as 1855 by Charles Pasley, colonial engineer of Victoria, and
Colonel MacArthur, administrator of Victoria and commander of its military forces.

Prior to this time the site had not been built on, and was most likely used for farming pursuits,
although historical descriptions of the area generally describe it as swampy and generally unfit
for habitation.

In 1898 the original Order-in-Council had been revoked, leaving the Barracks site with its
present day area of about 12 acres.

Defence History

The site for a substantial permanent military barracks for the City of Melbourne was selected in
1855-56 and was probably selected for its proximity to the city, as well as the fact that it had
largely remained undeveloped prior to this time. It was gazetted as military reserve in June
1859, comprising 168 acres on the western side of St Kilda Road.




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Several parcels of the 168 acres were sold off as freehold land, and used for public reserves
during 1880s, gradually reducing the size of the barracks site.

In 1854 the General Headquarters of the Imperial Army in Australia moved from Sydney to
Melbourne, due largely to the latter’s prominence relating to goldfields expansion across
Victoria. The first tenders were called in July 1856, for “temporary office and stores, and a two
rail fence”.

The following individual building histories are provided:

A Block

Construction of A block commenced in 1860, to the design of Public Works Architect, Gustav
Joachimi. The central bay and southern wing were built first, with the north wing added in the
1870s for the NCO’s quarters. The building was used as Officers’ quarters and housed
apartments and offices for senior military personnel throughout the late nineteenth and early
twentieth centuries.

During World War One, A Block accommodated Defence headquarters, and continued to be
used for this role until Defence HQ moved to Canberra in 1958. It continues to serve an
administrative function today.

A-New Wing (ANW)

A-New Wing was constructed to the design of John Smith Murdoch from 1915-1918, to be
sympathetic in scale and design to its older neighbour. It was designed to provide additional
administrative space and housed offices for senior military officers including Ministers and
Secretaries of Defence. Room 108 became the War Cabinet Room during Australia’s
involvement in World War Two. The Department of Defence Headquarters moved to Canberra
in 1958 and the building has continued its administrative role, providing offices and meeting
rooms for staff.

B Block

Constructed in 1862 as the Barracks Guardhouse, B Block was established to provide cells and
guard accommodation. It was built to the design of the Public Works Department by contractor
GD Langridge. In 1910 it was converted to a Chemical Laboratory, later the Defence Library in
the 1930s and the Printing Section in the 1970s. It has also been used as office
accommodation and was refurbished in 1997. It now contains the VBM Guardhouse Heritage
Centre, conference and office space.

C Block

The earliest sections of C Block were constructed in 1860 -1861 as the Armoury and Ordnance
storage buildings, with the design influenced by Sir Peter Scratchley. These functions
continued through until about 1911, when changes to the use of these buildings were proposed.
The additions to C Block were commenced in 1912 under the direction of John Smith Murdoch.




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This included the addition of a second storey to the (western) ordnance store to provide a
symmetrical base, on which to construct the red brick second and third floors to the central
pavilion, as well as the rendered colonnade.

By 1937 the Armoury was used for stores and Navy occupied the old Ordnance offices. The
building has served an office and administrative function since this time.

D Block

D Block was constructed in 1940 and was originally known as N Block, designed by D.B.
Windebank. It was built adjoining the east and west wings of C Block. The demands placed on
Victoria Barracks leading up to and during World War Two required additional office
accommodation to be provided, and D Block was built originally to house the HQ Department of
Navy and RAAF administrative functions. It continues to be used for offices.

F Block

F Block was constructed as the Barrack’s military hospital in 1856-57. By the late 1880s it had
been converted to an Ordnance Stores Office, as its location close by the Armoury and
Ordnance store made it well suited to this function. It has served as offices and storage to the
present day.

G Block

G Block was erected in 1856-1859 as the soldiers’ barracks block, and several contracts were
let for material supply, although the labour was largely supplied by the 40th (2nd Somersetshire)
Regiment of Foot. The southern portion housing 250 soldiers was ready for occupation in late
1859, with a mirrored northern wing intended (but never built). The Imperial troops for whom
the barracks were built were gone by 1870, and at this time only a small number of permanent
local soldiers (known as the Victorian Artillery Corps), were housed there.

In 1871, the northern end of G Block became the home for juvenile and destitute children of the
Melbourne Industrial School, although the location within a military site was considered
unsuitable for such a purpose. Gradually the children from Victoria Barracks were moved to
boarding houses, and by 1881 the northern end of G Block was being used by the Victoria
Police. Their area was fenced off from the grounds used by the military, and a Police Parade
Ground was established between G Block and J Block, which was also used by the Police for a
time.

The last military personnel housed in G Block departed for newer barracks at Maribyrnong in
1914. The police moved to new premises in 1920. From World War One, G Block has been
predominantly used as offices for various Army units, as well as by the RAAF. The Officers’
Mess was constructed in 1933, to the design of H.G. Mackennal, director of the Commonwealth
Works Department, and has continued to function as a Mess to the present. The southern end
of G Block is occupied by the Victoria Barracks Melbourne Sergeants’ Mess.




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J Block

Construction of J Block commenced in 1858 to house the Staff Sergeants’ Quarters. It
maintained this function until the mid 1870s when it became the Police Hospital, at the time
when police officers were housed in northern end of G Block. A verandah was added in 1878.

The Victoria Police moved out in 1920 and by 1921, J Block was used by the newly formed
RAAF.

By the late 1930s the Chief of Air Staff was accommodated in J Block, along with other senior
RAAF personnel. The RAAF, Air Board and Department for Civil Aviation remained throughout
World War Two. In 1975 the RAAF vacated the building, and it has since been used for
administrative purposes.

M Block

M Block was built during the period of expansion of office accommodation due to the threat of
impending war. Completed in 1939 to the design of Department of Works architect D.B.
Windebank, it was built parallel to A Block and connected to it via a series of enclosed
walkways, as its function was to house support staff for the senior administration in A Block and
ANW.

In 1999 M Block was being used as a barracks medical centre operated by 6 RAAF Hospital. It
continues its role as the Health Centre and associated offices for staff, in addition to housing
general administrative offices.

The Chapel

The Chapel was constructed in 1862 and its original use was as quarters for married soldiers.
Later it was used for residential accommodation for a site caretaker, and various Defence
personnel have also lived there. In 1992 it was renovated, blessed and dedicated as Barracks
Chapel.

Motor Transport Depot

The Motor Transport Depot was erected on the part of the Victoria Barracks site originally used
as stables and yards for mounted troops, and later the mounted police. In 1924 the stables and
other structures were cleared for the Transport Depot with additions constructed in the mid
1930s. Part of this was demolished when K-Block was constructed in the late 1970s. Some
original elements remain, including the boundary wall to Wadey Street.

The Keep

The construction of the Keep commenced in 1859 after tenders were called, and was designed
to be a visually strong element that was also part of the defensive perimeter wall surrounding
the site. As well as its defensive function, it contained ablution blocks for the troops, a function
it retained for many years.

Over time the defensive role of the Keep lessened, as more and more structures were built
outside the confines of the perimeter wall and several sections of the wall were demolished.



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The Keep retained a symbolic purpose. It has been used for storage, including as a wine store,
for a number of years.

The Repatriation Building (Asset 013)

The Repatriation Building replaced an earlier galvanised structure on the south eastern corner
of the site. It was constructed in 1936-37 to the design of George Hallendal of the
Commonwealth Department of Works to house an outpatient clinic, including medical
examination rooms, theatres and a dispensary.

It was temporarily used as a store for the Department of Defence, when transferred to Defence.
It was used by the Maintenance Engineering Agency for a time during the 1990s. In 1999 it was
described as unoccupied and in ‘disrepair’ and has been vacant since. All asbestos material
was removed in 2005 and the exterior refurbished in 2006.

The Parade Ground

The Parade Ground is the rectangular expanse of lawn uniting the facades of M Block, H Block,
G Block and C Block. The open feel and proliferation of views to and from the Ground creates a
distinct character unique to the precinct. Several juvenile Magnolias (Magnolia grandiflora) line
the bitumen footpaths on all but the western boundary of the lawn. Bollard and chain fencing
restricts access to the Parade Ground from all edges and the northern edge adjacent to H Block
is also bounded by a brick and bluestone parking area. Artefacts including three guns, a
Douglas C47 Dakota propeller, a kedge anchor from the HMAS Australia II, and a Great War
Memorial sculpture rest on the boundaries.

The location of the Parade Ground has remained unchanged from the initial pre-1860 plan to
current day and visually and physically forms the heart of Victoria Barracks. The Parade Ground
once occupied a larger area and fulfilled a more prominent function before the construction of H
Block and its associated parking truncated its length. A fountain contemporary with the
construction of H Block (1979) was positioned at the northern end of the ground, but was
removed during major earthworks to restore the parade ground in 1995.

In 1871 the Parade Ground was partially enclosed by a high timber paling or corrugated iron
fence at the west end to separate the military and police precincts. An 1889 plan shows a
planting of nine trees, five on the northern edge and four on the eastern edge, possibly Moreton
Bay Figs (Ficus macrophylla). Photographs from the era confirm the trees were planted but it is
unclear whether these trees were the same Moreton Bay Figs shown in a 1920 photograph of C
Block, two of which still exist today, but in locations differing from those suggested by the 1889
plan.

The Parade Ground has been a practice and ceremonial venue for much of Victoria Barracks
history, save for a period of approximately 60 years, when several temporary structures were
erected on the parade ground, initially associated with Australia’s military involvement in World
War One and Two.




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Site Gardens

Established in 1996 in the grassy space adjacent to the eastern edge of C Block, The Peace
Rose Garden was planted to celebrate the pursuit of peace throughout the world and the
Australian Defence Force members who have served in UN and multi-national peace-making
and peace-keeping forces. The ‘Peace’ and ‘Spirit of Peace’ roses were originally under-
planted with low growing grasses and herbs, but now exist in a rectangle of bare earth. The
roses are appropriate for a Peace Garden as the ‘Peace’ Rose was named on 29 April 1945,
the day Berlin fell to the Allies, and the ‘Spirit of Peace’ Rose named fifty years later to
commemorate the anniversary. The terra cotta tiles bordering the garden originally bounded
the Canary Island Palms in front of A Block and, because they have been moved from their
original location, do not retain their full heritage value. Ashes of a few individuals have been
interred in the garden. At present, the garden is in need of rejuvenation, as the symbolic
message of the garden is in danger of being diluted.

The Peace Rose Garden is not of heritage significance. However, it has cultural significance
due to its location within a military barracks, the ideal of peace that it celebrates, as well as a
memorial to those who have had their ashes placed there.

Directly north of the Peace Rose Garden on the opposite side of the road lies the Victoria Cross
Garden (VC Garden), a grassed, ovoid space planted with four Gallipoli Lone Pines (Pinus
brutia) in a linear layout*. The four pines represent each of the four wars in which Australian
servicemen won a Victoria Cross; the Boer War, WWI, WWII, and Vietnam. The Victoria
Barracks Lone Pines came from seedlings propagated and donated by Anglesea Barracks,
Hobart. The Pines are under-planted with Rosemary bushes (Rosmarinus officinalis) to
symbolise remembrance.

The Gallipoli Lone Pine has become a strong cultural icon representing the heroism and
tenacity of Australian servicemen. Gallipoli Lone Pines in Australia were cultivated from a single
specimen originating on Plateau 400 or ‘Lone Pine’ in Turkey- the setting for several high
casualty hand-to-hand battles in World War One. The plateau was a heavily fortified Turkish
trench position cleared of all trees except a solitary Pinus brutia (Turkish Pine, known in
Australia as the Gallipoli Lone Pine). The battle for this plateau involved six Australian Battalions
suffering heavy casualties (80 officers and 2197 men; Turkish deaths estimated between 5,000
and 6,000). At least two soldiers took cones from the Lone Pine as souvenirs of their
experience. Once back on Australian soil, seeds from the cones were cultivated and distributed
for planting at memorials including the Shrine of Remembrance in Melbourne. The Victoria
Barracks Melbourne Lone Pines came from seedlings propagated and donated by Anglesea
Barracks, Hobart. The original Lone Pine was destroyed in the fighting.

Other Gardens onsite not containing heritage or cultural significance are those associated with
H Block.

*Gallipoli Lone Pines (Pinus brutia) were once classified as Pinus halepensis var. brutia, but
have now been assigned their own genus. They have been given the vernacular name Turkish
Pine though sometimes referred to as Aleppo Pine. This name is generally applied to Pinus
halepensis.




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2.2       HERITAGE STATUS AND LEGISLATIVE FRAMEWORK

All levels of government in Australia are involved in cultural heritage and many different arms of
government have a role in the identification, management and protection of heritage places and
objects.

The following legislative matrix has been developed to summarise the various forms of
legislation and their implications on the site management of Victoria Barracks, Melbourne.

NOTE: Comprehensive details regarding the various forms of legislation affecting Victoria
Barracks are provided in Appendix B.

HERITAGE LEGISLATION MATRIX

                                                     Implications for Site
Legislation                    Administrator                                                Relevant Notes
                                                     Management

EPBC Act 1999                  DEWR                  None (However, refer to Section        Victoria Barracks is NOT included
(Commonwealth) –                                     5.4 a discussion of the implications   on the National Heritage List
                                                     of a NHL listing)
National Heritage List
                                                                                            Victoria Barracks is entered on
EPBC Act 1999                  DEWR                  A written plan to protect and          the CHL both as a Precinct (refer
(Commonwealth) –                                     manage the Commonwealth                Appendix B Heritage Legislation &
                                                     heritage values of the place must      Listings) and for individual
Commonwealth                                         be prepared. All actions must be       buildings, including A Block, B
Heritage List                                        in compliance with an accredited       Block, C Block, F Block, G Block,
                                                     management plan for the place.         J Block, and the Keep.
                                                                                            This means that the individual
                                                     Advice from the Australian             buildings, and items and elements
                                                     Government Minister for the            listed in the Precinct listing must
                                                     Environment and Water                  be managed in accordance with
                                                     Resources must be sought prior to      the adjacent implications.
                                                     undertaking any actions that will
                                                     have, or is likely to have, a
                                                     significant impact on the place.
                                                     Advice is not required however if a
                                                     plan for managing the place has
                                                     been endorsed by the Minister and
                                                     the action is provided for or taken
                                                     in accordance with the plan.

                                                     Actions must not be taken that will
                                                     have, or is likely to have an
                                                     adverse impact on the
                                                     Commonwealth heritage values of
                                                     the place, unless there is no
                                                     feasible and prudent alternative to
                                                     taking the action and all measures
                                                     that can reasonably be taken to
                                                     mitigate the impact of the action
                                                     on those values have been taken.

                                                     Approval must be obtained from
                                                     the Minister before any action
                                                     takes place which has, will have,
                                                     or is likely to have, a significant
                                                     impact on the Commonwealth
                                                     heritage values of a listed place.




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HERITAGE LEGISLATION MATRIX

                                                     Implications for Site
Legislation                    Administrator                                                Relevant Notes
                                                     Management
                                                                                            The same buildings and areas are
EPBC Act                       DEWR                  Certain referral and approval          listed under the RNE at Victoria
1999(Commonwealth) –                                 requirements (Section 26 to 28         Barracks as those listed on the
                                                     inclusive) of the EPBC Act.            CHL (see above)
Register of the
National Estate                                      Must be considered by Australian
                                                     Government Minister for the
                                                     Environment and Water
                                                     Resources and when making
                                                     decisions under the EPBC Act.

Victorian Heritage Act         Heritage Victoria     Defence is not under any               Victoria Barracks has not been
1995                                                 legislative obligation to seek         listed on the Victorian Heritage
                                                     approval from Heritage Victoria to     Register (VHR).
                                                     undertake groundworks within the
                                                     Victoria Barracks site, however it     Victoria Barracks has been
                                                     would be good practice to do so.       entered into the Heritage
                                                                                            Inventory (H 7822-0210) for
                                                                                            potential archaeological value.

Planning and                   City of               In accordance with the existing        The Victoria Barracks site is
Environment Act 1987           Melbourne             agreement between                      defined as Commonwealth Land
(Victoria)                                           Commonwealth and State,                on the City of Melbourne Planning
                                                     compliance with state environment      Scheme, and as such is not
                                                     and planning laws as a ‘best           subject to the provisions of the
                                                     practice' approach to the              scheme (other than to the extent
                                                     management of local heritage           defined under Implications)
                                                     values should be adopted.

Aboriginal Heritage Act        Aboriginal            Large developments and high            The Regulations prescribe
2006                           Affairs Victoria      impact activities in culturally        circumstances that will trigger the
                               (AAV)                 sensitive landscapes may require       preparation of a Cultural Heritage
(replaced Part IIA of the                            the preparation of a Cultural          Management Plan. The Plan
Commonwealth                                         Heritage Management Plan.              should be approved prior to
Aboriginal and Torres                                Activities likely to harm Aboriginal   undertaking such activities.
Strait Islander Heritage                             cultural heritage may require a
Protection Act 1984 and                              Cultural Heritage Permit               Victoria Barracks lies within the
the State                                                                                   Wurundjeri Tribe Land
Archaeological and                                                                          Compensation and Cultural
Aboriginal Relics                                                                           Heritage Council Incorporated
Preservation Act 1972)                                                                      area.




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National Trust of Australia (Victoria)

Victoria Barracks has several listings on the National Trust Register, including:

J Block – File Number B203 (level of value: Regional)

The Keep – File Number B204 (level of value: Regional)

F Block – File Number B1254 (level of value: Local)

A Block – File Number B1255 (level of value: Regional)

Wall and Gates – File Number B1318 (level of value: International)

Cannon – File Number B1999 (level of value: Local)

G Block – File Number B2950 (level of value: Regional)

Guardhouse – File Number B2956 (level of value: Local)

Caretaker’s Cottage – File Number B3106 (level of value: File only)

The National Trust of Australia is a community-based, non-government organisation that works
to promote and conserve Australia's indigenous, natural and historic heritage through its
advocacy work and its custodianship of heritage places and objects.

Classification by the National Trust recognises the heritage values of places and objects, but it
has no legal implications.




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                             FIGURE 2            Site Plan

                             PROJECT TITLE       Victoria Barracks, Melbourne, Victoria

                             SCALE               Not to scale




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2.3       KEY HERITAGE ASSETS

2.3.1 Individual Heritage Assets and their Values

To assess the values of the various heritage assets at Victoria Barracks, Melbourne, the
following significance ranking tool has been used. These levels of significance have been
developed by the Defence Directorate for Heritage and Biodiversity Conservation (DHBC) to
provide a consistent approach.

Exceptional:               Rare or outstanding precinct or element which significantly embodies and
                           demonstrates Commonwealth Heritage values in its own right and makes a
                           direct and irreplaceable contribution to a place’s significance/value. High
                           degree of original fabric or attributes with heritage values. Loss or alteration
                           would significantly diminish the Commonwealth heritage values of the place.

High:                      Precinct or element which demonstrates Commonwealth Heritage Values in
                           its own right and makes a significant contribution to the place’s heritage
                           value. Existing alterations do not detract from its heritage values. Loss or
                           unsympathetic further alteration would diminish the Commonwealth Heritage
                           values of the place.

Moderate:                  Precinct or element which reflects some Commonwealth heritage values but
                           only contributes to the overall significance/values of the place in a moderate
                           way. Loss or unsympathetic alteration is likely to diminish the
                           Commonwealth Heritage values of the place.

Low:                       Precinct or element which reflects some Commonwealth Heritage values
                           and only contributes to the overall significance/values of the place in a
                           moderate way. Loss will not diminish the Commonwealth Heritage values of
                           the place.

None:                      Precinct or element which does not reflect or demonstrate any
                           Commonwealth Heritage values and detracts from the overall
                           Commonwealth Heritage values of the place. Does not fulfil criteria for
                           heritage listing.

Intrusive:                 Damaging to the place’s heritage values. Loss may contribute to the
                           Commonwealth Heritage values of the place. Does not fulfil criteria for
                           heritage listing.




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                             FIGURE 3            Significance Rankings of Individual Heritage Assets

                             PROJECT TITLE       Victoria Barracks, Melbourne, Victoria

                             SCALE               Not to scale


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The following table is a quick reference table of the individual heritage assets at Victoria
Barracks and their values. Further details of the condition and integrity of the assets are
provided in Volume 2 – Heritage Handbook.
 Asset Name          Current Use                   Former Use                Date           Heritage Value

 A Block             Administration &              Senior Defence            1860-62        Exceptional
                     Offices                       and Officers’
                                                   Accommodation
 A-New Wing          Administration &              Administration,           1915-18        Exceptional
 (ANW)               Offices                       War Cabinet
                                                   Room
 B Block             Heritage Centre and           Guard House,              1862           High
                     Conference Room               Cells, Chemical
                                                   Laboratory,
                                                   Printing Office,
                                                   Library, Barracks
                                                   Staff Offices
 C Block             Offices                       Armoury and               1860; 1912     High
                                                   Ordnance Store            second and
                                                                             third storey
                                                                             added
 D Block             Offices                       Offices                   1940           Low
                                                   Department of
                                                   Navy and RAAF
                                                   Administration
 F Block             Offices                       Military Hospital,        1856-57        High
                                                   Ordnance Stores
                                                   Office
 G Block             Offices, Officers’            Soldiers’                 1856-59        High / Exceptional
                     Mess (northern end)           Barracks, Police
                     Sergeants’ Mess               accommodation,
                     (southern end)                Officers’ Mess
 H Block             Administration,               Defence Signals           1979           Intrusive
                     Offices, Auditorium,          Directorate
                     Café and Credit
                     Union Offices
 J Block             Offices                       Staff Sergeants’          1858, 1878     High
                                                   Quarters, Police          verandah
                                                   Hospital, Civil           added
                                                   Aviation Authority,
                                                   RAAF Offices
 K Block             Services Buildings            -                         c1976          None


 M Block             Health Centre and             Additional Offices        1939           Moderate
                     Offices                       linked with A
                                                   Block
 The Keep            Storage                       WC’s, Defensive           1859-89        High
 (Asset 018)                                       feature in
                                                   perimeter wall




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 Asset Name          Current Use                   Former Use                Date           Heritage Value

 The Chapel          Chapel                        Married Quarters          1862           High
 (Asset 012)                                       and Barracks
                                                   Caretaker’s
                                                   Quarters
 Motor               Garages                       Former site of            Mid 1930’s     Low
 Transport                                         stables
 Depot
 Repatriation        Vacant Offices                Repatriation              1937           Moderate
 Building                                          Outpatient Clinic
 (Asset 013)


2.3.2 Built Heritage Values

Significance of Assets Rated ‘Moderate’ or above

A Block

A Block is one of the earliest buildings constructed at Victoria Barracks, dating from 1860, and is
an outstanding example of the work of the Victorian Public Works Department under Architect
Gustav Joachimi.

A Block is the most visually dominant building on the site and presents the ‘face’ of the Barracks
to St Kilda Road, representing the authority and formal nature of the Defence activities housed
within.

A Block is architecturally significant as a refined example of the Victorian Italianate style,
appropriate to represent the importance of the functions within. It is finely crafted in basalt with
austere detailing and finely dressed stone. Internally the building retains numerous original
features including ornate cornices, iron work and fine staircases.

A Block has been associated with the administration functions of Australia’s Defence since its
construction from 1860 onwards, and has served this function through several major events
including both World Wars.

A Block housed offices and provided for defence administration throughout these periods.

A Block is associated with numerous important military figures in Australia’s history, having
housed the offices of such senior military officers as Colonel (later Major General) Bridges and
Field Marshal Sir Thomas Blamey. A Block contained Defence headquarters throughout World
War One.

A-New Wing (ANW)

A-New Wing is significant for its direct association with Australia’s involvement in World War
Two and housing the War Cabinet Room where major decisions were made.

A-New Wing is architecturally accomplished and is associated with Government Architect John
Smith Murdoch, who designed the building in 1915 to be sympathetic to neighbouring A Block; it
displays good use of similar materials and massing and is visually an appropriate addition to the
St Kilda Road boulevard.


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A-New Wing is associated with the key figures of Australia’s involvement in World War Two
including Prime Ministers Sir Robert Menzies, John Curtin and Ben Chifley, and senior military
officers, housing their offices throughout the period of conflict.

The War Cabinet Room (room 108) is highly significant as the site of major decisions made by
Australia’s War Cabinet and Advisory War Council during World War Two, and retains key items
including some original furniture, sound proofing and concealed map and notice boards behind
panelling to the walls.

B Block

B Block is significant as the former original guardhouse constructed in 1862 to provide
accommodation for duty guards, cells and office accommodation.

B Block retains original design details and materials from the earliest period of development at
the Barracks, including basalt walls, and the hipped slate roof detailing displayed on other early
buildings

B Block demonstrates the changing requirements of the Barracks, adapted from its original
Guardhouse use to temporary use as an ammunition store, in the early twentieth century, before
being converted in 1910 to a chemical laboratory, the first of its kind in Defence. This function
transferred to Maribyrnong in 1922, and B Block became a library and later office
accommodation.

B Block is an important component of the original axial planning of the Barracks and is a visually
important element at the south gate.

C Block

The earliest parts of C Block date from 1860 and are representative of the style of building and
preferred planning used at this time, following the axial nature of building location and using
similar materials and form to its contemporaries.

The 1860s parts of C Block are significant for their original role as the Armoury and Ordnance
store, and may have been influenced in their design by Sir Peter Scratchley.

The later (1912) additions to C Block are important as an excellent example of design resolution
through the integration of the old and new fabric, and represent a major change in the focus of
the Barracks from Colonial to Commonwealth control, resulting in a more administrative role for
the site.

The 1912 additions are associated with John Smith Murdoch, Government Architect, and
display his skill at integrating the new fabric into the existing structure, whilst providing the
building with a new identity focused towards the Parade Ground.

D Block

D Block is an unadorned and relatively plain building, which does not have a direct relationship
with the key central parade ground focal point of the site. However it is representative of the
style and design elements used in the 1940s by the government Public Works Department,



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under D.B. Windebank, and is indicative of the rapid expansion of office accommodation
provided to cater for the requirements created by World War Two.

Windebank was also responsible for the design of M Block (1939) and the architecturally
impressive Officers’ Mess at RAAF Williams (Laverton).

F Block

F Block is a key component of the earliest construction phase at the Barracks, constructed as a
Military Hospital in 1856-57.

F Block is architecturally significant and relates to most of the early buildings through the use of
bluestone walls, hipped corrugated roof and symmetrical design; F Block is almost identical in
design to J Block.

F Block demonstrates the changing requirements of the site and has adapted to suit, being first
used as a Military Hospital, later an Ordnance Stores Office, and then to office, administrative
and storage purposes.

F Block is significant as one of the earliest known hospital buildings in Victoria, although it is no
longer used for this purpose.

G Block

G Block is significant as the earliest substantial building to be commenced at the site in 1856 as
the soldiers’ barracks. It was not completed until 1859, built largely using the military for labour,
and housed 250 men.

G Block is architecturally significant as one of the earliest bluestone buildings at the site. Its
form is derived from its use, with each unit having its own hipped roof, concealed when viewed
from the ground by the bluestone parapet. It displays typical detailing including rock faced
coursed bluestone walling, multipaned timber sash windows and timber joinery. The southern
‘tower’ has a newer flat roof, reportedly due to an anti-aircraft gun being temporarily installed
there during World War Two.

G Block is an important component in the original axial planning of the site, and holds a
prominent position on the western side of the parade ground.

J Block

J Block is significant as one of the early and intact bluestone buildings at Victoria Barracks,
reflecting the axial planning, material use and design characteristics of this group of buildings. It
was the first permanent building to be built in the barracks by private contractors instead of the
military or military contractors.

J Block is architecturally impressive and is the only building to have a decorative timber and
cast iron verandah, also retaining its slate roof.

J Block is important for its altering use and adaptation, from its original function as the Staff
Sergeants’ Quarters, through use as the Police Hospital, and then use as the RAAF offices.



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M Block

M Block is indicative of the expansion of accommodation required due to the threat of
impending war.

M Block is a restrained design of four storey face red brick and manganese brick that employs
similar massing to its neighbouring buildings. It retains original fabric and some ornate detailing
indicative of its time, in a style respectful of both A Block and C Block.

The Keep (Asset 018)

The Keep is one of the early buildings remaining on the site, and conforms to the original axial
planning and design of the site. It is intact and well built using the materials commonly applied
to this era of buildings, displaying finely crafted bluestone walls with a crenellated parapet and
defensive slit windows. It is important for its original defensive function in conjunction with the
perimeter wall (now largely demolished), and also for its symbolic value.

The Chapel (Asset 012)

The Chapel / Former Married Soldiers’ Quarters is significant as one of the earlier buildings
constructed at Victoria Barracks, but set apart from its contemporaries by its domestic scale and
appearance. It is the only remaining residence within the barracks. It continues to serve the
important role of Barracks Chapel.

The Repatriation Building (Asset 013)

The Repatriation Building is an important component of the Government facilities established to
assist repatriated armed forces personnel, in particular from World War One, and later, for
subsequent wars and conflicts.

The Repatriation building is a good example of an Art Deco influenced design, with restrained
detailing, and is associated with the architect George Hallendal, a major influence on the design
of many 1930-40s Defence Buildings through his work at the Commonwealth Department of
Works.




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                             FIGURE 4            Map of Landscape Precincts

                             PROJECT TITLE       Victoria Barracks, Melbourne, Victoria

                             SCALE               Not to scale


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                             FIGURE 5            Map of Landscape Elements

                             PROJECT TITLE       Victoria Barracks, Melbourne, Victoria

                             SCALE               Not to scale


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2.3.3 Landscape Values and Attributes

True to its original intent, the landscape of Victoria Barracks is understated, utilitarian, and
spartan. Construction, renovation and continuous use over the past 150 years have impacted
upon and altered the landscape, which in keeping with the Barracks as a whole, was always
sparse. Significant elements with heritage value remain that should be retained, maintained, or
expanded to increase their presence onsite including: the formal, enclosed, axial layout of the
compound; the remnants of the perimeter wall which convey the original planning intent of the
barracks; the open quality of the Parade Ground; the circulation patterns with the Parade
Ground as its centre; the Canary Island Palms (Phoenix canariensis), Boston Ivy
(Parthenocissus tricuspidata) and overall character of the St Kilda Road frontage associated
with A Block; the Canary Island Palms (Phoenix canariensis) and English Elms (Ulmus procera)
surrounding the Chapel; the Moreton Bay Figs (Ficus macrophylla) growing adjacent to the
north-eastern corner of C Block; and the single Smooth-barked Apple (Angophora costata) in
the north parking area near the north guardhouse and entry gate.

Trees are identified as significant when they conform to criteria established for the identification
of heritage trees established by the National Trust of Australia (Victoria). The level of
significance is dependant upon the individual tree and the degree to which the tree meets the
criteria.

The Canary Island Palms (Phoenix canariensis) and Boston Ivy (Parthenocissus tricuspidata)
are highly significant on their own as well as part of A Block’s St Kilda Road frontage because
they are the main elements of A Block’s St Kilda Road frontage which has, over time, become a
landscape iconic of Victoria Barracks Melbourne. The group of Canary Island Palms (Phoenix
canariensis), their visual connection with Victoria Barracks Melbourne, their connection to the
history and planting preference of the 1920s when they were planted, their presence as part of
St Kilda Road, as well as their age render them significant. The Boston Ivy growing on A Block
is of similar aesthetic prominence to the palms adding to the presence and impact of A Block.
The vine is of a similar age to the palms and has achieved impressive spread and trunk
circumference.

The five Canary Island Palms (Phoenix canariensis) located near the Chapel are of moderate
significance as they are the same era as those associated with A Block’s St Kilda Road
frontage. They are representative of the history of Victoria Barracks Melbourne and are a
prominent element of the landscaping of the Chapel area. The two English Elms (Ulmus
procera) located on the east side of the Chapel are significant because of their age, size, and
connection to the street trees used throughout Melbourne around the turn of the century.
Similarly, the Moreton Bay Figs (Ficus macrophylla) on the north eastern corner of C Block
achieve moderate significance because of their age, their long term connection with the
aesthetics of C Block, and their link with the plantings of Moreton Bay Figs (Ficus macrophylla)
that once surrounded the Parade Ground. Finally, the Smooth-barked Apple Gum located at the
northeastern corner of the North Carpark is significant as an outstanding example of its type, its
impressive trunk diameter and canopy spread and its aesthetic contribution to the otherwise
Spartan character of the space.

The original intent of Victoria Barracks was to provide a substantial and permanent barracks for
troops stationed in Melbourne, surrounded on all sides by an imposing boundary wall. As the


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barracks expanded, the perimeter wall was breached to allow for further construction and
expansion. Remnants of the wall convey the 1850s extent of the barracks as well as the sense
of enclosure, a key characteristic of the original planning objective of Victoria Barracks. The
Parade Ground has always been the central feature used in early years for ceremony and
practice.

The St Kilda Road frontage associated with A Block, while not the original installation, has
become an image consistently identified with Victoria Barracks, St Kilda Road, and the City of
Melbourne and possesses high heritage value. Prior to 1920, the landscape along St Kilda
Road was lined with a timber post and rail fence, native shrubs and specimen eucalypts.
Around the time of completion of A-New Wing (c.1920), the landscape and public face of
Victoria Barracks were redressed with the existing Canary Island Palms, Boston Ivy and panels
of lawn, a formal and axial configuration which mirrored the intent of the barracks as a whole.
The Canary Island Palms associated with the Chapel were also installed at this time.

