PERFORMANCE INDICATOR - 5A

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PERFORMANCE INDICATOR - 5A Powered By Docstoc
					Category V: Programs
This category is defined as the services, activities and responses provided by the agency for the
community or facility that are designed, organized and operated in compliance with the agency’s
mission, goals and objectives.

The key elements of evaluating these organized services are determining the various levels of
adequacy, deficiency, effectiveness, methods and results of programs. For purposes of accreditation,
these terms are defined within the glossary.

The agency’s mission, goals, and objectives should determine the applicability of all the listed
programs. The agency should decide the relevancy of each criterion in their self assessment report.
For Criterion in Category 5, “Programs” that are not applicable to the agency; the agency should
briefly explain why it does not provide this program.

NOTE: Category VIII, “Training and Competency” appraises the level of competency and
proficiency in which personnel actually perform within these programs.
Criterion 5A: Fire Suppression
There is an adequate, effective and efficient fire suppression program, designed to control and/or
extinguish fires for the purpose of protecting people from injury, death or property loss.

Description
Currently WF/RS is an ISO Class 2 rated department. The city is protected by five engine
companies, two of which are 75-foot Quints, one ladder company (109’ Quint), two squads, one
hazardous material response unit, a rescue boat, one SCBA support unit, one unified staff
command trailer, and one battalion vehicle. We have two pumpers, one 85-foot snorkel, one
support squad (utilized for transport of hazardous materials unit and unified staff command
trailer) and one brush squad unit in reserve status. WFRS has three-shift configurations (A, B, &
C; 24 hour shifts) consisting of 81 fire suppression personnel and a deputy chief over operations.
Personnel are involved in ongoing fire suppression, fire prevention, risk reduction, hazardous
materials, confined space, trench rescue, emergency apparatus, NIMS and emergency medical
training programs.
WF/RS strives to provide a minimum response force of 17 personnel via 3 Engines, 1 Truck, 2
Squads and 1 Battalion Commander to deploy a proper incident command structure and deploy
adequate tactics to mitigate the problem before flashover occurs and accomplish the overall
performance objective in a timely manner while maintaining personnel accountability. The
overall incident objective is to meet our three incident priorities of Life Safety, Incident
Stabilization, and Property Conservation while ensuring the safety of all responding personnel.


The response goal is for the first arriving unit to arrive on-scene within 6 minutes total reflex time
90% of the time and for the remaining units to arrive within 10 minutes total reflex time, 90% of
the time. The baseline response is for the first arriving unit to arrive on-scene within 7 minutes
20 seconds total reflex time 90% of the time and the remaining units 12 minutes 40 seconds total
flex time 90% of the time. This goal is for events occurring during the hours of 0700-2200.


The response goal for the first arriving company responding to events between the hours of 2201-
0659 is for the company to arrive within 6 minutes 30 seconds total reflex time, 90% of the time.
The baseline response is for the first arriving unit to arrive on-scene within 7 minutes 20 seconds
total reflex time 90% of the time and the remaining units 12 minutes 40 seconds total flex time
90% of the time. The goal for the remaining units is 10 minutes 30 seconds total reflex time, 90%
of the time.
Appraisal
The WF/RS Fire Suppression Program is successful and efficient. Data reveals that the
department responded to 130 structure fires in the past two years saving some $224,002,340 in
property. Suppression forces confined these fires within the room of origin 64% of the time. The
Wilson Fire/Rescue Services (WF/RS) improved its fire protection ISO rating in 2005 to a Class
2 from a Class 3. WF/RS has successfully operated under the incident command system
for several years. The department recently successfully adopted and implemented the
NIMS to reinforce ifs communication effort with other internal and external agencies.


Plan
The administrative staff shall continue to closely monitor expanding growth and calls for service
in the City of Wilson. The immediate focus of the study will be for the appropriate
establishment of Fire Station Six. We plan to continue providing a level of service equal to or
better than that currently provided.


