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					   The Recovery Act in Massachusetts




  Second Reporting Period Highlights
  October 1 - December 31, 2009




January 29, 2010
Massachusetts Recovery and Reinvestment Office
(617) 979-8380

Contact.Stimulus@massmail.state.ma.us

www.mass.gov/recovery

+Updated   February 25, 2010.
                                           A Message from Governor Patrick
To the Citizens of Massachusetts:

        Over the past year, the Commonwealth has faced a host of economic challenges.
Most of these challenges were precipitated by the global economic collapse that here in
Massachusetts produced $9 billion in budget gaps, difficult cuts to worthy programs, and the
elimination of thousands of jobs. Just like in household after household, and business after
business, we, in state government have had to make do with less, to improvise and
innovate, and to work harder. While tough choices still lie ahead, we remain hopeful. I am
happy to report that in the second reporting quarter of the federal stimulus program,
Massachusetts has seen real progress that benefits real people on an individual level –
preserving and creating jobs while improving our infrastructure for the present and the
future.

       Federal stimulus funds from the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009
(ARRA) have enabled us to support economic recovery in Massachusetts. Federal money
has not solved our fiscal problems, but it has helped cushion the blow. In the last quarter
alone, ARRA dollars have funded over 4,700 full-time jobs here in Massachusetts.

        Our administration has made economic recovery personal. Every job created means
that one more family can continue to put food on their table or make their mortgage
payments or send their child to college. We understand these and other challenges, and
that is why both short-term and long-term job creation have been at the forefront of our
economic recovery plan.

      To create jobs, we leveraged our world-class universities and health care institutions,
making investments in biotech, life sciences, and green technology so that the people of
Massachusetts would have opportunities in the innovation economy of tomorrow. We
made it personal, and federal stimulus has helped us do that.

         Our clean and alternative energy initiatives set national standards. We will increase
wind power 10-fold and solar power 15-fold by next year, and in the solar industry we have
already more than doubled the number of jobs and quadrupled the number of companies.
Construction projects like Assembly Square in Somerville, the Route 7 improvements in
Pittsfield, the Route 24 ramp in Fall River, and dozens of others have been made possible
by ARRA and by the Commonwealth‘s solid credit rating. These projects are putting people
to work now, creating more jobs in the coming months, and will improve the quality of life in
Massachusetts for years to come.



                                        Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update   2
       This quarter‘s Citizens‘ Update tells you not just about dollars, but stories of a few of
the people across the Commonwealth whose lives have been impacted by ARRA. Stimulus
funds in Lowell helped Tim Roussell keep his job as a police officer. Stimulus funds for low-
income housing weatherization are helping Mary Reynolds and her grandchildren in
Gloucester stay warm. And ARRA funds to upgrade the Fitchburg Commuter Rail line gave
Steve Burns a chance to start all over again. In the pages that follow we offer these stories
and others, real stories from real people whom ARRA has given a second chance at
employment and a better quality of life for themselves, their families, and their communities.

        I hope you find this information helpful in understanding the recovery program here
in Massachusetts and how it affects you and your fellow citizens. The economic crisis is
personal with real consequences for individual citizens. This administration will continue to
strive to make the economic recovery personal as well. Federal stimulus is helping, but
there is still work to be done. Unemployment in Massachusetts remains below the national
average, but we will not be satisfied until we have put all our people back to work.

          The Recovery Act continues to provide Massachusetts with a chance to create and
save jobs now and also lay the foundation for economic growth for the future. The work
goes on, and if we seize the opportunity this crisis has presented, I am certain our best days
still lie ahead.

Sincerely,




                                         Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update   3
RECOVERY ACT IMPACT
ON MASSACHUSETTS +
As of December 31, 2009


     $4.3 billion in awards to state agencies

     72% - $ 3.1 billion of awards committed by state agencies

     77% - $ 2.4 billion of committed awards spent by state agencies

              $1.7 billion spent on direct benefits (Unemployment Insurance,
               Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program, Medicaid, and other Safety Net
               Programs)

              $675 million spent on programs and infrastructure projects through state
               agencies

     Top 10 in the Nation* for percentage of announced funds spent

     4,809** direct full time equivalent (FTEs) jobs funded by ARRA between October 1 –
      December 31, 2009

     13,882 actual individual workers reflected in this funded FTE count

     6,941*** estimated indirect jobs created or retained

     20,823 estimated total employment impact (13,882 direct and 6,941 indirect)



*Figure calculated from values provided by recovery.gov as of January 19, 2010.
**Impact of all awards to state agencies, including those not subject to federal reporting.
  The FTE number for OMB reported awards is 4,635. All figures are based on new OMB guidance.
***Using a multiplier of 1.5
+ Updated February 25, 2010.




                                                   Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update   4
The Whole Picture – Where your Recovery Dollars are going
(Cumulative through December 31, 2009)

Note: This table shows a summary of all Recovery Dollars data Massachusetts has collected from state agencies. Information
reported to the federal government is highlighted in blue.
                                                Awarded to State
 Recipient Agency/Secretariat                                              Total Committed                 Expended
                                                  Agencies

 Awards Subject to 1512 Reporting to the Federal Government
 Education                                       1,221,264,735                      731,686,481                558,347,586
 Energy & Environment                               91,574,890                       63,578,573                  1,388,659
 Housing                                           236,792,591                      180,302,330                 27,976,556
 Labor (Workforce Programs)                               66,933,188                 53,109,369                  26,900,040
 Public Safety                                            38,772,172                 24,683,144                  13,701,079
 Transportation                                          292,088,374                204,837,788                  38,377,058
 Human Services                                           22,795,109                 11,127,795                   8,302,316
 Attorney General                                            271,484                    271,484                     271,484
 District Attorneys                                        1,053,655                     13,438                       3,495
 Victim Witness Assistance                                   930,000                    149,896                      24,940
 MA Cultural Council                                         323,600                    280,000                     280,000


                               Subtotal
                                                       1,972,799,798              1,270,040,298                675,573,215

 Awards Not Subject to 1512 Reporting to the Federal Government
 Administration and Finance                        22,395,109                         9,858,422                   5,132,782
 Energy and Environment                              7,410,932                        1,600,661                   1,600,661
 Housing                                          106,035,450                       103,321,404              see note below
 Human Services                                 1,544,573,302                     1,456,107,848               1,456,099,661
 Labor (Unemployment
                                                         675,741,583                231,177,367                230,780,367
 Benefits and Admin.)

                               Subtotal                2,356,156,376              1,802,065,702              1,693,613,471

                         Grand Total                   4,328,956,174              3,072,106,000              2,369,186,686


 Awards to State Entities which reported directly to the Federal Government
 University of Massachusetts                            66,894,211                    20,094,306                  5,857,982
 Work Study                                                  732,259                     732,259                    629,697
 Note: These expenditures relate to the ARRA Federal Tax Credit Exchange Program reimbursements for housing programs to
       be processed and reported in the next quarter.




                                                      Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update                    5
The Whole Picture – Second Reporting Period Jobs Impact +
(October 1 through December 31, 2009)

Note: This table shows a summary of all jobs data Massachusetts has collected from state agencies. Information reported to the
federal government is highlighted in blue.
                                                                            Direct Full Time
                                                                                                      Actual Worker
    Recipient Agency/Secretariat                                               Equivalent
                                                                                                          Count
                                                                             Count (FTEs)

    Awards Subject to 1512 Reporting to the Federal Government
    Education                                                                      3,004                    6,679
    Energy and Environment                                                           32                      171
    Housing & Economic Development                                                  421                     1,431
    Labor (Workforce Programs)                                                      310                     1,345
    Public Safety                                                                   211                     1,007
    Transportation                                                                  281                     2,016
    Human Services                                                                  362                      692
    Attorney General                                                                 0                        0
    District Attorneys                                                               0                        1
    Victim Witness Assistance                                                        3                        5
    MA Cultural Council                                                              11                       32

                                                              Subtotal             4,635                   13,379

    Awards Not Subject to 1512 Reporting to the Federal Government
    Administration and Finance                                                       42                       70
    Energy and Environment                                                           27                       38
    Human Services                                                                   78                       93
    Labor (Unemployment Benefits and Admin.)                                         27                      302

                                                              Subtotal              174                      503

                                                         Grand Total               4,809                   13,882

    FMAP Impact on State Government Jobs                                                                    3,800*

    Awards to State Entities which reported directly to the Federal Government
    University of Massachusetts                                         101                                  277
    Work Study                                                          109                                 1,084


* As previously reported in the first reporting period, this number represents the overall state agency job retentions based on an
increase of Federal Medicaid Assistance Percentage (FMAP) state fiscal relief funding from 50% to 61.59% under ARRA.
+ Updated February 25, 2010.


                                                        Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update                          6
         Second Reporting Quarter Jobs Analysis (October-December 2009) +
Awards Subject to 1512 Reporting to Federal Government
             Secretariat/Department                                               FTEs                          Headcount
                                                            Total       Created Retained Govt. Non-Govt. Headcount Created Retained
Attorney General
    Victim and Witness Assistance Board                             3        2        1       1        2         4       2        2
Executive Office for Administration and Finance
   Capital Asset Management and Maintenance                         3        3        0       3                  5       5        0
District Attorneys
     Northwestern District Attorney                                 0        0        0       0                  1       0        1
     Plymouth District Attorney                                     1        0        1       1                  2       0        2
                           Total District Attorneys                 1        0        1       1                  3       0        3
Executive Office of Education
   Elementary and Secondary Education                        1,713         571    1,142   1,707        6      3,047     953   2,094
   Department of Higher Education                            1,179          14    1,165   1,162       17      3,401      52   3,349
   Early Education and Care                                     52          13       39      52        0        119      30      89
                               Total Education               2,944         598    2,346   2,920       23      6,567   1,035   5,532
Executive Office of Housing and Economic Development
   Dept of Housing & Community Development      421                        224      197       5      416      1,431    679      752
Executive Office of Health and Human Services
   Department of Public Health                  342                         13      329      12      330       643      23      620
   Mass Commission for the Blind                  3                          3        0       3                  5       5        0
   Mass Rehabilitation Commission                17                         16        2       9        8        44      40        4
             Total Health and Human Services    362                         31      331      24      338       692      68      624
Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development
   Department of Workforce Development          515                        361      154    178       337      2,321   1,478     843
Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs
   Dept of Conservation and Recreation               4                       0        4       2        2         8       0        8
   Department of Energy Resources                   12                       7        5       5        7        62      18       44
   Department of Environmental Protection           13                       0       13      11        3        96       3       93
       Total Energy and Environmental Affairs       29                       7       22      17       12       166      21      145
Executive Office of Public Safety and Security
   EO Public Safety and Security                                66           4       62      66                125       6      119
   Department of Police                                          0           0        0       0        0        17       0       17
               Total Public Safety and Security                 66           4       62      66        0       142       6      136
Treasurer and Receiver-General
    Massachusetts Cultural Council                              11           0       11               11        32       0       32
Department of Transportation
   Department of Transportation                               281           86      196              281      2,016    445    1,571

                                               Subtotal      4,635        1,315   3,321   3,215    1,420     13,379   3,739   9,640
         Note: All figures reflect rounded whole numbers.
         + Updated February 25, 2010.




                                                               Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update       7
            Second Reporting Quarter Jobs Analysis (October-December 2009) +
Awards Not Subject to 1512 Reporting to Federal Government
              Secretariat/Department                                                  FTEs                                 Headcount
                                                               Total       Created Retained   Govt.       Non-Govt. Headcount Created Retained
Attorney General
    Office of the Attorney General                                     3         0        3           3                     6         0       6
Executive Office for Administration and Finance
   Exec Office for Administration & Finance                        14            9        5           8          6         20      14         6
   Department of Revenue                                           17            0       17                     17         18       0        18
   Operational Services Division                                    2            0        2        2                        3       0         3
             Total Administration and Finance                      33            9       24       10            23         41      14        27
Executive Office of Health and Human Services
   Department of Transitional Assistance                           77           64       13       77                       92      72        20
Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development
   Department of Workforce Development           27                              0       27       27                      302         0     302
Executive Office of Energy and Environmental Affairs
   Department of Environmental Protection           27                           0       27       27                       38         0      38
Office of the State Comptroller
     Office of the Comptroller                                         1         0        1           1                     2         1       1
Treasurer and Receiver-General
    Office of the Treasurer                                            1         0        1           1                     1         0       1
Office of the Inspector General
     Office of the Inspector General                                   4         2        2           4                    12         3       9
Office of the State Auditor
     Office of the State Auditor                                       1         0        1           1                     9         0       9

                                               Subtotal          174            74      100     151             23        503      90       413

                                           Grand Total          4,809        1,389    3,420    3,366          1,443    13,882   3,829     10,053
            Note: All figures reflect rounded whole numbers.
            + Updated February 25, 2010.




