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READING RECOVERY

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READING RECOVERY Powered By Docstoc
					                                    ALLIGNMENT OF READING RECOVERY® AND
                                  THE PENNSYLVANIA ACADEMIC STANDARDS FOR
                                   READING, WRITING, SPEAKING, AND LISTENING


                                                                       Introduction

“Reading Recovery is a highly effective short-term intervention of one-to-one tutoring for low-achieving first graders. Individual
students receive a half-hour lesson each school day for 12 to 20 weeks with a specially trained Reading Recovery teacher. As soon as
students can read within the average range of their class and demonstrate that they can continue to achieve, their lessons are
discontinued, and new students begin individual instruction.” 1

Reading Recovery is one part of an effective comprehensive literacy program and is not a complete program by itself. It is designed to
accelerate the literacy learning process of low progress students while they receive classroom instruction. This places them in a better
position to continue to learn from classroom instruction after the intervention is discontinued.

Many features of Reading Recovery will better prepare students to meet the Pennsylvania academic standards for reading, writing,
speaking, and listening. This document describes the Reading Recovery lesson components and lists the Pennsylvania standards they
address.




1
    Retrieved June 8, 2005, from www.readingrecovery.org/sections/reading/basic/.asp
Lesson Component - Reading Familiar Books



                                   Each day the child or teacher selects up to three or four books to reread from a box of previously
                                   read books. The child rereads the books aloud to the teacher. The books should be easy for the
                                   child to read since he has already read the books at least two times. The child and the teacher work
                                   together on fluency, word analysis, sight word acquisition, word study, developing deeper
                                   understandings of meaning and book structures, and applying processing strategies.




Pennsylvania Standards

1.1.3.B Preview the text formats.
1.1.3.C Use knowledge of phonics, word analysis (e.g. root words, prefixes and suffixes), syllabication, picture and context clues to
        decode and understand new words during reading.
1.1.3.D Read text using self-monitoring comprehension strategies (e.g., predict, revise predictions, reread, use headings,
        use organization of text, graphics, charts, adjust reading rate).
1.1.3.E Acquire a reading vocabulary by identifying and correctly using words (e.g., antonyms, synonyms, categories of words). Use
        a dictionary when appropriate.
1.1.3.G Demonstrate after reading understanding and interpretation of both fiction and nonfiction text.
1.1.3.H Demonstrate fluency and comprehension in reading.
1.4.3.A Write narrative pieces (e.g., stories, poems and plays).
1.5.3.D Write with an awareness of the stylistic aspects of composition.
1.6.3.A Listen to others.
1.6.3.B Listen to a selection of literature (Fiction and/or nonfiction).
1.6.3.C Speak using skills appropriate to formal speech situations.
1.6.3.D Contribute to discussions.
1.6.3.E Participate in small and large group discussions and presentations.
1.7.3.A Identify words from other languages that are commonly used English words.
1.2.3.B Locate information using appropriate sources and strategies.
1.8.3.C Summarize, orally or in writing, the main ideas.


Recording a Running Record of Yesterday’s New Book




                             The child reads the previous lesson’s new book. The teacher takes a running record of the reading, coding
Running Record Example       the accuracy of the reading and noting the reading behaviors and fluency. Immediately after the reading,
                             the teacher comments on the meaning of the book and using the coded record of reading, quickly
√ √ √ √ √ cat √√√            determines teaching points based on the child’s reading processing. The teaching points should address
          dog                and/or support any processing difficulties exhibited by the child. After the lesson the teacher analyzes the
                             running record for the difficulty level, the processing strategies used, and the sources of information in
                             the text the child uses or ignores. The teacher uses the analysis to plan future instruction.
A      √ √ √ √ √ √√
The
Pennsylvania Standards


1.1.3.B Preview the text formats.
1.1.3.C Use knowledge of phonics, word analysis (e.g. root words, prefixes and suffixes), syllabication, picture and
        context clues to decode and understand new words during reading.
1.1.3.D Read text using self-monitoring comprehension strategies (e.g., predict, revise predictions, reread, use headings, use
        organization of text, graphics, charts, adjust reading rate).
1.1.3.E Acquire a reading vocabulary by identifying and correctly using words (e.g., antonyms, synonyms, categories of
        words). Use a dictionary when appropriate.
1.1.3.G Demonstrate after reading understanding and interpretation of both fiction and non-fiction text.
1.1.3.H Demonstrate fluency and comprehension in reading.
1.6.3.A Listen to others.
1.6.3.B Listen to a selection of literature (Fiction and/or Non-Fiction).
1.6.3.C Speak using skills appropriate to formal speech situations.
1.6.3.D Contribute to discussions.
1.6.3.E Participate in small and large group discussions and presentations.
1.7.3.A Identify words from other languages that are commonly used English words.
1.8.3.B Locate information using appropriate sources and strategies.
1.8.3.C Summarize, orally or in writing, the main ideas.
Letter Identification and Making and Breaking

                   This part of the lesson is used to teach letter names and letter formation if needed and is later used for word work.
                   The children are directed to manipulate magnetic letters to make words and change words by arranging, adding,
                   subtracting or changing letters. This manual manipulation of letters is gradually transferred to work on a white
                   board or to teacher prompting in text as needed to support children’s problem solving efforts on words as they read
                   books.