Because of the functionality inherent in the original design and the need for all space to be
usable, there are few significant trees within Victoria Barracks site. The Canary Island Palms,
mature Moreton Bay Figs, and Smooth-barked Apple Gum are all significant. Unfortunately the
proximity of the Moreton Bay Figs to the exterior wall of C Block and the proximity of the
Smooth-barked Apple Gum to the perimeter wall may impact upon the integrity of the structures
and should be monitored.

Several elements that do not contain heritage value but are significant in that they hold cultural
implications are: the Dr Hawke Tree, a single specimen of Smooth-barked Kauri (Agathis
robusta) located on the northwest corner of A-New Wing planted by Dr. Allan Hawke, Secretary,
Department of Defence on 16 October 2001 to commemorate the centenary of the Australian
Defence Public Service; the Peace Rose Garden located between B and C Blocks; and the
Victoria Cross (VC) Garden located on the southern edge of M Block.

Artefacts including a 25 pounder gun, Palliser 64 pounder gun, no. 1719, Palliser 64 pounder
gun, no. 1821, a Douglas C47 Dakota propeller, anchor from HMAS Australia II, and a Great
War Memorial sculpture are installed on site. These objects have contributory heritage
significance and their placement at the corners of the Parade Ground is appropriate as guns are
traditionally placed at four corners of parade grounds to signify a position of strength and
“holding ground”. However, care should be taken to ensure that such installations, both on the
Parade Ground and elsewhere on site, are thoughtful and suitable for their locations.
Placement of artefacts on or near the parade ground should not interrupt the visual and physical
openness of the ground and should not disrupt the function of the ground as a practice, show,
and ceremonial ground. Most importantly, the Parade Ground must not become a repository for
objects lacking appropriate siting.




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The following table is a quick reference table of the individual heritage landscape elements at
Victoria Barracks and their values. Further details of the condition and integrity of the elements
are provided in Volume 2 – Heritage Handbook.


 Landscape Element Name                    Description                       Date               Heritage Value

 Smooth-barked apple tree                  Significant tree                  c.1950s            Moderate
 (Angophora costata)

 Allan Hawke Tree                          Commemorative planting            2001               Low


 Moreton Bay figs                          Significant tree                  c.1920             Moderate
 (Ficus macrophylla)

 Parade Ground                             Ceremonial, visually              Est 1860           High
                                           prominent

 Boston Ivy                                Visual feature to A-Block         c.1920             High
 (Parthenocissus tricuspidate)

 Canary Island Palms                       Significant trees                 c.1920             High
 (Phoenix canariensis)

 St Kilda Road Façade                      Public frontage, visual           Est 1920s          High
                                           feature

 Peace Rose Garden                         Memorial Garden                   est 1996           Low


 Victoria Cross Garden                     Memorial Garden                   est 1996           Low


 English Elm                               Significant tree                  Unknown            Moderate
 (Ulmus procera)

 Remnants of Perimeter Wall                Part of today’s boundary          Est 1860           High
                                           and internal site remnants




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SIGNIFICANCE OF LANDSCAPE ELEMENTS RATED ‘MODERATE’ OR ABOVE

Smooth-barked Apple (Angophora costata)

The Smooth-barked Apple located in the northeast corner of the site adjacent to the perimeter
wall. The tree is a large, well established and outstanding example of its type. Its impressive
trunk diameter, wide canopy spread, outstanding aesthetic value and prominent positioning
within the North Carpark make a significant contribution to the otherwise spartan character of
the space. The tree informs the character of the space and offers solar protection to the
adjacent parking area.

Moreton Bay Fig (Ficus macrophylla)

The two mature Moreton Bay Figs planted at the northeast corner of C Block are characteristic
of plantings of the 1920s and enhance the character of both C Block and the Parade Ground.

The Figs achieve moderate significance because of their age, their long term connection with
the aesthetics of C Block, and their link with the plantings of Moreton Bay Figs (Ficus
macrophylla) that once surrounded the Parade Ground.

The Parade Ground

The Parade Ground, a feature inherent in the design of the site since 1856, forms the physical
and symbolic heart of the Victoria Barracks complex. The large, bare expanse of uniform open
space establishes the barracks as a functional and ceremonial landscape. Views to and from
the Parade Ground characterise the experience from the key historic buildings that form its
borders.

Boston Ivy (Parthenocissus tricuspidata)

The Boston Ivy is an iconic facet of the A Block façade and forms part of the St Kilda Road
frontage. The Boston Ivy (Parthenocissus tricuspidata) as an individual specimen and as an
integral part of A Block’s St Kilda Road frontage is highly significant. The Ivy has aesthetic
prominence informing the character of A Block and the St Kilda Road frontage The Boston Ivy,
as part of the St Kilda Road frontage forms a major portion of the public face of Victoria
Barracks and its presence on the face of A Block key in the iconic vignette. The vine dates to
the 1920s and has achieved impressive spread and trunk circumference.

Canary Island Palms (Phoenix canariensis)

The Canary Island Palms are iconic specimens forming the backbone of the St Kilda Road
frontage. Planted circa 1920, these plants are well-established and healthy. The group of
Canary Island Palms (Phoenix canariensis), their visual connection with Victoria Barracks
Melbourne, their connection to the history and planting preference of the 1920s when they were
installed, their visual prominence as part of St Kilda Road, as well as their age render them
significant




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A Block/St Kilda Road Frontage

The A Block façade/St Kilda Road frontage is iconic of Victoria Barracks and makes up part of
the visual character of St Kilda Road. The frontage, inclusive of the significant Canary Island
Palms (Phoenix canariensis) and Boston Ivy (Parthenocissus tricuspidata), reveals the formal
and axial quality of the site as a whole and provides linkage between the form and function of
the site.

Site Gardens

The Site gardens, primarily the Victoria Cross Garden and the Peace Rose Garden form a piece
of the cultural heritage of Victoria Barracks. These gardens, installed in 1996, herald the ideals
of bravery, heroism, and the pursuit of peace. They are memorial in nature and complement the
Shrine of Remembrance, Royal Botanic Gardens, Parliament House, and the City of Melbourne.




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2.3.4 Setting

The location of Victoria Barracks on the busy St Kilda Road has ensured its prominence in the
public eye, particularly the imposing bluestone A and ANW Blocks. The small site has several
key areas of focus, the view from St Kilda Road being the most important in the public realm.

Internally within the site, the most important focus is the Parade Ground, the central open space
flanked by several significant buildings. These include C Block and G Block, and M block to the
east, the final (northern) boundary of the Parade Ground being formed by the somewhat
overwhelming H Block. Whilst M Block is an important building, its location does prevent an
understanding of the original relationship of A Block to the central space.

Outside the central space, there are some important relationships that could be improved,
including that between G Block and the Keep. At present the Keep is somewhat isolated, and
with the demolition of most of the perimeter wall, could benefit from some interpretation. There
is some potential for redevelopment along the Wells Street boundary, which is presently used
for car parking.

The open space in front of A Block along St Kilda Road provides for an important view and
should not be redeveloped in any way. The current main entry does not reflect the highly
significant nature of the site, with the modern / transportable guardhouse the first point of call –
it is understood that there are some issues with the amount of temporary car parking provided at
this point also.

The site sits well within the St Kilda Boulevard, adjacent other important sites such as the
Shrine of Remembrance, the Victorian College of Arts, the Victorian Arts Centre, the Royal
Botanic Gardens and the Queen Victoria Gardens.

Please refer to Figure 6 for a Site Setting Analysis.




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                             FIGURE 6            Site Setting Analysis

                             PROJECT TITLE       Victoria Barracks, Melbourne, Victoria

                             SCALE               Not to scale



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2.3.5 Archaeological

All known non-indigenous archaeological sites in Victoria are listed in the Heritage Inventory.
Victoria Barracks has been entered into the Inventory (H7822-0210) for potential archaeological
value although the Du Cros Archaeological Report (1992) confirms that due to the disturbance
of damp-coursing works in A-Block in the 1960’s the archaeological potential of this building is
now non-existent.

Archaeological areas on Commonwealth land are protected under the EPBC act as part of the
environment and any proposal to undertake groundworks would likely be referred to Heritage
Victoria for comment as good practice.

An archaeological assessment of the entire site should be undertaken.

2.3.6 Indigenous Aspects

There is no current Indigenous Heritage Assessment of the Victoria Barracks Melbourne site.

Due to both its location and long European occupation the Victoria Barracks site is unlikely to
have any indigenous values greater than those held in the general City of Melbourne area.
However, an indigenous heritage assessment of the site should be undertaken to confirm this.

2.4        COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS

Military Barracks were developed in most major cities in Australia during the nineteenth century,
under the direction of British Imperial Military forces. Those that compare with Victoria Barracks
Melbourne in regard to scale, date of establishment and significance include Victoria Barracks
(Sydney), Lancer Barracks (Parramatta), Anglesea Barracks (Hobart) and Victoria Barracks
(Brisbane). The following comparative analysis is provided to give some context to the
assessment of heritage values at Victoria Barracks (Melbourne).

2.4.1 Victoria Barracks, Sydney, NSW

Works to construct the new Barracks in Sydney to replace the dilapidated George Street
facilities commenced in 1841, but it was not until 1848 that the Barracks building was
completed. Other structures completed in the 1840s were the Guard House, Officers’ Quarters,
the Prison, the Hospital and the Bungalow (Barrack Master’s Quarters). The site housed British
Imperial troops until 1870, and then New South Wales Permanent Military Forces until
Federation in 1901, when it became the property of the Commonwealth Defence department.

During the 1930s the site was home to the Duntroon Royal Military College, and later as the
headquarters of various units including the 2nd Division and Field Force Command. In the later
part of the 20th century the Barracks took on more of an administrative role, which it has
maintained to the present day.

The Barracks are located on a prominent rise in the suburb of Paddington in inner Sydney. The
site is largely contained by the impressive sandstone perimeter wall, and most of the early
buildings are retained, as well as significant landscape elements. The Barracks is one of the
oldest continuously operational defence sites in Australia, and the size and integrity of the
Barracks building is unmatched at any other site.



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2.4.2 Lancer Barracks, Parramatta, NSW

The earliest buildings at Lancer Barracks, two single storey officers’ quarters and a two storey
soldiers’ barracks building, were completed by 1819, nearly 50 years before construction at the
Melbourne Victoria Barracks site commenced. One of these earliest buildings has been
demolished, but the site retains several key early structures, and reflects the traditional military
planning of buildings facing inwards to a central parade ground, with strong axial planning and
visual links between buildings an important feature of the site.

The scale of Lancer Barracks is smaller than the other sites discussed, and in 1862 the site
became the Police Barracks for 35 years. It was resumed for Defence purposes in 1897 and
has continued to be used by NSW troops to this day, although it now has an almost purely
administrative role.

The style of the early buildings is distinguished by the use of handmade bricks, and the form of
the buildings where the main roof extends to form a verandah. This remains an unusual feature
in such early buildings, with verandahs being added to buildings at other barracks into the
1870s and 1880s.

2.4.3 Anglesea Barracks, Hobart, Tasmania

Anglesea Barracks is regarded as the oldest military barracks site in Australia, dating from
1814. The site was selected by Governor Lachlan Macquarie in December 1811, the distance
from the town centre designed to reinforce the segregation of troops and populace.

A single storey barracks to accommodate 150 soldiers, with quarters for a captain and three
officers, a small hospital and a kitchen were planned. From 1827-1830 the capacity of the
barracks doubled with the now Sergeants Mess (formerly barracks accommodation). In 1826 a
new Mess room, the Officers Mess and Captain's Quarters and a new Soldier's Barracks were
constructed. The Subalterns Quarters were built in 1828, completing the suite of buildings
defining the Barracks Square.

The site retains a large number of early and intact buildings, as well as the planning scheme
implemented from the earliest days of its establishment, with the parade ground forming the
focal point of the site. Anglesea Barracks is the oldest continuously used military site is
Australia.

2.4.4 Victoria Barracks, Brisbane, Queensland

The Victoria Barracks, Brisbane, site was established in 1860, and consists of a group of
painted brick and stone buildings dating from this time through to the mid twentieth century.
Officers’ quarters, a non-commissioned officers’ and men’s barracks block and canteen, a guard
room and a kitchen annex, were ready for occupation in November 1864. In 1866-67 the
construction of a two-storeyed Commandant’s residence and a military hospital completed the
new military barracks.

Most of the military buildings remained vacant for a number of years from 1869, after the British
Imperial garrison withdrew from the site, under the supervision of a caretaker. They were
converted into police barracks for the Queensland Police Force in 1874, who occupied the site



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until 1885. After this time, the Barracks were used by Queensland Military forces, and after
Federation, the Queensland contingent of the Commonwealth Defence forces. In 1992 Victoria
Barracks, which had functioned as the administrative headquarters of the army in Brisbane
since 1885, became Brisbane’s Joint Defence headquarters.

2.4.5 Conclusion

The sites discussed above are all of significance to the development of the military in Australia,
particularly in the nineteenth century and early twentieth century when each state was more or
less responsible for its own defences, under British Imperial rule. Each site has played host to a
number of significant events, and architecturally each site displays merit in the design, planning
and construction techniques employed.

Victoria Barracks Melbourne is set apart from the sites discussed through its role as the national
Defence headquarters, until 1958 and the construction of the Russell Offices in Canberra as the
new home of Defence. This function saw successive Prime Ministers and Defence Secretaries
use the site for holding War Cabinet meetings, where decisions about Australia’s involvement in
World War Two were made.




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2.5       ASSESSMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE

2.5.1 Assessment against Commonwealth Heritage List Criteria

Victoria Barracks Melbourne has been assessed to meet the Commonwealth Heritage listing
criterion. The place has significant heritage value because of one or more of the following:

ASSESSMENT AGAINST CHL CRITERIA
Criteria                                       Values

a. The place's importance in                   Victoria Barracks Melbourne is highly significant for its role as
the course, or pattern, of                     a key Defence site from its construction in the 1850s until the
Australia's natural or cultural                present day. It served as Australia’s headquarters of Defence
history;                                       until 1958, through both world wars and many other periods of
                                               importance in the development of Australia’s military culture
                                               and standing, and the only place to have housed the
                                               headquarters of all three Armed Services and the Department
                                               of Defence.

b. The place's possession of                    Victoria Barracks, Melbourne, retains several buildings dating
uncommon, rare or                              from the mid nineteenth century, displaying finely crafted
endangered aspects of                          bluestone walls. A Block and A-New Wing retain several rare
Australia's natural or cultural                artefacts relating to the War Cabinet Room and Australia’s
history                                        involvement in both World Wars from an administrative and
                                               decision-making perspective.

c. The place's potential to yield              The Victoria Barracks site has been a military base since the
information that will contribute               1850s, and several areas have been redeveloped over time.
to an understanding of                         The site holds archaeological potential to provide information
Australia's natural or cultural                that may contribute to an understanding of Australian military
history                                        customs from an earlier period.

d. The place's importance in
demonstrating the principal                    Victoria Barracks is demonstrative of a number of
characteristics of:                            characteristics seen at other Defence sites around Australia,
                                               including elements of axial planning, the use of consistent
i) a class of Australia's natural              materials across several buildings, and the focus of a central
or cultural places; or                         parade ground. Like defence headquarters sites in other
ii) a class of Australia's natural             states (Victoria Barracks Sydney, Anglesea Barracks Hobart)
or cultural environments;                      it retains a visual prominence in the neighbourhood.

e. The place's importance in                   Victoria Barracks retains a prominent and highly visible
exhibiting particular aesthetic                location on St Kilda Road, one of Melbourne’s premier sites.
characteristics valued by a                    The consistent use of bluestone, slate roofing, and design
community or cultural group                    characteristics across many buildings presents an
                                               accomplished and highly valued face to the public, and is
                                               valued by both Defence and the wider community.



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ASSESSMENT AGAINST CHL CRITERIA
Criteria                                       Values

f. The place's importance in                   A number of buildings at Victoria Barracks Melbourne display
demonstrating a high degree of                 a high degree of technical merit in craftsmanship and design.
creative or technical
                                               The bluestone buildings of the 1850s and 1860s are very fine
achievement at a particular
                                               examples of design by the Victorian Public Works Department
period
                                               and workmanship by Melbourne stonemasons of the period.

g. The place's strong or special               Victoria Barracks retains a prominent administrative role
association with a particular                  within the Australian Defence forces and is a recognisable
community or cultural group for                and valued asset within the Defence community. It also
social, cultural or spiritual                  retains a level of value to the wider community as the public
reasons                                        face of Defence in Melbourne, an association bolstered by
                                               efforts to allow public access through open days and access
                                               to the War Cabinet Room, historic buildings and the Heritage
                                               Centre through the Heritage Tours program.

h. The place's special                         Victoria Barracks is closely associated with a number of
association with the life or                   prominent figures in Australia’s history, ranging from
works of a person, or group of                 successive Prime Ministers (including Sir Robert Menzies,
persons, of importance in                      John Curtin and Ben Chifley), and Defence Ministers (such as
Australia's natural or cultural                Sir George Foster Pearce, Sir Neville Reginald Howse (VC),
history                                        Sir Wm Thomas Glasgow, Joseph Lyons (later PM) and
                                               Frank Forde) and military officers (including Major General
                                               Bridges, Field Marshal Sir Thomas Blamey, MAJGEN Sir
                                               Brudenell White, GEN Sir Henry Chauvel, MAJGEN JD
                                               Lavarack and MAJ GEN VAH Sturdee), throughout the period
                                               that the barracks served as the nation’s Defence
                                               Headquarters, to several prominent Defence Secretaries
                                               (Permanent Heads of Department of Defence, including Sir
                                               Frederick Shedden, CAPT Collins, RN, Sir Samuel
                                               Pethebridge and Thomas Trumble) to important members of
                                               the Public Works Department including renowned architect,
                                               John Smith Murdoch.

i. The place's importance as                   Not assessed as part of this project.
part of Indigenous tradition.




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2.6       STATEMENT OF SIGNIFICANCE

Victoria Barracks Melbourne is a highly significant site, historically important for its association
with Australia’s defence from its construction (commencing in 1856) at a time when British
Imperial troops defended the colonies. Its significance has continued through Federation and a
Commonwealth based defence system, and through two world wars as National Defence
Headquarters. The role of the site has changed from living accommodation to a busy working
Defence establishment with buildings adapted over time to suit their changing requirements.

The site is a good example of traditional British influenced military planning, and retains a large
degree of integrity in its axial planning with the main buildings focussed on a central parade
ground. The buildings themselves are fine examples of their respective styles, with the
dominant use of bluestone presenting an austere and formal front to the public as the face of
Defence in Melbourne. Several of the buildings are associated with prominent architects and
designers of their era.

The place is highly significant as the site of defence headquarters until 1958, housing the War
Cabinet Room through World War Two. Successive Prime Ministers, Defence Ministers and
Defence Secretaries used the offices and meeting rooms at Victoria Barracks, in particular
those in A-New Wing, as the base for decisions regarding Australia’s involvement in the conflict.




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SECTION 3                         HERITAGE MANAGEMENT


3.1 OPERATIONAL AND PLANNING ISSUES

3.1.1 Linking the Heritage Assessment with Management Recommendations

This section is intended to provide a link between the methods used for determining the
heritage values (the Heritage Assessment) at Victoria Barracks, and the practical realities of
managing those values. This section outlines the current operational situation at the base, and
the strategic planning goals of the Defence Support Group which provide the framework for the
policies outlined in Section 3.3.

A Heritage Management Plan is intended to do the following:
•   Provide an understanding to the owner/user about why the place is significant.
•   Describe the current condition and integrity of the place and highlight any urgent works.
•   Set out a framework and policies for the management of heritage buildings and landscape
    precincts and elements.
•   Provide broad recommendations on issues such as conservation, maintenance, and
    interpretation.
•   Provide recommendations for the future, cognisant of the base’s planning goals.
•   Give guidance as to which other specialist areas require further professional input such as
    landscape management, specific development proposals or interpretation studies.
A Heritage Management Plan is a general, over-arching document. It cannot answer questions
specifically on items such as:
•   Conservation works. This is a separate commission requiring detailed dilapidation reports
    and/or documentation of works, or direct liaison with specialist contractors.
•   Upgrade or redevelopment proposals for individual assets. However, Defence Heritage and
    Biodiversity Conservation (DHBC) has initiated a Heritage Advisory Service to provide
    professional advice on occasional heritage issues. Examples include:
    -     How do I install air-conditioning in this heritage building?
    -     Can I chase cables into the masonry walls of this heritage building?
    -     What type of door handles can I use here?
    Up to 16 hours of free advice is available through the Heritage Panel. Many issues can be
    covered through emails/phone calls and photos, and advice can usually be given within a
    short period. DSG-Southern Victoria also has its own Heritage Officer who can provide
    specific advice.
•   Interpretation Plans: This is a separate commission requiring the expertise of an Interpretive
    Consultant who can establish the most appropriate means of communicating (i.e. signs,
    pamphlets, interactive boards, walking tours) the stories of a heritage site or place, although
    Victoria Barracks already has an extensive interpretive strategy in place with the
    establishment of its Heritage Centre and its associated walking tours. A review of the
    existing interpretive strategy initially by the Victoria Barracks Heritage staff from time to time
    is recommended. If short falls or opportunities in communicating Victoria Barrack’s heritage
    are identified, targeted interpretive plans could be commissioned. Future interpretive



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    opportunities are discussed further in Section 3.4 (interpretation and other opportunities) of
    this report.
3.1.2      Defence Heritage and Biodiversity Conservation

Defence Heritage and Biodiversity Conservation (DHBC) is the part of the Environment,
Heritage and Risk Branch in the Department of Defence and is responsible for the Defence
Heritage Policy. Through the development of policies and heritage management tools and
resources, DHBC assists with the strategic management of Defence's heritage places. This
includes assisting the various Defence regions to meet their obligations under the
Commonwealth heritage legislative regime.

3.1.3       Current and Future Uses

Victoria Barracks is currently predominantly used for administrative functions and has an
increasing need for more office accommodation. There are no plans to dispose of the site. The
Defence Green Book reportedly includes plans for a new multi-storey office building to be
constructed in the rear carpark.

Further options for additional office space are provided in Section 3.4.2.

3.1.4      Security

Increased security requirements worldwide have translated into stricter security measures at all
Australian Defence establishments. These controls inhibit public access to places such as
Victoria Barracks.Sensitive data withheld strictly for Defence purposes only

Improved access to Defence Heritage places is one of the five key priorities set out in the
Defence Heritage Strategy and so security measures need to be flexible enough to enable
initiatives such as Opening the Doors (open days) to proceed without risk.

3.1.5      Occupational Health and Safety Requirements

Resolving the conflicts that often arise between protecting the heritage value of a place and
Occupational Health and Safety (OH&S) requirements are critical to its long term future use.

Defence’s Occupational Health Safety and Compensation (OHSC) Branch manages projects
that 'change' organisations to achieve benefits that are of 'strategic' importance.

Issues:
•   Maintaining essential services to prevent/control occupational diseases and accidents
•   Removal of occupational factors and conditions hazardous to health and safety at work
•   Development and promotion of healthy and safe work, work environments and work
    organisations
•   The safe management of asbestos and/or other forms of contamination




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3.2 RISKS TO HERITAGE VALUES

Risk Management

The following risk management matrix has been developed for a number of risks, identifying the
likelihood of each risk occurring (rated using Defence’s own tool for risk probability) and the
suggested risk management strategy.

Probability

The likelihood of a hazard occurring has been calculated using the following rating tool set out
in Defence’s Estate Risk Assessment Guide (2005).

Almost Certain           Very high probability of the consequences occurring AND has a > 90%
                         chance of occurring if the risk is not mitigated

Likely                   High probability of the consequences occurring AND has a 60-90% chance of
                         occurring if the risk is not mitigated.

Possible                 Even probability of consequences occurring AND has a 40-60% chance of
                         occurring if the risk is not mitigated.

Unlikely                 Low probability of occurrence but not negligible AND has a 10-30% chance of
                         occurring in the future if the risk is not mitigated.

Rare                     Very low probability of the consequences occurrence but not impossible AND
                         may occur in exceptional circumstances, i.e. less than 10% chance of
                         occurring if the risk is not mitigated.




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RISK MANAGEMENT MATRIX

Risk                 Probability          Suggested Risk Management Action

Inappropriate        Possible             •      Should the need for additional facilities arise, careful consideration needs to
Development                                      be given to their proposed location.

                                          •      Project Managers should allow adequate time to consider heritage values
                                                 and engage Heritage Professionals to assess the impacts any proposed
                                                 redevelopment will have on the buildings at the site.

                                          •      Internal redevelopment of office accommodation should take into
                                                 consideration the values identified on the corresponding Heritage Asset
                                                 Management Schedule provided in Volume 2 Heritage Handbook.

Inappropriate        likely               •      Restrict current and future planting and structural feature to species within
Planting                                         heritage palette established for Victoria Barracks.

                                          •       Consult historic photographs to determine plant palette or planting
                                                 character of precinct before radically altering what is currently installed.

                                          •      Should the need for its development arise, careful consideration needs to be
                                                 given to proposed location. Effort should be made to restrict further
                                                 development to the western edge of the barracks parallel to G Block.
                                                 Retention of the character, view sheds, and relationship of Blocks A/M, G,
                                                 and C to Parade Ground is key in maintaining the Heritage character of
                                                 Victoria Barracks.

                                          •      Consult professional Landscape Architects specialising in heritage
                                                 landscapes prior to altering existing landscapes.

                                          •      Where alteration is necessary, follow the Heritage Landscape Plan.

                                          •      Create a formal development buffer zone to protect the heritage values and
                                                 landscapes of Victoria Barracks.

                                          •      Replace senescing specimens with like taxon.

                                          •      Create landscape maintenance regimes that give priority to the heritage of
                                                 culturally important sections of Victoria Barracks.

                                          •      Advise gardeners to follow maintenance regimes which give priority to
                                                 retaining and preserving heritage character.

                                          •      Maintain specimens according to best horticultural practice

Inappropriate        Likely               •      Restrict site furnishings such as rubbish bins, barbecues, and picnic tables
Site furniture                                   to areas that are not located within the primary heritage precincts. Where
                                                 necessary, place site furnishings in unobtrusive locations where they will not
                                                 be visually prominent.

                                          •      Where site furnishings (lighting, benches, bins) are required, choose
                                                 materials that are neutral in colour and understated in appearance to
                                                 minimise visual impact. Avoid the use of historic reproductions in favour of
                                                 understated modern features.

                                          •      Consult professional Landscape Architects specialising in heritage
                                                 landscapes prior to installation of site furnishings.




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RISK MANAGEMENT MATRIX

Risk                 Probability          Suggested Risk Management Action

Senescence of        Almost certain       •      Maintain specimens according to best horticultural practice.
trees
                                          •      Monitor specimens for health, safety, vitality, and form.

                                          •       Install irrigation in areas where microclimatic conditions are contrary to the
                                                 needs of individual species.

                                          •      Annual arboricultural inspections and required tree works to ensure safety,
                                                 longevity and vitality of specimens.

                                          •      Establish Tree Protection Zones (TPZ) around significant or at risk
                                                 specimens when maintenance or construction is required. Seek appropriate
                                                 advice about the extent of TPZs.

                                          •      Restrict vehicular access and paving from areas under canopy of trees.

                                          •       Replace dead specimens with historically appropriate species suited to site
                                                  conditions.

Lack of              Possible             •       It should be noted that old buildings have defects and show wear and
Appropriate                                       superficial damage from years of use. Items should not be repaired or
Maintenance                                       replaced simply to make them look new – repairs and maintenance should
                                                  be to prevent further deterioration.

                                          •       The bluestone buildings and perimeter wall and the slate roofs in particular
                                                  require additional care and consideration on top of general maintenance. A
                                                  full survey of these elements and follow-up specialist repairs would
                                                  maintain the condition of these important heritage assets.

Loss of Values       Likely               •       Asset 013 Repatriation Building is currently vacant and unused and may
to Asset 013                                      deteriorate further with no upgrade works.

                                          •       Establish an Adaptive Reuse Options Study that includes an Order of Cost
                                                  Estimate of Options to assist Defence with decision-making.

                                          •       Consider reuse of this asset for office accommodation as a priority over
                                                  internally reconfiguring other heritage assets.

Storms               Likely               •     Maintain roofs in good order

                                          •     Check fixings and secure roofing tiles or sheets, fencing and signage

                                          •     Trim trees and remove overhanging branches well clear of buildings

                                          •     Regularly inspect and clean roof gutters, parapet gutters and downpipes of
                                               leaves etc

                                          •     Inspect and maintain storm water drainage systems




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RISK MANAGEMENT MATRIX

Risk                 Probability          Suggested Risk Management Action

Fire                 Possible             •    Regularly inspect and immediately repair any faulty electrical wiring or
                                               appliances

                                          •    Remove any items blocking access to exits, egress, fire protection appliances
                                               and alarms

                                          •    Regularly inspect and replace any missing or discharged extinguishes

                                          •    Maintain any lightning conductors in good order

                                          •    Maintain liaison with fire brigade to regularly test and monitor systems

                                          •    Prepare a Fire Emergency Response, emergency plans and procedures in
                                               accordance with CS FP 001-1995 and AS 3745-2002 Emergency control
                                               organization and procedures for buildings, structures and workplaces.

Water ingress        Possible             •    Identify the likely hazard of flooding activity within the site (including
and flooding                                   probability of height and volume of flood waters) and assess the risks to
                                               heritage assets and Defence capability

                                          •    Maintain drains in good order to avoid localised flooding.

                                          •    Regularly inspect for dripping from sprinkler heads, pipes, building expansion
                                               joints, drip / drainage trays;

Pests                Possible             •    Regularly check for evidence of pest damage, nests, droppings / frass, or
                                               remains, particularly in unused or inaccessible areas such as behind desks,
                                               appliances and other equipment

                                          •    Exterminate and remove any nests or hatching colonies.

                                          •    Close off any unused chimney flues with exterior grade plywood caps,
                                               properly ventilated, or protected with framed wire screens.

                                          •    Screen existing vents, grills, and louvers in roof and underfloor spaces with
                                               fine mesh or heavy duty wire depending on the type of pest being controlled.

Vandalism            Possible             •    Maintain liaison with local police.

                                          •    Abate persistent vandalism though the strategic placement of lighting.

                                          •    Maintain detection capabilities such as intrusion detection systems, alarms

Vehicle impact       Likely               •    Good display, design and good traffic flow will minimise the chances of
                                               accidental vehicular and heritage asset damage, including the perimeter wall

                                          •    Provide a secure space for visitor parking and minimise visitors from driving
                                               around the site.

Civil                Rare                 •    Maintain current monitored security system and liaison with police.
disturbance /
terrorism




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3.3       HERITAGE POLICY GUIDELINES

The following guidelines provide overarching direction on how the heritage management of
Victoria Barracks site may best be achieved both in the long and short term.

The guidelines are based on the conservation principles and processes set out in the Burra
Charter, the Statement of Significance set out in Section 2.6 of this report and the significance
rankings of the key heritage assets set out in Section 2.3 of this report.

Policy Guidelines have been developed for the following conservation issues:

           Guideline 1                    Appropriate Use

           Guideline 2                    Maintenance

           Guideline 3                    Fabric and Setting

           Guideline 4                    Building Services Upgrade

           Guideline 5                    Redevelopment

           Guideline 6                    Archaeological

           Guideline 7                    Archival Recording

           Guideline 8                    Demolition

           Guideline 9                    Disposal

           Guideline 10                   Monitoring and Review

           Guideline 11                   Landscape Management

           Guideline 12                   Planting Policies

           Guideline 13                   Tree Management

           Guideline 14                   Tree Removal & Replacement

           Guideline 15                   Lawn Management

           Guideline 16                   Garden Bed Management

           Guideline 17                   Hard Landscape Features




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3.3.1 GUIDELINE No. 1                        Appropriate Use

The objective of this Guideline is to identify uses that are compatible for assets, in accordance
with their heritage value rating.
APPROPRIATE USE GUIDELINES
Heritage Value Guideline
of Asset

Exceptional              The preferred uses should not involve the alteration (including subdivision) or
Heritage value           removal of any surviving original and early building materials, interior
                         spaces/rooms or surrounding hard/soft landscaping

High Heritage            The preferred uses should not involve the removal of any surviving original
value                    and early building materials, interior spaces/rooms or surrounding hard/soft
                         landscaping however limited alterations (including subdivision) may be
                         acceptable provided new works are highly sensitive to the heritage value of
                         the asset and entirely reversible.

Moderate                 The preferred uses may involve internal alterations (including subdivision)
Heritage value           provided new works do not externally compromise the key heritage building
                         elements as identified in the Handbook.

Low Heritage             Any use may be acceptable if it is the sole means for ensuring the survival of
value                    the asset.



No Heritage              Any use is acceptable.
value



Intrusive                Any use is acceptable but consideration should be given to removal when
                         possible.


3.3.2 GUIDELINE No. 2                        Maintenance

The objective of this Guideline is to ensure that the maintenance of all buildings, structures and
items of heritage value:
•   provides for the continuous protective care and the long-term conservation of the asset;
•   is organised in a systematic rather than an ad-hoc manner;
•   is carried out to a standard that enhances the presentation of the property;
•   is carried out by qualified specialist contractors using appropriate materials and methods.