                                                                   Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update            8
I. THE FACES OF ECONOMIC RECOVERY and Program Updates
EDUCATION

Awarded Funds to Date:                                $1.2 billion
Total Committed or Under Contract:                   $731 million
Expended Funds to Date:                              $558 million


 Marlon Davis: Recovery Act funding helps Banneker School help its kids

                                                       of the student body is on free or reduced
                                                       lunch.

                                                       The Princeton Review was interested in
                                                       partnering with an elementary school as a
                                                       way to provide options for students
                                                       previously unable to access their resources
                                                       and the Banneker School is functioning as a
                                                       pilot in its program. All indications point to a
                                                       successful trial.

                                                       ―The kids are now in their second year of
                                                       tutoring and Princeton‘s data shows the
                                                       program worked,‖ says Davis.
      For the Benjamin Banneker Charter Public
      School in Cambridge, the $400K American          The ARRA funds mean that the students
      Recovery and Reinvestment Act award it           have four hours of tutoring sessions a week.
      received last year enabled the elementary        According to Davis, the students in the
      school to provide comprehensive tutoring         tutoring program have not only achieved
      services for 40 students through a               measurable gains on their MCAS scores but
      partnership with the Princeton Review.           they also have greater self esteem.
      ―The stimulus funds were a breath of fresh       The improved scores also helped the school
      air,‖ says Marlon Davis, the school‘s            move out of a probationary status under the
      Executive Director. ―Not only did they allow     No Child Left Behind Act.
      us to partner with a proven service provider
      but they also allowed us to provide services     The school already has 25 additional
      for many more students than we could have        students this year and Davis anticipates that
      serviced.‖ Davis adds that two of the            number will go up after the second year of
      school‘s teachers‘ jobs were also preserved      the tutoring program. In addition to the
      thanks to the funds.                             tutoring, Davis says the school will use the
                                                       ARRA funds in the second year to provide
      The mission of the 350-student Banneker          additional special education services,
      School is to provide children with the           counseling and psychological evaluations.
      opportunities they need to pursue careers in
      science, technology and engineering and          ―ARRA put us on this path,‖ says Davis. ―It‘s
      math fields. Davis estimates that 80 percent     a beautiful thing.‖



                                      Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update             9
The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) continues to provide educators with the exciting
and unprecedented opportunity to address some of the most pressing challenges in our public education
system.

During the second quarter of FY 2010, approximately $92 million in ARRA education funding was spent to:

   Maintain and enhance the fiscal stability of the public higher education system;
   Create and retain jobs for educators and staff members in school districts and public institutions of
    higher education; and
   Provide targeted instructional support to students.

Most importantly, ARRA education funding was expended to ensure that students have access to high-
quality educational opportunities.

Maintain and Enhance the Fiscal Stability of the Public Higher Education System
Administrators at public institutions of higher education expended State Fiscal Stabilization funds to offset
budget shortfalls caused by the fiscal situation in the Commonwealth and create/retain jobs at the state and
community colleges and the University of Massachusetts campuses.

During the second quarter of FY 2010, a total of $13.6 million was expended at the state and community
colleges, and a total of $47.5 million was expended at the University of Massachusetts campuses. These
funds were spent to support administrators, faculty members, and staff members, and to address
infrastructure needs (in accordance with guidance issued by the U.S. Department of Education).
Approximately 11,500 educators were supported by the expenditure of these funds. Students‘ access to
high-quality educational opportunities was both maintained and enhanced during this period.

Create and Retain Jobs for Educators in School Districts and Public Institutions of
Higher Education
During the second quarter of FY 2010, different types of ARRA
education funding – primarily State Fiscal Stabilization, Title I, and the
Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), directly supported
the jobs of 3,000 FTEs or 6,700 educators and staff members in
school districts and public institutions of higher education across the
Commonwealth. Teachers, paraprofessionals, staff members, and
service providers were supported in school districts as a result of the
allocation of $7.2 million and $20.5 million in Title I and IDEA funds,
respectively. In addition, as described in the previous section,
administrators, faculty members, and staff members were supported
in public institutions of higher education as a result of $61 million in
State Fiscal Stabilization fund spending.

Provide Targeted Instructional Support to Students
The allocation of Title I and IDEA School-Age and Pre-School funding has provided targeted instructional
support to eligible students in schools and districts across Massachusetts.

During the first and second quarters of FY 2010, the Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
awarded supplementary ARRA Title I grants to 258 districts that included 677 eligible schools. In these
                                                 Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 10
schools, 202,166 students are directly eligible to receive Title I services. In addition, supplementary ARRA
IDEA grants were awarded to 389 districts that serve approximately 165,000 students who are eligible to
receive special education services. Lastly, the Department of Early Education and Care awarded
supplementary ARRA IDEA Pre-School grants to 179 districts that serve approximately 9,000 children who
are eligible to receive pre-school special education services.

In all cases, the funds will continue to provide differentiated educational opportunities to students,
professional development opportunities for educators, and other intervention and support services. To
date, $42 million in supplementary Title I funds and $18.7 million in IDEA funds have provided additional
support to students and educators.

Selected Competitive Grant Opportunities
Massachusetts submitted a Phase I application for the Race to the Top Fund, an unprecedented $4.35
billion competitive grant program, in January 2010. The U.S. Department of Education will award Phase I
grants to selected states that are creating the conditions for education innovation and reform, achieving
significant improvement in student outcomes (including closing achievement gaps, improving high school
graduation rates, and increasing college/career readiness), and implementing innovative plans that address
four education priorities:

    1)   adopting high-quality and rigorous standards and assessments;
    2)   building robust data systems;
    3)   developing and supporting an effective educator workforce; and
    4)   turning around low-performing schools.

Phase I awards will be announced in April 2010. A second round of applications will be accepted in
June 2010.

The U.S. Department of Education will issue final requirements for other competitive grant programs
including the Investing in Innovation Fund and the Teacher Incentive Fund during the spring of 2010, and
Massachusetts will actively pursue these opportunities to complement our ongoing efforts to advance
Governor Patrick‘s ambitious and comprehensive education agenda.




                                              Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 11
HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES
                                                             Included in 1512 Report            Not in 1512 Report
 Awarded Funds to Date:                                          $22.8 million                       $1.54 billion*
 Total Committed or Under Contract:                              $11.2 million                       $1.46 billion*
 Expended Funds to Date:                                          $8.3 million                       $1.46 billion*

*Note: $1.54 billion has been awarded, $1.46 billion has been committed and expended as part of the enhanced Federal
Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP) and the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) that are part of the General
Funds of the Commonwealth and are not part of the Federal ARRA reporting requirements.



    Maritza Ortiz: A Health Center Expands to                         Ortiz who came to the US from Ecuador at the age of
    Care for its Community                                            seven and returned right after high school. She came
                                                                      back to the US a few years later and immediately
    For Maritza Ortiz, and the many employees of the                  found a job and a home at the Health Center.
    Greater Lawrence Family Health Center who live in
    Lawrence, the Center is a vibrant hub of their                    ―For me, to come back and have this opportunity to
    community, a hub that the increasing population was               grow within Greater Lawrence has been a
    rapidly outgrowing.                                               tremendous experience,‖ says Ortiz. She adds, ―It is
                                                                      an honor to see that tomorrow we will still be here and
    The need to expand the site was evident to anyone
    involved in the Center. The expansion plans were put              we‘ll be here with many, many more opportunities not
    into place, a site was located for additional parking             only for medical care but also for jobs.‖
    but the Center didn‘t have funds for the whole project.
    A stimulus award of nearly $1.5 million is what is
    enabling the expansion plans to go through.

    ―I think the Greater Lawrence Family Health Center
    North Side expansion means that there will be
    opportunities to receive more patients, to be able to
    provide medical care not only for a nursing visit, but
    for physicals and for primary care to a family,‖ says
    Ortiz.

    Ortiz has been working at the Health Center‘s North
    Site for 23 years. Currently she is the Supervisor of
    Patient Service Representatives. ―It‘s an honor to see
    that I‘m still a part of the growth of what it has done
    for the community. For me as a person, I have grown
    within Greater Lawrence Family Health Center,‖ says




Departments within the Executive Office of Health and Human Services have been awarded $22.7 million
in direct ARRA grants. The funded projects assist disadvantaged populations in securing or retaining
employment, providing resources to expand and support local public health infrastructure, and delivering a
range of support resources for families hardest hit by the recession.




                                                      Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 12
The programmatic and economic highlights for ARRA grants include the following:

The Federal share of Medicaid Assistance (FMAP) was increased when ARRA was passed in February of
2009. Massachusetts now receives a 61.59% reimbursement from the Federal government for Medicaid
spending. Enhanced Federal Medicaid Assistance provided under ARRA extends through 2010.

                                             The Department of Public Health (DPH) has received over
                                             $3.2 million in ARRA financing to improve Massachusetts'
                                             public health infrastructure. These include programs to expand,
                                             study, or enhance existing critical disease surveillance,
                                             identification, and response systems that are now underway.

                                             Additionally, nearly 8,000 children with developmental delay or
                                             disabilities and their families have been served by the DPH
                                             Early Intervention program. This has been possible through
                                             $8.5 million in ARRA funding that enables DPH to maintain
                                             service and eligibility levels for children and families.

The Executive Office of Elder Affairs distributed over $2.5 million in ARRA financing to support the delivery
of home meals and other nutrition support services for elders. These resources go directly to families in the
Commonwealth who are impacted by the recession and are working to care for their elders in home
settings on stretched family finances.

The Department of Transitional Assistance (DTA) moved quickly to streamline business processes to
handle an unprecedented increase in enrollment in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program
(SNAP), formerly known as Food Stamps, within the last year. Increased benefits due to the stimulus have
helped more than 390,000 families (over 725,000 individuals). These benefits will generate a projected
total of approximately $416 million in local production, sales, and jobs for the Commonwealth between
October 2009 and September 2010.

The Massachusetts Commission for the Blind (MCB) and the Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission
(MRC) have completed the planning phase of several long-term ARRA-supported investments. MCB is
poised to make a grant to support the development of a mobile eye care van for senior residents. MRC will
also invest in a new information technology system to improve case management for MRC clients. Both
departments have hired a number of program staff to work in and oversee MRC and MCB programs. In
both departments, ARRA dollars are working in the Commonwealth to bring resources, independence,
and self-sufficiency to those most in need of assistance.

In November, Governor Patrick visited Washington, DC to meet with officials to discuss opportunities for
Massachusetts to develop health information technology projects with funding from the Recovery Act. This
potential investment of federal funding will allow Massachusetts to continue to play a national leadership
role in using state-of-the-art technologies to transform the way we provide care to patients. Electronic
medical records and e-health technology are key to driving down the cost of health care. The secure
exchange of health information is also vital to effective treatment and prevention strategies that will greatly
benefit patients in Massachusetts. Details on an ARRA award to help fund these technology upgrades will
be confirmed by early February of this year.




                                                Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 13
LABOR & WORKFORCE PROGRAMS

                                                  Workforce Programs                        Unemployment Insurance*
 Awarded Funds to Date:                                          $66.9 million                                   $675. 7 million
 Total Committed or Under Contract:                              $53.1 million                                    $231.2 million
 Expended Funds to Date:                                         $26.9 million                                    $230.8 million

Note: The above amounts reflect the total ARRA funding to Labor & Workforce Development for workforce programs,
unemployment benefits and administrative costs.
*Unemployment Insurance programs are not reportable under section 1512.