Pennsylvania Standards

1.1.3.C Use knowledge of phonics, word analysis (e.g. root words, prefixes and suffixes), syllabication, picture and
        context clues to decode and understand new words during reading.
1.1.3.E Acquire a reading vocabulary by identifying and correctly using words (e.g., antonyms, synonyms, categories of words). Use
        a dictionary when appropriate.
1.6.3.A Listen to others.
1.6.3.C Speak using skills appropriate to formal speech situations.
1.6.3.D Contribute to discussions.
1.6.3.E Participate in small and large group discussions and presentations.




Writing A Story
The child and the teacher work together to compose a story that is written on the bottom half of a horizontally oriented writing journal.
The story can come from the child’s personal experiences or from a book read previously in the lesson. The teacher supports t he
accurate writing of the story by instructing the child to say the words slowly and writing the sounds he hears, making the word like
another word he knows, or by teaching the word. The child uses the top work page to practice quick letter formation, for fluent writing
of words he needs to learn to write quickly, to try to write a word like another word he knows, or for a slow sound analysis and
recording of a word he wants to write.




Pennsylvania
Standards


1.1.3.C   Use knowledge of phonics, word analysis (e.g. root words, prefixes and suffixes), syllabication, picture and context clues to
          decode and understand new words during reading.
1.1.3.E   Acquire a reading vocabulary by identifying and correctly using words (e.g., antonyms, synonyms, categories of
          words). Use a dictionary when appropriate.
1.1.3.F   Understand the meaning of and use correctly new vocabulary learned in various subject areas.
1.1.3.H Demonstrate fluency and comprehension in reading.
1.4.3.A   Write narrative pieces (e.g., stories, poems and plays).
1.4.3.B Write informational pieces (e.g., descriptions, letters, reports, and instructions) using illustrations when relevant.
1.4.3.C   Write an opinion and support it with facts.
1.5.3.A Write with a sharp, distinct focus identifying topic, task and audience.
1.5.3.B   Write using well-developed content appropriate for the topic.
1.5.3.C Write with controlled and/or subtle organization.
1.5.3.D   Write with an awareness of the stylistic aspect of composition.
1.5.3.E   Revise writing to improve detail and order by identifying missing information and determining whether ideas
          follow logically.
1.5.3.F   Edit writing using the conventions of language.
1.5.3.G Present and/or defend written word for publication when appropriate.
1.6.3.A   Listen to others.
1.6.3.C Speak using skills appropriate to formal speech situations.
1.6.3.D   Contribute to discussions.
1.6.3.E   Participate in small and large group discussions and presentations.
1.7.3.A   Identify words from other languages that are commonly used English words.
1.8.3.C Summarize, orally or in writing, the main ideas.

Hearing and Recording Sounds in Words



                   The child uses boxes drawn by the teacher for each sound or letter of a word he wants to write. Initially the student
                   practices saying words slowly and pushes markers for each sound into the boxes. The child is supported to hear the
                   sounds and record the letters in each box. The sound markers are gradually eliminated as the student learns to
                   control the task. Letter boxes, a box for each letter, eventually replace the sound boxes as the procedure becomes a
                   visual memory task.




Pennsylvania Standards:
Pennsylvania Standards

1.1.3.C Use knowledge of phonics, word analysis (e.g. root words, prefixes and suffixes), syllabication, picture and
        context clues to decode and understand new words during reading.
1.6.3.A Listen to others.
1.6.3.C Speak using skills appropriate to formal speech situations.
1.6.3.D Contribute to discussions.
1.6.3.E Participate in small and large group discussions and presentations.


Cut-Up Story




                                             The child rereads his written story as the teacher rewrites it on a sentence strip. The
                                             teacher cuts the sentence strip at the phrase, word or letter level as the child rereads
                                             the story. The child then reassembles the cut-up story using his memory for the story
                                             and the visual cues on the sentence strip. The story can then be arranged in phrases
                                             and reread for fluency.