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 MAINTENANCE GUIDELINES

 •     routine maintenance should be carried out in accordance with the Routine Maintenance
      Schedule [Volume 2- Heritage Handbook] prepared as part of this HMP;


 •     the Heritage Handbook [Volume 2] should be reviewed five yearly



 •     maintenance of buildings, structures and items should be carried out in accordance with the
      standards set out in the schedule to this Guideline (below)



SCHEDULE TO GUIDELINE 2
 Heritage Value                                  Standard of Maintenance

 Exceptional                                     Asset to be in best possible condition

 High                                            Asset to be in good condition operationally and aesthetically

 Moderate                                        Asset to be in reasonable condition, fully meeting operational
                                                 requirements

 Low/ none/ intrusive                            Asset needs to meet minimum operational requirements.
                                                 (Intrusive elements may be considered for removal in future
                                                 developments).

3.3.3 GUIDELINE No. 3                        Fabric and Setting

The objective of this Guideline is to identify the most appropriate way of caring for the physical
building materials and interior spaces associated with assets and the land around them.
FABRIC AND SETTING GUIDELINES
Heritage     Guideline
Value of
Asset

Exceptional           •   All surviving original and early building materials, interior spaces/rooms and
Heritage                  surrounding hard/soft landscaping should not be altered or removed.
value                 •   Non-original alterations (such as unsympathetic additions, fixtures and/or
                          finishes) should be removed and the original building detail/finish restored.

High                  •   All surviving original and early building materials, interior spaces/rooms and
Heritage                  surrounding hard/soft landscaping should not be removed but may be altered
value                     to a limited extent provided new works are highly sensitive to the heritage
                          value of the asset.
                      •   Non-original alterations (such as unsympathetic additions, fixtures and/or
                          finishes) should be either removed and the original building detail/finish
                          restored, or altered to an extent that it no longer detracts from the heritage
                          value of the asset.



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FABRIC AND SETTING GUIDELINES
Heritage     Guideline
Value of
Asset

Moderate              •   All surviving original and early building materials and surrounding hard/soft
Heritage                  landscaping should not be removed however may be altered provided that
value                     new works do not compromise the key heritage building elements as
                          identified in the Heritage Handbook [Volume 2].

                      •   Non-original alterations (such as unsympathetic additions, fixtures and/or
                          finishes) should be either removed and the original building detail/finish
                          restored, or altered to an extent that it no longer detracts from the heritage
                          value of the asset.

                      •   Partial demolition may be carried out provided that a professionally prepared
                          archival record is prepared prior to the commencement of works.

Low                   •   Any surviving original and early building materials and surrounding hard/soft
Heritage                  landscaping should be kept where reasonably possible but may be
value                     substantially altered if it is the sole means for ensuring the survival of the
                          asset.

                      •   Non-original alterations (such as unsympathetic additions, fixtures and/or
                          finishes) may be kept, removed or replaced, ideally in a manner that
                          enhances the heritage value of the asset.

                      •   These assets may be partially or fully demolished provided that a
                          professionally prepared archival record of the asset is prepared prior to the
                          commencement of works.

No Heritage           •   These assets may be substantially altered without any implication on the
value                     heritage value of the asset.



Intrusive             •   Where an asset is intrusive and detracts from the heritage value of the place,
                          plans should be made to replace that asset with a more sympathetic structure
                          in the future, or be removed altogether.




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3.3.4 GUIDELINE No. 4                        Building Services Upgrade

The objective of this Guideline is to provide direction on various aspects of building upgrade
works.
BUILDING UPGRADE GUIDELINES
Issue         Guideline

Fire and                 •    All fire protection works must be in accordance with the Defence Manual of
Security                      Fire Protection Engineering (MFPE) which details fire protection
                              requirements as well as the Defence requirements for certification of
                              Defence buildings and the processing of dispensations from those
                              requirements.

                         •   The installation of required fire and security devices on or around heritage
                             assets should avoid permanent damage to the building or its surroundings
                             whilst providing the required level of protection.

                         •   Any replacement of existing fire or security devices should be refixed in
                             existing locations, or in better concealed locations if available.

                         •   The installation of any new fire or security devices should reuse existing
                             fixings, holes, openings, ducts, conduits, clips, brackets etc, wherever
                             possible.

Mechanical –             •   The design, installation, testing, commissioning and maintenance of
Heating and                  heating, ventilating and air-conditioning system(s) must comply with all
Cooling                      relevant Australian Standards. The system(s) must also comply with the
                             relevant State and Territory laws or regulations, and Codes of Practice,
                             unless the Defence requirements are more stringent.

                         •   Wherever possible common routes should be found and allocated for the
                             installation of new services involving pipes, ducts, cables and wires.

                         •   All flexible ducting should be positioned as discretely as possible and not
                             just the shortest and straightest possible route.

                         •   Any replacement of existing mechanical devices should be refixed in
                             existing locations, or in better concealed locations if available.

                         •   The installation of any new mechanical devices should reuse existing
                             fixings, holes, openings, ducts, conduits, clips, brackets etc, wherever
                             possible.

                         •   New climatic control systems should be designed to be appropriate to the
                             character of the internal space, e.g. hidden systems for formal spaces,
                             more exposed in industrial or open spaces.

                         •   The installation of any new mechanical services should be positioned in
                             defined plant/equipment rooms or less visible areas, e.g. basements,
                             ceiling spaces, under floors or secondary areas

                         •   The installation of window mounted propeller fans should be avoided in


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BUILDING UPGRADE GUIDELINES
Issue         Guideline
                             historic window frames or significant elevations of historically significant
                             buildings.

                         •   The installation of false ceilings for mechanical services should be avoided
                             in rooms of high heritage value as this detrimentally affects the original
                             volume of the space.

Electrical/Data          •   Redundant wiring should be identified and removed, with any damage to
                             the underlying building fabric repaired accordingly.

                         •   All new wiring should be surface mounted and discretely positioned - not
                             just along the shortest route. Wherever possible poorly positioned wiring
                             on existing assets should be relocated to more visually appropriate
                             positions.
                         •   Any replacement of existing electrical devices should be refixed in existing
                             locations, or in better concealed locations if available.
                         •   The installation of any new electrical devices should reuse existing fixings,
                             holes, openings, ducts, conduits, clips, brackets etc, wherever possible.
                         •   Original decorative elements including switch plates, grilles, radiators, fans
                             should be retained and creatively adapted to work within the new or
                             upgraded systems.

Lighting                 •   Where sufficient photographic or documentary evidence of original light
                             fittings exists, copies of these fittings should be reconstructed and installed
                             in original locations.

                         •   Where evidence of original light fittings no longer exists, a contemporary
                             fitting of appropriate scale and materials should be installed. Modern
                             ‘historic’ light fittings are inappropriate.

                         •   Any replacement of existing light fittings should be refixed in existing
                             locations, or in better concealed locations if available.
                         •   The installation of any new light fittings should reuse existing fixings, holes,
                             openings, ducts, conduits, clips, brackets etc, wherever possible.

                         •   The use of adjacent structures for the fixing of external light fittings should
                             be maximized wherever possible to avoid damage to significant building
                             fabric.

Plumbing                 •   Plumbing should be concealed wherever possible – under floors, in ceilings
                             or in existing ducts, cupboards, service courts or lesser rooms. Use of
                             disused chimney flues, for vertical passage of new conduits and pipes
                             should be investigated.
                         •   Exposed new plumbing on the exterior of a building should match the
                             detailing and materials of original plumbing or painted to the same colour
                             as the wall to reduce its visual impact.




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BUILDING UPGRADE GUIDELINES
Issue         Guideline

Building Code            •    BCA requirements for disabled access are to be provided in all Defence
of Australia                  buildings except those which have approved dispensations.
(BCA)
                         •   Increasing the height of existing handrails in a heritage asset should be
                             subject to a prior risk assessment that considers the frequency of a
                             stair/balcony’s use, the degree of variation in height requirements, and the
                             risk of injury from a fall.

Disability               •    For new Defence buildings or buildings undergoing major refurbishment,
Discrimination                the full requirements of the BCA Part D3 (Access for People with
Act (DDA)                     Disabilities) apply, unless a dispensation is approved in accordance with
                              the requirements of the Manual of Fire Protection Engineering (MFPE)
                              Chapter 26.

                         •    Buildings should be fitted with disabled facilities as identified in the User
                              Requirements Brief and which are not the responsibility of the Technical
                              Equipment for Disabled Commonwealth Employees Program (TEDCEP).

                         •    Buildings which generally would not require compliance with the BCA Part
                              D3, and for which dispensation may be sought, are:

                               -    Buildings that will be occupied only by ADF personnel (the nature of
                                    whose employment would preclude permanent disabilities), and:

                               -    Buildings that will not be accessible to the public, or Defence civilians
                                    and contractors (the nature of whose work might be undertaken by
                                    people with permanent disabilities); and

                               -    Buildings where the user functions are not subject to Commercial
                                    Support Program (CSP) testing in the foreseeable future; or

                               -    Buildings where the functions may be performed by civilians and any
                                    facilities they are entitled to access are restricted to the ground floor,
                                    and disabled access and facilities are provided to that floor; or

                               -    Buildings that will be occupied by civilians, who, because of the nature
                                    of their duties (security monitoring and response staff etc), cannot be
                                    mobility impaired, and the buildings are not accessible to the public or
                                    Defence civilians and contractors (the nature of whose work might be
                                    undertaken by people with permanent disabilities.




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BUILDING UPGRADE GUIDELINES
Issue         Guideline

Occupational             •    The Occupational Health and Safety Act 1991 requires Defence and
Health and                    members of the Defence Force to maintain a secure, healthy and safe
Safety Act                    working environment.
1991
                         •    Dispensation may be sought by Defence to take any action or to refrain
                              from taking any action, that would be, or could reasonably be expected to
                              be, prejudicial to Australia’s defence.




3.3.5 GUIDELINE No. 5                        Redevelopment

The objective of this Guideline is to set directions for future developments resulting from
changing needs at the site.
REDEVELOPMENT GUIDELINES

•   Redevelopment should recognise and respect the location's unique character and the potential
    to enhance it.

•   There will be a general presumption in favour of conserving buildings of Exceptional, High
    and Moderate levels of heritage value, and where the re-use and disposal of any building is
    being considered, the best viable use will be sought
•    There will be a general presumption in favour of retaining all open spaces that contribute to
    the character and setting of the heritage place.

•    Significant views into, within and out of the heritage place, as assessed in Section 2.3.4 of
    this HMP should be safeguarded.

•   The design of new developments should reflect the prevailing planning character, historic
    fabric and pattern of existing development, i.e. the separation between buildings, setbacks,
    building heights, building materials, colours, etc.




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                            FIGURE 7            Potential Redevelopment Plan

                            PROJECT TITLE       Victoria Barracks, Melbourne, Victoria

                            SCALE               Not to scale


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3.3.6 GUIDELINE No. 6                        Archaeology

The objective of this Guideline to identify constraints associated with any physical investigation
of the assets and their surrounds.
ARCHAEOLOGICAL GUIDELINES

•   Archaeological activities should not reduce or otherwise compromise the recognised heritage
    value of the asset, its surrounds or the place generally.
•   Only the minimum amount of disturbance necessary for the archaeological investigation should
    be carried out or allowed.
•   Where possible non-destructive techniques for investigation (such as Radiography, Ultrasound,
    Impulse Radar, etc.) should be utilized in preference to methods that cause irreparable
    damage.
•   The professional competence and experience of the overseeing archaeologists should be well
    established prior to the commencement of any destructive investigation.
•   The results of all investigations should be made readily available to fellow-colleagues, to the
    land managers and, if desirable, to the general public.
•   Provisions should be made for the safe keeping of any recovered artefacts and associated
    documentation.
•   Excavation of Aboriginal sites MUST be preceded by consultation with the relevant Aboriginal
    owners/councils and relevant government authorities and in accordance with the Aboriginal
    Heritage Act (2006).
•   The need for permit approvals from various statutory authorities MUST be established prior to
    the commencement of any excavation or destructive investigation of the assets or their
    surrounds.


3.3.7 GUIDELINE No. 7                        Archival Recording

The objective of this Guideline is to provide directions for the undertaking of permanent records
for historical purposes.

This Guideline is based on the NSW Heritage Office publications, Guidelines for Photographic
Recording of Heritage Sites, Buildings & Structures and How to Prepare Archival Records of
Heritage Items. Copies of these documents are available from
http://www.heritage.nsw.gov.au/03_index.htm


ARCHIVAL RECORDING GUIDELINES

•   Photographic recording should be carried out in accordance with the NSW Heritage Office
    publication, Guidelines for Photographic Recording of Heritage Sites, Buildings, & Structures.
    for the following actions:
     - before and during any major work to an asset of Exceptional, High and Moderate
          heritage value (e.g. alterations and additions);
     - before full or partial demolition of an asset of any heritage value (except none and
          intrusive);
     - during any archaeological investigations;
     - before disposal of an asset of any heritage value (except none and intrusive) or the
          entire heritage place.



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ARCHIVAL RECORDING GUIDELINES

•   Measured drawings should be prepared in accordance with Measure for Measure: A Practical
    Guide for Recording Buildings and Landscapes, published by the RAIA in 1990 for the
    following actions:
     - before full or partial demolition of an asset of Exceptional or High heritage value;
     - during any archaeological investigations in areas of High potential archaeological
          interest

3.3.8 GUIDELINE No. 8                        Demolition

The objective of this Guideline is to provide guidelines for demolition of buildings with significant
heritage value.
DEMOLITION GUIDELINES

•    Demolition of buildings or building fabric of moderate or high heritage significance is not
     acceptable without adequate investigations into potential reuse options or alternative
     solutions.

•    Partial demolition of significant fabric may be acceptable where its removal reveals an
     aspect of the asset’s history which is considered to be of much greater significance or
     critical to the interpretation of the asset, landscape or place.

•    The removal of any significant fabric should be carried out in a manner that enables
     reinstatement when circumstances permit.

•    Prior to any proposed demolition of an entire building or structure for places of any level of
     significance (with the exception of intrusive items), photographs of the place, both exterior
     and interior should be taken in accordance with the recording described in Section 3.3.7,
     showing all elevations and with particular attention to window and door openings, mouldings
     and other decorative features.

•    Prior to demolition of places with a rating of Exceptional or High significance measured
     drawings of the place at a scale of 1:100 should be prepared in accordance with the
     recording described in Section 3.3.7 unless Defence already hold such drawings.


3.3.9 GUIDELINE No. 9                        Disposal

Disposal of the Victoria Barracks site is considered unlikely in the foreseeable future.

Should disposal be considered by Defence at any stage, the heritage values of the place will
need to be protected through the course of, and following, the sale (or lease). Mechanisms for
the responsible protection of the heritage values of the place are set in the provisions of the
EPBC Act.
DISPOSAL GUIDELINES

•     Heritage Listing by State and Local Government Authorities: Although listing by other
     Government agencies can sometimes result in a lesser level of protection, listing of the site
     on the Victorian Heritage Register and / or the City of Melbourne Planning Scheme affords
     some statutory control for the site in relation to heritage management. Discussions for
     entering the site onto other registers should take place early in the disposal process to



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DISPOSAL GUIDELINES
    ensure continuous protection;

•    A covenant to the Certificate of Title for the property, requiring the purchaser to undertake
    certain tasks to ensure the appropriate management of heritage values;

•    Preparation of a Heritage Agreement between vendor and purchaser / lessee;

•    Defence will be required to notify the Department for Environment and Water Resources of
    any intended sale or lease.

•    Disposal of the heritage place should be dealt with in accordance with the procedure
    outlined in Figure 8.

•    Disposal of this heritage place should be considered in its entirety.

•    The image of the Australian Defence Force as a responsible property manager should be
    enhanced by ensuring that public good is taken into account as part of the disposal process
    and that financial return is not the sole criterion.

•    Heritage values are maintained and the fabric of the place is not allowed to deteriorate while
    decisions about future use and disposal are made.

•    Archival recording of the heritage place should be carried out prior to the disposal of the
    property in accordance with Section 3.3.7.




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                             FIGURE 8            Process for disposal of heritage property

                             PROJECT TITLE       Victoria Barracks, Melbourne, Victoria

                             SCALE               Not to scale

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3.3.10 GUIDELINE No. 10                      Monitoring and review

The objective of this Guideline is to set directions for ensuring that the heritage values of the
place continue to be properly managed.
MONITORING AND REVIEW GUIDELINES

•   In accordance with the requirements of the EPBC Act, the HMP must be reviewed within five
    years.


•   The review should assess the content of the plan and determine its effectiveness in protecting
    the heritage values of the place, and assess any changes to the place that may impact on the
    way it should be managed.

•   The review should make recommendations for updating or re-writing the HMP as required.



•   Should a major redevelopment proposal or change occur at the base, it may be necessary to
    update the HMP and Handbook before the five year period


3.3.11 GUIDELINE No. 11                      Landscape Management

The objective of this Guideline is to identify the most appropriate way of caring for the identified
heritage landscape elements, layouts, and spaces associated with the buildings and their
setting.
MONITORING AND REVIEW GUIDELINES

•   All surviving original and early hard and soft landscaping of primary significance should not be
    altered or removed but carefully conserved and maintained.

•   All surviving original early elements and plantings should be conserved, not removed, but
    landscaping layouts may be altered to a limited extent provided new works are appropriately
    sensitive to the heritage of the place.

•   Original layouts executed in accordance with nineteenth century landscape plans should be
    retained and, if possible, restored in accordance with the principles, stylistic features, and
    planting schemes of that plan.

•   Plantings that have failed may be replaced with ones similar in period, character and scale to
    the original, unless these prove unsuitable.


•   Where possible, unsympathetic or intrusive elements should be removed or ameliorated.




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3.3.12 GUIDELINE No. 12                      Planting Policies

The objective of this Guideline is to ensure that the heritage values and integrity of the setting
for Victoria Barracks is conserved and retained.
MONITORING AND REVIEW GUIDELINES

•   The circulation patterns surrounding the Parade Ground, views to and from the Parade
    Ground, central expansive character of the Parade Ground, formal axial layout, and utilitarian
    character should be retained as generally indicated in the Landscape Management Plan.

•   The planting layout and plant palette of specimens nominated as significant should be
    preserved and future plantings should be reflective of this, or the existing planting character.


3.3.13 GUIDELINE No. 13                      Tree Management

The objective of this Guideline is to provide for the retention of existing significant trees through:
•    The management of their long-term health and structure
•    The protection of trees from undue mechanical damage.
MONITORING AND REVIEW GUIDELINES

•   A Tree Management Plan should be implemented to monitor tree health, assess maintenance
    intervals and identify required maintenance works. This should be carried out by a qualified
    arborist with the aim being the preservation of tree health and the extension of useful life
    expectancies.

•   A regular maintenance regime is to be established with the works being carried out by a
    suitably experienced and qualified Arborist (Certificate IV or higher). Any pruning is to be in
    accordance with AS4373-1996 Pruning of Amenity Trees.

•   If further development of Victoria Barracks is required, Tree Protection Zones (TPZs) are to
    be enforced during any development works.

•   A qualified arborist is to approve any works that may alter soil moisture, relative levels, or
    oxygen levels within TPZs such as fill, compaction or addition of paving.

3.3.14 GUIDELINE No. 14                      Tree Removal and Replacement

As trees, unlike buildings, have a life expectancy, it is important to address the issue of removal
and replacement. The objective of this Guideline is to allow for the appropriate removal and
replacement of trees in a manner which maintains the character of the place.
MONITORING AND REVIEW GUIDELINES

•   Trees are to be maintained for health and safety on an annual and ongoing basis.

•   Trees are to be monitored annually by a qualified arborist to determine when removal is
    required.

•   Trees identified by a qualified arborist to be senescent or structurally unsound (and therefore
    unsafe) are to be removed, with replacement carried out in line with best arboricultural
    practice and in line with the policies listed below.



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MONITORING AND REVIEW GUIDELINES

•   A Tree Replacement Policy should be written and implemented with the aim being to maintain
    existing character and presence.

•   The Replacement Policy should be assessed in conjunction with the Tree Management Plan
    to determine appropriate timing for tree planting and removal.

•   Supplementary fertiliser and irrigation are required where new trees are to be established
    close to existing mature trees. This should continue for the first two growing seasons to allow
    establishment.

•   Trees of high or moderate heritage value are to be replaced with trees of the same taxon.

•   Trees of low or no heritage value do not require replacement.

•   If further development of Victoria Barracks is required, Tree Protection Zones (TPZs) are to
    be enforced during any development works.

•   A qualified arborist is to approve any works that may alter soil moisture, relative levels, or
    oxygen levels within TPZs such as fill, compaction or addition of paving.

Canary Island Palms and Date Palms

•   Canary Island Palms (Phoenix canariensis) and Date Palms (Phoenix dactylifera) are to be
    replaced with trees of the same species when they are removed.

•   Replacement of Canary Island Palms is not necessary until: 4 in the row of 11 immediately in
    front of A Block die or 2 of the 5 adjacent to the Chapel die. When these quotas are met,
    replace the entire group to ensure uniformity in appearance.

Moreton Bay Figs

•   Moreton Bay Figs (Ficus macrophylla) are to be replaced with trees of the same species.

•   Care should be taken to maintain the integrity of the foundation of C Block when replanting.
    Consideration should be given to the feasibility of a Root Barrier at planting in order to protect
    C Block.

Smooth-barked Apple

•   Smooth-barked Apple (Angophora costata) is to be replaced with a tree of the same species.
    Use of this species should be extended in planting bays throughout the parking lot adjacent to
    the North Guard House.




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MONITORING AND REVIEW GUIDELINES

F Block Carparking Area

•   The Magenta Cherries (Syzygium paniculatum) are in serious decline. Replacement is
    advisable.

•   Parking medians planted with trees should be established to allow for screening and solar
    protection of cars. Species for consideration include Water Gum (Tristaniopsis laurina), Pin
    Oak (Quercus palustris), and Plane Tree (Platanus orientalis).

English Elm

•   The English Elms (Ulmus procera) adjacent to the perimeter wall near the Chapel are possibly
    suckers from City of Melbourne street trees.

•   To maintain axial and formal character of Victoria Barracks the row of English Elms should be
    extended from their current position on the interior of the perimeter wall to the southeast
    corner of A Block.

•   Remove ailing Plane Tree (Platanus occidentalis).

Manchurian Pears

•   Manchurian Pears (Pyrus ussuriensis) have been used extensively onsite as screening trees.
    This species of pear is renowned for having poor structure leading to limb loss. Formative
    pruning should be implemented.

•    When 25% of a given planting group dies, replace the entire planting with species of same
    character.

Narrow-leaf Ash

•   The Narrow-leaf Ash (Fraxinus angustifolia) is not significant and should be replaced with an
    appropriate tree taxon to achieve similar visual impact.

Park-like Setting West of G Bock

•   Replacement planting should maintain the character of the area with specimen trees planted
    in lawn. New specimens should favour drought tolerant and indigenous vegetation.

•    Wherever possible replacement tree planting should take place well prior to the removal of
    the tree they are to replace. This allows the next generation to become established prior to
    the removal of existing trees. However, planting that modifies the form of the new tree should
    be avoided.




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3.3.15 GUIDELINE No. 15                      Lawn Management

The objective of this Guideline is to retain lawns is good condition.
MONITORING AND REVIEW GUIDELINES

•   A lawn maintenance program should be prepared concerning weeding, fertilising, irrigation,
    cutting frequency and height, soil aeration and reseeding.

•   Where installed, lawn irrigation systems to be allocated separate zones to enable automatic
    irrigation programs to be turned off during drought or water restrictions without affecting
    surrounding vegetation.

•   Irrigation systems must be located so that watering arcs do not cover or affect the outdoor
    artefacts.



3.3.16 GUIDELINE No. 16                      Garden Bed Management

The objective of this Guideline is to ensure that garden beds are of a high standard of
presentation and are consistent with the heritage character of Victoria Barracks.
MONITORING AND REVIEW GUIDELINES

•   Except for The Peace Rose Garden, The Victoria Cross Garden, and planting beds
    immediately associated with H Block, garden beds to be planted with species that are
    understated and are appropriate to the historic intent of the precinct.

Hedging

•   Hedging, such as that around the Chapel and B Block, should be low, lush and neatly pruned.
•    Should more than 10% of the hedging die, either remove remaining plants or replace
      planting with plants of like group of species.
•   Retention of hedges is not vital.

Peace Rose Garden

•   Replace ailing or senescing specimens of ‘Peace’ or ‘Spirit of Peace’ with like.

•   Stakes shall be provided until the trunk of the rose is capable of supporting the weight of the
    plant.

•   Maintain Peace Rose Garden according to best horticultural practice.

•   Under plant roses with unobtrusive groupings of low perennials and grasses in
    complementary colours.




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MONITORING AND REVIEW GUIDELINES

Victoria Cross Garden
•   Establish a mulched tree protection zone with a diameter of 1-1.5 meters at the base of each
    tree.
•


Gallipoli Lone Pines have, in other Australian locations, shown signs of decline, poor or sparce
canopy cover, and poor arboricultural form. In order to maintain the symbolic, reflective and
respectful intent of the garden, replace all four trees as a unit when one tree dies to maintain the
symbolic intent and uniform appearance of the garden.
•   Under-plant or edge with low growing green mass.

•   Under-planting with Flanders Poppies is not recommended.

Garden Beds Associated with A Block’s St Kilda Road Frontage

•   Maintain as unobtrusive green border with texture similar to existing.

•   Retention of individual species or specimens is not vital except for the Boston Ivy
    (Parthenocissus tricuspidata).

3.3.17 GUIDELINE No. 17                      Hard Landscape Features

The objective of this Guideline is to ensure that hard landscape features are maintained in good
condition, in compliance with OH&S where applicable, and consistent with heritage fabric where
appropriate.
MONITORING AND REVIEW GUIDELINES

•   Maintain bitumen footpaths and roadways in good order. Cracking and breakage are to be
    repaired, holes filled, and new surface topcoat applied as required.

•    Curbing to be retained in good order. Cracking and breakage to be repaired and stone
    cobbles to be re-mortared as required.

3.4       INTERPRETATION AND OTHER OPPORTUNITIES

3.4.1 Interpretive Opportunities
Current Status

Victoria Barracks has an existing interpretation strategy which includes displays and guided
tours to heritage locations throughout the Barracks. This is supported by the publication
“Victoria Barracks Melbourne - A Social History” by Agnes Hannan, (published 1995, Australian
Defence Force Journal), which is sold at the Barracks. Due to security restrictions, however,
tours are restricted to pre-booked groups from recognised organisations, associations and
secondary schools. The grounds also contain a collection of movable heritage items with some
interpretive signage and two memorial gardens. The Peace Garden (established in 1996) is
planted and dedicated to the pursuit of peace with Peace and Spirit of Peace roses. The
Victoria Cross Garden (established in 1996) was planted with four Lone Pine trees and
commemorates the 96 Australians who have won the Victoria Cross in four conflicts (Boer War,



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WWI, WWII and Vietnam). The trees were planted from the seed of the original Australian Lone
Pine, which in turn was propagated from the seeds of Lone Pine on Plateau 400, Turkey,
collected by soldiers who fought in that battle.

Displays are installed in several locations including the War Cabinet Room and the Heritage
Centre (in B Block). Visitation to the displays is restricted to pre-booked visiting groups and on
site defence personnel.

Opportunities

Links to the Shrine of Remembrance – An opportunity exists to link Victoria Barracks with the
nearby Shrine of Remembrance. Historical links between the two sites are provided through:
•   A shared history of particular events played out from Victoria Barracks and remembered by
    anniversary at the Shrine.
•   A National perspective of Australia’s defence history.
•   The ‘Lone Pine’ specimens (Pinus brutia) planted in both locations from seed brought back
    from Turkey during World War One.
•   The gardens of remembrance at Victoria Barracks, both of which commemorate
    anniversaries and achievements likewise commemorated at the Shrine.
Information may be provided in partnership with the RSL via brochure, booklet or interpretive
signage on both sites, promoting Victoria Barrack’s heritage as it connects with events
commemorated at the Shrine. Consideration could be given to producing a series of leaflets for
particular events such as ANZAC Day, V.E. day (Peace Rose naming anniversary), and V.P.
Day.

Guided Tours – Guided tours are the preferred and most effective means of communicating
heritage values at Victoria Barracks. Ongoing training of volunteers to undertake tours should
be supported and continued. Even if the Barracks becomes more easily accessed by the
public, it is the view of the consultant that guided tours remain the only means of touring the
place.

The existing tours provide both a controlled movement through the site and a far more valuable
exchange of information than can be achieved by audio or brochure driven self guided tours.

As the Barracks is difficult to navigate a guided tour is likely to be the only means of gaining a
full understanding of its history.

Identity Signage – As Victoria Barracks is already considered a significant Melbourne landmark
there is little advantage in increasing site signage presence, except to ensure the place is
correctly and accurately signed from public vantage points. To introduce interpretative signage
may run the risk of lowering the dignified tone of the Barracks. Measures could be taken (via
interpretation and HMP plans) to ensure the visual dignity and importance of Victoria Barracks is
not diminished with ill considered and rudimentary directional and identity signs.

Interpretive Signage – Interpretive signage exists for movable heritage items within the
grounds. Review of the signs and upgrading of interpretation provided by signage should be
ongoing. As new items are introduced to the grounds or existing objects are restored, the
interpretation should be upgraded, using current technologies providing signs of a durable and
easily read style.


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In particular with any upgrade of the Peace Rose Garden or the nearby Victoria Cross Garden
there would be an opportunity to review the way the garden’s meaning is communicated. Both
the content and style of the interpretive signage in these areas could be improved to provide
information and key themes in what is a reasonably accessible location. Works associated with
any upgrades could also incorporate a revamped interpretation component.

Display – With the current restricted access to interpretive displays at Victoria Barracks it is
difficult to justify increased interpretation through static displays. However if in the future a
greater volume of public and /or defence visitation is achieved then consideration could be
made to upgrading the display craft and intensity of information and interpretation within
heritage spaces.

Painted Signs – Early sign written or painted signs occur in some locations around VBM, these
signs allude to earlier uses of the buildings such as “Police Hospital” and are a valuable visual
connection to the past. Wherever possible these signs should be preserved not restored to
retain the historical integrity of the sign.

3.4.2 Future Office Accommodation

Asset 013 Repatriation Building contains moderate heritage values and makes a contribution to
the values of the Victoria Barracks site. Currently vacant, it would respond well to internal
adaptive reuse works. Its floor plan includes a large central hall that could provide a flexible
open-plan office layout, suitable for Defence’s current standards for office accommodation. A
number of small existing rooms around the perimeter of the building could provide additional
meeting rooms, offices and quiet rooms as required. The existing lobby provides scope for a
secure entry lobby, or alternatively, access from the rear (via D-Block to the west) could be
incorporated if internal site access is required.

Office accommodation is at a premium within this site, however it is difficult to create useable
office spaces efficiently within the existing layouts of buildings such as A-Block, C-Block and G-
Block with their internal stone walls. Each of these buildings also have extremely high heritage
values. Whilst solutions can be achieved that harmoniously balance the heritage values and
Defences needs within these assets, it would be highly preferable to investigate the upgrade of
Asset 013 first. This building retains a number of character features that users may enjoy,
within an upgraded modern office environment.

3.4.3 Improved Landscape Features

Interpretive signage in the form of bronze plaques exists for many of the movable artefacts and
buildings on Victoria Barracks, although are often difficult to read easily. If possible, improved
signage methods should be found for landscape features. See Section 3.4.1 above
(Interpretive Signage).

Signage illustrating the intent, history, and symbolism of the Peace Rose Garden and the
Victoria Cross Garden, as well as information conveying the original layout of the barrack site
would add to the experience of the barracks if located on easily read signage in accessible
locations.




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3.4.4 Implications of a National Heritage List Nomination

The National Heritage List is Australia's list of places with outstanding heritage value to our
nation.

Only information on a place's national heritage value is recorded in the list, and these values are
protected by the Australian Government. A place may have natural, Indigenous or historic
values, or a combination of all three.

Victoria Barracks Melbourne has been assessed against the criteria for Commonwealth
Heritage Listing (refer to Section 2.5) to confirm its heritage value within the Commonwealth
context. This assessment has determined that the A-Block and A-1 Block are of exceptional
heritage value, and furthermore that the site as a whole is highly significant in a national context.

Whilst the threshold for inclusion on the National Heritage List has not been defined, it is
considered that Victoria Barracks may have one or more National Heritage Values, and could
be nominated for inclusion on this list. Anyone is entitled to nominate a place to the National
Heritage List. The nomination will be assessed by the Australian Heritage Council, who
recommend to the Minister of Environment and Water Resources whether the place should be
included.

The implications of National Heritage Listing are largely the same as those encountered by
places on the Commonwealth Heritage List, such as Victoria Barracks. A management plan is
required for sites consistent with National Heritage Management Principles, which can be
viewed at www.deh.gov.au/heritage/publications/factsheets/fact18.

Effectively the requirements for places of National Heritage Value are an extension of those for
places of Commonwealth Heritage Value, reflective of the outstanding or exceptional values of
the place.