    Ishmael Salaam: New Hope for the Future

    Last spring, Ishmael ―Izzy‖ Salaam, 21, was going to the        Salaam worked at the Forbes Library in Northampton in
    Franklin-Hampshire Career Center at least four days a           the mornings setting up its anti-virus protection system
    week looking for work. He had just been removed from            on over 30 computers. In the afternoons, he worked on
    voluntary custody by DSS and he                                                     a Mock Trial program, which
    needed a source of income. He ran                                                   involved preparing a law case with
    into Paul Putnam, who runs the                                                      the participants taking different
    Summer Youth Employment                                                             roles in the judicial system.
    program at the center. The program
                                                                                         Salaam was the prosecuting
    had received stimulus funding and
                                                                                         attorney. For Salaam, the Summer
    Putnam was looking to place youth
                                                                                         Youth Employment program meant
    in the various work experiences that
                                                                                         money in his pocket – and more. It
    the program was funding.
                                                                                         showed him, he says, that ―I could
    Putnam convinced Salaam to join                                                      really be a lawyer. Maybe not
    the program. ―I feel like it put me                                                  immediately but it definitely gave
    back in the right direction,‖ says                                                   me an interest in the judicial
    Salaam.                                                                              system.‖

    Salaam was forced to withdraw from high school in his           After Salaam completed the paid working experiences,
    junior year because he didn‘t have a stable place to live.      the stimulus-funded summer initiative connected him
    He eventually joined Dial/Self, which provides an               with the Career Center's year-round vendor, the YWCA.
    independent living center for teens, and got his GED.           The organization agreed to pay Salaam's tuition at
    He did a few semesters of college but found it difficult.       Holyoke Community College, where he is majoring in
    His poor grades led DSS to remove him from voluntary            Electronic Media Studies.
    custody, which necessitated a job for Salaam. The
                                                                    ―I feel like I‘m on a good path now,‖ he says. ―I feel
    ARRA funded Summer Youth Employment program fit
                                                                    confident about my future.‖
    the bill.



Massachusetts will invest over $66 million of Recovery funds in formula grants to the 16 workforce regions
across the Commonwealth. An additional $3 million in Recovery funds has been sub-granted from the
Executive Office of Public Safety and Security through its ARRA Byrne/Justice Assistance Grant (JAG) to
support work experience opportunities for at-risk youth and young adults in 32 cities and towns. The
Department of Workforce Development‘s Rapid Response Unit works with local workforce boards to apply
for Dislocated Worker National Emergency Grants (NEG‘s) to help individuals and communities recover
economically from the consequences of plant closures and large-scale layoffs.



                                                        Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 14
As of December 31, 2009, Recovery funds have made it possible for the Commonwealth‘s 16 workforce
regions and the 37 One-Stop Career Centers to provide services to over 63,000 individuals. These services
include job counseling, job search assistance, skill assessment and intensive case management. For
eligible individuals, free education and training activities are also provided. The majority of these individuals
have received personalized assistance from staff at the One-Stop Career Centers as they seek jobs and
develop the skills to help them achieve successful employment outcomes.

To date, the Byrne/JAG funding is supporting work opportunities for 864 youth in 32 cities and towns in a
program scheduled to operate until April 30, 2010. Many of the program participants, ages 14 – 24, work up
to 25 hours per week, and take part in work readiness training that helps them develop the necessary skills
to compete in the job market. Approximately 72% of program participants are in school, 20% are either
foster-youth, court involved or high school dropouts. A high number of participating youths – 45% - have a
physical or mental health related disability.

During the second reporting period, Massachusetts has also been approved for up to $5,334,055 in
National Emergency Grants (NEG) funding to support dislocated workers in situations such as: layoffs in a
single plant closure of over 50 workers, multiple company layoffs in a specific region, and industry-wide
layoffs in the Commonwealth‘s financial industry. Initial NEG awards to the Commonwealth thus far total
$3,921,301 and will support targeted services and assistance for workers laid-off due to a plant closure at
Jabil Circuit, Inc. in Billerica, individuals laid off in the financial industry in the Metro South West area and
individuals from multiple industries who were laid off from nine companies in the Metro South West area.

Unemployment Benefits and Administration
The Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development (EOLWD) estimates that $500 million in
Recovery funds will come to Massachusetts claimants from the $25 per week increase in benefit payments
to unemployment claimants (this includes estimates of $100 million for fiscal year 2009 and $400 million for
fiscal year 2010.) This funding is received through reimbursements after claims have been paid. Overall,
508,085 people have benefited from the additional unemployment compensation. ARRA has also extended
the qualifying time for the existing federal Unemployment Insurance extensions. This allowed 182,350
persons to collect federal extended benefits in 2009 who would not have otherwise qualified.

Over $162 million in Recovery funds will bolster the Commonwealth‘s Unemployment Insurance Trust
Fund, the state fund that pays unemployment compensation. The Commonwealth has also received
$11.6 million in Recovery funds to support technology upgrades to our Unemployment Compensation
system.

Programs creating or retaining jobs with Recovery funds for the quarter ending December 31, 2009 include:

            The Byrne/JAG Youth Employment Program which is supporting employment opportunities for
             894 youths in 32 cities and towns, while providing them with additional supportive services.

            Recovery funds support increased staffing at the Commonwealth‘s 37 One-Stop Career
             Centers to provide enhanced services to unemployed and regular job seekers and employers.




                                                 Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 15
PUBLIC SAFETY

 Awarded Funds to Date:                                            $38.8 million
 Total Committed or Under Contract:                                $24.7 million
 Expended Funds to Date:                                           $13.7 million


    Tim Roussell: Stimulus award gives police officer a chance

                                                              Roussell had to put a brake on his life. He knew
                                                              that he would be one of those laid off. ―When the
                                                              news of the layoffs came out I was looking to buy
                                                              a house,‖ he says. ―I put that on hold.‖

                                                              Stimulus changed all that. The Lowell Police
                                                              Department received a $2 million award through
                                                              the COPS Hiring Recovery Program and a $550
                                                              thousand award through the Lowell Officer
                                                              Recovery Initiative.

                                                              ―We were facing an absolutely devastating
                                                              situation here if we did not receive those funds,‖
    photograph by: Ariel Kessler                              says Lavallee. ―We were looking at laying off – in
                                                              addition to the attrition we had already suffered --
    For Tim Roussell, one thing has always been               26 officers, so as a result of the funding we
    clear: ―I‘ve wanted to be a police officer my whole       received we‘ve been able to retain 26 police
    life,‖ he says.                                           officers. If we lost those officers our staffing
                                                              levels would have been below 200 and we would
    The twenty-six year old achieved that dream               have been absolutely devastated.‖
    when he began the Lowell Police Academy in
    May of 2008. After five months, he graduated              For Roussell, a Navy veteran of four years who
    and has been on the job ever since.                       spent time in Somalia and the Persian Gulf, the
                                                              Stimulus award allowed him to move on with his
    But this past fall, rumors started circulating about      life. He can now buy his first house – and take
    potential layoffs. The recession was hitting the          advantage of the $8K tax credit for first time
    Lowell Police Department hard. ―We found                  homebuyers.
    ourselves dropping back substantially,‖ says
    Police Chief Kenneth Lavallee.                            ―I am so relieved I was retained,‖ he says.


Stimulus funds have allowed Massachusetts to avoid significant cuts in critical areas of public safety. As a
result of stimulus funding, positions across 13 public safety agencies, including state police officers,
correctional officers, and parole officers have been retained. Approximately $13.5 million of ARRA funding
was utilized to address a portion of the fiscal year 2009 budget shortfall. These funds helped maintain
funding for over 700 public safety positions.

One major source of stimulus funding for public safety has come in the form of Byrne Justice Assistance
Grants (JAG), of which Massachusetts has been awarded over $25 million. Approximately $3.1 million of
this amount has been allocated to the Executive Office of Labor and Workforce Development and awarded
to local organizations for the purpose of youth employment.

An additional $6.2 million has been awarded to municipal police departments for the retention of sworn
police officers. These awards helped to hire, rehire, or retain 83 officers across 35 police departments. This

                                                     Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 16
funding supplements over $15 million in ARRA funding directly to cities and towns to support overtime
patrols and community policing.

Another $12.5 million in JAG grants has been used
to offset budget cuts at the Department of
Correction. This funding supports medical and
mental health services in the state prison system,
creating jobs at UMass Medical Center and other
medical and mental health providers.

In an effort to follow through on the Governor‘s
commitment to energy efficiency throughout state
government, the Commonwealth also plans to
execute contracts for eight energy efficiency
projects totaling over $9.4 million that have been                                       photograph by: Sarah Skwira
funded by the National Guard Bureau. Upgrades will
include new windows, insulated siding, repainting
and sealing of building envelope, replacement of
boilers, and upgrades to HVAC systems.

State Fiscal Stabilization Government Services
During the second quarter, Government Services funds were awarded and expended to support
Massachusetts municipal fire departments impacted by budget cuts that have forced layoffs and also
vacancies resulting from attrition. The Commonwealth announced two sets of awards, one in October
directing $7.8 million to rehire 125 firefighters who were laid off, and then a second round in late November
directing $11.6 million to retain or hire 105 firefighters in their fire departments. In total, 85 communities
were impacted by ARRA funding for these two awards. The second round of awards will also be used to
support additional shift staffing needs. Spending has occurred in the first set of 10 communities that
received awards.

In total, over $71 million in ARRA funds have flowed to public safety services in Massachusetts.




                                               Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 17
TRANSPORTATION

 Awarded Funds to Date:                                          $292.1 million
 Total Committed or Under Contract:                              $204.8 million
 Expended Funds to Date:                                          $38.4 million


  Steve Burns: Stimulus Gives Laid Off Worker a Second Chance

  For Steve Burns, the shock of being laid off
  was compounded by the fact that he had
  been at his previous job at a major national
  insurance company for 28 years.

  ―I got called into the office and they said
  we've eliminated your position,‖ he says.
  ―They walked me to my locker like I was a
  criminal. I was too shocked to be upset.‖

  Burns began looking for work. His age he                 Then he heard about the $10.2 million
  says – he is currently 54 –put him at a
                                                           stimulus project to upgrade the Fitchburg
  disadvantage. ―I thought I‘d retire from my
                                                           Commuter Rail Line.
  old job,‖ he says. ―I was too old to start this
  all over again.‖
                                                           He interviewed for a job as a track man on
                                                           the railroad and he soon found out he got it.
  Burns found some part time work driving a
  truck but as the father of two kids he needed            ―It was like hitting the lottery,‖ he says. ―I‘m
  a steady, full time job. ―I was looking for a full
                                                           very happy.‖
  time job for two years,‖ he says. ―There was
  nothing out there.‖


Massachusetts has set itself apart by choosing to fund transportation projects that will have both short and
long term economic impacts -- and investing in projects like the regional transit center, multi-use paths or
park and ride lots that build stronger, healthier communities. The state has also focused particularly in the
second round of funding, on projects that will result in direct investment by the private sector.

In total, Massachusetts will invest $437.9 million in Recovery funds for highway and bridge projects, and
another $319 million for projects to improve transit systems throughout the state. Once advertised, ARRA
road and bridge projects are moving faster than ever before. For example, MassHighway took a 120-day
advertising/bid/contract award process and reduced it to 44 days.

As of December 31st, 66 highway projects were in the pipeline with a construction value of more than
$253 million. Of those 66 projects, 45 contracts have been awarded with a total dollar value of
$203.4 million and $34 million has been spent on those projects. More than 4,100 people are working on
ARRA stimulus road and bridge projects throughout the state. In addition to repairing and repaving roads
in every corner of the Commonwealth, we are using stimulus funds to spark economic development and
long term job growth. For example, the state investing $15 million of stimulus funding to support critical
infrastructure road, bike, and pedestrian improvements in the Assembly Square economic development


                                                    Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 18
project in Somerville. We are also spending $35 million on Exit 8 ½ in Fall River/Freetown to support
economic growth in that important region.

                                                     At the MBTA, in just the first few months since the
                                                     initial $164 million of ARRA funding was approved,
                                                     108 new RIDE vans are in operation, Silver Line
                                                     service has been extended to South Station, the first
                                                     of the hybrid buses are on the assembly line, and
                                                     work is underway on 17 projects. As of December
                                                     15, the MBTA has entered into commitments (i.e.,
                                                     contracts, material and equipment purchase orders)
                                                     for over $62 million, and has hired 38 ―temporary
                                                     special project‖ employees from local union halls to
                                                     initiate the work. Given the nature of the rail, bridge
                                                     and commuter rail station work, construction activity
                                                     and spending will accelerate after the winter months.