                                             Pennsylvania Standards
1.1.3.C Use knowledge of phonics, word analysis (e.g. root words, prefixes and suffixes), syllabication, picture and
        context clues to decode and understand new words during reading.
1.1..3.D Read text using self-monitoring comprehension strategies (e.g., predict, revise predictions, reread, use headings, use
         organization of text, graphics, charts, adjust reading rate).
1.1.3.E Acquire a reading vocabulary by identifying and correctly using words (e.g., antonyms, synonyms, categories of
        words). Use a dictionary when appropriate.
1.1.3.H Demonstrate fluency and comprehension in reading.
1.5.3.G Present and/or defend written word for publication when appropriate.
1.6.3.A Listen to others.
1.6.3.C Speak using skills appropriate to formal speech situations.
1.6.3.D Contribute to discussions.
1.6.3.E Participate in small and large group discussions and presentations.

Introduction to the New Book



                                     The teacher selects a new book for the student to read. The new book should be selected with the
                                     processing behaviors of the student in mind. While there will be challenges for the student, the
                                     book should be well within the child’s reading processing control so that a running record the next
                                     day will have an accuracy score of 90% or above. The teacher introduces the book orienting the
                                     child to the meaning, language structures, concepts and new and important words in the book.


                                     Pennsylvania Standards
1.1.3.C Use knowledge of phonics, word analysis (e.g. root words, prefixes and suffixes), syllabication, picture and
        context clues to decode and understand new words during reading.
1.1.3.F Understand the meaning of and use correctly new vocabulary learned in various subject areas.
1.1.3.G Demonstrate after reading understanding and interpretation of both Fiction and Non-Fiction.
1.1.3.H Demonstrate fluency and comprehension in reading.
1.6.3.A Listen to others.
1.6.3.B Listen to a selection of literature (Fiction and/or Non-Fiction).
1.6.3.C Speak using skills appropriate to formal speech situations.
1.6.3.D Contribute to discussion.
1.6.3.E Participate in small and large group discussions and presentations.
1.7.3.A Identify words from other languages that are commonly used English words.
1.7.3.B Identify variations in the dialogues of literacy characters and relate them to differences in occupation or
        geographic location.
1.8.3.B Locate information using appropriate sources and strategies.




                         New Book Attempted
The child reads the new book as independently as possible. At difficulty or after an error, the teacher makes quick instructi onal
decisions about how best to support the child’s efforts in a manner that promotes the development of strategic problem solving. The
teacher scaffolds the child’s reading behaviors and encourages independence. Fluency, quick sight word recognition, word analysis,
understanding, self-monitoring, searching for further information sources in text, and self-correction are some of the behaviors taught,
before, during and/or after the reading of the new book.




Pennsylvania Standards


1.1.3.A Identify the purposes and types of text.
1.1.3.B Preview the text formats.
1.1.3.C Use knowledge of phonics, word analysis (e.g. root words, prefixes and suffixes), syllabication, picture, and context clues to
        decode and understand new words during reading.
1.1.3.D Read text using self-monitoring comprehension strategies (e.g., predict, revise predictions, reread, use headings,
        use organization of text, graphics, charts, adjust reading rate).
1.1.3.E Acquire a reading vocabulary by identifying and correctly using words (e.g., antonyms, synonyms, categories of words). Use
        a dictionary when appropriate.
1.1.3.G Demonstrate after reading understanding and interpretation of both fiction and non-fiction text.
1.1.3.H Demonstrate fluency and comprehension in reading.
1.2.3.A Read and understand essential content of informational texts and documents in all academic areas.
1.2.3.C Produce work in at least one literary genre that follows the conventions of the genre.
1.3.3.A Read and understand works of literature.
1.3.3.B Identify literacy elements in stories describing characters, setting and plot.
1.3.3.C Identify literacy devices in stories (e.g., rhyme, rhythm, repetition, personification).
1.3.3.D Identify the structures in poetry (e.g., pattern books, predictable books, nursery rhymes).
1.3.3.E Identify the structures in drama (e.g., dialogue, story enactment, acts, and scenes).
1.3.3.F Read and respond to Non-Fiction and Fiction including poetry and drama.
1.5.3.D Write with an awareness of the stylistic aspects of composition.
1.6.3.A Listen to others.
1.6.3.B Listen to a selection of literature (fiction and/or non-fiction).
1.6.3.C Speak using skills appropriate to formal speech situations.
1.6.3.D Contribute to discussions.
1.6.3.E Participate in small and large group discussions and presentations.
1.7.3.A Identify words from other languages that are commonly used English words.
1.7.3.B Identify variations in the dialogues of literary characters and relate them to differences in occupation or geographic locati on.
1.8.3.B Locate information using appropriate sources and strategies.
1.8.3.C Summarize, orally or in writing, the main ideas.
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