3.5       SUMMARY OF KEY WORKS

3.5.1 Summary of Key Works for Heritage Buildings

Asset Number                      Required Works                                                             Indicative
                                                                                                             Cost
                                                                                                             - $2,000 to $4,000
A Block                           • A full survey of the bluestone should be undertaken to determine         to prepare a
                                      the extent of conservation works required.                             professional report

                                  • Substantial movement of stone entry steps to St Kilda Road               - $3,000 to $4,000
                                      entries requires an assessment by a Structural Engineer.
                                                                                                             - $2,000 for
                                  • Investigate adequacy of weather stripping to window in central           investigation
                                                                                                             consultancy
                                      main entry bay as there is evidence of damp to the sills.              services
                                  • Sand back peeling paint and repaint timber doors and window
                                                                                                             - $150 to $200/m2
                                      frames in a colour as approved by the DS-SV Heritage Officer.
                                                                                                             - $500 to $1,000
                                  • Monitor minor cracking to main lobby stair at tread/riser junction.      per structure
                                                                                                             engineer
                                  • Brush back peeling paint and treat corrosion of lamp posts,
                                                                                                             inspection
                                      balustrades and decorative metal railings with a rust inhibitor.
                                                                                                             - $200 to $250/m2



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Asset Number                      Required Works                                                             Indicative
                                                                                                             Cost

                                      Prime and repaint to match existing colour.
                                                                                                             - $1,000 to $2,000
                                  • Evidence of damage and shifting to the south-east corner and to
                                      the adjacent retaining wall requires an assessment by a                - $90 to $115/m
                                      Structural Engineer.

                                  • Corroded gutters to link bridge to M-Block require replacement.
                                                                                                             - $100 to $200/m
A-New Wing                        • Corrosion to joints and sides of inset cast iron downpipes on
                                      south side.                                                            - Scope not
                                                                                                             defined
                                  • Signs of water ingress to balcony floor.
                                                                                                             - $200 to $500 to
                                  • Blocked copper downpipe to North-west corner.                            unblock
                                  • Check flashing around lift overrun as there is peeling paint to the      - $200 to $300/m
                                      beam over the top lift lobby level.                                    to repair flushing
                                                                                                             - $500 inspection
B Block                           • Cracking to east wall to be monitored.                                   only
                                                                                                             - $295 to $390/m2
                                  • Slate roof leaking over verandah.
                                                                                                             to replace
                                  • Damaged flashing to verandah skylights.                                  - $150 to $250/m
                                                                                                             to repair
                                                                                                             - $200 to $500 to
C Block                           • Unblock drain to balcony level.                                          up block
                                                                                                             - Scope not
                                  • Repair leaking pipework below balcony level.
                                                                                                             defined
                                  • Repair rotting timber window frame in north west corner and              - $1,000 to $2,000
                                                                                                             per window
                                      repaint.
                                                                                                             - $300 to $500
F Block                           • Broken / missing vent on east side.                                      each
                                  • Remove painted lines to stonework that formerly delineated
                                                                                                             - $20 to $30/m
                                      carparking.
                                                                                                             - $300 to $500/m2
                                  • Structural engineer to assess the effect of missing stone wall           for stone repair
                                      (former perimeter wall) has on rear of building. Holes to be           replacement
                                      patched with replacement stone to prevent water ingress.
                                                                                                             - $1,000 to $2,000
G Block                           • Repaint window frames.                                                   each
                                  • Patch and repaint corroding metal railing once treated with rust
                                                                                                             - $200 to $250/m2
                                      inhibitor.
                                                                                                             - $2,000 to $3,000
                                  • Full survey of bluestone required to determine extent of
                                      repointing required.
                                                                                                             - $1,500 for
                                  • Investigate source of various patches of damp to stonework.              investigation
                                                                                                             - $200 to $300
                                  • Some damage to walls from leaking downpipe.
                                                                                                             - $2,000 for survey
                                  • Cracking to end bay may need further assessment by structural
                                      engineer as part of dilapidation survey.
                                                                                                             - $500 to $700
                                  • Reconnect vent pipe on rear of south west bay.
                                                                                                             - $700 to $1,500
                                  • Repoint weathered stone fascia.                                          each
                                  • Repair damaged rainheads to Officers’ Mess.
                                                                                                             N/A
J Block                           • Monitor verandah for signs of settlement/ movement




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Asset Number                      Required Works                                                             Indicative
                                                                                                             Cost
                                                                                                             - $200 to $300/m
M Block                           • Damaged timber fascia to North west corner.
                                                                                                             - $200 to $300/m2
                                  • Repair cracked panes of glass.

                                  • Extensive cracking to south-west corner requires assessment by           - $1,000 to $2,000

                                      a Structural Engineer.

                                                                                                             N/A
The Keep                          • Extensive cracking to the south east corner requires assessment
                                      by a Structural Engineer. It appears that too much of the original
                                      perimeter wall has been removed from this corner.
                                                                                                             - $200 to $300/m
The Chapel                        • Repair fascia at north-east corner gutter.
                                                                                                             - $500 for
                                  • Check drain and downpipe for blocks as there is evidence of
                                                                                                             inspection
                                      rising damp to whole perimeter of building.
                                                                                                             - N/A
                                  • Cracking to window in the north corner.                                  - $1,000 to $2,000
                                                                                                             each
                                  • Repaint window frames.                                                   - $35 to $55/m2
                                                                                                             for pressure clean
                                  • Excessive lichen to slate roof needs to be removed.
                                                                                                             and seal


3.5.2 Summary of Key Works for Landscape Elements

Landscape Element                 Required Works                                                             Indicative Cost


                                                                                                             - Allow $4,000 per
Canary Island Palms               • Annual arboricultural inspections and maintenance                        annual inspections
                                      regime (including required tree works) to ensure tree                  including tree
                                                                                                             pruning
                                      health, vitality and safety.
                                  • Inspection and treatment (if required) of Canary Island                  - $500 per
                                                                                                             inspection
                                      Date Palms for evidence of Fusarium wilt.
                                                                                                             - $1,500 to $2,000
                                  • Remove ailing Plane Tree and replace with a row of
                                                                                                             per tree removal.
                                      English Elms to join and compliment the existing three.                Allow $3,000 for
                                                                                                             new mature trees
                                                                                                             - Allow
Boston Ivy on A Block &           • Annual arboricultural inspections and maintenance                        $4,000/year
                                      regime (including required tree works) to ensure tree
St Kilda Road frontage
                                      health, vitality and safety.
                                                                                                             - $Scope to be
                                  • Regular, professional maintenance of low garden beds at                  defined
                                      base of A Block.                                                       - Assumed part of
                                                                                                             grounds
                                  • Regular maintenance of lawn surfaces.
                                                                                                             maintenance’

                                                                                                             - Assumed part of
                                  • Maintain the current circulation patterns of the bitumen                 grounds
                                                                                                             maintenance
                                      paths.
                                                                                                             - $20 to $30 for
Lawns and Parade                  • Maintenance                                                              new irrigated turf
                                                                                                             including
Ground                                                                                                       preparation




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Landscape Element                 Required Works                                                             Indicative Cost


                                                                                                             - $500/tree for
Cypress                           • Treeworks                                                                minor tree surgery


                                                                                                             - $400 per
Moreton Bay Figs                  • Monitor Moreton Bay Figs sited at the northeastern end                   inspection
                                      of C Block to ensure they do not affect the integrity of the
                                      structure.
                                                                                                             - $1,000 to $1,500
C Block Courtyard                 • Remove                                                                   each
                                                                                                             - Scope to be
                                  • Redesign
                                                                                                             defined

English Elms near                 • Treeworks                                                                - $400 per
                                                                                                             inspection
Chapel                            • Screening for Elm Leaf Beetle infestation and disease

                                  • Completion of row
                                                                                                             - $1,500 to $2,000
Plane Tree near                   • Remove                                                                   per tree
southeast corner of A
Block
                                                                                                             - $500/tree for
Magenta Cherries in F             • Treeworks                                                                minor tree surgery
Block Parking Lot
                                                                                                             - $100 to $150/m2
F Block Parking Lot               • Redesign parking lot to accommodate parking medians
                                      and appropriate plantings
                                                                                                             - $500/tree for
Narrow-leaf Ash near F            • Treeworks                                                                minor tree surgery
Block
                                                                                                             - $500/tree for
Ussurian Pears                    • Treeworks                                                                minor tree surgery


                                                                                                             - $500/tree for
Jacaranda near G Block            • Treeworks                                                                minor tree surgery


                                                                                                             - $5 to $15/m2
Nature Strip parallel to          • Remove vegetation
                                                                                                             - $50 to $100/m2
G Block                           • Redesign
                                                                                                             - Scope to be
Remove parking from               • Restrict Parking                                                         defined
roadside immediately
adjacent to G Block
                                                                                                             - $500/tree
Dr Hawke Tree                     • Treeworks


                                                                                                             - $50 to $100/m2
Peace Rose Garden                 • Maintenance

                                  • Underplanting design

VC Garden                         • Treeworks                                                                - $500/tree
                                  • Underplanting design




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Landscape Element                 Required Works                                                             Indicative Cost


                                                                                                             - $100 to $130/m2
Remnant Perimeter Wall            • Re-mortar joints in areas particularly adjacent A-Block
                                      south. A full survey should be undertaken to determine
Sections
                                      the extent of conservation works required.
                                  • Cracking and severe movement near the south gate                         - $2,000 to $2,500
                                                                                                             for structural
                                      (which may be due to tree roots) requires assessment by                report
                                      a Structural Engineer.
                                                                                                             - $500 to $1,000
Smooth-Barked Apple               • Monitor Smooth-barked Apple sited at the northeastern                    for structural
                                      corner of the Carparking Area to ensure it does not affect             inspection
Tree
                                      the integrity of the Perimeter Wall.



Basis of Rates

The estimated rates are based upon conditions we currently believe applicable as of August
2007. We have assumed that the project will be competitively tendered under standard industry
conditions and lump sum form of contract.

This is an Order of Cost Estimate based on the documentation listed above and does not at this
stage provide a direct comparison with tenders received for the works at any future date. To
enable monitoring of costs, this estimate should be updated regularly during the design and
documentation phases of the project.

Our estimates are inclusive of builder’s preliminaries and contingencies.

Escalation

The unit rates used reflect current market conditions as at August 2007. We anticipate these
rates will have a ‘shelf life’ until end 2007. To provide an indication of the potential cost at
completion we recommend an escalation allowance be incorporated when an indicative
programme is established.

Current Market Status

The Melbourne construction market is currently buoyant with numerous projects competing for
the available resources. It has become increasingly difficult to attract tenderers to projects and it
is not uncommon for tenderers to withdraw during the tender period. We expect that this level of
activity and demand for resources to continue for the foreseeable future.

Exclusions

Our estimate specifically excludes the following, which may be required to be considered when
preparing an overall feasibility study:
•   Asbestos and Hazardous Materials Removal
•   Access
•   BCA & Seismic upgrade works



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•   Services and Infrastructure upgrade
•   Relocation and decanting costs
•   Staging / phasing costs
•   PABX and Phones
•   Loose soft and hard furnishings
•   Murals and works of art
•   Active IT Equipment
•   Work outside site boundaries
•   Out of hours work
•   Professional Fees
•   Statutory authority costs & CITB Levy
•   Holding costs and interest charges
•   Land and legal costs
•   Marketing and leasing allowances
•   Escalation in costs beyond late 2007
•   Goods and Services Taxation and associated holding costs




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SECTION 4                         IMPLEMENTATION


Implementation is about assigning and clarifying the responsibilities of each key user of Victoria
Barracks to ensure that the heritage values are properly managed.

4.1        ACTION PLAN – DEFENCE SUPPORT GROUP (DSG-SV)

Action                                                    HMP Reference         Comments

Distribute HMP to relevant                                -                     -
stakeholders, including:
- DSG-SV staff
- Base Management (DSG-SV)
- CMC (Defence Maintenance
Management (DMM))
Refer to Policy Guidelines and                            Section 3.3 and       Liaise with CMC to ensure
Heritage Handbook before                                  Volume 2              consistent approach
commissioning works at the Base                           (Heritage
(including landscape and maintenance                      Handbook)
works)

Ensure review of HMP within 5 years,                      -                     In association with DHBC (ensure
or at time of major redevelopment                                               up to date versions are distributed)


4.2       ACTION PLAN – BASE PERSONNEL

Action                                                    HMP Reference         Comments

Refer to DSG-SV Heritage Officer for                      Volume 2              For example if underlying paint
assistance with items beyond scope of                     (Heritage             finishes or the like are found.
HMP                                                       Handbook)

Refer to Heritage Handbook and                            Volume 2              -
Heritage Asset Management                                 (Heritage
Schedules before commissioning or                         Handbook)
undertaking works to
buildings/elements

Refer to Precinct specific policies and                   Volume 2              -
development curtilages when                               (Heritage
proposing works/redevelopment                             Handbook)




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4.3       ACTION PLAN – COMPREHENSIVE MAINTENANCE CONTRACTORS (CMC’S)



Action                                                    HMP Reference         Comments

Ensure distribution of relevant HMP                       Volume 2              Ensure up to date versions are
Content (e.g. Heritage Asset                              (Heritage             provided after review of HMP
Management Schedules) to all                              Handbook)
contractors, service providers

Refer to policies and heritage                            Section 3.3 and       -
handbook before commissioning                             Volume 2
works at the site                                         (Heritage
                                                          Handbook)


4.4       ACTION PLAN – DIRECTORATE FOR HERITAGE AND BIODIVERSITY
          CONSERVATION (DHBC)

Action                                                    HMP Reference         Comments

Distribute HMP to relevant areas such                     -                     As required for development/
as master planning, strategic planning                                          planning proposals.

Consider nomination to the National                       Section 5.4           -
Heritage List.




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SECTION 5                         SUMMARY OF RECOMMENDATIONS


5.1       CONDITION OF BLUESTONE BUILDINGS

There is evidence of damp affecting the bluestone buildings, in addition to areas where stones
have fallen out due to fretting mortar or structural movement. A full dilapidation survey should
be undertaken by a heritage professional in conjunction with a structural engineer to determine
the full extent of required works, such as repointing and stone replacement, and if any pinning
may be necessary. It is understood that an initial assessment by a stonemason may have
already been undertaken.

It is recommended that the conservation works are documented to ensure that heritage values
are maintained, and to enable the scope to be costed by a cost consultant or issued for
competitive tender for budgeting purposes. If these works are not undertaken soon, there is a
serious risk in terms of OH&S issues and the loss of heritage values of the assets at this
important site.

5.2       CONSERVATION AND MAINTENANCE WORKS

Key conservation and maintenance works have been summarised in Section 3.5.

Generally the significant buildings at Victoria Barracks have been well maintained, with the
exception of the bluestone walls of the early buildings and perimeter wall, as outlined in Section
5.1 above.

A maintenance schedule has been provided in Volume 2 Heritage Handbook, in addition to the
maintenance list of elements provided within each individual HAMS sheet.

5.3       LANDSCAPE

In keeping with its original intent, the landscape of Victoria Barracks is understated, utilitarian,
and simple. Even so, several significant elements with heritage value remain that should be
retained, maintained, or expanded to increase their presence onsite including: the formal,
enclosed, axial layout of the compound; the remnants of the perimeter wall which conveys the
original planning intent of the barracks; the open quality of the Parade Ground; the circulation
patterns with the Parade Ground as the central feature; the Canary Island Palms (Phoenix
Canariensis) Boston Ivy (Parthenocissus tricuspidata) and overall character of the St Kilda Road
frontage associated with A Block; the Canary Island Palms (Phoenix canariensis) and English
Elms (Ulmus procera) surrounding the Chapel; the Moreton Bay Fig (Ficus macrophylla)
growing adjacent to the north-eastern corner of C Block; and the single Smooth-barked Apple
(Angophora costata) in the parking area behind near the north guardhouse and entry gate.

Preventative maintenance of existing landscape elements by qualified, skilled personnel is key
in maintaining the health and longevity of Victoria Barracks as a heritage landscape. Trees,
shrubs and vines should be inspected annually by a certified arborist and required treeworks
carried out according to best arboricultural practice. Lawn surfaces should be regularly mowed,
weeded, fertilised, aerated and reseeded as required.


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A Landscape Masterplan inclusive of a Tree Management Plan, Tree Replacement Policy, and
a Grounds Maintenance Policy should be developed and implemented. This Landscape
Masterplan will include advice from relevant professionals including an arborist and a landscape
architect specialising in heritage landscapes and will clearly define policies and procedures for
maintaining the existing heritage character at Victoria Barracks. Designs and plant palettes for
the parking areas associated with F Block and the North Guard House as well as any landscape
areas slated for redevelopment or alteration will be included and applied to the grounds over
time.

Future development should be curtailed to the western edge of the complex leaving the central
historic core containing the Parade Ground, G Block, C Block and M Block intact. Should the
need for new plantings occur, consult with a landscape architect specialising in heritage
landscapes for advice on the historically sensitive design and planting palette. Areas outside of
the historic core that should be redesigned and redeveloped are C Block Courtyard and D Block
Courtyard.

Care should be taken to limit the installation of moveable objects (guns, sculptures, etc.) to
appropriate areas on the periphery of the site to preserve the character of the Parade Ground.

On-site gardens of cultural value, including the Peace Rose Garden and the Victoria Cross
Garden, should be revitalised to renew the symbolic value of the plantings. Gardens of cultural
value should be carefully maintained according to best horticultural practice to clarify and
enhance the intent of the planting.

Parking should not be allowed in the historic core of the site including the Parade Ground and
surrounds, the lot to the south of H Block and the roadside to the west of G Block. Parking
should be limited to the existing lot adjacent to the North Guard House and the lot associated
with F Block. All parking should be screened with unobtrusive plantings and parking medians to
minimise visual impact.

5.4       NOMINATION TO NATIONAL HERITAGE LIST

Victoria Barracks Melbourne is an exceptional site of great importance – both to Defence and
the wider community. It is encouraged that the barracks, (and A Block and A-New Wing
specifically) be nominated to the National Heritage List for its significance as a defence site
since the 1850s and for serving as the site of the War Cabinet Room during World War Two.

The implications of listing are not overly onerous, as discussed in Section 3.4.4.




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5.5       FUTURE OFFICE ACCOMMODATION

Office accommodation is at a premium within this site, however it is difficult to create useable
office spaces efficiently within the existing layouts of buildings such as A-Block, C-Block and G-
Block with their internal stone walls. Each of these buildings also have extremely high heritage
values. Whilst solutions can be achieved that harmoniously balance the heritage values and
Defences needs within these assets, it would be highly preferable to investigate the upgrade of
Asset 013 first. This building retains a number of character features that users may enjoy,
within an upgraded modern office environment. With moderate heritage values, it would
respond well to internal adaptive reuse works. This is discussed further in Section 3.4.2.

5.6       INTERPRETIVE OPPORTUNITIES

The following six recommendations are listed in order of the impact their implementation would
have on the place and defence awareness of Victoria Barracks heritage values:

5.6.1 Link to the Shrine of Remembrance

It is recommended that defence investigate the possibility of further networking with the
Victorian RSL to promote the heritage values of Victoria Barracks and defence’s role in events
commemorated at the Shrine of Remembrance. Consideration could be given to producing
interpretive signage to support the initiative and further developing joint tour initiatives or
anniversary celebrations. Further investigation into Heritage Trail opportunities should also be
undertaken, including the Heritage Centre as a key stakeholder.

5.6.2 Guided Tours

It is recommended that ongoing training of volunteers to conduct tours be continued as the
highest priority of the interpretation strategy.

5.6.3 Identity Signage

A review of site signage visible to the general public is recommended to ensure the importance
and dignity of the place is supported and reflected in site identity signs.

5.6.4 Interpretive Signage

The ongoing upgrading of interpretive signage associated with movable heritage objects on site
is recommended. A review of interpretive signage associated with the two memorial gardens is
also recommended.

5.6.5 Display

Review and upgrade of existing static displays throughout the Barracks is recommended to
ensure key themes are effectively communicated to a wide audience and that display methods
show objects and texts to the best possible standards.




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5.6.6 Review

A review of the existing interpretation strategy could be planned for either regular intervals of 5
years or at significant times such as when the access/security status of the place changes or
when a significant amount of heritage fabric or objects are altered, restored or introduced.




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APPENDIX A


BIBLIOGRAPHY AND SOURCES
•   Victoria Barracks Heritage Centre / Museum pamphlet
•   Commonwealth Heritage List Citations
•   Register of the National Estate Citations
•   National Trust (Victoria) website
•   Victoria Barracks (Sydney) Heritage Management Plan, Woodhead, June 2005.
•   Victoria Barracks Melbourne – Conservation Analysis and Management Plan, Allom Lovell
    and Associates, April 1999
•   Victoria Barracks – A Social History, Agnes Hannan, 1995
•   Victoria Barracks Melbourne – Archaeological Investigations in the Vicinity of the Western
    Perimeter Wall, Du Cros and Associates, September 1994
•   Archaeological Investigation of E-Block Site, Australian Construction Services, April 1989.
•   Thematic History of Defence in Victoria, Australian Construction Services, June 1994.
•   Pictorial Guide to Identifying Australian Architecture, Apperly et al 1989.




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APPENDIX B


HERITAGE LEGISLATION




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B.1       Commonwealth Legislation

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999 (EPBC Act)

The EPBC Act protects heritage values on Commonwealth land. It lays down the rules and
procedures that all Commonwealth agencies must follow to manage and protect heritage values
on land they own, care for, affect or control. All properties with heritage values owned and
managed by Defence must be managed in accordance with the EPBC Act. A compliance table
[Appendix E] has been developed to demonstrate how this report satisfies the requirements of
this Act.

The EPBC Act protects heritage by:

      1. identification and inclusion of heritage places on heritage lists;

      2. controlling significant impacts on heritage values.

National Heritage List (NHL)

    This is Australia's list of places with outstanding heritage value to our nation. Only
    information on a place's national heritage values is recorded in the list, and only these values
    are protected by the Australian Government. A place may have natural, Indigenous or
    historic values, or a combination of all three. Anyone can nominate a place with outstanding
    heritage values for inclusion in the National Heritage List.

    The Australian Heritage Council assesses the values of these nominated places against set
    criteria and makes recommendations to the Minister about listing. The final decision on
    listing is made by the Minister. So important are the heritage values of these places that
    they will be protected by Australian Government laws and through special agreements with
    state and territory governments and with private owners.

    Victoria Barracks is not included on the National Heritage List.

Commonwealth Heritage List (CHL)

    The Commonwealth Heritage List is a list of natural and cultural heritage places owned or
    controlled by the Australian Government. These include places connected to defence,
    communications, customs and other government activities that also reflect Australia's
    development as a nation. The list will be comprised of places, or groups of places, in
    Commonwealth lands and waters, that are identified as having Commonwealth heritage
    values. Anyone can nominate a place for inclusion in the list. The Australian Heritage
    Council assesses nominated places against set criteria and makes recommendations to the
    Minister about listing. The final decision on listing is made by the Minister.

    The Commonwealth Heritage List has the following entries for Victoria Barracks:




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          Victoria Barracks Precinct, Item 105232;
          Keep, Item 105172;
          A Block, Item 105167;
          B Block, Item 105173;
          C Block, Item 105171;
          F Block, Item 105170;
          G Block, Item 105168;
          J Block, Item 105172.


      Register of the National Estate (RNE)

    The Register of the National Estate is a list of important natural, Indigenous and historic
    places throughout Australia. It is a statutory register established under the Australian
    Heritage Commission Act 1975. Under that Act, the Australian Heritage Commission
    compiled a record of more than 13 000 places. The Australian Heritage Commission Act
    1975 has now been repealed but the Register of the National Estate has been retained
    under the Australian Heritage Council Act 2003.

    The Australian Heritage Council will compile and maintain the Register. Registered places
    are recorded on a database that will continue as a significant information and education
    resource on Australia's natural and cultural heritage places. The information in the Register
    database may be of particular interest for those making development and planning decisions
    that may have an impact on heritage values. Information about a place in the database may
    also help the Department of the Environment and Heritage assess cases where actions may
    have a significant impact on the environment, including heritage, on Commonwealth land.

    The Register of the National Estate has the following entries for Victoria Barracks:

          Victoria Barracks Precinct, Item 14471;
          Keep, Item 5442;
          A Block, Item 5440;
          B Block, Item 15396;
          C Block, Item 15405;
          F Block, Item 5458;
          G Block, Item 5441;
          J Block, Item 5459.

B.2       Victorian State Legislation Affecting Heritage
Victorian Heritage Act 1995

    The Victorian Heritage Act 1995 is administered by Heritage Victoria and is the Victorian
    Government's key piece of cultural heritage legislation. The Act enables the identification
    and protection of heritage places and objects that are of significance to the State of Victoria.
    The Heritage Act establishes the Victorian Heritage Register, the Heritage Inventory and the
    Heritage Council of Victoria.


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    Victoria Barracks is not included on the Victorian Heritage Register. Victoria Barracks
    has been entered into the Heritage Inventory (HI No. H7822-0210) as a site of potential
    archaeological interest.

Planning and Environment Act 1987 and Port Phillip Planning Scheme

    All municipalities in Victoria are covered by land use planning controls which are prepared
    and administered by State and local government authorities. The legislation governing such
    controls is the Planning and Environment Act 1987 as amended in 2000.

    The land associated with Victoria Barracks is within the municipal boundaries of the City of
    Melbourne. It is listed as Commonwealth Land and is not subject to the provisions of the
    Planning Scheme.

B.3       Indigenous Heritage Legislation

The EPBC Act provides for the protection of Indigenous heritage through the inclusion of places
on the National Heritage List and the Register of National Estate.

The Aboriginal Heritage Act 2006 is a Victorian State Government Act to regulate the
consultation process with registered Aboriginal Parties through the Victorian Aboriginal Heritage
Council. It will align heritage protection with planning/permit approvals.

Areas and objects in Australia and in Australian waters that are of particular significance to
Aboriginals in accordance with Aboriginal tradition are also preserved and protected from injury
or desecration under the Act. In Victoria this legislation is administered at the state level by
Aboriginal Affairs Victoria (AAV).




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APPENDIX C


EPBC ACT COMPLIANCE TABLE

The following compliance table demonstrates how this Management Plan has been prepared to
meet the requirements of the EPBC Act and its Regulations

Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Amendment Regulations 2003
(No. 1) Schedule 7A – Management Plans for Commonwealth Heritage Places

Legislation                                                          Comment

A management plan must:

(a) establish objectives for the identification,                     Section 3.3    Heritage Policy Guidelines
    protection, conservation, presentation and
    transmission of the Commonwealth
    Heritage values of the place; and

b) provide a management framework that                               Section 2.2    Heritage Status and Legislative
   includes reference to any statutory                                              Framework
   requirements and agency mechanisms for
   the protection of the Commonwealth
   Heritage values of the place; and

c) provide a comprehensive description of                            Section 2.1    Historical Summary
   the place, including information about its
                                                                     Section 2.3    Key Heritage Assets
   location, physical features, condition,
   historical context and current uses; and

d) provide a description of the                                      Section 2.6    Statement of Significance
   Commonwealth Heritage values and any
   other heritage values of the place; and

e) describe the condition of the                                     Section 3.5    Summary of Key Works
   Commonwealth Heritage values of the
                                                                     Volume 2       HAMS sheets
   place; and

f)   describe the method used to assess the                          Section 2.4    Comparative Analysis
     Commonwealth Heritage values of the
                                                                     Section 2.5    Assessment of Significance
     place; and

g) describe the current management                                   Section 3.1    Operational and Planning
   requirements and goals including                                                 Issues
   proposals for change and any potential
                                                                     Section 3.2    Risks to Heritage Values
   pressures on the Commonwealth Heritage
   values of the place; and




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Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Amendment Regulations 2003
(No. 1) Schedule 7A – Management Plans for Commonwealth Heritage Places

h) have policies to manage the                                       Section 3.3    Heritage Policy Guidelines
   Commonwealth Heritage values of a
   place; and

i)   include an implementation plan; and j)                          Section 4      Implementation
     show how the implementation of policies
     will be monitored; and

k) show how the management plan will be                              Section 4.1    DSG Action Plan
   reviewed.


Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Amendment Regulations 2003
(No. 1) Schedule 7B – Commonwealth Heritage Management Principles

Legislation                                                          Comment

1. The objective in managing Commonwealth                            Section 1.2    Location
   Heritage places is to identify, protect,
                                                                     Section 2.3    Key Heritage Assets
   conserve, present and transmit, to all
   generations, their Commonwealth                                   Section 3.4    Interpretation and Other
   Heritage values.                                                                 Opportunities

                                                                     Section 3.5    Summary of Key Works

2. The management of Commonwealth                                    All authors are qualified Heritage Practitioners
   Heritage places should use the best
                                                                     All management guidelines are in accordance
   available knowledge, skills and standards
                                                                     with the standards set out in the Burra Charter
   for those places, and include ongoing
   technical and community input to                                  Defence personnel who manage Defence
   decisions and actions that may have a                             heritage places have access to a Heritage
   significant impact on their Commonwealth                          Advisory Service through the Defence
   Heritage values.                                                  Heritage panel.

3. The management of Commonwealth                                    Section 2.2    Heritage Status and Legislation
   Heritage places should respect all heritage                                      Framework
   values of the place and seek to integrate,
   where appropriate, and Commonwealth,
   State, Territory and local government
   responsibilities for those places.

4. The management of Commonwealth                                    Section 3.3    Heritage Policy Guidelines
   Heritage places should ensure that their
                                                                     Volume 2       HAMS sheets
   use and presentation is consistent with the
   conservation of their Commonwealth
   Heritage values.


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Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Amendment Regulations 2003
(No. 1) Schedule 7B – Commonwealth Heritage Management Principles

5. The management of Commonwealth                                    Due to nature of the site and operations
   Heritage places should make timely and                            (Defence), only limited community consultation
   appropriate provisions for community                              is considered appropriate
   involvement, especially people who: a)
   have a particular interest in, or
   associations with, the place; and b) may
   be affected by the management of the
   place.

6. Indigenous people are the primary source                          Victoria Barracks lies within the Wurundjeri
   of information on the value of their                              Tribe Land Compensation and Cultural
   heritage and that the active participation of                     Heritage Council Incorporated area.
   indigenous people in identification,
   assessment and management is integral
   to the effective protection of indigenous
   heritage values.

7. The management of Commonwealth                                    Section 4.1    DSG Action Plan
   Heritage places should provide for regular
   monitoring, review and reporting on the
   conservation of Commonwealth Heritage
   values.




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APPENDIX D


SITE DEVELOPMENT PLAN




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APPENDIX E


SIGNIFICANT TREE ASSESSMENT PROCESS




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IDENTIFICATION OF SIGNIFICANCE OF TREES

The methodology implemented for the identification and assessment of significant trees was
based upon that of the National Trust of Australia (Victoria). In this, trees are identified as
having significance based upon a number of criteria. The following criteria are considered:
•   Any tree of outstanding aesthetic significance.
    This criterion includes trees that are notable for their visual quality and their contribution to
    the quality of their landscape setting.
•   Any tree outstanding for its height, trunk circumference or canopy spread.
    This criterion implies a degree of maturity on the part of the tree such that it has achieved
    notable size for its taxon.
•   Any tree that is particularly old or venerable.
    Particularly old trees are likely to include predominantly indigenous trees though remnant
    fruit or orchard trees may also comply. In part a tree’s venerability will be a reflection of age.
•   Any tree commemorating or having associations with an important historic event.
    Such trees are not necessarily old but do have a significant role to play in the history of the
    development of Victoria Barracks Melbourne. Trees planted to commemorate wider
    historical events also comply.
•   Any tree significantly associated with a well-known public figure or ethnic group including
    planting by Royalty and other prominent people and trees associated with Aboriginal
    activities.

    This is a self-explanatory group but of most interest to this study are trees that have value for
    pre-white settlement e.g. in the form of canoe bark trees.
•   Any tree, which occurs in a unique location or context, and so provides a contribution to the
    landscape, including remnant native vegetation, important landmarks and trees that form
    part of an historic garden, park or town.

    This criterion offers a broad category for trees noted as having significance within the
    landscape and is viewed as including trees that have broad ecological or environmental role.
    For this study this criterion also included trees which made a significant contribution to the
    streetscape.
•   Any tree or species or variety that is rare or of very localised distribution.
•   Any tree which is of horticultural or genetic value and could be an important source of
    propagating stock, including specimens that are particularly resistant to disease or exposure.
    Rare exotic trees provide a valuable resource for future propagation and have been included
    in this group. Also of interest are old fruit trees of varieties not now commercially grown and
    of consequence extreme rarity.
•   Any tree which exhibits a curious growth form or physical feature such as abnormal
    outgrowth, natural fusion of branches, severe lightning damage and unusually pruned forms.




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•   Any stand or avenue of trees conforming to one of the above criteria.
    These criteria were considered to offer an effective broad overview of significant trees,
    however review of The Australian Heritage Commission Act 1975 led to the recognition of
    two further categories:
•   Any tree having religious, symbolic or spiritual associations.
•   Any tree revealing examples of planting no longer practical.