                                              Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 19
HOUSING

 Awarded Funds to Date:                                          $236.8 million
 Total Committed or Under Contract:                              $180.3 million
 Expended Funds to Date:                                           $28 million


    Mary Reynolds: Recovery Act awards keeps grandmother warm through the winter

    Mary Reynolds watches her three grandchildren            was determined that the house needed air-
    every day after school, and in the winter it would       sealing, insulation, and window replacement -- an
    get pretty cold in the unit she rents on Linnett         estimated $6,900 worth of energy services. The
    Place in Gloucester.                                     weatherization improvements will save the
                                                             landlord at least 30 percent on her energy bills.
    ―The house needed to be weatherized,‖ says
    Reynolds. ―It gets really cold in here. The              ―It was wonderful,‖ Reynolds says of the day the
    windows and doors are bad                                               weatherization project on the
    and we would get nothing but                                            house started. ―They blew
    cold air. When it gets really                                           insulation into the siding, they
    cold, the air condenses inside                                          covered the pipes in the cellar.‖
    the house so we can‘t see out
    our windows.‖                                                              Reynolds says measurements
                                                                               were also taken on her windows
    Mary‘s landlord, a recent                                                  and doors so she can get new
    widow who lives in the                                                     ones. ―They came up here and
    downstairs unit, could not                                                 they could see the hot air just
    afford to weatherize the house.                                            pouring out of my apartment,‖
    She applied for assistance                                                 says Reynolds of the day when
    through Action, Inc., the                                                  local leaders came to visit. ―They
    Gloucester-based social services organization            were appalled.‖
    that received $8.5 million in Recovery Act funds.
    With the Recovery funding, Action will be able to        Reynolds thinks the Recovery funding is
    serve more than 1,182 households throughout 29           ―wonderful". They are trying to help people – and
    Massachusetts communities over the next three            it‘s going to be so much warmer here. I am very
    years.                                                   grateful that this will be taken care of. This is not
                                                             something my landlord can do. It felt like a prayer
    After an energy audit was done on the house, it          being answered. ‖


With the tremendous increase in ARRA funds for the existing weatherization program, Massachusetts has
been able to dramatically increase both the number of homes that will receive improvements and the level
of improvements. The Department of Housing and Community Development (DHCD) has been
successfully helping low-income families lower their energy bills through home weatherization for over three
decades. Recovery Act funding will provide weatherization services to an approximately 15,000 homes in
addition to the 2,000 per year that have typically been done. Those families whose homes have been
weatherized will save, on average, $576 per year on their heating bills. Since the start of the program on
September 1st, 1,310 homes were weatherized.

In the coming quarters, DHCD will continue to train and certify local weatherization agencies, creating more
jobs and servicing a greater number of low income and elderly citizens. DHCD is working with regional
agencies to ramp up production to accomplish 17,000 weatherizations. This funding has been allocated


                                                    Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 20
among 12 Community Action Agencies as well as state assisted public housing and expiring-use housing
developments.

ARRA-funded Community Services Block Grants are also at work for individuals and families in
communities across the Commonwealth. DHCD has spent $6.8 million of the $25 million awarded to
Massachusetts for this program, providing needed community development services. The funds have been
allocated to Community Action Agencies across the Commonwealth. The Community Services Block Grant
program has already created over 650 jobs in Massachusetts for stabilization specialists, job developers,
education specialists, homelessness prevention workers, and others, who together have served over
20,000 clients.

In the coming months, housing funds through the Recovery Act will continue to create jobs and provide vital
social services. Governor Patrick has announced that over $ 80 million from the Tax Credit Exchange
Program will jumpstart 18 stalled affordable housing projects by converting previously unused and
unmarketable tax credits into direct grants. Another $45.5 million from the Tax Credit Assistance Program
will jumpstart an additional eight stalled housing projects. Together, these two programs will create an
estimated 1,760 jobs and increase the Commonwealth‘s stock of affordable housing. These construction
projects have tremendous spin-off effects in goods and services purchased and additional people
employed.

Other ARRA programs will go to work to prevent homelessness, re-house those suffering from
homelessness, and make other homes safer for families. $18.4 million in Homelessness Prevention and
Rapid Re-Housing funds will help prevent homelessness by helping homeless individuals and families find
permanent homes. $9.1 million in Community Development Block Grants will support housing
modernization and social services to build communities across the Commonwealth. Finally, the
Commonwealth will invest $2.6 million from the Lead Hazard Control Program to remove lead
contamination from homes in Massachusetts and ensure that their occupants can live in a safer
environment.




                                              Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 21
ENERGY & ENVIRONMENT

 Awarded Funds to Date:                                           $91.6 million
 Total Committed or Under Contract:                               $63.6 million
 Expended Funds to Date:                                           $1.4 million


    Brendt Gonsalves: The Future of Wind Technology

    Building a Wind Technology Testing Center in             work was already done, this was truly a ―shovel-
    Charlestown – the largest of its kind in the world -     ready‖ project. In May, they found out that the
    - was only a dream for those involved, until             center was awarded the $25 million it needed to
    Stimulus came into the picture.                          develop the state‘s Wind Technology Testing
                                                             Center.
    According to Rahul Yarala, Executive Director of
    the Wind Technology Testing Center, the                  ―We were jumping up and down when we heard,‖
    Massachusetts Renewable Energy Trust                     says Yarala. ―We went to all of a sudden being a
    committed $13 million to the project and the             fully funded project.‖ Yarala adds that the project
    Department of Energy kicked in another $2                will create between 250 and 300 construction
    million but that still wasn‘t anywhere near the $40      jobs, 30 design team jobs and 8 administrative
    million the project needed.                              jobs.

                                                             Turner Construction Company won the contract
                                                             to build the center and according to Brendt
                                                             Gonsalves, the project superintendent, the
                                                             company was excited to get this job in a very
                                                             competitive market.

                                                             Gonsalves believes that wind blades are the new
                                                             frontier in renewable energy. As he points out,
                                                             fossil fuel sources are a fixed quantity and they
                                                             are being depleted. ―Wind and solar technologies
                                                             are terrific. We need to look at other sources,‖ he
                                                             says. Yarala agrees. ―Renewable energy is the
                                                             future,‖ says Rahul. ―Stimulus had confidence in
                                                             renewable energy.‖

                                                             As for this project, Gonsalves emphasizes that
                                                             everybody involved is very appreciative of the
                                                             role the Stimulus award played. ―Stimulus is
    Soon after the Stimulus Act was passed, the              fantastic,‖ he says. ―Without it, this project would
    Massachusetts Clean Energy Center went to                not exist. And it‘s creating jobs for years to
    work applying for a grant. Because the design            come.‖



ENERGY

Solar
In the quarter ending December 31, the Commonwealth conducted the largest procurement of solar
photovoltaic energy systems in the state‘s history: 12 projects at drinking water and wastewater facilities
around the state totaling 4 megawatts. These were contracted in January. State agencies have issued five
additional Requests for Proposals (RFPs) for over 40 additional projects totaling an additional 4 megawatts.

                                                    Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 22
Contracts will be signed in March and April and work will begin shortly after. In addition to the state
government‘s solar projects, funds from the Recovery Act will enable a new round of the state‘s popular
solar rebate program. The program will be administered by the Massachusetts Clean Energy Center
(CEC).

Energy Efficiency
As part of the Governor‘s recently announced Commonwealth Energy Solutions effort to capture substantial
savings from current energy spending, the state is deploying an Enterprise Energy Management System
(EEMS) for state facilities and is accelerating a pipeline of building energy efficiency projects. A Request
for Reponses (RFR) was issued in late December, and a contract for the EEMS will be awarded for the first
20 million square feet of building space in March. Recovery Act funds have already provided the project
management with the resources needed to enable the Commonwealth to accelerate a $238 million pipeline
of building energy efficiency projects, with several RFPs at various stages of issuance, evaluation, and
award. These projects will be financed through a share of the future energy savings generated.

In addition to the state government‘s energy efficiency projects, the Commonwealth launched a $15 million
competitive High Performance Buildings Grant Program for broadly applicable solutions that improve
building energy performance. Over 115 proposals were submitted, totaling over $250 million. Awards will
be announced in February.

Energy Block Grants
The Commonwealth has also launched several initiatives for local governments: (1) block grants of up to
$150,000 for energy efficiency and renewable energy projects for municipalities less with populations than
35,000 (communities greater than 35,000 applied directly to USDOE); (2) technical and project
management assistance to cities and towns for energy projects; and (3) energy code training for
Massachusetts municipal building code officials. Awards for the first two of these initiatives will be
announced by the end of February and energy code training will begin this quarter.

Wind Blade Testing Facility
Massachusetts has received $25 Million in ARRA funding to accelerate development of the Wind
Technology Testing Center, a joint venture between the National Renewable Energy Lab, the
Massachusetts Clean Energy Center, UMass, MIT and other partners. This center, located in Charlestown,
will create hundreds of construction jobs, as well as become an international center for the testing of the
next generation of large wind turbine blades. This is the largest facility of its kind in the world. Work began
this quarter, with the official groundbreaking ceremony taking place on December 1, and completion is
anticipated within one year.

ENVIRONMENT
The Department of Environmental Protection -- with the approval of the U.S. Environmental Protection
Agency -- has allocated all $185 million of the ARRA Clean Water and Drinking Water State Revolving
Fund (SRF) money to 111 projects across the state. During the second quarter, MassDEP and the Water
Pollution Abatement Trust completed loan agreements for 56 projects totaling over $369 million. The
balance of the projects will be reported in the next quarter. The 111 ARRA-subsidized SRF projects reflect
$775 million in total construction and engineering activity that will support economic recovery and public
health in the Commonwealth, including 45 projects worth more than $220 million that have already broken

                                                Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 23
ground and begun construction. As of December 31, 2009, a total of $445 million in construction contracts
had been awarded, and $252 million of contracts were out to bid. Other costs related to ARRA SRF,
including 5% construction contingency, resident engineering services, etc., are calculated at approximately
$78 million. All told, $775 million is actively stimulating the Massachusetts water infrastructure economy.

Massachusetts will use approximately $3.1 million dollars in stimulus money to fund the remediation of
known storage tanks buried underground that are or have been compromised and are leaking petroleum
into the environment. In Quarter 2, four projects were initiated at three sites under the Leaking
Underground Storage Tank (LUST) ARRA program. Two Direct Site Assessments were initiated
(Fisherville Mill in Grafton and Quincy Street in Dorchester) and two Direct Cleanups were initiated (Maple
Street in Holyoke and Quincy Street in Dorchester). The activities undertaken by MassDEP staff funded by
LUST ARRA money involve fiscal, administrative and technical aspects of grant implementation, including
grant management, required federal program reporting, contract administration and management, project
evaluation and selection, and field oversight. Jobs with our vendors include environmental scientists and
engineers, project managers responsible for developing and implementing site work plans, construction
and field staff, heavy equipment operators to run backhoes and excavators, laborers, and construction
foremen who are responsible for managing construction related site work.

With a Water Quality Management Grant (604b Clean Water), MassDEP is conducting water quality-related
pollution assessment activities in priority watersheds including: Cape Cod, Boston Harbor, and
Narragansett/Mt. Hope Bay watersheds. Monitoring in FY 2010 will be targeted to the Deerfield, Millers,
Ipswich, Buzzards Bay, the Islands, and Shawsheen watersheds. Also, sampling and analysis plans will be
developed for the Connecticut, Chicopee, Blackstone, Cape Cod Narragansett/Mt. Hope Bay and Boston
Harbor basins. MassDEP sought proposals to fund projects to improve water quality assessment and
management, and to identify water quality problems and propose solutions. Eleven projects were selected
in Amesbury, Brewster, Cambridge, Duxbury, Marshfield, North Reading, Pembroke, Pittsfield,
Provincetown, Sharon, and the Pioneer Valley. These projects have been contracted and the notices to
proceed have been issued.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has also awarded $85 million from the federal Superfund to
clean up hazardous waste at three Massachusetts sites. These funds will clean up New Bedford Harbor,
the Hatheway & Patterson site in Mansfield and Foxboro, and Silresim Chemical Corp. site in Lowell. This
will ensure that these sites are suitable for future economic development and recreation while removing
environmental contamination.