Reference
Standard of Coverage Document
WFRS SOP D9 Response to Emergency Calls
North Carolina Institute of Government Performance Measures Report
WFRS Equipment Inventory Sheets for Engine 5
ISO Classification Details
AS400 computer software (Stock Requisition)
Suppression supply inventory
SOP Memos SOP meetings/minutes
Adoption of NIMS Ordinance
Incident Command Training Levels
WFRS SOP D13 Incident Command System
WFRS SOP D4 Fire Ground Accountability
WFRS SOP manual
FireView Software Screen Shot
BC Monthly Report Incident Run Data
WFRS Annual Report 2005
WFRS Annual Report 2006
VISION software (Screen shot)
Email notification of incidents outside of response threshold
Sample Threshold Report showing turnout time outside of threshold
Fire Central Software Screen Shot
Structure Fires Confined to 2006
Structure Fires Confined to 2005
WFRS Content Property Loss Saved 2006
WFRS Content Property Loss Saved 2005
Atlas Map # 37 (Response comparison for fires > 4 minute travel time)
Atlas Map # 36 (Response comparison for fires <= 4 minute travel time)
Fractal Report-Data collected manually by WF/RS
Fractal Report total reflex time All Calls 2005 (data collected by CAD)
Fractal Report total reflex time All Calls 2006 (data collected by CAD)
Fractal Report travel time All Calls 2005 (data collected by CAD)
Fractal Report travel time All Calls 2006 (data collected by CAD)
Atlas Map 36 (Response Comparison All Fires <= 4 Min. Travel Time – 2006)
Atlas Map 37 (Response Comparison All Fires > 4 Min. Travel Time – 2006)
Performance Indicators
5A.1   Given the agency’s standards of response coverage and emergency deployment
objectives as described in Criterion 3A.2, the agency meets its staffing, response time,
pumping capacity and apparatus and equipment deployment objectives.

Description
The Wilson Fire/Rescue Services is dispatched by the Wilson County 911 Center. They utilize a
Computer Aided Dispatch (CAD) program that assign calls and equipment based on location and
call class. The Wilson Fire/Rescue Services (WF/RS) established a desired response time of 4
minutes in 1987. At that time, the main focus was placed on travel time (time the fire apparatus
started rolling until it reached the scene). Careful study of the “Standards of Response Coverage”
book for fire departments shifted our focus to looking at the entire deployment process. Our goal
changed in 2002 with our first self assessment when we begin to track the total reflex time (the
call handling interval, turnout time interval plus the travel time interval). The WF/RS Standards
of Coverage document, July 2001, indicated that “for 90% of all incidents, the first-due unit shall
arrive within six minutes total reflex time. The first-due unit shall be capable of advancing the
first line for fire control or starting rescue or providing basic life support for medical incidents.”
“That in a maximum risk area, an initial effective response force shall arrive within 10 minutes
total reflex time, 90% of the time and be able to provide 1,500 gpm for firefighting, or be able to
handle a five patient emergency medical incident.”


After attending additional standard of cover classes and reviewing the 7th edition of the self
assessment book, the WF/RS has changed its standard of cover to include a baseline (minimally
accepted) response. We also modified our night time response to allow for 30 additional seconds
for turnout time during the hours of 2201 and 0659.


WF/RS strives to provide a minimum response force of 17 personnel via 3 Engines, 1 Truck, 2
Squads and 1 Battalion Commander to deploy a proper incident command structure and deploy
adequate tactics to mitigate the problem before flashover occurs and accomplish the overall
performance objective in a timely manner while maintaining personnel accountability. The
overall incident objective is to meet our three incident priorities of Life Safety, Incident
Stabilization, and Property Conservation while ensuring the safety of all responding personnel.
The response goal is for the first arriving unit to arrive on-scene within 6 minutes total reflex time
90% of the time and for the remaining units to arrive within 10 minutes total reflex time, 90% of
the time. The baseline response is for the first arriving unit to arrive on-scene within 7 minutes
20 seconds total reflex time 90% of the time and the remaining units 12 minutes 40 seconds total
flex time 90% of the time. This goal is for events occurring during the hours of 0700-2200.


The response goal for the first arriving company responding to events between the hours of 2201-
0659 is for the company to arrive within 6 minutes 30 seconds total reflex time, 90% of the time.
The baseline response is for the first arriving unit to arrive on-scene within 7 minutes 20 seconds
total reflex time 90% of the time and the remaining units 12 minutes 40 seconds total flex time
90% of the time. The goal for the remaining units is 10 minutes 30 seconds total reflex time, 90%
of the time.


As stated, one of the principal reasons for the suppression response goal is to mitigate the
problem before flashover occurs. The "time-temperature curve" standard identified below is
based on flash over data from the National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) which have
established a typical point source of ignition in a residential house will "flashover" at some time
between 8 and 15 minutes after ignition, turning a typical "room and contents" fire into a
structural fire of some magnitude.