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HERITAGE HANDBOOK


Refer to Volume 2 of the Victoria Barracks Melbourne HMP




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     Victoria Barracks
    Melbourne, Victoria
        HERITAGE HANDBOOK

           PUBLIC VERSION

Final report for comment in accordance with
s.341S(3) of the Environment Protection and
    Biodiversity Conservation Act 1999
  This Heritage Handbook for Victoria Barracks, Melbourne, Victoria has been prepared for the Directorate of Heritage
              and Biodiversity Conservation (DH&BC), Department of Defence through Woodhead Pty Ltd

                                   Distribution of this Plan is at the discretion of the Director, DH&BC




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DEFENCE CONTACT

Peter Navaretti
Heritage Officer, DSG-Southern Victoria                                                 E peter.navaretti@defence.gov.au
Defence Plaza Melbourne                                                                 T 03 9282 7638
Level 8, 661 Bourke Street                                                              F 03 9282 7650
MELBOURNE VIC 3000


CONSULTANT CONTACT

Woodhead Pty Ltd                                                                        E adelaide@woodhead.com.au
26 Chesser Street                                                                       T +61 (8) 8223 5013
Adelaide SA 5000                                                                        F +61 (8) 8232 0028




DOCUMENT HISTORY

Authors – Woodhead                                                             Nicole Dent
Project Director                                                               Jason Pruszinski
Client Name                                                                    Directorate of Heritage and Biodiversity
                                                                               Conservation and DSG – Southern Victoria
Name of Project                                                                Victoria Barracks, Melbourne, Victoria
Name of Document                                                               Heritage Management Plan
Document Version and date saved                                                Final – August 2007
                                                                               Copy for notification – 11 September 2009
Consultant Project Number                                                      06626001AR & 09808008AR
Defence Project Number




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TABLE OF CONTENTS




1                INTRODUCTION                                                                                    1


2                KEY ISSUES ARISING FROM THE HMP                                                                 3


3                HERITAGE ASSET MANAGEMENT SCHEDULES (HAMS)                                                      5


3.1              Individual Asset HAMS                                                                           5


3.2              Precinct HAMS                                                                                  53


3.3              Landscape HAMS                                                                                 57


4                ROUTINE MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE                                                                   81




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SECTION 1                    INTRODUCTION


This Heritage Handbook for Victoria Barracks, Melbourne has been prepared for the
Department of Defence through DHBC within the Environment, Heritage and Risk Branch to
provide practical guidance for the management of heritage assets and values at the site.

It provides recommendations for the main precinct, individual assets and elements that have
been identified in the accompanying HMP, as being of significant heritage value. Refer to the
Heritage Asset Management Schedules for the precinct, for individual assets and landscape
elements following.

The EPBC Act and Regulations require Commonwealth agencies meet certain obligations in
managing places they own or control that are of heritage value. These obligations are
discussed in the accompanying Heritage Management Plan, in Section 2.2.

The accompanying HMP provides more historical and background information about Victoria
Barracks, Melbourne, as well as strategic level recommendations and guidelines for the
management of heritage values at the site. The HMP should be used in conjunction with this
Handbook.




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SECTION 2                    KEY ISSUES ARISING FROM THE HMP


2.1      SIGNIFICANCE OF THE SITE

Victoria Barracks in Melbourne is a highly significant site, historically important for its
association with Australia’s defence from its construction (commencing in 1858) at a time when
British Imperial troops defended the colonies. Its significance has continued through Federation
and a Commonwealth based defence system, and through two world wars as National Defence
Headquarters. The role of the site has changed from living accommodation to a busy working
establishment, with buildings adapted over time to suit their changing requirements.

The site is a good example of traditional British influenced military planning, and retains a large
degree of integrity in its axial planning with the main buildings focused on a central parade
ground. The buildings themselves are fine examples of their respective styles, with the
dominant use of bluestone presenting an austere and formal front to the public as the face of
Defence in Melbourne. Several of the buildings are associated with prominent architects and
designers of their era.

The place is highly significant as the site of defence headquarters until 1958, housing the War
Cabinet Room through World War Two. Successive Prime Ministers, Defence Ministers and
Defence Secretaries used the offices and meeting rooms at Victoria Barracks, in particular
those in A-New Wing, as the base for decision making regarding Australia’s involvement in the
conflict.

2.2      SITE POTENTIAL

New Development

Should the need for additional facilities arise, careful consideration needs to be given to their
proposed location. A potential redevelopment zone is available in the south-western carpaking
area, or the demolition of H-Block may give the opportunity to create a more sensitive and
appropriate design to the north of the Parade Ground.

Project Managers should allow adequate time to consider the heritage values of Victoria
Barracks and engage Heritage Professionals to assess the impacts that any proposed
redevelopment will have on the buildings at the site.

Internal redevelopment of office accommodation should take into consideration the values
identified on the corresponding Heritage Asset Management Schedule (HAMS) provided in
Section 3.

Future Office Accommodation

Office accommodation is at a premium within this site, however it is difficult to create useable
office spaces efficiently within the existing layouts of buildings such as A-Block, C-Block and G-
Block with their internal stone walls. Each of these buildings also have extremely high heritage
values. Whilst solutions can be achieved that harmoniously balance the heritage values and
Defences needs within these assets, it would be highly preferable to investigate the upgrade of
Asset 013 first. This building retains a number of character features that users may enjoy,

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within an upgraded modern office environment. With moderate heritage values, it would
respond well to internal adaptive reuse works.

Landscape

Victoria Barracks has potential for preservation as a key heritage landscape. Much of the
significant vegetation on-site dates from the 1920s and is relatively intact and healthy. With the
exception of H Block, modern development has been limited to the northern and western edge
of the site leaving the central historic precinct composed of the Parade Ground and the
buildings that surround it, largely intact and true to the original character of the site. Areas that
have been altered by development are mostly in the form of carparking areas. The impact of
carparking areas can be mitigated through the addition of medians and site appropriate trees for
screening and solar protection.

2.3      RISKS

Condition of Bluestone buildings

There is evidence of damp affecting the bluestone buildings, in addition to areas where stones
have fallen out due to fretting mortar or structural movement. A full dilapidation survey should
be undertaken by a heritage professional in conjunction with a structural engineer to determine
the full extent of required works, such as repointing and stone replacement, and if any pinning
may be necessary. It is understood that an initial assessment by a stonemason may have
already been undertaken.

It is recommended that the conservation works are documented to ensure that heritage values
are maintained, and to enable the scope to be costed by a cost consultant or issued for
competitive tender for budgeting purposes. If these works are not undertaken soon, there is a
serious risk in terms of OH&S issues and the loss of heritage values of the assets at this
important site.

Landscape

As trees are living organisms, there is an ever-present risk of damage, decline, or death.
Because much of the characteristic or significant materials are well-established, they have the
increased potential to survive stress from drought, neglect, or other environmental factors.
However, established trees have extensive root systems which are vulnerable to soil
compaction caused by concentrated foot traffic or vehicles and severing in the course of new
development especially the excavation of trenches for new underground services. Preventative
maintenance and mindfulness is vital in maintaining the significant landscapes of Victoria
Barracks.




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SECTION 3                    HERITAGE ASSET MANAGEMENT SCHEDULES


3.1      INDIVIDUAL ASSET HAMS




                                FIGURE A             Individual Assets Plan

                                PROJECT TITLE        Victoria Barracks, Melbourne, Victoria

                                SCALE                Not to scale

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KEY BUILT HERITAGE ASSETS

 Asset Name            Current Use                       Former Use                              Date                    Heritage

 A Block               Administration &                  Administration, Senior                  1860-62                 Exceptional
                       Offices                           Defence Officers’
                                                         Accommodation
 A-New Wing            Administration &                  Administration, War                     1915-18                 Exceptional
 (ANW)                 Offices                           Cabinet Room

 B Block               Heritage Centre &                 Guard House, Cells,                     1862                    High
                       Conference Room                   Chemical Laboratory,
                                                         Printing Office, Library,
                                                         Barracks Staff offices
 C Block               Offices                           Armoury and Ordnance                    1860; 1912 second       High
                                                         Store                                   and third storey
                                                                                                 added
 D Block               Offices                           Offices Department of                   1940                    Low
                                                         Navy and RAAF
                                                         Administration
 F Block               Offices                           Military Hospital,                      1856-57                 High
                                                         Ordnance Stores Office

 G Block               Offices, Officers’                Soldiers’ Barracks,                     1856-59                 High /
                       Mess (northern                    Police accommodation,                                           Exceptional
                       end) Sergeants’                   Officers’ Mess
                       Mess (southern
                       end)
 H Block               Administration,                   Defence Signals                         1979                    Intrusive
                       Offices, Auditorium,              Directorate
                       Café and Credit
                       Union offices
 J Block               Offices                           Staff Sergeants’                        1858, 1878              High
                                                         Quarters, Police                        verandah added
                                                         Hospital, Civil Aviation
                                                         Authority, RAAF Offices
 K Block               Services Building                 -                                       c1976                   None


 M Block               Health Centre and                 Additional Offices linked               1939                    Moderate
                       Offices                           with A Block

 The Keep              Storage                           WC’s, Defensive feature                 1859-89                 High
 (Asset 018)                                             in perimeter wall

 The Chapel            Chapel                            Married Quarters &                      1862                    High
 (Asset 012)                                             Barracks Caretaker’s
                                                         Quarters
 Motor                 Garages                           Former site of stables                  Mid 1930s               Low
 Transport
 Depot
 Repatriation          Vacant Offices                    Repatriation Outpatient                 1937                    Moderate
 Building                                                Clinic
 (Asset 013)




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Note: HAMS Sheets have been provided for Assets and Landscape elements rated “Moderate”
significance or above.


                                                   A Block

Individual Heritage Value                          Exceptional

Heritage Precinct                                  Victoria Barracks Parade Ground Precinct




Front elevation                                             Boston ivy to facade                                   Rear elevation

Description, Condition and                         A Block remains relatively intact to its original form, particularly externally. It is a
Integrity                                          relatively austere, three storey bluestone building centrally, with two storey (plus
                                                   basement) wings to either side, and is highly symmetrical. The stone is rock
                                                   faced and axed bluestone, finely executed, with segmented and half round
                                                   arches to openings, and unusual oval windows to the stair on the west
                                                   elevation. The roof is hipped with decorative iron cresting to the central section
                                                   and corbelled chimneys.

                                                   Internally the building is reasonably intact with the main entry retaining early
                                                   joinery.

                                                   Exterior

                                                   Walls: Rock faced bluestone

                                                   Roof: Hipped slate with iron cresting to central portion

                                                   Chimneys: Bluestone
                                                   Windows: timber sash

                                                   Doors: Timber

                                                   Interior: Parquetry floor to main lobby and bluestone flags to ground lobby,
                                                   timber joinery and skirtings
                                                   The Blamey Room, named after Sir Thomas Blamey, (Chief of Staff during
                                                   World War One and a Commander in the Army during World War Two), features
                                                   timber panel dado, lined ceilings, moulded plaster straps, original fireplaces,
                                                   moulded timber doors, fireplace surrounds, high skirtings, wide architraves and
                                                   picture rails.

Key Heritage Elements:                             • Overall external symmetrical form, well crafted bluestone walling, refined
                                                       detailing, copper rainwater goods, stone quoins to corners of building and
                                                       around windows and doors.

                                                   • Original relationship with Parade Ground and other early buildings (greatly
                                                       diminished by M. Block);

                                                   • Internal original timber detailing, parquetry floor, bluestone flags, timber
                                                       staircase, Blamey Room.

                                                   • Visibility to St Kilda Road.

Risks                                              • Lack of maintenance



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                                                   A Block

High Priority Works (at February                   • A full survey of the bluestone should be undertaken to determine the extent
2007)                                                  of conservation works required.
                                                   • Substantial movement of stone entry steps to St Kilda Road entries requires
                                                       an assessment by a Structural Engineer.
                                                   • Investigate adequacy of weather stripping to window in central main entry
                                                       bay as there is evidence of damp to the sills.
                                                   • Sand back peeling paint and repaint timber doors and window frames in a
                                                       colour as approved by the DS-SV Heritage Officer.
                                                   • Monitor minor cracking to main lobby stair at tread/riser junction.
                                                   • Brush back peeling paint and treat corrosion of lamp posts, balustrades and
                                                       decorative metal railings with a rust inhibitor. Prime and repaint to match
                                                       existing colour.
                                                   • Evidence of damage and shifting to the south-east corner and to the adjacent
                                                       retaining wall requires an assessment by a Structural Engineer.
                                                   • Corroded gutters to link bridge to M-Block require replacement.

Longer term Works                                  • Monitor signs of damp adjacent central entry which may be caused by the
                                                       concrete infill to basement lightwell.

                                                   • Red brick steps could be replaced with stone in the longer term.

                                                   • Corroded original vent could be replaced.




IMPLICATIONS OF POLICY GUIDELINES
Policy Guideline                                   Implications for this asset

Appropriate Use                                    Continued use as offices acceptable.

Maintenance                                        Asset to be in best possible condition.

Fabric and Setting                                 All early original fabric should be retained.

Building Upgrade                                   Services upgrade works should be undertaken in accordance with Section
                                                   3.3.4 of the main HMP.

Redevelopment                                      Opportunities for extension to this building are extremely limited. There may be
                                                   some potential to create openings through original internal walls whilst
                                                   retaining nib walls, but these too are limited.

Archaeological                                     There is minimal expected archaeological interest in the land under and
                                                   around this asset, although A-Block is listed on the heritage Inventory for its
                                                   potential values. The Allom Lovell Report (p. 118) summarises that the latest
                                                   reports have found that this ‘potential’ is now “non-existent”.

Archival Recording                                 Photographic recording should be carried out before and during any major
                                                   work, before full or partial demolition and before disposal.

                                                   Measured drawings should be prepared before full or partial demolition to
                                                   assets of high or exceptional significance.

Demolition                                         Complete demolition of this asset should be avoided.

                                                   Partial demolition of significant building fabric may be acceptable where its
                                                   removal reveals an aspect of the asset’s history which is considered to be of
                                                   much greater heritage value or critical to its interpretation.



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IMPLICATIONS OF POLICY GUIDELINES
Policy Guideline                                   Implications for this asset

                                                   The unavoidable removal of any significant building fabric should be carried
                                                   out in a manner that enables reinstatement when circumstances permit.

Disposal                                           Should be considered as part of the entire site.




Building Element                                   Maintenance Checklist

Walls                                              Bluestone

                                                   • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −    Spalling of surface or disintegration of stones

                                                       −    Cracks through stones or joints

                                                       −    Open joints or loose mortar in pointing

                                                       −    Loose or missing stonework

                                                       −    Hard cement mortar or patching

                                                       −    Bulging stonework.

                                                   • Repairs: Patching with compatible material if area of defect is isolated.

                                                   • Replacement: Only where deterioration is substantial using new stone
                                                       matching the colour, texture and size of the original blocks.

                                                   • Repointing: Only if affected area is isolated using manual equipment and
                                                       mortar that matches the original in appearance, profile, hardness and
                                                       composition.

                                                   • Cleaning: Only if necessary using specialist pulse action sprays on timers
                                                       and low pressure rotating vortex systems or air, powder and small amounts
                                                       of water.

                                                   • Bulges: May lead to structural failure and serious safety hazards so should
                                                       be left to engineering professionals to assess.

Roof                                               Slate Roof

                                                   • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −    Broken or missing slates

                                                       −    Slates flaking apart

                                                       −    Nails letting go

                                                   • Replacement: Only as necessary matching tile profiles, sizes and colours.

                                                   • Reuse: Where possible reuse existing tiles.

                                                   • Refixing: Using non-ferrous nails.

                                                   • Cleaning: Clean lichen off periodically.

Rainwater Goods                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −    Gutters and downpipes clogged with debris.

                                                       −    Gutters and downpipes that are corroded.

                                                       −    Gutters and downpipes that are loose, tilted or missing.

                                                       −    Broken seams in metal linings of built-in gutters or downpipes.


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Building Element                                    Maintenance Checklist

                                                       −     Birds nests and roosting places.

                                                    • Cleaning: Clean out gutters at least twice a year and consider installation of
                                                       discrete gutter guards if problematic.

                                                    • Repair: Patch using compatible materials if defect isolated. Re-solder open
                                                       joints.

                                                    • Replacement: Only if deterioration is substantial. Profiles of new gutters
                                                       and downpipes must match originals.

                                                    • Rectifications: Introduce additional downpipes discretely if required.

Windows and Doors                                   Timber Frame Windows

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Proper operation of all sashes and hardware.

                                                       −     Loose, cracked or missing glazing putty.

                                                       −     Soundness of weather-stripping.

                                                       −     Cracks and other damage to lintel or sill.

                                                       −     Rot and/or deterioration of timber framing.

                                                    • Rectification: Establish the source of differential settlement and address
                                                       accordingly if sashes are sticking. Strip back excessive paint build-up.

                                                    • Repair: Selective repair or replacement of deteriorated components in kind.
                                                       Sills or other members exhibiting isolated surface defects may be built-up
                                                       using wood putties and then painted.

                                                    • Replacement: New putty should be compatible with adjacent materials.
                                                       Complete replacement of a window unit should only be considered in cases
                                                       of extreme deterioration or restoration of an original window.

                                                    Timber Doors

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Door alignment.

                                                       −     All parts for sign of deterioration.

                                                       −     All door hardware for proper operation.

                                                    • Rectification: Establish the source of differential settlement and address
                                                       accordingly.

                                                    • Repair: Isolated surface defects may be built-up using wood putties and
                                                       then painted or splice in new timber sections.

                                                    • Replacement: Complete replacement of a door unit should only be
                                                       considered in cases of extreme deterioration or restoration of an original
                                                       door.




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Building Element                                    Maintenance Checklist

Other features                                      Cast Iron Balustrade Railings

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Damage, corrosion, deterioration.

                                                       −     Loose / missing fixings.

                                                    • Repair: Defects should be repaired using appropriate patching technique
                                                       for the specific type of material. Loose and missing fixings should be
                                                       repaired / rectified as necessary.

                                                    • Paint removal: Brush all peeling and loose paint from affected area of paint
                                                       if problem localized using a stiff natural bristle brush.

                                                    • Repainting: Repair any loose or broken sections using appropriate metal
                                                       repair techniques. Fill any gouges and deep scratches with epoxy filler prior
                                                       to sanding. Prime and apply finishing paint that is compatible with primer
                                                       and appropriate to prevailing conditions.




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                                                    A-New Wing (ANW)

Individual Heritage Value                           Exceptional

Heritage Precinct                                   Victoria Barracks Parade Ground Precinct




North Elevation                                              South east view                                      North Balcony

Description, Condition and                          A-New Wing is located to the north end of A Block, with original plans to build a
Integrity                                           symmetrical block to the south never eventuating. The 1915-1918 building sits
                                                    next to A Block, using a consistency of materials and form to achieve a
                                                    comfortable relationship; the newer building respectful of its neighbour. The
                                                    bluestone building has a slate hipped roof and its five storeys with string
                                                    courses, and the setting back of the upper storey, are effectively integrated with
                                                    the three storey neighbour, to which it is connected at several points.
                                                    Compared to A-Block, it has smaller stone blocks, larger windows, recessed
                                                    rectangular copper downpipes and a timber soffit lining to a small overhang.

                                                    The building retains its original form and detailing, as well as a large number of
                                                    internal features, including a bomb proof ‘alternate war room’ in the basement.

                                                    Exterior:
                                                    Walls: Rockfaced Bluestone

                                                    Smooth bluestone string courses and window and door surrounds, hooded
                                                    vents

                                                    Roof: Hipped, slate, louvred roof vents

                                                    Windows: painted timber

                                                    Doors: painted timber

                                                    Interior: The War Cabinet Room remains virtually intact with original chairs and
                                                    a ‘coffin’ shaped table from the basement (assumed used as an alternative War
                                                    Cabinet Room, bomb-proof for emergencies), original pull-down maps, the
                                                    extraction fans built over doors for the politicians smoking cigars during
                                                    meetings (with smoke extracted into the adjacent typing room, rather than
                                                    through the double-baffle glazed windows!)

                                                    The original table is said to be in Russell offices in Canberra.

Key Heritage Elements:                              • Overall form, well crafted bluestone walling and original detailing, wrought
                                                       iron railings,

                                                    • Internal layout largely intact to original layout.

                                                    • Internal detailing and features including joinery, lift car and wire cage, War
                                                       Cabinet Room features, bluestone stair, and light fittings.

Risks                                               • Lack of maintenance

High Priority Works (at February                    • Corrosion to joints and sides of inset cast iron downpipes on south side.
2007)                                               • Signs of water ingress to balcony floor.

                                                    • Blocked copper downpipe to North-west corner.



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                                                    A-New Wing (ANW)

                                                    • Check flashing around lift overrun as there is peeling paint to the beam over
                                                       the top lift lobby level.

Longer term Works                                   • Monitor inset downpipes for leaking.

                                                    • Recommend leaf guard to lightwell basement for drainage.




IMPLICATIONS OF POLICY GUIDELINES
Policy Guideline                                    Implications for this asset

Appropriate Use                                     Continued use as offices acceptable.

Maintenance                                         Asset to be in best possible condition.

Fabric and Setting                                  All early original fabric should be retained.

Building Upgrade                                    Services upgrade works should be undertaken in accordance with Section
                                                    3.3.4 of the main HMP.

Redevelopment                                       Opportunities for extension to this building are extremely limited. There may be
                                                    some potential to create openings through original internal walls whilst
                                                    retaining nib walls, but these too are limited.

Archaeological                                      There is minimal expected archaeological interest in the land under and
                                                    around this asset.

Archival Recording                                  Photographic recording should be carried out before and during any major
                                                    work, before full or partial demolition and before disposal.

                                                    Measured drawings should be prepared before full or partial demolition to
                                                    assets of high or exceptional significance.

Demolition                                          Complete demolition of this asset should be avoided.

                                                    Partial demolition of significant building fabric may be acceptable where its
                                                    removal reveals an aspect of the asset’s history which is considered to be of
                                                    much greater heritage value or critical to its interpretation.

                                                    The unavoidable removal of any significant building fabric should be carried
                                                    out in a manner that enables reinstatement when circumstances permit.

Disposal                                            Should be considered as part of the entire site.




Building Element                                    Maintenance Checklist

Walls                                               Bluestone

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Spalling of surface or disintegration of stones

                                                       −     Cracks through stones or joints

                                                       −     Open joints or loose mortar in pointing

                                                       −     Loose or missing stonework

                                                       −     Hard cement mortar or patching

                                                       −     Bulging stonework.

                                                    • Repairs: Patching with compatible material if area of defect is isolated.


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Building Element                                    Maintenance Checklist

                                                    • Replacement: Only where deterioration is substantial using new stone
                                                       matching the colour, texture and size of the original blocks.

                                                    • Repointing: Only if affected area is isolated using manual equipment and
                                                       mortar that matches the original in appearance, profile, hardness and
                                                       composition.

                                                    • Cleaning: Only if necessary using specialist pulse action sprays on timers
                                                       and low pressure rotating vortex systems or air, powder and small amounts
                                                       of water.

                                                    • Bulges: May lead to structural failure and serious safety hazards so should
                                                       be left to engineering professionals to assess.

Roof                                                Slate Roof

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Broken or missing slates

                                                       −     Slates flaking apart

                                                       −     Nails letting go

                                                    • Replacement: Only as necessary matching tile profiles, sizes and colours.

                                                    • Reuse: Where possible reuse existing tiles.

                                                    • Refixing: Using non-ferrous nails.

                                                    • Cleaning: Clean lichen off periodically.

Rainwater Goods                                     • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Gutters and downpipes clogged with debris.

                                                       −     Gutters and downpipes that are corroded.

                                                       −     Gutters and downpipes that are loose, tilted or missing.

                                                       −     Broken seams in metal linings of built-in gutters or downpipes.

                                                       −     Birds nests and roosting places.

                                                    • Cleaning: Clean out gutters at least twice a year and consider installation of
                                                       discrete gutter guards if problematic.

                                                    • Repair: Patch using compatible materials if defect isolated. Re-solder open
                                                       joints.

                                                    • Replacement: Only if deterioration is substantial. Profiles of new gutters
                                                       and downpipes must match originals.

                                                    • Rectifications: Introduce additional downpipes discretely if required.

Windows and Doors                                   Timber Frame Windows

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Proper operation of all sashes and hardware.

                                                       −     Loose, cracked or missing glazing putty.

                                                       −     Soundness of weather-stripping.

                                                       −     Cracks and other damage to lintel or sill.

                                                       −     Rot and/or deterioration of timber framing.



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Building Element                                    Maintenance Checklist

                                                    • Rectification: Establish the source of differential settlement and address
                                                       accordingly if sashes are sticking. Strip back excessive paint build-up.

                                                    • Repair: Selective repair or replacement of deteriorated components in kind.
                                                       Sills or other members exhibiting isolated surface defects may be built-up
                                                       using wood putties and then painted.

                                                    • Replacement: New putty should be compatible with adjacent materials.
                                                       Complete replacement of a window unit should only be considered in cases
                                                       of extreme deterioration or restoration of an original window.

                                                    Timber Doors

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Door alignment.

                                                       −     All parts for sign of deterioration.

                                                       −     All door hardware for proper operation.

                                                    • Rectification: Establish the source of differential settlement and address
                                                       accordingly.

                                                    • Repair: Isolated surface defects may be built-up using wood putties and
                                                       then painted or splice in new timber sections.

                                                    • Replacement: Complete replacement of a door unit should only be
                                                       considered in cases of extreme deterioration or restoration of an original
                                                       door.

Other features                                      Wrought Iron Balustrade Railings

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Damage, corrosion, deterioration.

                                                       −     Loose / missing fixings.

                                                    • Repair: Defects should be repaired using appropriate patching technique
                                                       for the specific type of material. Loose and missing fixings should be
                                                       repaired / rectified as necessary.

                                                    • Paint removal: Brush all peeling and loose paint from affected area of paint
                                                       if problem localized using a stiff natural bristle brush.

                                                    • Repainting: Repair any loose or broken sections using appropriate metal
                                                       repair techniques. Fill any gouges and deep scratches with epoxy filler prior
                                                       to sanding. Prime and apply finishing paint that is compatible with primer
                                                       and appropriate to prevailing conditions.




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                                                    B Block

Individual Heritage Value                           High

Heritage Precinct                                   Victoria Barracks Parade Ground Precinct




Entry verandah                                           West side adjacent rose garden                            Rear view

Description, Condition and                          B Block is a single storey, L-shaped bluestone building with bluestone walls,
Integrity                                           hipped slate roof and verandah, and rendered chimneys. It has brick extensions
                                                    to the east and annexes to the rear housing amenities, and has undergone
                                                    several phases of internal alteration, although the exterior remains largely
                                                    original.

                                                    Exterior:

                                                    Walls: Bluestone and red brick extension with rendered face.
                                                    Roof: Hipped slate with skylights to verandah roof.

                                                    Windows: Double hung timber sash.

                                                    Doors: Timber with glazed panel.

                                                    Interior:

                                                    Ripple iron ceilings in main display room.

                                                    Hard plaster walls.

Key Heritage Elements:                              • Overall form

                                                    • Original materials including bluestone walls, and slate roof

                                                    • Bluestone verandah plinth

                                                    • Internal features such as ripple iron ceilings

                                                    • Intact remnant cells including barrel vaulted ceilings.

Risks                                               • Lack of maintenance

High Priority Works (at February                    • Cracking to east wall to be monitored.
2007)
                                                    • Slate roof leaking over verandah.

                                                    • Damaged flashing to verandah skylights.

Longer term Works                                   • Minor weathering to fascias – repair and repaint.

                                                    • An inefficient airconditioning system should be upgraded when funding is
                                                       available.




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IMPLICATIONS OF POLICY GUIDELINES
Policy Guideline                                    Implications for this asset

Appropriate Use                                     Continued use as offices acceptable and also for historical displays.

Maintenance                                         Asset to be in good condition.

Fabric and Setting                                  All early original fabric should be retained.

Building Upgrade                                    Services upgrade works should be undertaken in accordance with Section
                                                    3.3.4 of the main HMP.

Redevelopment                                       Opportunities for extension to this building are extremely limited. There may be
                                                    some potential to create openings through original internal walls whilst
                                                    retaining nib walls, but these too are limited.

Archaeological                                      There is some expected archaeological interest in the land under and around
                                                    this asset due to the timber floor construction of the building..

Archival Recording                                  Photographic recording should be carried out before and during any major
                                                    work, before full or partial demolition and before disposal.

                                                    Measured drawings should be prepared before full or partial demolition to
                                                    assets of high or exceptional significance.

Demolition                                          Complete demolition of this asset should be avoided.

                                                    Partial demolition of significant building fabric may be acceptable where its
                                                    removal reveals an aspect of the asset’s history which is considered to be of
                                                    much greater heritage value or critical to its interpretation.

                                                    The unavoidable removal of any significant building fabric should be carried
                                                    out in a manner that enables reinstatement when circumstances permit.

Disposal                                            Should be considered as part of the entire site.




Building Element                                    Maintenance Checklist

Walls                                               Bluestone

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Spalling of surface or disintegration of stones

                                                       −     Cracks through stones or joints

                                                       −     Open joints or loose mortar in pointing

                                                       −     Loose or missing stonework

                                                       −     Hard cement mortar or patching

                                                       −     Bulging stonework.

                                                    • Repairs: Patching with compatible material if area of defect is isolated.

                                                    • Replacement: Only where deterioration is substantial using new stone
                                                       matching the colour, texture and size of the original blocks.

                                                    • Repointing: Only if affected area is isolated using manual equipment and
                                                       mortar that matches the original in appearance, profile, hardness and
                                                       composition.




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Building Element                                    Maintenance Checklist

                                                    • Cleaning: Only if necessary using specialist pulse action sprays on timers
                                                       and low pressure rotating vortex systems or air, powder and small amounts
                                                       of water.

                                                    • Bulges: May lead to structural failure and serious safety hazards so should
                                                       be left to engineering professionals to assess.

                                                    Modern Brickwork

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Cracks through joints or bricks.

                                                       −     Open joints or loose mortar in pointing.

                                                       −     Spalling of surface or disintegration of bricks.

                                                       −     Loose or missing brickwork.

                                                       −     Bulging brickwork.

                                                    • Repairs: Patching with compatible material if area of defect is isolated.

                                                    • Replacement: Only where deterioration is substantial using bricks matching
                                                       the colour, texture and size of the original bricks.

                                                    • Repointing: Only if affected area is isolated using manual equipment and
                                                       mortar that matches the original in appearance, profile, hardness and
                                                       composition.

                                                    • Bulges: May lead to structural failure and serious safety hazards so should
                                                       be left engineering professionals to assess.

Roof                                                Slate Roof

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Broken or missing slates

                                                       −     Slates flaking apart

                                                       −     Nails letting go

                                                    • Replacement: Only as necessary matching tile profiles, sizes and colours.

                                                    • Reuse: Where possible reuse existing tiles.

                                                    • Refixing: Using non-ferrous nails.

                                                    • Cleaning: Clean lichen off periodically.

Rainwater Goods                                     • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Gutters and downpipes clogged with debris.

                                                       −     Gutters and downpipes that are corroded.

                                                       −     Gutters and downpipes that are loose, tilted or missing.

                                                       −     Broken seams in metal linings of built-in gutters or downpipes.

                                                       −     Birds nests and roosting places.

                                                    • Cleaning: Clean out gutters at least twice a year and consider installation of
                                                       discrete gutter guards if problematic.

                                                    • Repair: Patch using compatible materials if defect isolated. Re-solder open
                                                       joints.




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Building Element                                    Maintenance Checklist

                                                    • Replacement: Only if deterioration is substantial. Profiles of new gutters
                                                       and downpipes must match originals.

                                                    • Rectifications: Introduce additional downpipes discretely if required.

Windows and Doors                                   Timber Frame Windows

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Proper operation of all sashes and hardware.

                                                       −     Loose, cracked or missing glazing putty.

                                                       −     Soundness of weather-stripping.

                                                       −     Cracks and other damage to lintel or sill.

                                                       −     Rot and/or deterioration of timber framing.

                                                    • Rectification: Establish the source of differential settlement and address
                                                       accordingly if sashes are sticking. Strip back excessive paint build-up.

                                                    • Repair: Selective repair or replacement of deteriorated components in kind.
                                                       Sills or other members exhibiting isolated surface defects may be built-up
                                                       using wood putties and then painted.

                                                    • Replacement: New putty should be compatible with adjacent materials.
                                                       Complete replacement of a window unit should only be considered in cases
                                                       of extreme deterioration or restoration of an original window.

                                                    Timber Doors

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Door alignment.

                                                       −     All parts for sign of deterioration.

                                                       −     All door hardware for proper operation.

                                                    • Rectification: Establish the source of differential settlement and address
                                                       accordingly.

                                                    • Repair: Isolated surface defects may be built-up using wood putties and
                                                       then painted or splice in new timber sections.

                                                    • Replacement: Complete replacement of a door unit should only be
                                                       considered in cases of extreme deterioration or restoration of an original
                                                       door.




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                                                    C Block

Individual Heritage Value                           High

Heritage Precinct                                   Victoria Barracks Parade Ground Precinct




North view                                                      Former Ordnance Store                            Internal Courtyard

Description, Condition and                          C Block is comprised of three sections which have been skillfully integrated into
Integrity                                           the one element. The original 1860 Armoury to the east is a two storey
                                                    bluestone building, whilst the original ordnance store was located in the central
                                                    and west wings, also in bluestone. The later 1912 additions, part in red brick
                                                    and part bluestone, continuing the use of hipped slate roofs seen on earlier
                                                    buildings. The whole of the structure is tied together by the rendered verandah
                                                    and colonnade to its northern façade.

                                                    Whilst the 1912 additions diminished the integrity of the original 1860s
                                                    structures, they display skill and merit in their own right and are indicative of the
                                                    changing needs at the Barracks after Federation and the handing over of control
                                                    of Defence matters to the Commonwealth.