                                              Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 24
TECHNOLOGY & RESEARCH

    Josh Hamilton: ARRA award to further studies in regenerative medicine


    Josh Hamilton, the chief academic and scientific        grant came out we realized it was a perfect
    officer of the Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL),      match for us.‖
    likes to point out that we humans share the same
    basic genes with starfish. But there‘s one main         Hamilton emphasizes that the ARRA grant is an
    difference: ―Starfish can regenerate their arms,‖       important component to the success of the new
    says Hamilton. "Why can't we?"                                        Center. "We greatly appreciate
                                                                          the funding from the state to
    Thanks, in part, to a recent                                          renovate our labs and create this
    Recovery Act award, the MBL                                           new Center, "says Hamilton, "and
    can now try to answer this                                            the new facilities will greatly
    question and others related to                                        enhance our research. But of
    regenerative biology.                                                 course science is done by
                                                                          scientists, and this will now
    The Marine Biological Laboratory                                      enable us to recruit the best and
    received $802,500 in federal                                          brightest minds to the MBL to
    stimulus funds through the                                            make new discoveries in this
    National Institutes of Health. It is                                  important new field that will
    part of an initiative to establish a                                  ultimately benefit all of us."
    Center for Regenerative Medicine
    at the Laboratory which was                                             Hamilton notes that the
    spearheaded by a $10 million                                            Laboratory gave the NIH a
    grant from the Massachusetts Life Sciences              commitment to sustain these positions once the
    Center and a matching $15 million grant from the        two-year grant runs out.
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute.
                                                            The focus of the new center, says Hamilton, is to
    The Recovery Act award will enable the                  use marine and other aquatic organisms, with the
    Laboratory to staff the new center and provide          goal of understanding how they regenerate.
    them with start up funds. ―The timing was really        ―Others are looking at human stem cells but our
    good for us,‖ says Hamilton. ―When this ARRA            niche is looking at lower organisms and how we
                                                            can learn from them,‖ he says. ―It‘s a
                                                            complimentary focus.‖



Broadband
The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (―ARRA‖) appropriates funds nationwide to promote
high-speed Internet connectivity. The majority of the funding will be used to increase broadband access in
rural, unserved, and underserved areas.

Of the $200 million in grants set aside for expanding public computer center capacity, the Boston Public
Computing Centers project has been awarded $1.9 million to fund the first of a three-tier broadband project
to bring Internet access to the city's poorest communities. The partnership proposes to expand computer
and Internet capacity at the city‘s main library and 25 branches, 16 community centers, and 11 public
housing sites. An estimated 18,700 people will be served per week at the 53 centers.

The University of Massachusetts at Lowell was awarded $780,000 under the Sustainable Broadband
Adoption program to promote broadband awareness and computer literacy among vulnerable populations,
                                                   Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 25
including the nation‘s second largest Cambodian population, low-income and at-risk youth, the
unemployed, residents without college degrees, and seniors in Lowell and Merrimack Valley. It is estimated
to serve more than 10,000 existing or new broadband subscribers. As part of the program, UMass–Lowell
students will work in local computer centers with at-risk youth and seniors to develop appropriate training
and outreach materials.

Finally, the Massachusetts Broadband Institute (MBI) has already received $2 million under the Broadband
Data Improvement Act to develop or update broadband coverage mapping for the state to determine. MBI
estimates the mapping project will be complete by February.

Electronic Health Record Grants
Recovery Act funding of up to $36 billion has been set aside for health information technology (health IT)
projects. $34 billion of these funds offer Medicare and Medicaid incentives to help physicians and hospitals
acquire electronic health record (EHR) technology. The additional $2 billion from the Health Information
Technology for Economic and Clinical Health Act will promote a nationwide health IT infrastructure,
facilitate the creation and dissemination of health IT standards and policies, and create regional health IT
extension centers. Award announcements will begin this year.

Of the ARRA allocated health IT funds, Massachusetts could receive up to $500 million for initiatives for the
creation of electronic patient records. State money will be used for the development of a secure network
for statewide health information exchange, allowing authorized health care providers to share electronic
health records. While protecting patient privacy, expanding the use of electronic health records will
improve health care delivery and coordination, reduce unwarranted treatment variation and help facilitate
chronic disease management and promote transparency.

Additionally, physicians and hospitals already using EHR technology will receive funding in the form of
reimbursements. Physicians who have implemented the technology could receive up to $44,000 in
reimbursements each over four years. Partners Healthcare and its member hospitals Brigham and
Women‘s and Massachusetts General, which have already implemented an electronic records system,
could also receive substantial awards. Massachusetts, which has nearly twice the national average of
doctors using EHR technology, will likely see above-average federal reimbursements. In addition to its
cost-saving and efficiency benefits, EHR technology may also create private-sector jobs among vendors
installing the systems.


National Institute of Health Grants
In 2009, Massachusetts was second in the nation for National Institute of Health (NIH) grants awarded with
a total of 1,294 recovery-act grants funded by the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009
(ARRA).

Over $500 million in NIH ARRA grants have been awarded to Massachusetts hospitals, universities, and
educational, scientific, and medical research groups, to support cutting edge research. Unlike previous NIH
grants, ARRA investments aim to create and retain jobs in the short term, in addition to accelerating
scientific achievement.

Research institutions in the Commonwealth have received grants to conduct research on a wide range of
medical topics, from genetics to cardiology, from cancer to human behavior. Brigham and Women‘s
Hospital is one of the largest recipients in Massachusetts, having received over $58 million in grants. The

                                               Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 26
Broad Institute in Cambridge received a $9 million award to perform research on genome sequencing. Tufts
Medical Center was awarded over $8 million that will support, among other things, cutting-edge research in
heart disease and leukemia treatment.

A total of $10.4 billion has gone to the NIH for funding to support economic growth through advancement of
scientific research, and Massachusetts‘ share totals more than 5 percent of all awards granted nationally.
Only California, with 1,785 ARRA NIH awards, has received a higher number of NIH ARRA awards than
Massachusetts. (Following Massachusetts are New York with 1204 grants, Pennsylvania with 843, and
Texas with 698.)




                                             Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 27
II. BENEFICIARIES
This narrative provides the details of various ARRA program awards that are having a real impact on our
citizens every day - over and above the jobs that have been created by Recovery dollars. While many of
these initiatives are ones that have existed for several years, the injection of ARRA funds has allowed for
the continuation and even expansion of these programs during these hard economic times. The
beneficiaries listed below are representative of citizens across the Commonwealth from neighborhoods in
every city and town. The numbers shown are an estimate by each responsible state agency of the
beneficiaries impacted by the addition of ARRA funds into these programs.

Administration and Finance

     Program Description                                                                 Beneficiaries
      Impact on Child Support Incentives (Federal Match) Program run by                  >200,000
        The Child Support Enforcement Division, within the Department of
        Revenue, currently services in excess of 200,000 child-support cases.

Health and Human Services
     Program Description                                                                Beneficiaries
      Senior Community Service Employment grant provides community                      108
        service and training programs for older workers, specifically providing
        them with the skills, knowledge and confidence to attain employment
        in today‘s job market
      Congregate Meals Grant helps provide fresh meals on a statewide                     18,774
        basis through a network of 23 community based local Area Agencies
        on Aging (AAAs), which provide a wide range of services to elders and
        their families
      Medicaid Federal Medical Assistance Percentage (FMAP) allows                        1,200,000
        Massachusetts to avoid what would have been even deeper cuts
        throughout state government. A large portion of these dollars went
        towards the maintenance of the MassHealth program to enable the
        preservation of critical medical services to over 1.2 M recipients.
      Home Delivered Nutrition Services helps elders with nutritional                     7,204
        needs to become or remain healthy, independent, and active in their
        community.
      Vocational Rehabilitation Services – ARRA funds are used by the                     291
        Massachusetts Rehabilitation Commission to support a number of
        projects designed to assist individuals with disabilities.
      Supplemental Assistance Nutrition Program is handling an                            390,000
        unprecedented 30% increase in enrollment in the Supplemental                        families
        Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP, formerly known as Food
        Stamps), beginning in April 2009, benefit amounts rose by 18% due to
        federal stimulus funding (resulting in a sizable monthly increase for
        most families).




                                               Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 28
Health and Human Services (continued)

       Infants and Families with Disabilities (IDEA) benefits infants and           7,966
        toddlers, children age 0-3 years of age, who have or are at risk for
        developmental delays.

Housing

    Program Description                                                           Beneficiaries
     CDBG Block Grant for infrastructure improvements and public housing          367
       modernization awarded to provide services to the most vulnerable in
       our communities, and to create jobs through the expansion and
       retention of businesses.
     Tax Credit Assistance Program supports Low Income Housing Tax                  Future
       Credit Projects that were stalled due to lack of investor support.             residents of
                                                                                      housing
                                                                                      projects
                                                                                      underway
       Community Services Block Grants provide assistance to local                  21,687
        communities, working through a network of 24 Action Agencies to
        reduce poverty, revitalize low income communities, and empower low
        income families and individuals to become full self-sufficient.
       Weatherization Assistance Program aims to increase the energy                2,614
        efficiency of dwellings occupied by low income persons, reduce their
        total home energy expenses, and improve their overall health and
        safety. The program targets particularly vulnerable people such as the
        elderly, the disabled and low income families with children.

Labor and Workforce Development

    Program Description                                                          Beneficiaries
     Federal Additional Unemployment Compensation has allowed                    508,085
       508,085 individuals from across the Commonwealth to receive an
       additional $25 per week benefit compensation as a result of the
       Recovery Act.
     Recovery Act Emergency Unemployment Compensation extends                       182,350
       the qualifying time for existing federal unemployment insurance
       benefits. This has provided federal extensions to individuals in 2009
       who otherwise would not have qualified.
     WIA Recovery Act Title 1 Services for Adult, Dislocated and                    10,994
       Youth Workers funds directly benefit low-income individuals of the
       Commonwealth who qualify under the Workforce Investment Act (WIA)
       and received employment and training services. Qualified youth
       received employment opportunities.




                                             Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 29
Labor and Workforce Development (continued)

       Wagner Peyser Act Employment Services benefits employed and                       52,385
        unemployed workers seeking to upgrade their skills and obtain jobs,
        and provides customized services to clients with special needs,
        including veterans, individuals with disabilities, and unemployment
        claimants likely to exhaust their benefits.

Public Safety

    Program Description                                                                    Beneficiaries
     State Fiscal Stabilization Fund – Government Services During the                      230
       second quarter of FY 2010, Government Services funds were expended                     firefighters,
       to support Massachusetts municipal fire departments impacted by budget                 benefiting
       cuts that have forced layoffs and also vacancies resulting from attrition.             residents of
       The Commonwealth announced two sets of awards, one in October                          85 cities &
       directing $7.8 million to rehire 125 firefighters who were laid off, and then          towns
       a second round in late November directing $11.6 million to retain or hire
       105 firefighters in their fire departments.
     Victims of Crime Assistance Program benefits victims of crime and                       273
       their families who have experienced one or a combination of the
       following: domestic violence, sexual assault, child abuse, and surviving a
       homicide.
     The Edward Byrne Memorial Justice Assistance Grant provides                             1,728
       assistance to state and local law enforcement agencies to enhance and
       improve law enforcement programs, prevention and education programs,
       technology, as well as to help create and retain public safety jobs.
     Crime Victim Compensation - ARRA benefits either the victims of                         198
       violent crimes or providers who have provided service to those victims.
     Internet Crimes Against Children education prevention services are                      1,809
       provided to Craneville Elementary School in Dalton, MA to grade 2
       students, teachers, staff, and parents; Wahconah Regional High School
       students and staff; Stearns Elementary School, Pittsfield, MA grades K-5.

Education

    Program Description                                                                Beneficiaries
     State Fiscal Stabilization Fund – Educational Stabilization Fund                  Students and
       During the second quarter of FY 2010, Education Stabilization funds                educators at the
       were expended to maintain the fiscal stability of the public higher                state and
       education system and support administrators, faculty members, and                  community
       staff members at the state and community colleges and the University               colleges and
       of Massachusetts campuses. In addition, funds were spent (in                       the University of
       accordance with guidance issued by the U.S. Department of                          Massachusetts
       Education) to address infrastructure needs at these institutions. A                campuses
       total of 11,554 educators were supported by the expenditure of these
       funds during this quarter.