Appraisal
The historical data retrieved from our records management system prior to 2006 was only able to
provide travel-time for all incidents, not total reflex time. This value provides an average travel-
time in percentage of time. Our recent CAD modifications provide data that allows us to track
total reflex time. The ECC receives the call for service, processes the given information
and dispatches the appropriate units and outlined in response protocols. During the
response process, the times are stamped and recorded in the CAD system. These times
are then electronically interfaced with WF/RS Records Management System. The
process for documenting appropriate response times is based on the reaction time of the
telecommunicator receiving and responding to voice transmissions from field units. In
many cases, these times have been determined to be in error. The contributing factors
have been identified as: not having advanced technology to allow fire units to time stamp
their turnout time and travel time from their apparatus; the telecommunicator talking to
caller (fire dispatch protocol) when transmission are made, receiving another call at the
same time transmissions are made, not hearing the radio transmission, etc.
WF/RS personnel in an effort to compare and document response data for accuracy have
been wearing stop watches around their necks to time stamp the response times. Fire
station 4 personnel are actively engaged in this data collection process. In comparing the
manually collected time versus the electronic collected data, it was discovered that the
department’s actual response efforts were much more effective when the data was
collected manually. This data was then imputed into the fractal reports yielding more
positive results as indicated in the above table. A careful study of all data documented shows
some inadequacies in our desired total reflex times. The data is summarized in the tables below.

                            Response Time Fractal Performance
                                  (using 911 electronic data)
Year      Baseline Percentile (7 min. 20 seconds) 70        Goal (benchmark) (6 minutes)
                         Percentile                                 90 Percentile
2005
6 min. 10 seconds
7 min. 54 seconds

2006
6 min.
7 min. 55 seconds


                            Response Time Fractal Performance
                                 (using WF/RS manual data)
Year      Baseline Percentile (7 min. 20 seconds) 70    Goal (benchmark) (6 minutes)
                         Percentile                             90 Percentile
2005
No Data
No Data

2006
5 min. 23 seconds
7 min. 22 seconds



Travel Time Performance
                                  (using 911 electronic data)
Year      Baseline Percentile (5 min. 20 seconds) 70        Goal (benchmark) (4 minutes)
                         Percentile                                 90 Percentile
2005
3 min. 39 seconds
5 min. 03 seconds

2006
3 min. 40 seconds
5 min. 10 seconds



Travel Time Performance
                                 (using WF/RS manual data)
Year      Baseline Percentile (7 min. 20 seconds) 70    Goal (benchmark) (6 minutes)
                         Percentile                             90 Percentile
2005
No Data
No Data

2006
3 min. 27 seconds
4 min. 48 seconds




Plan
The WF/RS will pursue efforts to acquire a software system that allows the firefighter to
electronically time stamp the response times from the apparatus. This system should
allow us to get closer if not achieve our standard of cover for first arriving units. The
incident data will continue to be downloaded into the FireView software and mapped per
fire district/FDZ. This data will allow the department to more thoroughly understand our
standard of coverage and implement necessary changes. In addition, we will work with
the communications center to determine if the call dispatch process can be shorted. This
is crucial to the department’s success in achieving desired results surrounding our
Standard of Cover and response goals. The department will continually seek ways to reduce
its total response time.


Reference
Standard of Coverage Document
WFRS SOP D9 Response to Emergency Calls
North Carolina Institute of Government Performance Measures Report
Atlas Map # 37 (Response comparison for fires > 4 minute travel time)
Atlas Map # 36 (Response comparison for fires <= 4 minute travel time)
Fractal Report-Data collected manually by WF/RS
Fractal Report total reflex time All Calls 2005– data collected by CAD
Fractal Report total reflex time All Calls 2006– data collected by CAD
Fractal Report travel time All Calls 2005 – data collected by CAD
Fractal Report travel time All Calls 2006 – data collected by CAD
Atlas Map 36 (Response Comparison All Fires <= 4 Min. Travel Time – 2006)
Atlas Map 37 (Response Comparison All Fires > 4 Min. Travel Time – 2006)




5A.2 There is appropriate and adequate equipment on fire apparatus.

Description
Current fire apparatus equipment needs are in compliance with NFPA Standards and ISO
Recommendations. Fire apparatus is adequately and appropriately equipped to perform its
assigned functions.