                                                    Exterior:
                                                    Walls: Rock faced bluestone (of former Armoury and Ordnance Store), face red
                                                    brick, rendered masonry portico (of 1912 additions)
                                                    Roof: Hipped slate

                                                    Windows: Double hung timber sash

                                                    Doors: French doors to colonnades (of 1912 additions)

Key Heritage Elements:                              • Overall form of the building including three storey central section with
                                                       colonnades, two storey bluestone wings (former Armoury and Ordnance
                                                       store)

                                                    • Original detailing including ‘Armoury’ sign over original entrance

                                                    • Internal features including joinery

Risks                                               • Lack of maintenance

High Priority Works (at February                    • Unblock drain to balcony level.
2007)                                               • Repair leaking pipework below balcony level.

                                                    • Repair rotting timber window frame in north west corner and repaint.




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IMPLICATIONS OF POLICY GUIDELINES
Policy Guideline                                    Implications for this asset

Appropriate Use                                     Continued use as offices acceptable.

Maintenance                                         Asset to be in good condition.

Fabric and Setting                                  All early original fabric should be retained.

Building Upgrade                                    Services upgrade works should be undertaken in accordance with Section
                                                    3.3.4 of the main HMP.

Redevelopment                                       Opportunities for extension to this building are extremely limited. There may be
                                                    some potential to create openings through original internal walls whilst
                                                    retaining nib walls, but these too are limited.

Archaeological                                      There is no expected archaeological interest in the land under and around this
                                                    asset.

Archival Recording                                  Photographic recording should be carried out before and during any major
                                                    work, before full or partial demolition and before disposal.

                                                    Measured drawings should be prepared before full or partial demolition to
                                                    assets of high or exceptional significance.

Demolition                                          Complete demolition of this asset should be avoided.

                                                    Partial demolition of significant building fabric may be acceptable where its
                                                    removal reveals an aspect of the asset’s history which is considered to be of
                                                    much greater heritage value or critical to its interpretation.

                                                    The unavoidable removal of any significant building fabric should be carried
                                                    out in a manner that enables reinstatement when circumstances permit.

Disposal                                            Should be considered as part of the entire site.




Building Element                                    Maintenance Checklist

Walls                                               Bluestone

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Spalling of surface or disintegration of stones

                                                       −     Cracks through stones or joints

                                                       −     Open joints or loose mortar in pointing

                                                       −     Loose or missing stonework

                                                       −     Hard cement mortar or patching

                                                       −     Bulging stonework.

                                                    • Repairs: Patching with compatible material if area of defect is isolated.

                                                    • Replacement: Only where deterioration is substantial using new stone
                                                       matching the colour, texture and size of the original blocks.

                                                    • Repointing: Only if affected area is isolated using manual equipment and
                                                       mortar that matches the original in appearance, profile, hardness and
                                                       composition.




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Building Element                                    Maintenance Checklist

                                                    • Cleaning: Only if necessary using specialist pulse action sprays on timers
                                                       and low pressure rotating vortex systems or air, powder and small amounts
                                                       of water.

                                                    • Bulges: May lead to structural failure and serious safety hazards so should
                                                       be left to engineering professionals to assess.

                                                    Modern Brickwork

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Cracks through joints or bricks.

                                                       −     Open joints or loose mortar in pointing.

                                                       −     Spalling of surface or disintegration of bricks.

                                                       −     Loose or missing brickwork.

                                                       −     Bulging brickwork.

                                                    • Repairs: Patching with compatible material if area of defect is isolated.

                                                    • Replacement: Only where deterioration is substantial using bricks matching
                                                       the colour, texture and size of the original bricks.

                                                    • Repointing: Only if affected area is isolated using manual equipment and
                                                       mortar that matches the original in appearance, profile, hardness and
                                                       composition.

                                                    • Bulges: May lead to structural failure and serious safety hazards so should
                                                       be left engineering professionals to assess.

Roof                                                Slate Roof

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Broken or missing slates

                                                       −     Slates flaking apart

                                                       −     Nails letting go

                                                    • Replacement: Only as necessary matching tile profiles, sizes and colours.

                                                    • Reuse: Where possible reuse existing tiles.

                                                    • Refixing: Using non-ferrous nails.

                                                    • Cleaning: Clean lichen off periodically.

Rainwater Goods                                     • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Gutters and downpipes clogged with debris.

                                                       −     Gutters and downpipes that are corroded.

                                                       −     Gutters and downpipes that are loose, tilted or missing.

                                                       −     Broken seams in metal linings of built-in gutters or downpipes.

                                                       −     Birds nests and roosting places.

                                                    • Cleaning: Clean out gutters at least twice a year and consider installation of
                                                       discrete gutter guards if problematic.

                                                    • Repair: Patch using compatible materials if defect isolated. Re-solder open
                                                       joints.




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Building Element                                    Maintenance Checklist

                                                    • Replacement: Only if deterioration is substantial. Profiles of new gutters
                                                       and downpipes must match originals.

                                                    • Rectifications: Introduce additional downpipes discretely if required.

Windows and Doors                                   Timber Frame Windows

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Proper operation of all sashes and hardware.

                                                       −     Loose, cracked or missing glazing putty.

                                                       −     Soundness of weather-stripping.

                                                       −     Cracks and other damage to lintel or sill.

                                                       −     Rot and/or deterioration of timber framing.

                                                    • Rectification: Establish the source of differential settlement and address
                                                       accordingly if sashes are sticking. Strip back excessive paint build-up.

                                                    • Repair: Selective repair or replacement of deteriorated components in kind.
                                                       Sills or other members exhibiting isolated surface defects may be built-up
                                                       using wood putties and then painted.

                                                    • Replacement: New putty should be compatible with adjacent materials.
                                                       Complete replacement of a window unit should only be considered in cases
                                                       of extreme deterioration or restoration of an original window.

                                                    Timber Doors

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Door alignment.

                                                       −     All parts for sign of deterioration.

                                                       −     All door hardware for proper operation.

                                                    • Rectification: Establish the source of differential settlement and address
                                                       accordingly.

                                                    • Repair: Isolated surface defects may be built-up using wood putties and
                                                       then painted or splice in new timber sections.

                                                    • Replacement: Complete replacement of a door unit should only be
                                                       considered in cases of extreme deterioration or restoration of an original
                                                       door.




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                                                    F Block

Individual Heritage Value                           High

Heritage Precinct                                   Victoria Barracks Parade Ground Precinct




North east view                                                 Perimeter wall former joint                      Blocked door to future balcony

Description, Condition and                          F Block is a two storey L shaped bluestone building with a hipped roof and
Integrity                                           stone parapet. It is generally a symmetrical building and displays typical
                                                    detailing similar to the other early buildings at the site, including rock-faced
                                                    bluestone, double hung windows and bluestone sills.

                                                    Externally, F Block is reasonably intact, with some internal modifications.

                                                    Exterior:
                                                    Walls: Rock faced bluestone with picked quoins

                                                    Roof: Hipped corrugated iron

                                                    Windows: Timber double hung sash, some with vertical metal bars

                                                    Doors: Timber

Key Heritage Elements:                              • Bluestone walls, timber windows, overall form, symmetrical façade, bluestone
                                                       chimney

                                                    • Historical value as earliest known remaining hospital building in Victoria.

Risks                                               • Lack of maintenance

High Priority Works (at February                    • Broken / missing vent on east side.
2007)                                               • Remove painted lines to stonework that formerly delineated carparking.

                                                    • Structural engineer to assess the effect of missing stone wall (former
                                                       perimeter wall) has on rear of building. Holes to be patched with
                                                       replacement stone to prevent water ingress.

Longer term Works                                   • Interpretive opportunity to highlight bricked up rafter holes and blocked
                                                       doorway for future balcony that was never built.




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IMPLICATIONS OF POLICY GUIDELINES
Policy Guideline                                    Implications for this asset

Appropriate Use                                     Continued use as offices acceptable.

Maintenance                                         Asset to be in good condition.

Fabric and Setting                                  All early original fabric should be retained.

Building Upgrade                                    Services upgrade works should be undertaken in accordance with Section
                                                    3.3.4 of the main HMP.

Redevelopment                                       Opportunities for extension to this building are extremely limited. There may be
                                                    some potential to create openings through original internal walls whilst
                                                    retaining nib walls, but these too are limited.

Archaeological                                      There may be some archaeological interest in the land under and around this
                                                    asset.

Archival Recording                                  Photographic recording should be carried out before and during any major
                                                    work, before full or partial demolition and before disposal.

                                                    Measured drawings should be prepared before full or partial demolition to
                                                    assets of high or exceptional significance.

Demolition                                          Complete demolition of this asset should be avoided.

                                                    Partial demolition of significant building fabric may be acceptable where its
                                                    removal reveals an aspect of the asset’s history which is considered to be of
                                                    much greater heritage value or critical to its interpretation.

                                                    The unavoidable removal of any significant building fabric should be carried
                                                    out in a manner that enables reinstatement when circumstances permit.

Disposal                                            Should be considered as part of the entire site.




Building Element                                    Maintenance Checklist

Walls                                               Bluestone

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Spalling of surface or disintegration of stones

                                                       −     Cracks through stones or joints

                                                       −     Open joints or loose mortar in pointing

                                                       −     Loose or missing stonework

                                                       −     Hard cement mortar or patching

                                                       −     Bulging stonework.

                                                    • Repairs: Patching with compatible material if area of defect is isolated.

                                                    • Replacement: Only where deterioration is substantial using new stone
                                                       matching the colour, texture and size of the original blocks.

                                                    • Repointing: Only if affected area is isolated using manual equipment and
                                                       mortar that matches the original in appearance, profile, hardness and
                                                       composition.




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Building Element                                    Maintenance Checklist

                                                    • Cleaning: Only if necessary using specialist pulse action sprays on timers
                                                       and low pressure rotating vortex systems or air, powder and small amounts
                                                       of water.

                                                    • Bulges: May lead to structural failure and serious safety hazards so should
                                                       be left to engineering professionals to assess.

Roof                                                Corrugated Metal Sheeting

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Build up of debris.

                                                       −     Rust or corrosion spots.

                                                       −     Punctures in metal or broken seams.

                                                    • Patching: Small holes using ubiquitous silicone resin.

                                                    • Rectifications: Introduce slip sheets between rusted lap joints.

Rainwater Goods                                     • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Gutters and downpipes clogged with debris.

                                                       −     Gutters and downpipes that are corroded.

                                                       −     Gutters and downpipes that are loose, tilted or missing.

                                                       −     Broken seams in metal linings of built-in gutters or downpipes.

                                                       −     Birds nests and roosting places.

                                                    • Cleaning: Clean out gutters at least twice a year and consider installation of
                                                       discrete gutter guards if problematic.

                                                    • Repair: Patch using compatible materials if defect isolated. Re-solder open
                                                       joints.

                                                    • Replacement: Only if deterioration is substantial. Profiles of new gutters
                                                       and downpipes must match originals.

                                                    • Rectifications: Introduce additional downpipes discretely if required.

Windows and Doors                                   Timber Frame Windows

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Proper operation of all sashes and hardware.

                                                       −     Loose, cracked or missing glazing putty.

                                                       −     Soundness of weather-stripping.

                                                       −     Cracks and other damage to lintel or sill.

                                                       −     Rot and/or deterioration of timber framing.

                                                    • Rectification: Establish the source of differential settlement and address
                                                       accordingly if sashes are sticking. Strip back excessive paint build-up.

                                                    • Repair: Selective repair or replacement of deteriorated components in kind.
                                                       Sills or other members exhibiting isolated surface defects may be built-up
                                                       using wood putties and then painted.

                                                    • Replacement: New putty should be compatible with adjacent materials.
                                                       Complete replacement of a window unit should only be considered in cases
                                                       of extreme deterioration or restoration of an original window.


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Building Element                                    Maintenance Checklist

                                                    Timber Doors

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Door alignment.

                                                       −     All parts for sign of deterioration.

                                                       −     All door hardware for proper operation.

                                                    • Rectification: Establish the source of differential settlement and address
                                                       accordingly.

                                                    • Repair: Isolated surface defects may be built-up using wood putties and
                                                       then painted or splice in new timber sections.

                                                    • Replacement: Complete replacement of a door unit should only be
                                                       considered in cases of extreme deterioration or restoration of an original
                                                       door.




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                                                    G Block

Individual Heritage Value                           High / Exceptional

Heritage Precinct                                   Victoria Barracks Parade Ground Precinct




East elevation                                           Officers Mess                                            North west view

Description, Condition and                          G Block is a rectangular bluestone building that forms the western boundary of
Integrity                                           the parade ground. It is three storeys, comprising ground and first floor and
                                                    basement level. It is divided into 5 bays in terrace housing style, each identical
                                                    in elevation with a central door. From the rear, the building is punctuated by two
                                                    and three storey projecting towers.

                                                    Internally, G Block is relatively intact although it underwent alterations in the
                                                    1880s, during World War One, and in the 1930s with the creation of the Officers’
                                                    Mess. Ongoing alterations have been made internally over time to maintain the
                                                    required level of amenity.

                                                    Exterior:
                                                    Walls: Coursed rock faced bluestone

                                                    Roof: Hipped corrugated iron to each ‘bay’ and to Officers’ Mess (Southern
                                                    tower has flat roof).

                                                    Windows: 12-pane timber double-hung sash

                                                    Doors: Timber

                                                    Interior: Flagstone lobby; original stair to each bay; corridors now interconnect
                                                    between bays.

Key Heritage Elements:                              • Bluestone rock faced walls, original hipped roof profile (originally slate clad),
                                                       multi pane sash windows, original cobblestone to ground outside basement

                                                    • Relationship with Parade Ground and other key buildings

                                                    • “Mother-in-law” doors to second storey for winching furniture and the like

                                                    • Bluestone stairs, joinery, etc. inside

                                                    • Intact planning internally

Risks                                               • Lack of maintenance

High Priority Works (at February                    • Repaint window frames.
2007)
                                                    • Patch and repaint corroding metal railing once treated with rust inhibitor.

                                                    • Full survey of bluestone required to determine extent of repointing required.

                                                    • Investigate source of various patches of damp to stonework.

                                                    • Some damage to walls from leaking downpipe.

                                                    • Cracking to end bay may need further assessment by structural engineer as
                                                       part of dilapidation survey.

                                                    • Reconnect vent pipe on rear of south west bay.



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                                                    G Block

                                                    • Repoint weathered stone fascia.

                                                    • Repair damaged rainheads to Officers’ mess.

Longer term Works                                   • Remove and repair poor repointing / hard cement patching.

                                                    • Rationalize cabling / conduits to rear of building.




IMPLICATIONS OF POLICY GUIDELINES
Policy Guideline                                    Implications for this asset

Appropriate Use                                     Continued use as offices acceptable. Continued use for Officers’ and
                                                    Sergeants’ Messes is also appropriate.

Maintenance                                         Asset to be in best possible condition.

Fabric and Setting                                  All early original fabric should be retained.

Building Upgrade                                    Services upgrade works should be undertaken in accordance with Section
                                                    3.3.4 of the main HMP.

Redevelopment                                       Opportunities for extension to this building are extremely limited. There may be
                                                    some potential to create openings through original internal walls whilst
                                                    retaining nib walls, but these too are limited.

Archaeological                                      There is expected archaeological interest in the land under and around this
                                                    asset, as the building has a timber floor to the basement and the surrounding
                                                    grassed area to the west used to be the 1890’s site for supporting buildings
                                                    such as the cookhouse, canteen and ablutions blocks.

Archival Recording                                  Photographic recording should be carried out before and during any major
                                                    work, before full or partial demolition and before disposal.

                                                    Measured drawings should be prepared before full or partial demolition to
                                                    assets of high or exceptional significance.

Demolition                                          Complete demolition of this asset should be avoided.

                                                    Partial demolition of significant building fabric may be acceptable where its
                                                    removal reveals an aspect of the asset’s history which is considered to be of
                                                    much greater heritage value or critical to its interpretation.

                                                    The unavoidable removal of any significant building fabric should be carried
                                                    out in a manner that enables reinstatement when circumstances permit.

Disposal                                            Should be considered as part of the entire site.




Building Element                                    Maintenance Checklist

Walls                                               Bluestone

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Spalling of surface or disintegration of stones

                                                       −     Cracks through stones or joints

                                                       −     Open joints or loose mortar in pointing

                                                       −     Loose or missing stonework



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Building Element                                    Maintenance Checklist

                                                       −     Hard cement mortar or patching

                                                       −     Bulging stonework.

                                                    • Repairs: Patching with compatible material if area of defect is isolated.

                                                    • Replacement: Only where deterioration is substantial using new stone
                                                       matching the colour, texture and size of the original blocks.

                                                    • Repointing: Only if affected area is isolated using manual equipment and
                                                       mortar that matches the original in appearance, profile, hardness and
                                                       composition.

                                                    • Cleaning: Only if necessary using specialist pulse action sprays on timers
                                                       and low pressure rotating vortex systems or air, powder and small amounts
                                                       of water.

                                                    • Bulges: May lead to structural failure and serious safety hazards so should
                                                       be left to engineering professionals to assess.

Roof                                                Corrugated Metal Sheeting

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Build up of debris.

                                                       −     Rust or corrosion spots.

                                                       −     Punctures in metal or broken seams.

                                                    • Patching: Small holes using ubiquitous silicone resin.

                                                    • Rectifications: Introduce slip sheets between rusted lap joints.

Rainwater Goods                                     • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Gutters and downpipes clogged with debris.

                                                       −     Gutters and downpipes that are corroded.

                                                       −     Gutters and downpipes that are loose, tilted or missing.

                                                       −     Broken seams in metal linings of built-in gutters or downpipes.

                                                       −     Birds nests and roosting places.

                                                    • Cleaning: Clean out gutters at least twice a year and consider installation of
                                                       discrete gutter guards if problematic.

                                                    • Repair: Patch using compatible materials if defect isolated. Re-solder open
                                                       joints.

                                                    • Replacement: Only if deterioration is substantial. Profiles of new gutters
                                                       and downpipes must match originals.

                                                    • Rectifications: Introduce additional downpipes discretely if required.

Windows and Doors                                   Timber Frame Windows

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Proper operation of all sashes and hardware.

                                                       −     Loose, cracked or missing glazing putty.

                                                       −     Soundness of weather-stripping.

                                                       −     Cracks and other damage to lintel or sill.



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Building Element                                    Maintenance Checklist

                                                       −     Rot and/or deterioration of timber framing.

                                                    • Rectification: Establish the source of differential settlement and address
                                                       accordingly if sashes are sticking. Strip back excessive paint build-up.

                                                    • Repair: Selective repair or replacement of deteriorated components in kind.
                                                       Sills or other members exhibiting isolated surface defects may be built-up
                                                       using wood putties and then painted.

                                                    • Replacement: New putty should be compatible with adjacent materials.
                                                       Complete replacement of a window unit should only be considered in cases
                                                       of extreme deterioration or restoration of an original window.

                                                    Timber Doors

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Door alignment.

                                                       −     All parts for sign of deterioration.

                                                       −     All door hardware for proper operation.

                                                    • Rectification: Establish the source of differential settlement and address
                                                       accordingly.

                                                    • Repair: Isolated surface defects may be built-up using wood putties and
                                                       then painted or splice in new timber sections.

                                                    • Replacement: Complete replacement of a door unit should only be
                                                       considered in cases of extreme deterioration or restoration of an original
                                                       door.

Other features                                      Cast Iron Balustrade Railings

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Damage, corrosion, deterioration.

                                                       −     Loose / missing fixings.

                                                    • Repair: Defects should be repaired using appropriate patching technique
                                                       for the specific type of material. Loose and missing fixings should be
                                                       repaired / rectified as necessary.

                                                    • Paint removal: Brush all peeling and loose paint from affected area of paint
                                                       if problem localized using a stiff natural bristle brush.

                                                    • Repainting: Repair any loose or broken sections using appropriate metal
                                                       repair techniques. Fill any gouges and deep scratches with epoxy filler prior
                                                       to sanding. Prime and apply finishing paint that is compatible with primer
                                                       and appropriate to prevailing conditions.




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                                                    J Block

Individual Heritage Value                           High

Heritage Precinct                                   Victoria Barracks Parade Ground Precinct




Entry view                                             West elevation                                            North view and part original
                                                                                                                 perimeter wall

Description, Condition and                          J Block is generally intact both externally and internally. The design is very
Integrity                                           similar to that of F Block, with the distinguishing feature being its two storey cast
                                                    iron and timber verandah. The hipped slate roof is partly concealed by the low
                                                    bluestone parapet. Walls and chimneys are in bluestone. Internally many
                                                    rooms retain their original timber board ceilings, although several refurbishments
                                                    have occurred throughout the building.

Key Heritage Elements:                              • Bluestone walls, two storey cast iron and timber verandah, timber windows,
                                                       slate hipped roof, chimney, west wing wall and remnant perimeter wall.

Risks                                               • Lack of maintenance

High Priority Works (at February                    • Monitor verandah for signs of settlement/ movement
2007)




IMPLICATIONS OF POLICY GUIDELINES
Policy Guideline                                    Implications for this asset

Appropriate Use                                     Continued use as offices acceptable.

Maintenance                                         Asset to be in good condition.

Fabric and Setting                                  All early original fabric should be retained.

Building Upgrade                                    Services upgrade works should be undertaken in accordance with Section
                                                    3.3.4 of the main HMP.

Redevelopment                                       Opportunities for extension to this building are extremely limited. There may be
                                                    some potential to create openings through original internal walls whilst
                                                    retaining nib walls, but these too are limited.

Archaeological                                      There is some archaeological potential in the land under and around this asset.

Archival Recording                                  Photographic recording should be carried out before and during any major
                                                    work, before full or partial demolition and before disposal.

                                                    Measured drawings should be prepared before full or partial demolition to
                                                    assets of high or exceptional significance.




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IMPLICATIONS OF POLICY GUIDELINES
Policy Guideline                                    Implications for this asset

Demolition                                          Complete demolition of this asset should be avoided.

                                                    Partial demolition of significant building fabric may be acceptable where its
                                                    removal reveals an aspect of the asset’s history which is considered to be of
                                                    much greater heritage value or critical to its interpretation.

                                                    The unavoidable removal of any significant building fabric should be carried
                                                    out in a manner that enables reinstatement when circumstances permit.

Disposal                                            Should be considered as part of the entire site.




Building Element                                    Maintenance Checklist

Walls                                               Bluestone

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Spalling of surface or disintegration of stones

                                                       −     Cracks through stones or joints

                                                       −     Open joints or loose mortar in pointing

                                                       −     Loose or missing stonework

                                                       −     Hard cement mortar or patching

                                                       −     Bulging stonework.

                                                    • Repairs: Patching with compatible material if area of defect is isolated.

                                                    • Replacement: Only where deterioration is substantial using new stone
                                                       matching the colour, texture and size of the original blocks.

                                                    • Repointing: Only if affected area is isolated using manual equipment and
                                                       mortar that matches the original in appearance, profile, hardness and
                                                       composition.

                                                    • Cleaning: Only if necessary using specialist pulse action sprays on timers
                                                       and low pressure rotating vortex systems or air, powder and small amounts
                                                       of water.

                                                    • Bulges: May lead to structural failure and serious safety hazards so should
                                                       be left to engineering professionals to assess.

Roof                                                Slate Roof

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Broken or missing slates

                                                       −     Slates flaking apart

                                                       −     Nails letting go

                                                    • Replacement: Only as necessary matching tile profiles, sizes and colours.

                                                    • Reuse: Where possible reuse existing tiles.

                                                    • Refixing: Using non-ferrous nails.

                                                    • Cleaning: Clean lichen off periodically.




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Rainwater Goods                                     • Inspect and check for:

                                                    −         Gutters and downpipes clogged with debris.

                                                    −         Gutters and downpipes that are corroded.

                                                    −         Gutters and downpipes that are loose, tilted or missing.

                                                    −         Broken seams in metal linings of built-in gutters or downpipes.

                                                    −         Birds nests and roosting places.

                                                    • Cleaning: Clean out gutters at least twice a year and consider installation of
                                                    discrete gutter guards if problematic.

                                                    • Repair: Patch using compatible materials if defect isolated. Re-solder open
                                                    joints.

                                                    • Replacement: Only if deterioration is substantial. Profiles of new gutters
                                                    and downpipes must match originals.

                                                    • Rectifications: Introduce additional downpipes discretely if required.

Windows and Doors                                   Timber Frame Windows

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                        −     Proper operation of all sashes and hardware.

                                                        −     Loose, cracked or missing glazing putty.

                                                        −     Soundness of weather-stripping.

                                                        −     Cracks and other damage to lintel or sill.

                                                        −     Rot and/or deterioration of timber framing.

                                                    • Rectification: Establish the source of differential settlement and address
                                                        accordingly if sashes are sticking. Strip back excessive paint build-up.

                                                    • Repair: Selective repair or replacement of deteriorated components in kind.
                                                        Sills or other members exhibiting isolated surface defects may be built-up
                                                        using wood putties and then painted.

                                                    • Replacement: New putty should be compatible with adjacent materials.
                                                        Complete replacement of a window unit should only be considered in cases
                                                        of extreme deterioration or restoration of an original window.

Other features                                      Cast Iron Balustrade Railings

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                        −     Damage, corrosion, deterioration.

                                                        −     Loose / missing fixings.

                                                    • Repair: Defects should be repaired using appropriate patching technique
                                                        for the specific type of material. Loose and missing fixings should be
                                                        repaired / rectified as necessary.

                                                    • Paint removal: Brush all peeling and loose paint from affected area of paint
                                                        if problem localized using a stiff natural bristle brush.

                                                    • Repainting: Repair any loose or broken sections using appropriate metal
                                                        repair techniques. Fill any gouges and deep scratches with epoxy filler prior
                                                        to sanding. Prime and apply finishing paint that is compatible with primer
                                                        and appropriate to prevailing conditions.




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                                                    M Block

Individual Heritage Value                           Moderate (but intrusive on the understanding of the original relationship of A
                                                    Block to the Parade Ground)

Heritage Precinct                                   Victoria Barracks Parade Ground Precinct




View from Parade Ground                                  East side                                                North side, near A-New Wing

Description, Condition and                          M Block is a four storey face red brick building, running parallel with A Block. It
Integrity                                           has a hipped Marseille terracotta tile roof and a manganese (brown) brick plinth,
                                                    the east façade also employing this material to define the entry.

                                                    Exterior:
                                                    Walls: Face red brick and manganese brick

                                                    Roof: Hipped Marseille terracotta tiles

                                                    Windows: Original steel framed, half are modern aluminium
                                                    Doors: Some timber

Key Heritage Elements:                              • Overall form generally mirroring early buildings, close links with A and ANW
                                                       Blocks

                                                    • Face red brick and detail manganese brickwork, ornante entry detailing to
                                                       east façade and glazing to entry door.

Risks                                               • Lack of maintenance

High Priority Works (at February                    • Damaged timber fascia to North west corner.
2007)
                                                    • Repair cracked panes of glass.

                                                    • Extensive cracking to south-west corner requires assessment by a Structural
                                                       Engineer.

Longer term Works                                   • Rationalise conduits and old services.

                                                    • Repaint modern metal railings where peeling.




IMPLICATIONS OF POLICY GUIDELINES
Policy Guideline                                    Implications for this asset

Appropriate Use                                     Continued use as offices acceptable.

Maintenance                                         Asset to be in reasonable condition.

Fabric and Setting                                  All early original fabric should be retained.

Building Upgrade                                    Services upgrade works should be undertaken in accordance with Section
                                                    3.3.4 of the main HMP.

Redevelopment                                       Opportunities for extension to this building are extremely limited. There may be
                                                    some potential to create openings through original internal walls whilst
                                                    retaining nib walls, but these too are limited.


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IMPLICATIONS OF POLICY GUIDELINES
Policy Guideline                                    Implications for this asset

Archaeological                                      There is archaeological interest in the land under and around this asset.

Archival Recording                                  Photographic recording should be carried out before and during any major
                                                    work, before full or partial demolition and before disposal.

                                                    Measured drawings should be prepared before full or partial demolition to
                                                    assets of high or exceptional significance.

Demolition                                          Complete demolition of this asset should be avoided.

                                                    Partial demolition of significant building fabric may be acceptable where its
                                                    removal reveals an aspect of the asset’s history which is considered to be of
                                                    much greater heritage value or critical to its interpretation.

                                                    The unavoidable removal of any significant building fabric should be carried
                                                    out in a manner that enables reinstatement when circumstances permit.

Disposal                                            Should be considered as part of the entire site.




Building Element                                    Maintenance Checklist

Walls                                               Modern Brickwork

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Cracks through joints or bricks.

                                                       −     Open joints or loose mortar in pointing.

                                                       −     Spalling of surface or disintegration of bricks.

                                                       −     Loose or missing brickwork.

                                                       −     Bulging brickwork.

                                                    • Repairs: Patching with compatible material if area of defect is isolated.

                                                    • Replacement: Only where deterioration is substantial using bricks matching
                                                       the colour, texture and size of the original bricks.

                                                    • Repointing: Only if affected area is isolated using manual equipment and
                                                       mortar that matches the original in appearance, profile, hardness and
                                                       composition.

                                                    Bulges: May lead to structural failure and serious safety hazards so should be
                                                    left to engineering professionals to assess.

Roof                                                Terracotta Tile Roof

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Broken or missing tiles

                                                    • Replacement: Only as necessary matching tile profiles, sizes and colours.

                                                    • Cleaning: Clean lichen off periodically.




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Building Element                                    Maintenance Action

Rainwater Goods                                     • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Gutters and downpipes clogged with debris.

                                                       −     Gutters and downpipes that are corroded.

                                                       −     Gutters and downpipes that are loose, tilted or missing.

                                                       −     Broken seams in metal linings of built-in gutters or downpipes.

                                                       −     Birds nests and roosting places.

                                                    • Cleaning: Clean out gutters at least twice a year and consider installation of
                                                       discrete gutter guards if problematic.

                                                    • Repair: Patch using compatible materials if defect isolated. Re-solder open
                                                       joints.

                                                    • Replacement: Only if deterioration is substantial. Profiles of new gutters
                                                       and downpipes must match originals.

                                                    • Rectifications: Introduce additional downpipes discretely if required.




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                                                    The Keep (Asset 018)

Individual Heritage Value                           High

Heritage Precinct                                   Victoria Barracks Parade Ground Precinct




View from Wells Street                                   View from east                                           View from Guard house

Description, Condition and                          Built the same as any British-style barracks, the Keep is a small bluestone
Integrity                                           building with a defensive style of stepped parapet and small slot windows facing
                                                    the outside of the site. Now it is used as a cool store for wine.

Key Heritage Elements:                              • Overall form, bluestone construction, slot windows, remnant wall attached.

Risks                                               • Lack of maintenance

High Priority Works (at February                    • Extensive cracking to the south east corner requires assessment by a
2007)                                                  Structural Engineer. It appears that too much of the original perimeter wall
                                                       has been removed from this corner.




IMPLICATIONS OF POLICY GUIDELINES
Policy Guideline                                    Implications for this asset

Appropriate Use                                     Continued use as store is acceptable.

Maintenance                                         Asset to be in good condition.

Fabric and Setting                                  All early original fabric should be retained.

Building Upgrade                                    Services upgrade works should be undertaken in accordance with Section
                                                    3.3.4 of the main HMP.

Redevelopment                                       Opportunities for extension to this building are extremely limited. There may be
                                                    some potential to create openings through original internal walls whilst
                                                    retaining nib walls, but these too are limited.

Archaeological                                      There is some archaeological potential in the land under and around this asset.

Archival Recording                                  Photographic recording should be carried out before and during any major
                                                    work, before full or partial demolition and before disposal.

                                                    Measured drawings should be prepared before full or partial demolition to
                                                    assets of high or exceptional significance.

Demolition                                          Complete demolition of this asset should be avoided.

                                                    Partial demolition of significant building fabric may be acceptable where its
                                                    removal reveals an aspect of the asset’s history which is considered to be of
                                                    much greater heritage value or critical to its interpretation.

                                                    The unavoidable removal of any significant building fabric should be carried
                                                    out in a manner that enables reinstatement when circumstances permit.

Disposal                                            Should be considered as part of the entire site.



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Building Element                                    Maintenance Checklist

Walls                                               Bluestone

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Spalling of surface or disintegration of stones

                                                       −     Cracks through stones or joints

                                                       −     Open joints or loose mortar in pointing

                                                       −     Loose or missing stonework

                                                       −     Hard cement mortar or patching

                                                       −     Bulging stonework.

                                                    • Repairs: Patching with compatible material if area of defect is isolated.

                                                    • Replacement: Only where deterioration is substantial using new stone
                                                       matching the colour, texture and size of the original blocks.

                                                    • Repointing: Only if affected area is isolated using manual equipment and
                                                       mortar that matches the original in appearance, profile, hardness and
                                                       composition.

                                                    • Cleaning: Only if necessary using specialist pulse action sprays on timers
                                                       and low pressure rotating vortex systems or air, powder and small amounts
                                                       of water.

                                                    • Bulges: May lead to structural failure and serious safety hazards so should
                                                       be left to engineering professionals to assess.

Roof                                                Corrugated Metal Sheeting

                                                    • Inspect and check for:
                                                       −     Build up of debris.

                                                       −     Rust or corrosion spots.

                                                       −     Punctures in metal or broken seams.

                                                    • Patching: Small holes using ubiquitous silicone resin.

                                                    • Rectifications: Introduce slip sheets between rusted lap joints.

Rainwater Goods                                     • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Gutters and downpipes clogged with debris.

                                                       −     Gutters and downpipes that are corroded.

                                                       −     Gutters and downpipes that are loose, tilted or missing.

                                                       −     Broken seams in metal linings of built-in gutters or downpipes.

                                                       −     Birds nests and roosting places.