                                              Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 30
Education (continued)

       Title I, Part A funding improves teaching and learning for students            Students and
        most at risk of failing to meet State academic achievement standards.           educators in
        During the first and second quarters of FY 2010, grants were awarded            258 districts
        to 258 districts that serve 202,166 students who are directly eligible to
        receive Title I services. Massachusetts has received an additional
        $163 million in two types of Title I funding to supplement the
        $243 million that the state received in 2009, an increase of 67 percent.
        A total of 1,081 educators were supported by the expenditure of these
        funds during the second quarter.
       IDEA, Part B Pre-School Grants                                                 Students and
        During the first and second quarters of FY 2010, grants were awarded            educators in
        to 179 districts that serve 9,000 children who are eligible to receive          179 school
        special education services. Massachusetts has received an additional            districts
        $10.26 million in ARRA IDEA Pre-School funding to supplement the
        $7.3 million that the state received in 2009, an increase of more than
        100 percent. A total of 119 educators were supported by the
        expenditure of these funds during the second quarter.
       IDEA, Part B Grants to States support the provision of special                 Students and
        education services to children with disabilities. During the first and          educators in
        second quarters of FY 2010, grants were awarded to 389 districts that           389 districts
        serve approximately 165,000 students who are eligible to receive
        special education services. Massachusetts has received an additional
        $280 million in ARRA IDEA School-Age funding to supplement the
        $282 million that the state received in 2009, an increase of nearly 100
        percent. A total of 1,944 educators were supported by the expenditure
        of these funds during the second quarter.
       Child Care Development Fund (CCDF) assistance benefits youth                   1,555
        who received the summer learning vouchers, their parents who
        retained work as a result of having these vouchers, and the staff
        members who were employed because their programs received these
        vouchers.
       USDA Child Nutrition Recovery Act serves 114 schools in 31                     Students and
        districts, serving a total enrollment of approximately 60,000 new               educators in 31
        students. These funds were used to purchase new food service                    districts
        equipment for the schools.
       USDA Child Nutrition Programs – Elementary and Secondary                       4 community
        Education grants were awarded to four local community food banks                food banks,
        that serve approximately 750 local food pantries and soup kitchens              serving 750
        throughout the state.                                                           food pantries

Transportation
    Program Description                                                             Beneficiaries
       ARRA transportation projects are improving the roadways, transit               Community-
        systems, pedestrian/bike and ferry facilities. These projects are               wide
        located throughout each of the Commonwealth's 13 counties. The
        highway projects include 43 roadway resurfacing and

                                             Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 31
       reconstruction projects and 5 bridge improvement projects.
       Additionally we have invested in safety and congestion projects with 5
       intersection improvement projects and 5 bicycle/pedestrian and
       transit improvement projects - including an expansion of the busiest
       park and ride lot in the system and a new intermodal transit facility in
       Greenfield, MA. Finally, we have invested in security and public
       safety through the four Intelligent Transportation System projects
       that will upgrade out-dated communications equipment. All users of
       these roadways and bridges and bike/pedestrian facilities will benefit
       from the work being completed. The users of the Steamship
       Authority ferries will benefit from the docking and terminal facilities
       improvements being made in Falmouth, Hyannis and Oak Bluffs.
       Improving the transportation system of the commonwealth impacts the
       daily life of our citizens as well as providing the essential infrastructure
       for commerce.

Energy and Environment

   Program Description                                                                Beneficiaries
    USFS Native Species Ecological Restoration Grant benefits                         Residents of
      residents of Worcester and Berkshire Counties in Massachusetts by                  Worcester and
      addressing in the detection of the destructive Asian Longhorned                    Berkshire
      Beetle and other invasive insect species that destroy trees and other              counties
      vegetation.
    USFS Southeastern Massachusetts Fuels Mitigation benefits                           Residents of
      residents of Plymouth and Dukes Counties in Massachusetts. The                      Plymouth and
      fuels management and ecosystem restoration activities reduce the risk               Duke counties
      of wildfire in these counties.
    State Energy Program aims to provide leadership to maximize the                     Community-
      benefits of energy efficiency and renewable energy in Massachusetts.                wide
      The Department of Energy Resources is working to substantially
      increase solar energy resources in state facilities, as well as to reduce
      energy waste and increase renewable energy projects across the
      Commonwealth.
    Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants will advance                        Community-
      clean energy technology and energy efficiency goals at the community                wide
      level. This will include both funding to assist with energy efficiency
      projects and to provide technical assistance to municipalities.
    The Leaking Underground Storage Tank (LUST) program will                            Community-
      provide Massachusetts with funds for the remediation of known                       wide
      storage tanks buried underground that are or have been compromised
      and are leaking petroleum into the environment. This quarter, four
      projects were initiated at 3 sites under the LUST ARRA program. Two
      Direct Site Assessments took place at Fisherville Mill in Grafton and
      Quincy Street in Dorchester, and two Direct Cleanups began at Maple
      Street in Holyoke and Quincy Street in Dorchester.




                                              Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 32
III. ACCOUNTABILITY
Governor Patrick continues to make transparency and accountability top priorities in the Commonwealth‘s
handling of the stimulus funds. The Commonwealth‘s transparency website, www.mass.gov/recovery, has
been significantly updated and now contains a clickable map that provides real time information about how
stimulus dollars are being spent in Massachusetts at the city and town level. The site also continues to
provide citizens with news and updates on a variety of stimulus projects and programs that are ongoing
throughout the state.

The Massachusetts Recovery website was recently ranked by Good Jobs First, a national independent
organization, to be in the top 10 in the United States.

In the area of accountability, the Governor has also made the prevention of fraud waste and abuse a major
focus. Agencies responsible for handling stimulus funds attended a mandatory training on November 13,
2009, on how to improve their fraud, waste and abuse prevention efforts. Along with being provided with a
fraud, waste and abuse prevention toolkit, agencies were made aware of existing fraud, waste and abuse
reporting mechanisms, including state and federal hotlines and the online reporting available at
www.recovery.gov. This training, and the information that it provided, was the result of unprecedented
cooperation between the Massachusetts Recovery and Reinvestment Office (MassRRO), Attorney
General, Inspector General and the Comptroller.

Over the past several months the MassRRO has continued its work with the STOP Fraud Task Force – a
group of representatives from state and federal oversight agencies created by the Massachusetts Attorney
General. Through the STOP Fraud Task Force, stimulus oversight activities are being coordinated at both
the state and federal level to ensure the broadest possible coverage. In recent months several members of
the task force, including the Massachusetts Inspector General and the State Auditor, have begun proactive
oversight of stimulus projects in the Commonwealth. This oversight is designed to ensure that every
stimulus dollar is being spent appropriately and in accordance with all state and federal requirements.

The Commonwealth is also proud of its ongoing work with the Government Accountability Office (GAO).
Massachusetts is one of 16 states that have been selected for quarterly reviews by the GAO. These
reviews run the spectrum of ARRA projects and programs and will continue throughout the life of the
stimulus program. The information gathered by the GAO is being compiled into quarterly reports that are
submitted to Congress and made available to the public. These reports provide yet another layer of
transparency and accountability to the spending of stimulus dollars.




                                             Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 33
IV. RECOVERY OVERVIEW CHARTS
   (over the 27-month program)

               Anticipated ARRA Funds for Massachusetts Recipients
             To Municipalities,
              Non-Profits, and
             Private Enterprise,
              $3,025,969,235


                                                                       To State Agencies,
                                                                        $6,117,481,351




                   Direct to Citizens,
                    $4,655,959,473


      Anticipated Funds to Massachusetts State Agencies (by Category) - $6.1 Billion

                                         Technology & Research
                                               $694,157


                                                                        Education
                                                                     $1,552,947,566



                                                                                   Energy & Environment
  Human Services                                                                       $219,932,548
  $2,866,996,653

                                                                                   Housing
                                                                                 $197,964,274


                                                                                Labor
                                                                             $757,513,061
                                                                 Public Safety
                                                                 $39,232,748
                                             Transportation
                                             $482,220,344




                                            Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 34
   Appendix 1

   Award Details (through December 31, 2009)
Summary of Reports Submitted under Section 1512 of the Recovery Act


Award                               Massachusetts       Project/Program                                      Amount
Number          Secretariat          State Agency       Title                  Award Amount    Committed      Spent

                                                        Crime Victim
2009-SF-                               Office of the    Compensation -
B9-0135       Attorney General      Attorney General    ARRA                         271,484       271,484     271,484


                                                        Victims of Crime
2009-SG-                           Victim and Witness   Assistance Program -
B9-0143       Attorney General      Assistance Board    ARRA                         930,000       149,896      24,940


              Executive Office       Exec Office for
ARRA         for Administration     Administration &    ARRA Administration
Admin           and Finance             Finance         and Oversight              8,900,000     1,644,544    1,400,664


              Executive Office                          Impact on Child
0904MA40     for Administration      Department of      Support Incentives
02              and Finance            Revenue          (Fed Match)               13,495,109     8,213,878    3,732,119

                                                        2009 Edward Byrne
                                                        Memorial Justice
2009-SB-                            Plymouth District   Assistance Grant-
B9-2929       District Attorneys        Attorney        Plymouth County            1,053,655        13,438        3,495

                                    Elementary and      USDA CHILD
4MA34030     Executive Office of      Secondary         NUTRITION
3               Education              Education        RECOVERY ACT               1,404,025     1,402,262    1,363,333
                                                        USDA Child Nutrition
                                    Elementary and      Programs -
4MA84080     Executive Office of      Secondary         Elementary and
7               Education              Education        Secondary Ed                 858,013       428,940     428,940
                                                        Grants to States for
                                    Elementary and      the Education of
H391A0900    Executive Office of      Secondary         Children with
76              Education              Education        Disabilities             280,551,559   133,104,333   42,063,011

                                    Elementary and      Preschool Grants for
H392A0900    Executive Office of      Secondary         Children with
39              Education              Education        Disabilities              10,263,466     3,971,061    1,171,436

                                    Elementary and      Title II, Part D -
S386A0900    Executive Office of      Secondary         Enhancing Education
21              Education              Education        Through Technology        10,545,670     1,416,445      93,698

                                    Elementary and      Education for
S387A0900    Executive Office of      Secondary         Homeless Children
22              Education              Education        and Youth                  1,118,480       614,756     125,742


                                                        Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 35
Award                              Massachusetts        Project/Program                                           Amount
Number         Secretariat          State Agency        Title                     Award Amount    Committed        Spent

                                   Elementary and
S388A0900   Executive Office of      Secondary
22             Education              Education         School Improvements           2,483,714               0            0

                                                        Title I, Part A -
                                                        Improving Basic
                                   Elementary and       Programs Operated
S389A9002   Executive Office of      Secondary          by Local Educational
1              Education              Education         Agencies                    163,680,278    58,373,026      17,543,763

                                                        State Fiscal
                                                        Stabilization Fund -
S394A0900   Executive Office of   Executive Office of   Education
22             Education             Education          Stabilization Fund          544,913,152   432,140,333     404,860,377

                                                        State Fiscal
S397A0900   Executive Office of   Executive Office of   Stabilization Fund -
22             Education             Education          Government Services         180,954,993    97,971,850      90,047,096

                                                        Child Care
0901MACC    Executive Office of                         Development Fund
D7             Education          Early Ed and Care     (CCDF) - ARRA                23,966,942     2,250,000        636,714

                                                        Arts and the American
                                                        Recovery and
09-4188-    Executive Office of    Massachusetts        Reinvestment Act of
7127           Education           College of Art       2009                             25,000       12,571          12,571

                                                        Atlantic Partnership
            Executive Office of      Salem State        for the Biological
0928417        Education               College          Sciences                        299,733               0            0


                                                        A Track 1 Proposal for
                                                        Creating a Pipeline for
                                                        Diversity in the
                                                        Geosciences: A
            Executive Office of    Worcester State      Sustainability-based
0914513        Education              College           approach.                       199,710          904             904



            Executive Office of
              Housing and         Dept of Housing &
0901MACO        Economic             Community          Community Services
S2            Development           Development         Block Grant - ARRA           24,922,586    24,673,360       6,802,314



            Executive Office of
              Housing and         Dept of Housing &     Community
B-09-DY-        Economic             Community          Development Block
25-0001       Development           Development         Grant - ARRA                  9,103,174     8,161,356         26,407




                                                        Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 36
Award                              Massachusetts       Project/Program                                         Amount
Number          Secretariat         State Agency       Title                   Award Amount    Committed        Spent



             Executive Office of
               Housing and         Dept of Housing &
                 Economic             Community        Weatherization
EE0000130      Development           Development       Assistance Program        122,077,457    92,139,495     21,092,639



             Executive Office of
               Housing and         Dept of Housing &
M09-             Economic             Community        Tax Credit Assistance
ES250100       Development           Development       Program                    59,605,630    39,327,231              0



             Executive Office of
               Housing and         Dept of Housing &
MALHB042         Economic             Community        Lead Hazard Control
0-08           Development           Development       Program                     2,640,000     2,175,000        55,196