Appraisal
By following NFPA Standards and ISO recommendations the appropriate and adequate
equipment for our fire apparatus is provided. ISO credit for Engine Companies was a score of
9.66 out of a possible 10. Credit for Ladder Companies was 4.39 out of a possible 5. We have
also placed automatic external defibrillators and vehicle extrication equipment on our apparatus.
A committee is assembled within the department to assess apparatus/equipment needs when
replacing or purchasing a new apparatus. This process aids in properly equipping the apparatus.
The committee consists of the Fire Chief, Deputy Chief of Operations, Maintenance Specialists,
Captains, Lieutenants, Firefighter Engineers and Firefighters.

Plan
We will continue to evaluate, upgrade, test and replace equipment as necessary to maintain
operational effectiveness and performance. We will continue to subscribe to the professional
trade journals and send a variety of personnel to the professional trade shows. This will help us
stay abreast of new and changing technology.

Reference
WFRS Equipment Inventory Sheets for Engine 5
ISO Classification Details




5A.3    There are adequate supplies and materials (i.e. foam, gasoline, diesel, batteries, light
water, etc.) to achieve operational needs.

Description
The Wilson Fire/Rescue Services maintains all supplies necessary to support both emergency and
non-emergency operations. A full inventory of supplies is maintained at various locations
throughout the City of Wilson including: fire stations, City of Wilson Operations center, fire
training center, and Wilson County Emergency Management.

Appraisal
The Wilson Fire/Rescue Services has several systems in place to ensure that the necessary
supplies and materials for operating an emergency operations division are available on a
continuous basis. Station Supplies are maintained at each of the five stations, and are replenished
as necessary from the City of Wilson warehouse and other outside vendors. Emergency Medical
supplies are replenished as they are used from Wilson County Emergency Medical Services.
Additional emergency medical supplies are maintained at fire station number one. Essential
building supplies necessary to support facilities are available through the City of Wilson building
maintenance division. The city maintains automated fuel pumps at the City of Wilson operation
center. These pumps allow all city fire vehicles the ability to re-fuel with gasoline or diesel 24
hours a day. Batteries as needed are received through the city’s fleet maintenance division.
WF/RS has one full time fire mechanic and the recourses of the City of Wilson’s fleet
maintenance division. The fire mechanic maintains the necessary supplies to perform routine,
minor, and major repairs on all WF/RS vehicles. The diesel fuel for the generator at station one is
checked weekly during routine inspection. Fuel is delivered by fuel can. For emergency
purchases, city credit cards are utilized. Also, several local companies have been utilized in the
past without a card or purchase order. In disasters, City Risk Management Coordination has
authority and means for additional large purchases. Each WF/RS engine company carries a
minimum of 10 gallons of class B foam on board with delivery capabilities. Truck one carries 30
gallons of class B and 10 gallons of class A foam in on-board tanks with an around the pump
delivery system. Squad five is also outfitted with a 100-gallon foam tank and a 450 pound dry
chemical extinguishing agent (PKP potassium bicarbonate) with delivery capabilities. A
stockpile of foam is maintained at station one. Additional foam is available through mutual aid
from area airports.


Plan

WF/RS will continue to monitor, review and/or revise our supplies, materials,
maintenance systems and maintenance schedules.


Reference
AS400 computer software (Stock Requisition)
WFRS Equipment Inventory Sheets for Engine 5
Suppression supply inventory
5A.4    A current standard operating policy and procedure manual/general operating
guidelines manual, meeting the needs of the agency, is available and utilized by all
personnel.

Description

The Wilson Fire/Rescue Services has established a Policy and Procedures Manual
containing Standard Operating Procedures. All employees have a hardcopy SOP manual
and each employee has access to SOP Manuals on computers. The SOP manual is
reviewed with all new employees the first week on the job and also incorporated into
monthly training for engine companies.

Appraisal
The Standard Operating Procedures Manual is consistent with NFPA, City and State codes and
ordinances and other professional standards. A SOP committee reviews, updates and creates
policies and procedures on a regular basis.

Plan
The department will continue to review and/or revise policy and procedures on a regular rotating
basis. New policies and procedures are created on an “as needed basis”.

Reference
WFRS SOP manual
SOP Memos, SOP meetings/minutes




5A.5    The agency uses a standardized incident command/management system.