                                                    • Cleaning: Clean out gutters at least twice a year and consider installation of
                                                       discrete gutter guards if problematic.

                                                    • Repair: Patch using compatible materials if defect isolated. Re-solder open
                                                       joints.

                                                    • Replacement: Only if deterioration is substantial. Profiles of new gutters
                                                       and downpipes must match originals.

                                                    • Rectifications: Introduce additional downpipes discretely if required.


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Building Element                                    Maintenance Checklist

Windows and Doors                                   Timber Doors

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Door alignment.

                                                       −     All parts for sign of deterioration.

                                                       −     All door hardware for proper operation.

                                                    • Rectification: Establish the source of differential settlement and address
                                                       accordingly.

                                                    • Repair: Isolated surface defects may be built-up using wood putties and
                                                       then painted or splice in new timber sections.

                                                    Replacement: Complete replacement of a door unit should only be considered
                                                    in cases of extreme deterioration or restoration of an original door.




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                                                    The Chapel (Asset 012)

Individual Heritage Value                           High

Heritage Precinct                                   Victoria Barracks Parade Ground Precinct




Front entry                                              North east view                                          Garden wall

Description, Condition and                          The Chapel / former Married Soldiers’ Quarters is a single storey rendered brick
Integrity                                           building of domestic scale and appearance, setting it apart from the other early
                                                    buildings at Victoria Barracks. The principle façade presents as a double
                                                    fronted cottage with a projecting bay to the west, with separate hipped slate
                                                    roofs to the two sections. Internally the planning remains largely intact with
                                                    original fireplaces, although the conversion to Chapel use saw a complete
                                                    internal refurbishment. In c2004 the verandah was damaged and replaced with
                                                    modern colorbond.

Key Heritage Elements:                              • Rendered masonry walls, slate hipped roof, L shaped plan with symmetrical
                                                       main section of domestic character, original internal elements, chimneys and
                                                       chimney pots, 12 pane timber windows.

Risks                                               • Lack of maintenance

High Priority Works (at February                    • Repair fascia at north-east corner gutter.
2007)                                               • Check drain and downpipe for blocks as there is evidence of rising damp to
                                                       whole perimeter of building.

                                                    • Cracking to window in the north corner.

                                                    • Repaint window frames.

                                                    • Excessive lichen to slate roof needs to be removed.

Longer term Works                                   • Repair damage to wall where verandah flashing removed.




IMPLICATIONS OF POLICY GUIDELINES
Policy Guideline                                    Implications for this asset

Appropriate Use                                     Continued use as offices and chapel acceptable.

Maintenance                                         Asset to be in good condition.

Fabric and Setting                                  All early original fabric should be retained.

Building Upgrade                                    Services upgrade works should be undertaken in accordance with Section
                                                    3.3.4 of the main HMP.

Redevelopment                                       Opportunities for extension to this building are extremely limited. There may be
                                                    some potential to create openings through original internal walls whilst
                                                    retaining nib walls, but these too are limited.

Archaeological                                      There is some archaeological potential in the land under and around this asset.




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IMPLICATIONS OF POLICY GUIDELINES
Policy Guideline                                    Implications for this asset

Archival Recording                                  Photographic recording should be carried out before and during any major
                                                    work, before full or partial demolition and before disposal.

                                                    Measured drawings should be prepared before full or partial demolition to
                                                    assets of high or exceptional significance.

Demolition                                          Complete demolition of this asset should be avoided.

                                                    Partial demolition of significant building fabric may be acceptable where its
                                                    removal reveals an aspect of the asset’s history which is considered to be of
                                                    much greater heritage value or critical to its interpretation.

                                                    The unavoidable removal of any significant building fabric should be carried
                                                    out in a manner that enables reinstatement when circumstances permit.

Disposal                                            Should be considered as part of the entire site.




Building Element                                    Maintenance Checklist

Walls                                               Modern Brickwork

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Cracks through joints or bricks.

                                                       −     Open joints or loose mortar in pointing.

                                                       −     Spalling of surface or disintegration of bricks.

                                                       −     Loose or missing brickwork.

                                                       −     Bulging brickwork.

                                                    • Repairs: Patching with compatible material if area of defect is isolated.

                                                    • Replacement: Only where deterioration is substantial using bricks matching
                                                       the colour, texture and size of the original bricks.

                                                    • Repointing: Only if affected area is isolated using manual equipment and
                                                       mortar that matches the original in appearance, profile, hardness and
                                                       composition.

                                                    • Bulges: May lead to structural failure and serious safety hazards so should
                                                       be left to engineering professionals to assess.

Roof                                                Slate Roof

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Broken or missing slates

                                                       −     Slates flaking apart

                                                       −     Nails letting go

                                                    • Replacement: Only as necessary matching tile profiles, sizes and colours.

                                                    • Reuse: Where possible reuse existing tiles.

                                                    • Refixing: Using non-ferrous nails.

                                                    • Cleaning: Clean lichen off periodically.




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Rainwater Goods                                     • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Gutters and downpipes clogged with debris.

                                                       −     Gutters and downpipes that are corroded.

                                                       −     Gutters and downpipes that are loose, tilted or missing.

                                                       −     Broken seams in metal linings of built-in gutters or downpipes.

                                                       −     Birds nests and roosting places.

                                                    • Cleaning: Clean out gutters at least twice a year and consider installation of
                                                       discrete gutter guards if problematic.

                                                    • Repair: Patch using compatible materials if defect isolated. Re-solder open
                                                       joints.

                                                    • Replacement: Only if deterioration is substantial. Profiles of new gutters
                                                       and downpipes must match originals.

                                                    • Rectifications: Introduce additional downpipes discretely if required.

Windows and Doors                                   Timber Frame Windows

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Proper operation of all sashes and hardware.

                                                       −     Loose, cracked or missing glazing putty.

                                                       −     Soundness of weather-stripping.

                                                       −     Cracks and other damage to lintel or sill.

                                                       −     Rot and/or deterioration of timber framing.

                                                    • Rectification: Establish the source of differential settlement and address
                                                       accordingly if sashes are sticking. Strip back excessive paint build-up.

                                                    • Repair: Selective repair or replacement of deteriorated components in kind.
                                                       Sills or other members exhibiting isolated surface defects may be built-up
                                                       using wood putties and then painted.

                                                    • Replacement: New putty should be compatible with adjacent materials.
                                                       Complete replacement of a window unit should only be considered in cases
                                                       of extreme deterioration or restoration of an original window.




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                                                    Repatriation Building (Asset 013)

Individual Heritage Value                           Moderate

Heritage Precinct                                   Outside precinct




Front entry                                                     Coventry Street view                                    Entry stairs

Description, Condition and                          The Repatriation Building is a brown brick structure with vertical emphasis to
Integrity                                           openings and rendered detailing. It exhibits art deco influences in its decorative
                                                    elements including the design of the wrought iron gates and other motifs. Later
                                                    extensions have employed a similar palette of materials as the original 1936
                                                    building.

                                                    Internally the Art Deco influences continue, with terrazzo floors and decorative
                                                    mouldings to the walls. The staircase is particularly ornate, with terrazzo steps
                                                    and a finely turned timber handrail.
                                                    Exterior:

                                                    Walls: Manganese / brown brick
                                                    Roof: Concealed behind parapet; terracotta tile hipped roof with sections of
                                                    corrugated iron sheeting.
                                                    Windows: Steel framed.

                                                    Doors: Steel framed.

                                                    Interior: Open plan hall space, jarrah floors, original joinery, terrazzo lobby,
                                                    timber skirtings and architraves, art deco style plaster details, cornice, coffered
                                                    ceiling, cast iron grille vents.

Key Heritage Elements:                              • Overall form and restrained art deco detailing, vertical emphasis of windows
                                                       and main entry, internal finishes including terrazzo floors and hardwood
                                                       joinery as outlined above.

                                                    • Steel-framed art deco style windows.

                                                    • Wrought iron gates and grilles and downpipe brackets.

                                                    • Decorative plaster elements.

Risks                                               • Lack of maintenance

                                                    • Graffiti and vandalism

Longer term Works                                   • A reasonable amount of upgrade works are required to make this building
                                                       habitable. However, the building retains a large amount of original detail
                                                       giving it a lot of potential to become a unique redevelopment.

                                                    • Monitor minor cracking to south façade.




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IMPLICATIONS OF POLICY GUIDELINES
Policy Guideline                                    Implications for this asset

Appropriate Use                                     This building should undergo extensive upgrades and would be ideal for more
                                                    office accommodation, Defence Archives (subject to storage requirements) or
                                                    Public Museum.

Maintenance                                         Asset to be in reasonable condition.

Fabric and Setting                                  All early original fabric should be retained.

Building Upgrade                                    Services upgrade works should be undertaken in accordance with Section
                                                    3.3.4 of the main HMP.

Redevelopment                                       This building would be ideal for an upgrade into office accommodation. There
                                                    is potential for existing rooms to become offices of various sizes with a large
                                                    open plan area in the centre of the space that is well lit by natural light.

Archaeological                                      There is no expected archaeological interest in the land under and around this
                                                    asset.

Archival Recording                                  Photographic recording should be carried out before and during any major
                                                    work, before full or partial demolition and before disposal.

                                                    Measured drawings should be prepared before full or partial demolition to
                                                    assets of high or exceptional significance.

Demolition                                          Complete demolition of this asset should be avoided.

                                                    Partial demolition of significant building fabric may be acceptable where its
                                                    removal reveals an aspect of the asset’s history which is considered to be of
                                                    much greater heritage value or critical to its interpretation.

                                                    The unavoidable removal of any significant building fabric should be carried
                                                    out in a manner that enables reinstatement when circumstances permit.

Disposal                                            Could be considered as separate to barracks precinct. State and local
                                                    Government protection required before disposal.




Building Element                                    Maintenance Checklist

Walls                                               Modern Brickwork

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Cracks through joints or bricks.

                                                       −     Open joints or loose mortar in pointing.

                                                       −     Spalling of surface or disintegration of bricks.

                                                       −     Loose or missing brickwork.

                                                       −     Bulging brickwork.

                                                    Repairs: Patching with compatible material if area of defect is isolated.

                                                    • Replacement: Only where deterioration is substantial using bricks matching
                                                       the colour, texture and size of the original bricks.

                                                    • Repointing: Only if affected area is isolated using manual equipment and
                                                       mortar that matches the original in appearance, profile, hardness and
                                                       composition.


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Building Element                                    Maintenance Checklist

                                                    • Bulges: May lead to structural failure and serious safety hazards so should
                                                       be left to engineering professionals to assess.

Roof                                                Terracotta Tile Roof

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Broken or missing tiles

                                                    • Replacement: Only as necessary matching tile profiles, sizes and colours.

                                                    • Cleaning: Clean lichen off periodically.

                                                    Corrugated Metal Sheeting

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Build up of debris.

                                                       −     Rust or corrosion spots.

                                                       −     Punctures in metal or broken seams.

                                                    • Patching: Small holes using ubiquitous silicone resin.

                                                    • Rectifications: Introduce slip sheets between rusted lap joints.

Rainwater Goods                                     • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Gutters and downpipes clogged with debris.

                                                       −     Gutters and downpipes that are corroded.

                                                       −     Gutters and downpipes that are loose, tilted or missing.

                                                       −     Broken seams in metal linings of built-in gutters or downpipes.

                                                       −     Birds nests and roosting places.

                                                    • Cleaning: Clean out gutters at least twice a year and consider installation of
                                                       discrete gutter guards if problematic.

                                                    • Repair: Patch using compatible materials if defect isolated. Re-solder open
                                                       joints.

                                                    • Replacement: Only if deterioration is substantial. Profiles of new gutters
                                                       and downpipes must match originals.

                                                    • Rectifications: Introduce additional downpipes discretely if required.

Windows and Doors                                   Steel Frame Windows

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Proper operation of all hardware.

                                                       −     Soundness of weather-stripping.

                                                       −     Build-up of dirt or stains.

                                                       −     Corrosion and cracked surfaces.

                                                    • Repair: Defects should be repaired by a specialist contractor for steel
                                                       frames. Wire brush back peeling paint and treat corrosion with a rust
                                                       inhibitor.

                                                    • Repainting: Fill any gouges and deep scratches with epoxy filler prior to
                                                       sanding. Prime and apply finishing paint that is compatible with primer and
                                                       appropriate to prevailing conditions.



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Building Element                                    Maintenance Checklist

Other features                                      Wrought Iron Balustrade Railings

                                                    • Inspect and check for:

                                                       −     Damage, corrosion, deterioration.

                                                       −     Loose / missing fixings.

                                                    • Repair: Defects should be repaired using appropriate patching technique
                                                       for the specific type of material. Loose and missing fixings should be
                                                       repaired / rectified as necessary.

                                                    • Paint removal: Brush all peeling and loose paint from affected area if
                                                       problem localised, using a stiff natural bristle brush.

                                                    • Repainting: Repair any loose or broken sections using appropriate metal
                                                       repair techniques. Fill any gouges and deep scratches with epoxy filler prior
                                                       to sanding. Prime and apply finishing paint that is compatible with primer
                                                       and appropriate to prevailing conditions.




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3.2       PRECINCT HAMS




                                 FIGURE B            Precinct Plan

                                 PROJECT TITLE       Victoria Barracks, Melbourne, Victoria

                                 SCALE               Not to scale


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                                                    Victoria Barracks Parade Ground Precinct

Individual Heritage Value                           Exceptional




View towards G Block                                     View towards G and H Blocks                              View towards M Block

Description, Condition and                          The precinct has an exceptional collection of bluestone buildings in their original
Integrity                                           layout around Central Parade Ground. Overall the site is in a good condition
                                                    although attention needs to be given to the condition of the bluestone walls of
                                                    some assets.

Key Heritage Elements:                              • Bluestone buildings and remnants of perimeter wall.

                                                    • Open space in centre of precinct.

                                                    • Relationship of key buildings (A, A1, B, M, C, G) to each other.

                                                    • Relationship of contributory buildings (J, K, and the Keep to the key
                                                       buildings).

Risks                                               • Inappropriate Redevelopment




IMPLICATIONS OF POLICY GUIDELINES
Policy Guideline                                    Implications for this asset

Appropriate Use                                     Continued use for training and ceremonial functions acceptable.

Maintenance                                         All assets to be in best possible condition.

Fabric and Setting                                  Refer to Section 2.3.4 Setting and Figure 6 Site Setting Analysis.

Redevelopment                                       Redevelopment should be limited to the zones identified in Figure C following.
                                                    Only H Block should be redeveloped / demolished within this precinct.

Archival Recording                                  Photographic recording should be carried out before and during any major
                                                    work, before full or partial demolition and before disposal.

                                                    Measured drawings should be prepared before full or partial demolition of
                                                    assets of high or exceptional significance.

Demolition                                          Partial demolition of significant building fabric may be acceptable where its
                                                    removal reveals an aspect of the precinct’s history which is considered to be of
                                                    much greater heritage value or critical to its interpretation.

                                                    The unavoidable removal of any significant building fabric should be carried
                                                    out in a manner that enables reinstatement when circumstances permit.

Disposal                                            It is unlikely that such an important Defence site would be considered for
                                                    disposal. If it was, it may be suitable for administrative functions for an
                                                    education institution or another government department.




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                                 FIGURE C             Potential Redevelopment Zones

                                 PROJECT TITLE        Victoria Barracks, Melbourne, Victoria

                                 SCALE                Not to scale




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3.3       LANDSCAPE HAMS




                               FIGURE D            Landscape Precincts Plan

                               PROJECT TITLE       Victoria Barracks, Melbourne, Victoria

                               SCALE               Not to scale



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                               FIGURE E            Landscape Elements Plan

                               PROJECT TITLE       Victoria Barracks, Melbourne, Victoria

                               SCALE               Not to scale




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KEY LANDSCAPE ELEMENTS


 HAMS                Landscape Element Name                            Description                   Date               Heritage Value
 Sheet
 6                   Smooth-barked apple                               Significant tree              c1950s             Moderate
                     (Angophora costata)

 N/A                 Allan Hawke Tree                                  Commemorative                 2001               Low
                                                                       planting

 3                   Moreton Bay Figs                                  Significant tree              c.1920             High
                     (Ficus macrophylla)

 1                   Parade Ground                                     Ceremonial,                   Est 1860           High
                                                                       visually prominent

 4                   Boston Ivy                                        Visual feature to             c.1920             High
                     (Parthenocissus tricuspidata)                     A-Block

 5                   Perimeter Wall                                    Interpretive                  1850-60s           High
                                                                       feature, formerly
                                                                       boundary wall
                                                                       enclosing
                                                                       complex
 2                   Canary Island Palms                               Significant trees             c.1920             High
                     (Phoenix canariensis)

 4                   St Kilda Road Façade                              Public frontage               Est 1920s          High


 N/A                 Peace Rose Garden                                 Memorial Garden               est 1996           Low


 N/A                 Victoria Cross Garden                             Memorial Garden               est 1996           Low


 2                   English Elm                                       Significant Trees             Unknown            Moderate
                     (Ulmus procera)


Note: HAMS Sheets have been provided for Assets and Landscape elements rated “Moderate”
significance or above.




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LANDSCAPE HAMS SHEET 1

                                                Parade Ground

Individual Heritage Value                       High

Heritage Precinct                               Parade Ground Landscape Precinct




Description, Conditions and                     The Parade Ground is a rectangular expanse of lawn uniting the facades of M
Integrity                                       Block, H Block, G Block and C Block affording views to and from each of the
                                                buildings. The open feel and proliferation of views creates distinct character
                                                unique to the precinct. Several juvenile Magnolias (Magnolia grandiflora) line the
                                                bitumen footpaths on all but the western boundary of the lawn. Bollard and chain
                                                fencing restricts access to the Parade Ground from the west, south and east
                                                edges while the northern edge associated is a brick and bluestone parking area
                                                adjacent to and associated with H Block. Artefacts including three
                                                decommissioned guns, a Douglas C47 Dakota propeller, and a kedge anchor
                                                from the HMAS Australia II, and a Great War Memorial sculpture rest on the
                                                highest banks.

                                                The location of the Parade Ground has remained unchanged from the initial pre-
                                                1860 plan to current day visually and physically forming the heart of Victoria
                                                Barracks. The Parade Ground once occupied a larger area and more prominent
                                                function before the construction of H Block and associated parking truncated its
                                                length. A fountain also associated with H Block (c.1976) once stood on the north
                                                end of the ground, but has since been removed.

                                                In 1871 the grounds were partially enclosed by a high timber paling or corrugated
                                                iron fence at the west end to separate the military and police precincts. An 1889
                                                plan shows a planting of nine trees, five on the northern edge and four on the
                                                eastern edge, perhaps Moreton Bay Figs (Ficus macrophylla). Photographs from
                                                the era confirm the trees were planted but it is unclear whether these trees were
                                                the same Figs shown in a 1920 photograph of C Block, two of which still exist
                                                today but in locations differing from those suggested by the plan.

                                                The Parade Ground has been a practice and ceremonial venue for much of
                                                Victoria Barrack’s history save for a period of 60 years, when several temporary
                                                structures were erected on the parade ground, initially associated with Australia’s
                                                military involvement in World War One and Two.




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                                                Parade Ground

Key Heritage Elements:                          • Expansive grassed space, central in the complex.

                                                • Central views to and from the Parade Ground.

                                                • Sense of expanse and ceremonial quality of the Lawn

Risks                                           • The Parade Ground will become a depositary for historic artifacts detracting
                                                    from the visual intent and expanse of the ground.

                                                • The Parade Ground will be usurped by future development within the complex.

                                                • Loss of lawn areas due to drought.

Longer Term Works                               • Remove/restrict parking at northern edge of Parade Ground to create a visual
                                                    and physical pedestrian precinct. The car park is a visually intrusive element
                                                    inconsistent with the heritage character of the compound. Parking should be
                                                    limited to the western edge of the site and behind the guard house at the North
                                                    Gate.

                                                • Ensure that current and future installations of historic artefacts are thoughtful
                                                    (ie. Placement of guns at four corners of lawn to symbolise “holding ground”.

Planting Policies

Lawns                                           • Maintain visual presence of grassed area.

                                                • Mow grassed surfaces regularly maintaining height of no less that 2mm.

                                                • Replace the entirety of lawn areas that are patchy, brown or weedy.

                                                • When replacement is necessary use a high wearing low water grass species
                                                    such as a blend of 80% Kentucky Blue Grass and 20% Chewings Fescue
                                                    established as per manufacturer’s instructions.

                                                • Measures should be taken to limit the deposition of historic objects around the
                                                    edges of the Parade Ground to maintain expansive and open character.




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LANDSCAPE HAMS SHEET 2


                                                Canary Island Palms, English Elm near Chapel

Individual Heritage Value                       Moderate - High

Heritage Precinct                               Chapel Landscape Precinct




Description, Conditions and                     Five Canary Island Palms (Phoenix canariensis) and low, clipped hedge surround
Integrity                                       this diminutive single-storey structure. A simple wooden cross in the lawn area
                                                identifies this structure as the barracks chapel. English Elms (Ulmus procera),
                                                perhaps suckers from the street trees, grow on the eastern boundary of the
                                                structure near the bluestone boundary fence. A juvenile Plane Tree (Platanus
                                                occidentalis) stands near the wall adjacent to the southeast corner of A Block and
                                                is in serious decline.

                                                Other than circulation pattern, the Canary Island Palms, English Elms the
                                                landscape of B Block has been altered and is of little heritage significance.
                                                Remnants of curbing near the entry to the chapel and B block, if original, have
                                                been altered and therefore are not significant.

                                                Elms are susceptible to three parasites: the Elm Leaf Beetle (Pyrrhalta luteola),
                                                the Elm Bark Beetle (Scolytus multistriatus), and Dutch Elm Disease. The diet of
                                                the larval form of the Elm Leaf Beetle consists solely of Elm leaves making the
                                                trees very susceptible to defoliation. Once the trees are weakened by the Elm
                                                Leaf Beetle or other factors like drought or neglect, the opportunistic Elm Bark
                                                Beetle can invade the bark. The larval stage of the Elm Bark Beetle feeds on the
                                                vascular tissue of the Elm which can lead to tree loss. Dutch Elm Disease is a
                                                fungal infection which, while identified in New Zealand in 1989, has not yet
                                                reached Australia. Preventative measures are taken including quarantine,
                                                containment and eradication. Symptoms of infection include wilting, dramatic
                                                thinning of the crown, dark streaks in the sapwood, and ultimately tree death.
                                                Control of the Elm bark beetle is also vital as it is the main vector for the disease.
                                                A vaccine has been developed which may help to eradicate the disease, but it is
                                                still being tested. Information is available from The Friends of the Elms, c/o
                                                Burnley Gardens, 500 Yarra Boulevard, Richmond, Vic 3121, Phone 0409 870
                                                860, website: www.vicnet.net.au/~fote/.




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                                                Canary Island Palms, English Elm near Chapel

Key Heritage Elements                           • Plantings of High Heritage Significance are Canary Island Palms (Phoenix
                                                    canariensis) and English Elms (Ulmus procera).

                                                • Circulation pattern

                                                • Proximity to the South entrance

Future Use Opportunities                        • Create a unified appearance behind the Chapel by continuing the row of
                                                    English Elms along the interior of the southeast wall boundary.

Risks                                           • Loss of the English Elms to the Elm Leaf Beetle, Elm Bark Beetle, or Dutch
                                                    Elm Disease

                                                • Loss of Canary Island Date Palms to Fusarium wilt.

High Priority Works (at February                • Annual arboricultural inspections and maintenance regime (including required
2007)                                               tree works) to ensure tree health, vitality and safety.

                                                • Inspection and treatment (if required) of Canary Island Date Palms for
                                                    evidence of Fusarium wilt.

                                                • Remove ailing Plane Tree and replace with a row of English Elms to join and
                                                    compliment the existing three.

Longer Term Works                               • Maintain paths and paving.


Planting Policies

Lawns                                           • Maintain visual presence of grassed area.

                                                • Mow grassed surfaces regularly maintaining height of no less that 2mm.

                                                • Replace the entirety of lawn areas that are patchy, brown or weedy.

                                                • When replacement is necessary use a high wearing low water grass species
                                                    such as a blend of 80% Kentucky Blue Grass and 20% Chewings Fescue
                                                    established as per manufacturer’s instructions.

Canary Island Date Palms                        • Annual arboricultural inspections and maintenance regime (including required
(Phoenix canariensis)
                                                    tree works) to ensure tree health, vitality and safety.

                                                • Trim and remove dead (brown) fronds from the base of the crown annually.

                                                • Ensure that a mulched tree protection zone be established at the base of each
                                                    specimen. This will help to retain water and increase oxygen flow to roots.

                                                • Ensure that heavy machinery is kept away from the base of the trees to a
                                                    distance of 2 metres.

                                                • When 2 of the 5 individuals die, replace all trees at once with established
                                                    specimens of same species, in the same configuration.

English Elms                                    • Annual arboricultural inspections and maintenance regime (including required
(Ulmus procera)
                                                    tree works) to ensure tree health, vitality and safety.

                                                • To maintain axial and formal character of Victoria Barracks the row of English
                                                    Elms should be extended from their current position on the interior of the
                                                    perimeter wall to the southeast corner of A Block.

Plane Tree                                      •     Remove single specimen in the interior of the perimeter wall at the southeast
(Platanus occidentalis)                               corner of A Block.




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                                                Canary Island Palms, English Elm near Chapel

Hedging                                         •     Maintain hedges by regular pruning, mulching, and removal of deadwood.

                                                •     Should more than 10% of the hedging die, wither, remove remaining plants
                                                      or replace planting with like taxa.

                                                •     Retention of hedges is not vital.




PHOTOGRAPHS




Ailing Plane Tree.                                                            Curbing materials. It is unclear if stone cobbles are originally sited, but
Photo Credit: Alison Breach, March 2007                                       they appear to have been re-mortared.
                                                                              Photo Credit: Alison Breach, March 2007




English Elm near Chapel
Photo Credit: Alison Breach, March 2007




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LANDSCAPE HAMS SHEET 3

                                                Morton Bay Figs Near C Block

Individual Heritage Value                       Moderate

Heritage Precinct                               C Block/ Armoury Landscape Precinct




Description, Conditions and                     The brick and bluestone façade of C Block forms the southern border of the
Integrity                                       central Parade Ground. Two Moreton Bay Figs (Ficus macrophylla) shade the
                                                eastern corner of the structure in close proximity to the base of the building.
                                                Bitumen paths provide access and serve a barrier to the swath of grass enclosing
                                                the 1996 Peace Rose Garden which sits to the east of the armoury. Bluestone
                                                cobbles form curbing along the border of the parade ground. These have been re-
                                                mortared with a dark substance which probably dates to the 1970’s and it is
                                                unclear if they are originally sited.

                                                A cold and relatively dark courtyard formed by the addition of D Block adjacent to
                                                C Block is associated with this precinct. Within the sloping courtyard is a small
                                                concrete seating area shaded by a Sweet Pittosporum (Pittosporum undulatum)
                                                with a small Boston Ivy (Parthenocissus tricuspidata) climbing the south facing
                                                wall. Several scrubby native shrubs hug the north wall and slope.

History                                         The Armoury/C Block was constructed around 1860 with D Block added in 1940.
                                                A row of Moreton Bay Figs once parallelled the edge of the Parade Ground, of
                                                which two remain on the east end of the C Block façade. These trees were likely
                                                planted around 1920 after the addition of the brick second storey and unifying
                                                façade.

                                                Prior to 1920 C Block court yard was originally the Ordinance courtyard with
                                                several gun sheds which had a functional relationship with the Armoury

Key Heritage Elements:                          • Moreton bay Figs (Ficus macrophylla)

                                                •   Visual access to central Parade Ground.

                                                • Circulation Pattern

                                                • Formal Layout

Future Use Opportunities                        • Interpretive signage illustrating the history of C Block as an Armory and
                                                    describing the gun sheds that once existed where the C Block courtyard now
                                                    stands.



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                                                Morton Bay Figs Near C Block

Risks                                           • Moreton Bay Figs may negatively affect the northeast corner of C Block.

                                                • Loss of Moreton Bay Figs.

High Priority Works (at February                • Monitor Moreton Bay Figs sited at the northeastern end of C Block to ensure
2007)                                               they do not affect the integrity of the structure.

Longer term Works                               • Remove Sweet Pittosporum as it is classed as an invasive environmental weed
                                                    species.

                                                • Revitalize C Block Courtyard by installing retaining/seating walls, a more
                                                    accessible seating area, and appropriate plantings for shade and site
                                                    requirements.

Planting Policies

Lawns                                           • Maintain visual presence of grassed area.

                                                • Mow grassed surfaces regularly maintaining height of no less that 2mm.

                                                • Replace the entirety of lawn areas that are patchy, brown or weedy.

                                                • When replacement is necessary use a high wearing low water grass species
                                                    such as a blend of 80% Kentucky Blue Grass and 20% Chewings Fescue
                                                    established as per manufacturer’s instructions.

Moreton Bay Figs                                • Annual arboricultural inspections and maintenance regime (including required
(Ficus macrophylla)                                 tree works) to maintain health and safety.

                                                • Professional inspections of the impact of the Moreton Bay Fig’s roots on the
                                                    integrity of the north-eastern corner of C Block every five years. If necessary,
                                                    take actions to protect integrity of the structure.

Courtyard Vegetation                            • Maintain vegetation for safety and a manicured appearance.

                                                • Vegetation is not of significance and retention is not vital.




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PHOTOGRAPHS




Bluestone setts bounding Parade Ground north of C Block                          Moreton Bay Fig at northeast corner of C Block, note
showing re-mortaring                                                             damage to path
Photo Credit: Alison Breach 2007                                                 Photo Credit: Alison Breach 2007




C Block Courtyard                                                                C Block Court Yard, Sweet Pittosporum
Photo Credit: Alison Breach 2007                                                 Photo Credit: Alison Breach 2007




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LANDSCAPE HAMS SHEET 4


                                                Boston Ivy to A Block/St Kilda Road Frontage

Individual Heritage Value                       High

Heritage Precinct                               A Block Landscape Precinct




Description, Conditions and                     The formal, ivy covered bluestone façade of A Block provides the public face of
                                                Victoria Barracks along St Kilda Road. Between North Gate and South Gate lie a
Integrity
                                                row of 11 Canary Island Palms (Phoenix canariensis) and a secondary row of
                                                Date Palms (Phoenix dactylifera) run parallel the sidewalk forming a strong visual
                                                barrier between the Barracks grounds and St Kilda Road. An additional three
                                                palms are planted north of North Gate.

                                                The central entrance is framed by a pair of columnar Bhutan Cypress (Cupressus
                                                torulosa) and two substantial Boston Ivy (Parthenocissus tricuspidata)* climb the
                                                face of the building. Decommissioned cannons stand at the central entrance as if
                                                on guard while understated garden beds line the edge of the building maintaining
                                                the structured formality characteristic of the complex as a whole.

                                                Three bitumen footpaths provide access to the front of the structure. There are
                                                views to St Kilda Road and the Shrine of Remembrance from this precinct.

                                                While the planting palette and overall visual impact of the St Kilda Road frontage
                                                have been altered from their 1860’s intent (native shrubs and timber fencing
                                                punctuated by specimen eucalypts) the resulting 1920’s era landscape has
                                                become a visual facet of Victoria Barracks, St Kilda Road and the City of
                                                Melbourne and therefore, although not original, is intact and has high heritage
                                                value within itself. The A block frontage along with Government House, the
                                                Botanical Gardens and The Shrine of Remembrance work together to form a
                                                ceremonial entrance to Melbourne.

                                                Much of the significant vegetation is in good to excellent condition for its age. The
                                                lawn, while not significant as a specimen but instead for the effect it provides, is
                                                under severe stress partially resulting from the drought of recent years and is
                                                largely brown. The Boston Ivy which covers much of the bluestone façade is in
                                                good condition but is beginning to show preliminary signs of rot at the base of the
                                                northern trunk near the soil. Similarly, the Cypress and Canary Island Palms are
                                                in good condition and are showing signs of new growth. There is concern that the
                                                Canary Island Date Palms may be susceptible to Fusarium wilt, a worldwide


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                                                Boston Ivy to A Block/St Kilda Road Frontage

                                                fungal disease fatal to palms. Fusarium wilt is an incurable arboricultural disease
                                                caused by the fungus Fusarium oxysporum f. sp canariensis and is transmitted
                                                primarily through contact with contaminated pruning shears but also by insects
                                                and animals. Symptoms of infection include unusual browning and death of older
                                                (lower) fronds, a prominent brown stripe on the spine of the frond, and
                                                discoloured vascular bundles on the interior of the frond. The disease is incurable
                                                and therefore the best means of defence is prevention. Use clean and disinfected
                                                pruning implement on each tree, limiting access to palms by small animals (such
                                                as possums or rats), and ensuring the overall health of the palms are the best
                                                forms of preventing infection. The application of magnesium supplements may
                                                help to ward off the disease in juvenile specimens; it is unclear if it will help with
                                                established trees such as those in front of A Block. Several laboratories including
                                                the Forest Pathology Laboratory in Heidelberg (Tel: +03 9450 8666) test for the
                                                fungus and should be contacted if there is suspicion of infection. More information
                                                is available from the Department of Sustainability’s website (www.dse.vic.gov.au).

                                                Located near the northwest corner of A-New Wing is the Dr Hawke Tree, a single
                                                specimen of Smooth-barked Kauri (Agathis robusta) planted by Dr. Allan Hawke,
                                                Secretary, Department of Defence on 16 October 2001 to commemorate the
                                                centenary of the Australian Public Service. While it is not of heritage value it holds
                                                cultural significance for Victoria barracks.