             Executive Office of
               Housing and         Dept of Housing &   Homelessness
S-09-DY-         Economic             Community        Prevention and Rapid
25-0001        Development           Development       Re-Housing Program         18,443,744    13,825,888              0



             Executive Office of                       Section 1602/Low-
               Housing and         Dept of Housing &   Income Housing
TDP2009G         Economic             Community        Grants in Lieu of Tax
RMA25          Development           Development       Credits                   106,035,450   103,321,404              0

                                                       Ambulatory Surgical
             Executive Office of                       Center Healthcare
05-1005-     Health and Human       Department of      Associated Infection
MA5ASC            Services          Public Health      Prevention Initiative          97,000               0            0


             Executive Office of                       Trans-NIH Recovery
1R01ES01     Health and Human       Department of      Act Research Support
7407-01           Services          Public Health      - ARRA                        496,893       496,893              0


             Executive Office of                       Immunization and
3h23ip1225   Health and Human       Department of      Vaccines for Children
40-07s1           Services          Public Health      - ARRA                      1,096,587        92,170              0


             Executive Office of                       Preventing Healthcare
3U50CI123    Health and Human       Department of      Associated Infections
668-05S1          Services          Public Health      - ARRA                      1,599,587     1,009,622        20,502




                                                       Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 37
Award                              Massachusetts     Project/Program                                          Amount
Number          Secretariat         State Agency     Title                  Award Amount     Committed         Spent


             Executive Office of
3U50CI123    Health and Human       Department of
668-05S2          Services          Public Health    Immunization - ARRA          129,500                0             0


             Executive Office of                     Infants and Families
H393A0901    Health and Human       Department of    with Disabilities
07                Services          Public Health    (IDEA) - ARRA              8,488,034       6,377,225      6,377,225


             Executive Office of                     State Loan
H5BHP168     Health and Human       Department of    Repayment Program -
16                Services          Public Health    ARRA                         100,000                0             0


             Executive Office of
U6AHP167     Health and Human       Department of    State Primary Care
90                Services          Public Health    Offices                       42,470                0             0


             Executive Office of    Department of    Foster Care and
             Health and Human       Children and     Adoption Assistance
75-9-1546         Services            Families       Programs                   5,938,399       4,039,403      4,039,403


             Executive Office of    Exec Office of   Medicaid Federal
             Health and Human      Health & Human    Medical Assistance                                      1,448,068,41
75X0518           Services            Services       Percentage              1,531,946,401   1,448,068,419              9


             Executive Office of
09AAMAC1     Health and Human       Department of    Congregate Meals -
RR                Services           Elder Affairs   ARRA                       1,403,578       1,396,560        937,777


             Executive Office of
09AAMAC2     Health and Human       Department of    Home Delivered
RR                Services           Elder Affairs   Nutrition Services           690,992         687,537        585,069


             Executive Office of
AD-18372-    Health and Human       Department of    Senior Community
09-60-A-25        Services           Elder Affairs   Service Employment           516,999         479,156         87,647


                                                     Basic Support
             Executive Office of                     Vocational
H390A0900    Health and Human      Mass Commission   Rehabilitation
29                Services           for the Blind   Services - ARRA            1,060,294          91,307         79,044




                                                     Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 38
Award                              Massachusetts     Project/Program                                           Amount
Number          Secretariat         State Agency     Title                     Award Amount    Committed        Spent


             Executive Office of
H398A0900    Health and Human      Mass Commission   Independent Living Il -
30                Services           for the Blind   ARRA                             42,958               0            0


             Executive Office of
H399A0900    Health and Human      Mass Commission   Older Independent
21                Services           for the Blind   Blind Services-ARRA             778,450         5,663          5,663


             Executive Office of       Mass          Vocational
H390A0900    Health and Human       Rehabilitation   Rehabilitation
28                Services          Commission       Services - ARRA               6,008,334       491,662       209,389


             Executive Office of       Mass          Independent Living
H398A0900    Health and Human       Rehabilitation   Services, Part B -
29                Services          Commission       ARRA                            243,433               0            0

                                                     Supplemental
             Executive Office of    Department of    Nutrition Assistance
4MA44040     Health and Human        Transitional    Program, Admin -
2                 Services           Assistance      ARRA                          6,688,502     4,000,026      3,991,839

             Executive Office of                     Recovery Act
                Labor and           Department of    Unemployment
111-5 Sec       Workforce            Workforce       Insurance
903(f)         Development          Development      Compensation                174,303,580       397,000              0

             Executive Office of                     WIA Recovery Act
                Labor and           Department of    Title 1 Services for
AA-17127-       Workforce            Workforce       Adult, Dislocated and
08-55-A-25     Development          Development      Youth Workers                56,135,152    50,228,920     25,442,837

             Executive Office of                     Dislocated Worker
                Labor and           Department of    National Emergency
EM-19688-       Workforce            Workforce       Grant (NEG) Metro
10-60-A-25     Development          Development      Central 9                     1,906,964               0            0

             Executive Office of                     Dislocated Worker
                Labor and           Department of    National Emergency
EM-19689-       Workforce            Workforce       Grant (NEG) Jabil
10-60-A-25     Development          Development      Circut, Inc.                    827,616               0            0


             Executive Office of
                Labor and           Department of    Wagner Peyser Act
ES-17567-       Workforce            Workforce       Employment Services
08-55-A-25     Development          Development      - ARRA                        8,063,456     2,880,449      1,457,203




                                                     Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 39
Award                               Massachusetts     Project/Program                                          Amount
Number          Secretariat          State Agency     Title                    Award Amount    Committed        Spent

             Executive Office of                      Federal Additional
                Labor and           Department of     Unemployment
FAC-2002-       Workforce            Workforce        Compensation -
OWS/DUIO       Development          Development       ARRA                       500,000,000   229,460,900     229,460,900
                                                      Emergency
             Executive Office of                      Unemployment
                Labor and           Department of     Compensation
UI-18026-       Workforce            Workforce        Administration -
09-55-A-25     Development          Development       ARRA                         1,226,471     1,107,935       1,107,935

             Executive Office of                      Additional
                Labor and           Department of     Unemployment
UIPL 13-09      Workforce            Workforce        Compensation Admin
SBR            Development          Development       - ARRA                         211,532       211,532        211,532



USDA-        Executive Office of
FSA-            Energy and          Department of
ARRA-          Environmental         Agricultural     Assistance to Aquatic
AGP-17            Affairs            Resources        Producers                           0                0            0



             Executive Office of
09-DG-          Energy and             Dept of        USFS Southeastern
11420004-      Environmental       Conservation and   Massachusetts Fuels
600               Affairs            Recreation       Mitigation                   1,974,000       516,890         26,991



             Executive Office of
09-DG-          Energy and             Dept of
11420004-      Environmental       Conservation and   USFS Native Species
604               Affairs            Recreation       Ecological Restoration         538,000               0            0

                                                      MA Asian Longhorned
             Executive Office of                      Beetle Area
10-dg-          Energy and             Dept of        Watershed Health and
11420004-      Environmental       Conservation and   Ecological
609               Affairs            Recreation       Enhancement                  4,487,000               0            0



             Executive Office of
                Energy and
               Environmental         Department of    State Energy Program
EE0000227         Affairs          Energy Resources   - ARRA                      54,911,000    44,582,792        650,569



             Executive Office of                      Mass Energy
                Energy and                            Efficiency and
               Environmental         Department of    Conservation Block
EE0000737         Affairs          Energy Resources   Grant                       14,752,100    13,252,100              0


                                                      Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 40
Award                              Massachusetts     Project/Program                                          Amount
Number         Secretariat          State Agency     Title                    Award Amount    Committed        Spent



            Executive Office of
               Energy and
              Environmental         Department of
EE0001546        Affairs          Energy Resources   Save Energy Now                500,000               0            0



            Executive Office of
               Energy and                            State Energy Efficient
              Environmental         Department of    Appliance Rebate
EE0001667        Affairs          Energy Resources   Program                      6,235,000               0            0



            Executive Office of
               Energy and
OE000006      Environmental         Department of    Energy Assistance
9                Affairs          Energy Resources   Planning                       796,207       509,277         5,777



            Executive Office of
               Energy and         EO of Energy and   ARRA Port Security
2009-PU-      Environmental        Environmental     Grant Program - New
R1-0412          Affairs               Affairs       Bedford Pier Security          203,030               0            0

                                                     ARRA Port Security
            Executive Office of                      Grant Program -
               Energy and         EO of Energy and   Regional Readiness
2009-PU-      Environmental        Environmental     Response
R1-0413          Affairs               Affairs       Surveillance                   484,196               0            0



            Executive Office of
               Energy and          Department of     STIMULUS - State
              Environmental        Environmental     Clean Diesel Grant
96101401         Affairs             Protection      Program                      1,729,957     1,504,628        29,628



            Executive Office of                      STIMULUS - MA
               Energy and          Department of     Water Quality
              Environmental        Environmental     Management
96103801         Affairs             Protection      Planning                     1,343,900     1,073,458       229,184



            Executive Office of
               Energy and          Department of     STIMULUS - Nat.
              Environmental        Environmental     Diesel - State Fleet
96107001         Affairs             Protection      Retrofit                       502,500       500,490              0




                                                     Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 41
Award                             Massachusetts       Project/Program                                       Amount
Number         Secretariat         State Agency       Title                   Award Amount    Committed      Spent



            Executive Office of
               Energy and          Department of      MassDEP ARRA
              Environmental        Environmental      LUST Trust Fund
96118801         Affairs             Protection       Pgm                         3,118,000     1,638,938     446,511



            Executive Office of
2F-            Energy and          Department of
96105401-     Environmental        Environmental
0                Affairs             Protection       Safe Drinking Water         2,088,640       453,547     453,547



            Executive Office of
2W-            Energy and          Department of
25000209-     Environmental        Environmental      Clean Water SRF
0                Affairs             Protection       Admin                       5,322,292     1,147,114    1,147,114


            Executive Office of
2009-EF-    Public Safety and     EO Public Safety    Violence Against
S6-0052         Security           and Security       Women Act - ARRA            2,864,277       911,500      16,224

                                                      Edward Byrne
            Executive Office of                       Memorial Justice
2009-SU-    Public Safety and     EO Public Safety    Assistance Grant
B9-0025         Security           and Security       (JAG) award                25,044,649    15,753,031   13,613,785

                                                      Army National Guard
            Executive Office of                       Energy Efficiency
W912SV-     Public Safety and                         Upgrades to Barracks
09-2-9021       Security          Military Division   and Facilities              9,416,000     7,864,677            0


            Executive Office of                       Port Security Grant-
2009-PU-    Public Safety and      Department of      Purchase of
R1-0406         Security              Police          Equipment                     672,754        68,013            0


            Executive Office of
2009-SN-    Public Safety and      Department of      Internet Crimes
B9-K057         Security              Police          Against Children              774,492        85,922      71,071



                                                      Arts and the American
                                                      Recovery and
09-6188-     Treasurer and        Massachusetts       Reinvestment Act of
2088        Receiver-General      Cultural Council    2009                          323,600       280,000     280,000




                                                      Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 42
Award                      Massachusetts    Project/Program                                  Amount
Number     Secretariat      State Agency    Title              Award Amount    Committed      Spent

                                            DESIGN-BUILD
                                            INTERCHANGE
          Department of    Department of    CONSTRUCTION OF
001S899   Transportation   Transportation   ROUTE 24.             32,053,618    32,053,618            0

                                            RESURFACING AND
                                            RELATED WORK ON
          Department of    Department of    ROUTE 18 & ROUTE
001S917   Transportation   Transportation   28                     2,842,051     2,604,255   1,524,936

                                            RESURFACING AND
          Department of    Department of    RELATED WORK ON
001S918   Transportation   Transportation   ROUTE 116              2,199,456     2,031,682   1,477,385

                                            COLD PLANNING
                                            AND RESURFACING
          Department of    Department of    ROUTE 6 (SCENIC
001S919   Transportation   Transportation   HIGHWAY)               1,756,160     1,611,069     993,313

                                            COLD PLANING AND
                                            RESURFACING AT
          Department of    Department of    VARIOUS
001S920   Transportation   Transportation   LOCATIONS              5,074,035     4,681,119   3,391,142

                                            RESURFACING AND
                                            RELATED WORK ON
          Department of    Department of    ROUTE 122 &
001S921   Transportation   Transportation   ROUTE 62               2,268,246     2,088,803   1,700,504