Description
A standardized incident command system is in place and utilized on all incidents in accordance
with WF/RS SOP. The Wilson Fire/Rescue Services adopted the National Incident Management
System (NIMS) for the incident command system to be utilized by the department. In October of
2006, the city of Wilson formally adopted the NIMS which is a Homeland Security Presidential
Directive. WF/RS also utilizes the Passport Accountability system to track and manage
personnel on the scene. Use of the systems is mandatory for all personnel and units operating at
every incident.

Appraisal

WF/RS has successfully operated under the incident command system for several years.
The recent adoption of the NIMS reinforces our effectiveness in a communication effort
with other internal and external agencies. To date, NIMS has not been incorporated into
our department SOP however all of WF/RS personnel have been properly trained in the
use of the NIMS.


Plan
The NIMS shall be incorporated into our current SOP by July 2007. This department will
continue to remain abreast of changes and upgrades to NIMS and will insure that all members
receive regular refresher training.

Reference
Adoption of NIMS Ordinance
Incident Command Training Levels
WFRS SOP D-13 Incident Command System
WFRS SOP D-4 Fire Ground Accountability




5A.6    The agency’s information system allows for analysis of its emergency response reporting
capability.

Description
The Wilson Fire/Rescue Services utilizes the Fire Central as its Records Management System
(RMS). This system complies with the North Carolina/ National Fire Reporting system (NFIRS)
developed and tested by the North Carolina State Fire Marshall’s Office. WF/RS also utilizes a
Geographical Information System with Fireview software for analysis. The RMS has the ability
to generate a variety of reports that allow our department to analyze our emergency response
system. Daily reports are used to monitor our level of response to all incidents outside of our
desired parameters.


Appraisal
Fire Central has proven to be an effective structured database for capturing essential information.
The Geographical Information System (GIS) enhances our ability to capture essential information
from Fire Central through customized reports. These GIS reports allow for but are not limited to
the review of response times, call volume, type of call, trends and patterns.

Plan
In order to fully utilize the benefits of the GIS program the department will continue to collect
and enter data into the program. The department will continue to improve our records
management system by reviewing and assessing the needs of the department and the community
and making changes as needed.

Reference
Fire Central Software Screen Shot
FireView Software Screen Shot
BC Monthly Report Incident Run Data
WFRS Annual Report 2005
WFRS Annual Report 2006
Email notification of incidents outside of response threshold
Sample Threshold Report showing turnout time outside of threshold




5A.7    There should be a periodic appraisal made of the emergency response program.

Description
The Wilson Fire/Rescue Services provides appraisal of the emergency response program through
several mediums including: Monthly reports, Annual report, Fire Central Records Management
System, Geographic Information System (GIS) and post incident analysis of major incidents.
Daily reports are generated and distributed when response times are outside established
parameters. We utilize VISION risk analysis software as a continuous evaluation medium of our
community’s risk.

Appraisal
The periodic analysis and appraisal of emergency response used by this agency is adequate. The
monthly report addresses unit’s response, total response, fire and EMS response. The annual
report addresses type of calls and total response. A sizable amount of the above information is
gathered on Fire Central and GIS. Daily reports are an effective means of monitoring our
response effectiveness. Post-incident analysis has proven beneficial for suppression forces
critiquing all major incidents after they occur. This information provides and accurate assessment
of our emergency response to each incident. Data reveals that the department responded to 130
structure fires in the past two years saving some $224,002,340 in property. Suppression forces
confined these fires within the room of origin 64% of the time. The Wilson Fire/Rescue Services
(WF/RS) improved its fire protection ISO rating in 2005 to a Class 2 from a Class 3.
Plan
This Department plans to continue an evaluation of the current systems for effectiveness and
make modifications as needed. We will continue to assess the risk of new occupancies for the
purpose of maintaining an effective response for emergencies. We will continue to utilize daily
response reports to flag responses outside of the desired response goals.

Reference
BC Monthly Report Incident Run Data
WFRS Annual Report 2005
WFRS Annual Report 2006
Fire Central Software Screen Shot
FireView Software Screen Shot
Email notification of incidents outside of response threshold
Sample Threshold Report showing turnout time outside of threshold
VISION software (Screen shot)
ISO Classification Details
Structure Fires Confined to 2006
Structure Fires Confined to 2005
WFRS Content Property Loss Saved 2006
WFRS Content Property Loss Saved 2005

				
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