History                                         Constructed as part of the wall system enclosing the complex in the initial phase
                                                of development in 1856, A Block forms the ceremonial public front of the complex.
                                                Photographs dating from 1869 show A Block behind a timber post and rail fence
                                                with several small eucalypts and a border of bushy native shrubs. By 1877 the
                                                north wing of A Block is complete and the fence extends to cover the entirety of
                                                the road frontage. At this time the shrubs have been pruned back and the
                                                eucalypts have grown. The effect is a structured and formal garden in keeping
                                                with the overall character and design of the Victoria Barracks complex.

                                                The Canary Island Palms and the Boston Ivy do not appear in photographs until
                                                1943 but were likely planted around or before 1915-1918 with the completion of
                                                A-New Wing to reflect changing tastes in style and planting. The timber fence
                                                shown in earlier photos has been removed. The palms were set within borders of
                                                terra cotta tiles which have since been removed and used as a border for the
                                                1996 Peace Rose Garden.

                                                Circulation patterns traced by the bituminous footpaths on the front lawn echo
                                                original layout with a central straight pedestrian path and a semicircular arc
                                                providing access for carriages. Plans dating from c.1862 show this carriage path
                                                substantially wider than it is today.

Key Heritage Elements:                          • Iconic vignette created by Canary Island Date Palms, Boston Ivy, lawns and
                                                    the façade of A block.

                                                • Plantings of High Heritage: Significance Canary Island Palms (Phoenix
                                                    canariensis) and the Date Palms (Phoenix dactylifera) and Boston Ivy
                                                    (Parthenocissus tricuspidata).

                                                • Footpath circulation layout.

                                                • Formal, axial feel of gardens and plantings.




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                                                Boston Ivy to A Block/St Kilda Road Frontage

                                                • Visual access to and from The Shrine of Remembrance

Risks                                           • Loss of Canary Island Date Palms to Fusarium wilt.

                                                • Loss of the Boston Ivy, Canary Island Palms and Date Palms due to
                                                    approaching senescence.

                                                • Decline in tree health and vigour, or at worst - tree loss, in the event of
                                                    prolonged drought conditions and the absence of any supplementary irrigation.

                                                • Vandalism of plant material.

High Priority Works (at February                • Inspection and treatment (if required) of Canary Island Date Palms for
                                                    evidence of Fusarium wilt.
2007)
                                                • Annual arboricultural inspections and maintenance regime (including required
                                                    tree works) to ensure tree health, vitality and safety.

                                                • Regular, professional maintenance of low garden beds at base of A Block.

                                                • Regular maintenance of lawn surfaces.

                                                • Maintain the current circulation patterns of the bitumen paths.

Longer term Works                               • Provision of replacement tree planting using established precinct species
                                                    palette, to provide for generational succession.

                                                • Maintain garden beds at base of A Block as unobtrusive, low growing, formal
                                                    style plantings.

                                                • Regularly maintain and repair paving surface with material to match existing.

Planting Policies

Lawns                                           • Maintain visual presence of grassed area.

                                                • Mow grassed surfaces regularly maintaining height of no less that 2mm.

                                                • Replace the entirety of lawn areas that are patchy, brown or weedy.

                                                • When replacement is necessary use a high wearing, low water grass species
                                                    such as a blend of 80% Kentucky Blue Grass and 20% Chewings Fescue
                                                    established as per manufacturer’s instructions.

Canary Island Date Palms                        • Annual arboricultural inspections and maintenance regime (including required
(Phoenix canariensis)
                                                    tree works) to ensure tree health, vitality and safety.

                                                • Trim and remove dead (brown) fronds from the base of the crown annually.

                                                • Ensure that a mulched tree protection zone is established at the base of each
                                                    specimen. This will help to retain water and increase oxygen flow to roots.

                                                • Ensure that heavy machinery is kept away from the base of the trees to a
                                                    distance of 2 metres.

                                                • When 4 of the 11 individuals in the main planting between North and South
                                                    Gates die, replace all trees at once with established specimens of same
                                                    species, in the same configuration.

Date Palms                                      • Same as for Canary Island Date Palms bullets 1-4.
(Phoenix dactylifera)                           • Replace both trees with established specimens of same species, in the same
                                                    layout if one of the individuals dies.

Bhutan Cypress                                  • Annual arboricultural inspections and maintenance regime (including required



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                                                Boston Ivy to A Block/St Kilda Road Frontage

(Cupressus torulosa)                                tree works) to ensure tree health, vitality and safety.

                                                • Ensure that a mulched tree protection zone is established at the base of each
                                                    specimen. This will help to retain water and increase oxygen flow to roots.

                                                • Ensure that heavy machinery is kept away from the base of the trees to a
                                                    distance of 5 metres.

                                                • When individuals begin to show signs of decline, replace both trees at once
                                                    with established specimens of same species, in the same layout or remove
                                                    both trees when one dies.

Boston Ivy                                      • Annual arboricultural inspections and maintenance regime (including required
(Parthenocissus tricuspidata)                       works) to ensure tree health, vitality and safety.

                                                • Prune annually in autumn to clear foliage from windows, railings, doorways and
                                                    steps. Ensure that growth does not exceed cornice at upper extent.

                                                • If maintenance or repair work on the bluestone façade of A block is needed
                                                    care must be taken to preserve the ivy.

Garden Borders                                  • Maintain unobtrusive visual appearance of garden beds by replacing declining
                                                    specimens with like or similar materials.

                                                • Retention of Garden beds is not of high importance.

Smooth-barked Kauri                             • Annual arboricultural and maintenance regime (include required tree works) to
(Agathis robusta)                                   ensure health, safety and vitality of trees in precinct.

                                                • Retention of specimen is not vital.


* The Boston Ivy (Parthenocissus tricuspidata) on the face of a block has been misidentified by a previous gardener as
Crimson Glory Vine (Vitus coignetiae).




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PHOTOGRAPHS




Ivy covered façade of A Block with subtle garden beds.                    Water bins drip feeding trees/palms during drought.
Photo Credit: Alison Breach, March 2007                                   Photo Credit: Alison Breach, March 2007




1869                                                                      1877
Timber post and rail fence and plantings of native shrubs with            Timber post and rail fence is extended; shrubs have been trimmed and
specimen eucalypts.                                                       eucalypts have grown.
Source: Victoria Barracks Archives                                        Source: Victoria Barracks Archives




Victoria Barracks, from an early postcard.                                1899
Source: State Library of Victoria                                         Plantings in front of G-Block (on right)
                                                                          Source: Victoria Barracks Archives




1943                                                                      Hawke Commemorative Tree, Smooth Barked Kauri
View of main building looking across St. Kilda Road.                      Photo Credit: Alison Breach, March 2007
Source: Australian War Memorial: ID 052350



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LANDSCAPE HAMS SHEET 5

                                                Remnant Perimeter Wall Sections

Individual Heritage Value                       High

Heritage Precinct                               Partly around boundary and within Victoria Barracks Parade Ground Precinct




Description, Conditions and                     At present, the Perimeter Wall exists as fragments of its original extent. Begun in
Integrity                                       1856, the wall once enclosed the entirety of the Victoria Barracks creating an
                                                austere, bastioned complex shielded from the public eye. The wall creates an
                                                inward-facing sense of enclosure establishing the character of the complex as a
                                                whole. Construction and expansion on the Barracks necessitated the breaking of
                                                the wall leaving several fragments as reminders of the original character of the
                                                base. Notable fragments stand as part of St Kilda Road frontage adjacent to A
                                                Block and near J Block.

Key Heritage Elements:                          • Segments of the Perimeter Wall exist near J Block, A Block and St Kilda Road
                                                    frontage.

Future Use Opportunities                        • Interpretation

Risks                                           • Further destruction due to modern construction.

                                                • Fragments of the wall crumbling.

High Priority Works (at February                • Re-mortar joints in areas particularly adjacent A-Block south. A full survey
2007)                                               should be undertaken to determine the extent of conservation works required.

                                                • Cracking and severe movement near the south gate (which may be due to tree
                                                    roots) requires assessment by a Structural Engineer.

Longer term Works                               • Installation of interpretive signage describing the original extents and function
                                                    of the Perimeter Wall and its contribution to the original character of the
                                                    Victoria Barracks.

                                                • Ongoing and preventative maintenance to ensure structural integrity of
                                                    remaining wall fragments.

Planting Policies                               • none




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LANDSCAPE HAMS SHEET 6

                                                Smooth – Barked Apple Tree near North Carparking Area

Individual Heritage Value                       Moderate (Significant Tree)

Heritage Precinct                               North Carparking Area




Description, Conditions and                     The North Parking Lot is a small Carparking Area to the north of the North Gate
Integrity                                       and the Guardhouse. The lot is divided into three sections by medians which
                                                contain some unhealthy vegetation. A large Smooth-barked Apple (Angophora
                                                costata), possibly planted in the 1950s, provides shade in the northeast corner of
                                                the lot.

                                                In an 1889 plan of Victoria Barracks, this space was occupied by a horse
                                                menagerie. This menagerie had disappeared by 1927 when the area had been
                                                transformed into a garage for barracks vehicles. By 1967, the area had become a
                                                Carparking Area.

Key Heritage Elements:                          • Significant Tree - Smooth-barked Apple (Angophora costata) provides shade in
                                                    the northeast corner of the lot

Future Use Opportunities                        • Feature planting

Risks                                           • Loss of Smooth-barked Apple.
                                                • Smooth-barked Apple may negatively affect the northeast section of the
                                                    Perimeter Wall.

High Priority Works (at February                • Monitor Smooth-barked Apple sited at the northeastern corner of the
2007)                                               Carparking Area to ensure it does not affect the integrity of the Perimeter Wall.

Longer Term Works                               • Redesign North Parking Lot by installing parking medians planted with
                                                    Smooth-barked Apples as feature trees and other site appropriate vegetation
                                                    to provide solar protection and screening.

Planting Policies                               • Annual arboricultural inspections and maintenance regime (including required
                                                    tree works) to maintain health and safety.

                                                • Professional inspections of the impact of the Smooth-Barked Apple’s roots on
                                                    the north-eastern edge of the Perimeter Wall every five years. If necessary,
                                                    take actions to protect integrity of the wall.




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SECTION 4                     ROUTINE MAINTENANCE SCHEDULE


The following maintenance guidelines are provided for the heritage buildings at Victoria
Barracks. Tasks should be undertaken as described in the timing schedule, where possible. By
undertaking tasks to particular material or building types concurrently, economies of scale may
be achieved.

The most effective way to prevent costly and extensive repair works becoming required is to
undertake periodic inspections of all building elements, implement a regime of preventative
maintenance works, and perform specific maintenance tasks as they become required.

Should major works be required to repair damaged building fabric, a qualified Conservation
Architect should be engaged to advise on appropriate methods and materials for repair.




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Building Element                   Detail                      Tasks                                                                        Regularity                                 Actions




                                                                                                                          6 Monthly



                                                                                                                                      Annually



                                                                                                                                                 2 years



                                                                                                                                                           7 years
ROOF COVERING                          Slate                           Inspect and check for:                                                              X         •   Replacement: Only as necessary matching tile profiles, sizes
                                                                                                                                                                         and colours
                                                                       •     Broken slates
                                                                                                                                                                     •   Reuse: Where possible reuse existing tiles
                                                                       •     Missing slates
                                                                                                                                                                     •   Refixing: Using non-ferrous nails
                                                                       •     Slate flaking apart
                                                                                                                                                                     •   Cleaning: remove all particles from valleys
                                                                       •     Nails letting go
                                                                       •     Slate particles collecting valley flashing
ROOF COVERING                          Corrugated Metal Sheeting       Inspect and check for:                                                              X         •   Cleaning: Sweep low angle roofs regularly
                                                                       •     Build up of debris                                                                      •   Patching: Small holes using ubiquitous silicone resin
                                                                       •     Rust or corrosion spots                                                                 •   Rectifications: Introduce slip sheets between rusted lap joints
                                                                       •     Signs of previous patch jobs
                                                                       •     Punctures in metal
                                                                       •     Joints and seams broken
ROOF COVERING                          Metal Flashings / Cappings      Inspect and check for:                                                    X                   •   Refixing: Using non-ferrous nails
                                                                       •     Loose, corroded, or broken flashing                                                     •   Replacement: Examine, measure, and record existing flashing
                                                                                                                                                                         and its method of application Use sheet metal that is compatible
                                                                       •    Missing and unsealed openings at the tops                                                    with the remaining flashing on the roof, the gutters and the
                                                                            of flashing                                                                                  downpipes
                                                                       •    Base flashing and counter-flashing of                                                    •   Rectifications: Galvanised steel flashing may only be used in
                                                                            vertical joints                                                                              valleys (not with copper)
                                                                       •     Broken mortar bedding
                                                                       •     Slipped or missing capping tiles
ROOF PROJECTIONS                       Chimneys, Vent Pipes            Inspect and check for:                                                    X                   •   Repair: Attempt patching of flashing using compatible material if
                                                                                                                                                                         defect is isolated
                                                                       •     Proper flashing around projections
                                                                                                                                                                     •   Repair: Re-point deteriorated or open mortar joints using
                                                                       •     Weathering of mortar joints at chimneys                                                     compatible mortar
                                                                       •     Loose mortar joints that admit water




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Building Element                   Detail                      Tasks                                                                       Regularity                                 Actions




                                                                                                                         6 Monthly



                                                                                                                                     Annually



                                                                                                                                                2 years



                                                                                                                                                          7 years
                                                                       •     Chimney leans                                                                          •   Replacement: Examine, measure, and record existing flashing
                                                                       •     Loose and wobbly antennas                                                                  and its method of application. Replacement only if substantially
                                                                                                                                                                        deteriorated using sheet metal that is compatible with the
                                                                                                                                                                        remaining flashing on the roof, the gutters and the downpipes
                                                                                                                                                                    •   Reconstruct: Only if chimney structure has failed substantially.
                                                                                                                                                                        All chimney detailing must be replicated.
ROOF DRAINAGE                          Rainwater Goods                 Inspect and check for:                             X          X          X                   •   Cleaning: Clean out gutters at least twice a year and consider
                                                                                                                                                                        installation of discrete gutter guards if problematic
                                                                       •     Gutters and downpipes clogged with debris
                                                                                                                                                                    •   Repair: Patch using compatible materials if defect isolated. Re-
                                                                       •    Gutters and downpipes that are rusty or                                                     solder open joints
                                                                            corroded
                                                                                                                                                                    •   Replacement: Only if deterioration is substantial. Profiles of
                                                                       •    Gutters and downpipes that are loose,                                                       new gutters and downpipes must match originals
                                                                            tilted, or missing
                                                                                                                                                                    •   Rectifications: Introduce additional downpipes discretely if
                                                                       •    Broken seams in metal linings of built-in                                                   required
                                                                            gutters and downpipes
                                                                       •     Birds nests and roosting places
EAVES                                                                  •     Inspect for:                                            X                              •   Refixing: Using non-ferrous nails
                                                                       •     Water stains on soffit boards                                                          •   Replacement: Match materials and finishes to original details
                                                                       •     Damaged soffit boards
                                                                       •     Damaged fascia boards
EXTERNAL WALL FABRIC                   Stone                           •     Inspect and check for:                                                       X         •   Repairs: Patching with compatible material if area of defect is
                                                                       •     Spalling of surface                                                                        isolated
                                                                       •     Cracks through joints                                                                  •   Replacement: Only where deterioration is substantial using new
                                                                                                                                                                        stone matching the colour, texture and size of the original blocks
                                                                       •     Cracks through stones
                                                                                                                                                                    •   Repointing: Only if affected area is isolated using manual
                                                                       •     Open joints or loose mortar in pointing                                                    equipment and mortar that matches the original in appearance,
                                                                       •     Arrises broken and surfaces damaged                                                        profile, hardness and composition
                                                                       •     Disintegration of stones                                                               •   Cleaning: Only if necessary using specialist pulse action sprays
                                                                       •     Loose stonework                                                                            on timers and low pressure rotating vortex systems of air,
                                                                                                                                                                        powder and small amounts of water




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Heritage Handbook ~ Public version – For comment, 11 September 2009



Building Element                   Detail                      Tasks                                                                      Regularity                                 Actions




                                                                                                                        6 Monthly



                                                                                                                                    Annually



                                                                                                                                               2 years



                                                                                                                                                         7 years
                                                                       •     Staining of stone face                                                                •   Bulges: May lead to structural failure and serious safety hazards
                                                                       •     Inappropriate mortar                                                                      so should be left to engineering professionals
                                                                       •     Damage from removal of renders/paints
                                                                       •     Bulging stonework
EXTERNAL WALL FABRIC                   Brickwork                       •     Inspect and check for:                                                      X         •   Repairs: Patching with compatible material if area of defect is
                                                                       •     Spalling of surface                                                                       isolated
                                                                       •     Cracks through joints                                                                 •   Replacement: Only where deterioration is substantial using
                                                                                                                                                                       bricks matching the colour, texture and size of the original bricks
                                                                       •     Cracks through bricks
                                                                                                                                                                   •   Repointing: Only if affected area is isolated using manual
                                                                       •     Open joints or loose mortar in pointing                                                   equipment and mortar that matches the original in appearance,
                                                                       •     Arrises broken and surfaces damaged                                                       profile, hardness and composition.
                                                                       •     Disintegration of bricks                                                              •   Cleaning: Only if necessary using specialist pulse action sprays
                                                                       •     Loose brickwork                                                                           on timers and low pressure rotating vortex systems of air,
                                                                                                                                                                       powder and small amounts of water
                                                                       •     Staining of brickwork face
                                                                                                                                                                   •   Bulges: May lead to structural failure and serious safety hazards
                                                                       •     Inappropriate mortar                                                                      so should be left to engineering professionals
                                                                       •     Damage from removal of renders/paints
                                                                       •     Bulging brickwork
EXTERNAL FINISHES                      Painted Timber Surfaces         •     Inspect and check for:                                            X         X         •   Paint removal: Remove only affected area of paint if problem
                                                                       •    Excess moisture, swelling between wood                                                     localised using heat gun, manual sanding or chemical removers.
                                                                            and paint                                                                                  Abrasive removal systems such as sand blasting will damage the
                                                                                                                                                                       underlying timber surface.
                                                                       •     Poor surface preparation
                                                                                                                                                                   •   Repainting: To be generally repainted every 7 years. Repair
                                                                       •    Wrong type of paint used in wrong way                                                      any loose, broken or deteriorated sections using appropriate
                                                                            and/or in wrong place                                                                      timber repair techniques. Prime and apply finishing paint that is
                                                                       •    Peeling, flaking, blisters, cracking, or                                                   compatible with primer and appropriate to prevailing conditions.
                                                                            crazing
BALCONY RAILING AND                    Cast Iron or Wrought Iron       •     Inspect and check for:                                                      X         •   Repair: Defects should be repaired using appropriate
WINDOW GRILLES                                                         •     Damage, corrosion, deterioration                                                          patching technique for the specific type of material. Loose
                                                                                                                                                                       and missing fixings should be repaired/rectified as necessary




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Heritage Handbook ~ Public version – For comment, 11 September 2009



Building Element                   Detail                      Tasks                                                                        Regularity                                 Actions




                                                                                                                          6 Monthly



                                                                                                                                      Annually



                                                                                                                                                 2 years



                                                                                                                                                           7 years
                                                                       •     Loose/missing fixings                                                                   •   Paint removal: Brush all peeling and loose paint from
                                                                                                                                                                         affected area of paint if problem localised using a stiff natural
                                                                                                                                                                         bristle brush. Do not use wire brushes
                                                                                                                                                                     •   Repainting: Repair any loose or broken sections using
                                                                                                                                                                         appropriate metal repair techniques. Fill any gouges and
                                                                                                                                                                         deep scratches with epoxy filler prior to sanding. Prime and
                                                                                                                                                                         apply finishing paint that is compatible with primer and
                                                                                                                                                                         appropriate to prevailing conditions
WINDOWS                                Timber Frame                    •     Inspect and check for:                                              X                   •   Rectification: Establish the source of differential settlement and
                                                                       •    Proper operation of all sash (including                                                      address accordingly if sashes are sticking. Strip back excessive
                                                                            upper sash of double hung units)                                                             paint build-up
                                                                       •     Proper operation of hardware                                                            •   Repair: Selective repair or replacement of deteriorated
                                                                                                                                                                         components in kind. Sills or other members exhibiting isolated
                                                                       •     Loose, cracked or missing glazing putty                                                     surface defects may be built-up using wood putties and then
                                                                       •     Soundness of weather-stripping                                                              painted
                                                                       •     Cracks and other damages to lintel or sill                                              •   Replacement: New putty should be compatible with adjacent
                                                                       •     Rot and/or deterioration of wood framing                                                    materials. Complete replacement of a window unit should only
                                                                                                                                                                         be considered in cases of extreme deterioration or restoration of
                                                                                                                                                                         an original window
DOORS                                  External                        •     Inspect and check for:                                              X                   •   Rectification: Establish the source of differential settlement and
                                                                       •     Door alignment                                                                              address accordingly
                                                                       •     All parts for deterioration                                                             •   Repair: Selective repair or replacement of deteriorated
                                                                                                                                                                         components in kind. Thresholds or other members exhibiting
                                                                       •     All door hardware for proper operation                                                      isolated surface defects may be built-up using wood putties and
                                                                                                                                                                         then painted
                                                                                                                                                                     •   Replacement: Complete replacement of a door unit should only
                                                                                                                                                                         be considered in cases of extreme deterioration or restoration of
                                                                                                                                                                         an original door
STRUCTURE                              Timber Joists and Beams         •     Inspect and check for:                                              X                   •   •Sagging/ Bulges: May lead to structural failure and serious
                                                                       •     Sagging at the centre of span                                                               safety hazards so should be left to engineering professionals
                                                                       •     Springiness or vibration                                                                •   Pest Control: Contact extermination company to determine if




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Heritage Handbook ~ Public version – For comment, 11 September 2009



Building Element                   Detail                      Tasks                                                                      Regularity                                 Actions




                                                                                                                        6 Monthly



                                                                                                                                    Annually



                                                                                                                                               2 years



                                                                                                                                                         7 years
                                                                       •     Pronounced slope in one direction                                                         active infestation and extent of damage
                                                                       •     Split at bottom of joist or beam
                                                                       •    Floor squeaking and insect
                                                                            infestation/decay
                                                                       •     Bearing on masonry
                                                                       •     Bulging or sagging plaster ceiling
                                                                       •     Overloading of joists and beams
SUB-FLOOR STRUCTURE                    Underground Rooms and           •     Inspect and check for:                                                      X         •   Rectification: Investigate potential source of water infiltration
                                       Spaces                          •     Dampness or mould on surfaces                                                         •   Repointing: Only if affected area is isolated using manual
                                                                       •     Deterioration of mortar joints                                                            equipment and mortar that matches the original in appearance,
                                                                                                                                                                       profile, hardness and composition.
                                                                       •    Insect/termite infestation and decay of
                                                                            timber members                                                                         •   Pest Control: Contact extermination company to determine if
                                                                                                                                                                       active infestation and extent of damage
INTERIORS                              Timber Floors                   •     Inspect and check of                                                        X         •   Repair as necessary
                                                                       •     Cracks and badly damaged boards
                                                                       •     Twisted boards
                                                                       •     Squeaking
                                                                       •     If floor boards need refinishing
INTERIORS                              Carpet                          •     Inspect and check for:                                            X                   •   Replace as required in colours and textures that are sympathetic
                                                                       •     Frayed edges                                                                              to the style and character of the building. New elements should
                                                                                                                                                                       remain clearly as new insertions
                                                                       •     Damaged portions
                                                                       •     Stains and worn out areas
INTERIORS                              Ceramic Tile                    •     Inspect and check for:                                            X                   •   Replace as required in colours and textures that are sympathetic
                                                                       •     Adherence and grout in joints                                                             to the style and character of the building. New elements should
                                                                                                                                                                       remain clearly as new insertions Tiles to be approved by DS-SV
                                                                       •     Loose joints                                                                              Heritage Officer.
                                                                       •     Splits and cracks
                                                                       •     Missing tiles




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Heritage Handbook ~ Public version – For comment, 11 September 2009



Building Element                   Detail                       Tasks                                                                          Regularity                                 Actions




                                                                                                                             6 Monthly



                                                                                                                                         Annually



                                                                                                                                                    2 years



                                                                                                                                                              7 years
INTERIORS                              Internal Wall Finishes          •     Inspect and check for:                                                 X                   •   Replace as required in colours and textures that are sympathetic
                                                                       •     looseness                                                                                      to the style and character of the building. New elements should
                                                                                                                                                                            remain clearly as new insertions. Paint colours to be approved
                                                                       •    signs of dampness (this suggests leaks,                                                         by DS-SV Heritage Officer.
                                                                            either from the roof or internal pipes)
                                                                       •    cracks, bulges, peeling, blistering and
                                                                            mildew
INTERIORS                              Ceiling Finishes                •     Inspect and check for:                                                 X                   •   Replace as required in colours and textures that are sympathetic
                                                                       •    Signs of damp plaster on ceilings (this                                                         to the style and character of the building. New elements should
                                                                            suggests leaks from the roof or plumbing                                                        remain clearly as new insertions necessary. Paint colours to be
                                                                            and mechanical pipes)                                                                           approved by DS-SV Heritage Officer.
                                                                       •     Loose plaster, cracks and bulges
                                                                       •     Blistering and peeling
INTERIORS                              Fireplace                       •     Inspect and check:                                          X                              •   Repair as necessary
                                                                       •     Connection with flues
                                                                       •     If damper is operable
                                                                       •    If the flue is lined with a clay-tile liner to
                                                                            prevent fire and fumes leakage into the
                                                                            building
                                                                       •    If the flue is unobstructed all the way to the
                                                                            roof
                                                                       •     If the fire box has a firebrick liner
                                                                       •     Check if chimney caps are in place
INTERIORS                              Timber stairs and               •     Inspect and check for:                                                           X         •   Repair as necessary in appropriate material
                                       balustrades                     •     Secureness of all railings
                                                                       •     Gaps between treads, risers and stringers
                                                                       •     Stair pulling away from the wall
                                                                       •     Looseness or other damage to balustrades




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Heritage Handbook ~ Public version – For comment, 11 September 2009



Building Element                   Detail                      Tasks                                                                      Regularity                                 Actions




                                                                                                                        6 Monthly



                                                                                                                                    Annually



                                                                                                                                               2 years



                                                                                                                                                         7 years
                                                                       •    Looseness and other damage to newel
                                                                            post
                                                                       •     Irregular riser-tread ratio
INTERIORS                              Interior Doors, windows and     •     Inspect and check for:                                            X                   •   Patching: Suitable for cracks, splits and small defects in timber
                                       Architraves                     •    Proper door and window alignment, fit and                                                  using epoxy paste filler.
                                                                            operation                                                                              •   Repair: Repair all timberwork using traditional timber repair
                                                                       •     Presence of all door and window hardware                                                  techniques such as patching, splicing, or otherwise reinforcing.
                                                                                                                                                                       Repairs may also include replacement in kind of those parts that
                                                                       •    Proper operation of all locks, hinges and                                                  are either extensively deteriorated or are missing.
                                                                            pins
                                                                                                                                                                   •   Rectification: Establish the source of differential settlement and
                                                                       •     Signs of water leakage at frames                                                          address accordingly if sashes or doors are sticking. Strip back
                                                                       •     Movement of sash up and down the frame                                                    excessive paint build-up
                                                                       •     Seals around window panes                                                             •   Replacement: Only acceptable when existing windows/doors
                                                                       •     Condition of finish and other problems                                                    are too deteriorated to be repaired. Replacement windows/doors
                                                                                                                                                                       should match the colour, size and configuration of the original
                                                                                                                                                                       windows/doors and the material.




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Heritage Handbook ~ Public version – For comment, 11 September 2009



Building Element                   Detail                      Tasks                                                                       Regularity                                Actions




                                                                                                                         6 Monthly



                                                                                                                                     Annually



                                                                                                                                                2 years



                                                                                                                                                          7 years
SERVICES                               Electrical                      •     Inspect and check for:                                             X                   •   Repair as necessary
                                                                       •    The condition of incoming service wires
                                                                            and supports
                                                                       •    The operation of all exterior outlets and
                                                                            switches
                                                                       •    Whether all exterior plugs are fitted with
                                                                            ground fault connectors
                                                                       •    Whether fuses or circuit breakers trip
                                                                            frequently
                                                                       •    Whether an electrician has periodically
                                                                            checked all aluminium wire connections
                                                                       •    Whether power is brought in overhead
                                                                            rather than underground (if so, look for
                                                                            trees or other hazards that could cause
                                                                            problems)
SERVICES                               Plumbing                        •     Inspect and check for:                                             X                   •   Repair as necessary
                                                                       •    Any obvious signs of deterioration,
                                                                            damage, stains and rot
                                                                       •    Rust and leaks in the water supply and
                                                                            waste pipes
                                                                       •     Leaks in gas lines
SERVICES                               Stormwater Channels             •     Inspect and check:                                                                     •   Clear as necessary
                                                                                                                          X
                                                                       •     Drains - clear and free of debris
                                                                       •    Grates and openings - clear and free of
                                                                            debris
                                                                       •    Outlet in stormwater channel - clear and
                                                                            water will flow freely




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Heritage Handbook ~ Public version – For comment, 11 September 2009



Building Element                   Detail                      Tasks                                                                         Regularity                                 Actions




                                                                                                                           6 Monthly



                                                                                                                                       Annually



                                                                                                                                                  2 years



                                                                                                                                                            7 years
GROUND WORKS                                                           •     Inspect and check for:-                                   X                              •   Repair: Remove deteriorated or uneven sections of paving to
                                       Paving                                                                                                                             edge of sound surface. Verify condition of sub-base and patch
                                                                       •     Safety hazards (rises and depressions)
                                                                                                                                                                          with new material matching colour, finish and composition of in
                                                                       •    Cracks on and deterioration of paved                                                          kind material.
                                                                            material
                                                                                                                                                                      •   Rectification: Regrade paving at foundation to direct ground
                                                                       •     Damages to kerbs                                                                             water away from the building
                                                                       •     Water pooling close to building foundations                                              •   Replacement: Only appropriate where existing material is
                                                                                                                                                                          beyond reasonable repair or has replaced a previous more
                                                                                                                                                                          appropriate paving material.
GROUND WORKS                                                           •     Inspect and check for:-                                   X                    X         •   Repair: Surface defects should be repaired using appropriate
                                       Steps and Stairways                                                                                                                patching technique for the specific type of material
                                                                       •     Wear, corrosion, deterioration
                                                                       •     Loose fixings                                                                            •   Repair: Loose fixings and OH&S issues should be
                                                                                                                                                                          repaired/rectified as necessary
                                                                       •     OH&S hazards
GROUND WORKS                           Fencing                         •     Inspect and check for:-                                                        X         •   Repair: Defects should be repaired using appropriate patching
                                                                       •     Damage, corrosion, deterioration                                                             technique for the specific type of material
                                                                       •     Loose /missing fixings                                                                   •   Repair: Loose and missing fixings should be repaired/rectified
                                                                                                                                                                          as necessary
GROUND WORKS                           Gates                           •     Inspect and check for:-                                                        X         •   Repair: Defects should be repaired using appropriate patching
                                                                       •     Gate alignment                                                                               technique for the specific type of material
                                                                       •    All parts for damage, corrosion,                                                          •   Repair: Loose and missing fixings should be repaired/rectified
                                                                            deterioration                                                                                 as necessary
                                                                       •     All gate hardware for proper operation




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VICTORIA BARRACKS, MELBOURNE, VICTORIA
Heritage Handbook ~ Public version – For comment, 11 September 2009



Building Element                   Detail                      Tasks                                                                            Regularity                                 Actions




                                                                                                                              6 Monthly



                                                                                                                                          Annually



                                                                                                                                                     2 years



                                                                                                                                                               7 years
GROUND WORKS                           Vegetation                      •     Inspect and check for:-                                      X                              •   Rectification: Remove or thin all offending vegetation close to
                                                                       •    Trees overhang or rubbing against building                                                       external wall surfaces and foundations
                                                                            which cause damage                                                                           •   Rectification: Reduce soil or finished ground levels adjacent to
                                                                       •     Build-up against building – soil, rubbish, etc                                                  external wall surfaces and foundations where these are currently
                                                                                                                                                                             higher than the internal ground floor to allow sub-floor ventilation
                                                                       •    Creepers and vines causing damage (paint
                                                                            peeling, joint deterioration etc)                                                            •   Rectification: Remove or relocate all rubbish stored adjacent to
                                                                                                                                                                             external wall surfaces and foundations
                                                                       •     Plants holding water against structure
                                                                       •     Tree roots damaging structure
GROUND WORKS                           Landscape                       •    Arboricultural inspections and required                       X                              •   Rectification: Remove dead and dangerous limbs, control of
                                                                            treeworks                                                                                        pests and diseases, undertake damage mitigation, replace
                                                                       •     Maintenance of Lawn surfaces                                                                    removed trees, formative pruning of newly established trees.
                                                                       •     Maintenance of garden beds                                                                  •   Rectification: Top-dressing and fertilisation programs, scarifying
                                                                                                                                                                             and routine maintenance procedures.
                                                                                                                                                                         •   Rectification: Weed control and mulching, fertilising, pruning,
                                                                                                                                                                             removal and replacement of dead material.




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