                                            RESURFACING AND
          Department of    Department of    RELATED WORK ON
001S922   Transportation   Transportation   ROUTE 6A               3,150,634     2,921,241     271,172

                                            RESURFACING AND
          Department of    Department of    RELATED WORK ON
001S923   Transportation   Transportation   ROUTE 2                1,596,500     1,479,230   1,123,107

                                            RESURFACING AND
                                            RELATED WORK ON
                                            ROUTE 2 (WARDEN
          Department of    Department of    ST. TO SUDBURY
001S924   Transportation   Transportation   RD.)                   4,313,468     4,023,407   1,394,218

                                            RESURFACING AND
          Department of    Department of    RELATED WORK ON
001S925   Transportation   Transportation   ROUTE 6                4,159,044     3,854,340   3,001,565

                                            RESURFACING AND
          Department of    Department of    RELATED WORK ON
001S926   Transportation   Transportation   ROUTE 6                1,611,976     1,499,582   1,048,277




                                            Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 43
Award                      Massachusetts    Project/Program                                    Amount
Number     Secretariat      State Agency    Title             Award Amount     Committed        Spent

                                            RESURFACING AND
          Department of    Department of    RELATED WORK ON
001S927   Transportation   Transportation   ROUTE 24               5,718,302     5,272,550       761,206

                                            TRAFFIC SIGN &
                                            GUIDE
          Department of    Department of    REPLACEMENT ON
001S931   Transportation   Transportation   I-95 (SR 128)          3,168,470     2,903,804       230,985

                                            RESURFACING AND
          Department of    Department of    RELATED WORK ON
001S932   Transportation   Transportation   ROUTE 32                 657,048       578,133       495,467

                                            RESURFACING AND
          Department of    Department of    RELATED WORK ON
001S933   Transportation   Transportation   ROUTE 2                3,590,569     3,300,034     2,074,422

                                            RESURFACING AND
          Department of    Department of    RELATED WORK ON
001S934   Transportation   Transportation   ROUTES 5 & 10          3,891,211     3,635,448     1,529,476

                                            RESURFACING AND
          Department of    Department of    RELATED WORK ON
001S935   Transportation   Transportation   RT. 20                 2,775,064     2,474,381              0

                                            SCENIC BYWAY
                                            CONSTRUCTION ON
          Department of    Department of    ROUTE 10/ROUTE
001S936   Transportation   Transportation   63 PHASE I             1,100,620       982,066       632,326

                                            HIGHWAY
          Department of    Department of    RECONSTRUCTION
001S937   Transportation   Transportation   ROUTE 7A               3,670,204     3,462,997       943,804
          Department of    Department of    ERP-001S(938),
001S938   Transportation   Transportation   Lanesborough          10,799,484               0            0

                                            RESURFACING AND
          Department of    Department of    RELATED WORK ON
001S941   Transportation   Transportation   MILESTONE ROAD         4,748,670     4,316,452       966,981

                                            RESURFACING AND
          Department of    Department of    RELATED WORK ON
001S942   Transportation   Transportation   ROUTE 9                4,699,691     4,307,685     1,061,781

                                            RESURFACING AND
          Department of    Department of    RELATED WORK ON
001S945   Transportation   Transportation   ROUTE 8                1,265,387     1,159,743       966,781

                                            RECONSTRUCTION
                                            OF ROUTE 27
                                            PLEASANT ST. @
          Department of    Department of    WEST ST. AND
001S946   Transportation   Transportation   WESTGATE MALL          2,811,883     3,522,226     1,006,018


                                            Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 44
Award                      Massachusetts    Project/Program                                     Amount
Number     Secretariat      State Agency    Title               Award Amount    Committed        Spent

                                            RESURFACING AND
          Department of    Department of    RELATED WORK ON
001S947   Transportation   Transportation   ROUTE 7                 2,406,702     2,209,881     1,828,324

                                            BRIDGE
                                            REPLACEMENT (C-
          Department of    Department of    16-2) WATER
001S949   Transportation   Transportation   ST./NASHUA RIVER.       3,514,426     3,274,725        33,124

                                            RESURFACING AND
          Department of    Department of    RELATED WORK ON
001S952   Transportation   Transportation   ROUTE 2                 5,175,866     4,743,178     3,585,403

                                            RECLAMATION AND
          Department of    Department of    RELATED WORK ON
001S953   Transportation   Transportation   ELM ST.                   975,700       860,092       677,795
          Department of    Department of    EXPANSION OF
001S954   Transportation   Transportation   PARK AND RIDE           3,958,204     3,648,927        69,731
                                            BRIDGE
                                            RECONSTRUCTION
                                            W-35-3 RED BRIDGE
          Department of    Department of    RD./UTILITIES
001S955   Transportation   Transportation   CANAL                   1,838,194     1,709,217       497,124
                                            BRIDGE
                                            BETTERMENT (L-4-
                                            9) HAMPSHIRE
          Department of    Department of    ST./SPICKETT
001S959   Transportation   Transportation   RIVER                   2,522,939     2,305,489         5,245

                                            RESURFACING AND
          Department of    Department of    RELATED WORK ON
001S961   Transportation   Transportation   ROUTE 2                 7,485,002     7,158,540     1,576,055
          Department of    Department of    MULTI USE MANHAN
001S962   Transportation   Transportation   RAIL TRAIL              4,211,726     3,889,660       691,466

                                            SIGNAL AND
                                            INTERSECTION
          Department of    Department of    IMPROVEMENTS
001S963   Transportation   Transportation   MAGOUN SQ.              2,218,828               0            0
                                            INTERSECTION AND
                                            SIGNAL
                                            IMPROVEMENTS AT
                                            ROUTE 110
                                            (LITTLETON) AND
          Department of    Department of    ROUTE 225
001S964   Transportation   Transportation   (CONCORD RD.)           2,955,042     2,769,349     1,341,626

                                            INTERSECTION AND
                                            SIGNAL
          Department of    Department of    IMPROVEMENTS ON
001S965   Transportation   Transportation   DORCESTER AVE.         15,127,198    14,424,115              0


                                            Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 45
Award                      Massachusetts    Project/Program                                       Amount
Number     Secretariat      State Agency    Title                 Award Amount    Committed        Spent
          Department of    Department of    ERP-001S(966),
001S966   Transportation   Transportation   Boston                    4,630,670               0            0

                                            JACKSON ST. SAFE
          Department of    Department of    ROUTES TO
001S967   Transportation   Transportation   SCHOOLS                     613,114       539,483       103,436

                                            HYANNIS TERMINAL
          Department of    Department of    SLIP
001S989   Transportation   Transportation   IMPROVEMENTS              5,000,000     5,000,000       336,004

                                            RECLAMATION OF
                                            ATHOL, RICHMAND
          Department of    Department of    RD (RTE 32) FROM
001S995   Transportation   Transportation   ELM AVE TO NH SL.         1,000,000       905,063              0

                                            NORTH BANK
                                            BRIDGE (B-16-302 -
          Department of    Department of    C-1-8) RIVER WALK /
002S015   Transportation   Transportation   CHARLES RIVER            29,176,615    27,907,990              0
          Department of    Department of    RESURFACING AND
002S022   Transportation   Transportation   RELATED WORK              3,523,180               0            0

                                            BRIDGE ST
          Department of    Department of    RECONSTRUCTION.
002S026   Transportation   Transportation   SEE ALSO STP              8,529,498     6,920,664              0
                                            FOOTPRINT ROAD
                                            REHAB PROJECT
                                            RTE
                                            169(NO.WOODSTOC
          Department of    Department of    K RD) SEE ALSO
002S034   Transportation   Transportation   STP                       2,000,000     2,000,290              0
                                            FIBER OPTIC
                                            CONNECT 3 LOC
                                            CAMBRIDGE RT 2-
                                            MBTA ALEWIFE,
                                            NEWTON REST
                                            AREA RT.128 TO
          Department of    Department of    MBTA,
002S053   Transportation   Transportation   FRAMINGHAM                1,400,000     1,399,814              0
                                            VIDEO SYSTEM
                                            UPGRADES IP
                                            BASED VIRTUAL
          Department of    Department of    MATRIX SWITCH
002S055   Transportation   Transportation   (ITS) SEE STP             1,000,000     1,000,000              0
                                            COMMUNICATION
                                            EQUIPMENT
                                            INSTALLATION AT 5
                                            LOCATIONS & FIBER
                                            OPTIC
                                            CONNECTION
          Department of    Department of    EXISTING CONDUIT
002S056   Transportation   Transportation   3 LOCA                      908,172       354,467              0



                                            Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 46
Award                      Massachusetts    Project/Program                                        Amount
Number     Secretariat      State Agency    Title                  Award Amount    Committed        Spent
                                            CCTV
                                            INSTALLATION OF
                                            SIGNALIZED
          Department of    Department of    INTERSECTIONS
002S057   Transportation   Transportation   (ITS)                      1,613,346       599,438              0
          Department of    Department of    Projects ERP-
002S071   Transportation   Transportation   002S(071)X                   220,028               0            0
          Department of    Department of    ERP-002S(072)X,
002S072   Transportation   Transportation   Bridgewater                1,366,150               0            0
          Department of    Department of    PROJECT ERP-
002S073   Transportation   Transportation   002S(073)X                   742,500               0            0

                                            ERP-002S(074)X, Fall
          Department of    Department of    River - Bridge
002S074   Transportation   Transportation   betterment                 3,700,950               0            0

                                            ERP-002S(075)X,
          Department of    Department of    Springfield -
002S075   Transportation   Transportation   Columbus Ave               1,633,720               0            0
          Department of    Department of    ERP-002S(076)X,
002S076   Transportation   Transportation   Norwood                    1,169,710               0            0
          Department of    Department of    PROJECT ERP-
002S077   Transportation   Transportation   002S(077)X, Amherst        2,259,850               0            0
          Department of    Department of    PROJECT ERP-
002S078   Transportation   Transportation   002S(078)X, Oakham         1,567,490               0            0

                                            PROJECT ERP-
          Department of    Department of    002S(079)X,
002S079   Transportation   Transportation   Chicopee                   1,461,740               0            0
          Department of    Department of    ERP-002S(080)X,
002S080   Transportation   Transportation   Gardner                    2,483,490               0            0
          Department of    Department of    PROJECT ERP-
002S081   Transportation   Transportation   002S(081)X                 3,381,930               0            0
          Department of    Department of    ERP-002S(087)X,
002S087   Transportation   Transportation   South Hadley               1,679,570               0            0
          Department of    Department of    ERP-002S(099)X,
002S099   Transportation   Transportation   Boston                     4,438,830               0            0
          Department of    Department of    ERP-002S(100)X,
002S100   Transportation   Transportation   Boston                     4,529,600               0            0
          Department of    Department of    ERP-002S(101),
002S101   Transportation   Transportation   Boston                     3,806,310               0            0

          Department of    Department of
002S102   Transportation   Transportation   ERP-002S(102)X             4,039,490               0            0

          Department of    Department of    ERP-002S(103),
002S103   Transportation   Transportation   Bellingham-Reconstr       12,990,320               0            0


                                            Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 47
Award                      Massachusetts    Project/Program                                        Amount
Number     Secretariat      State Agency    Title                  Award Amount    Committed        Spent
          Department of    Department of    PROJECT ERP-
002S104   Transportation   Transportation   002S(104)X Braintree       2,456,940               0            0

                                            ARRA BUS
MA-06-    Department of    Department of    STATIONS/STOPS/T
X001-00   Transportation   Transportation   ERMINALS                  12,800,000    12,800,000       380,654

                                            ARRA 16
                                            BUSES/FACILITY
MA-86-    Department of    Department of    IMPROVEMENTS/EQ
X001-00   Transportation   Transportation   UIPMENT                    3,653,542     3,653,542       656,206




                                            Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 48
   Appendix 2 +

   Summary of Reports
   Submitted Under Section 1512 of the Recovery Act
   For Reporting Period Ending December 31, 2009

Reporting Summary

Total Number of Awards to           Number of Massachusetts State Agencies          Number of Direct
      State Agencies                                                                   Full-Time
                                                                                   Equivalents (FTEs)
                132                                   32                                 4,635




Number of Reporting Entities

    # of Sub-Recipients                            Vendors                            Subrecipient
                                                                                        Vendors
               1,512                                  42                                 1,706




Financial Summary

         Total Awarded                           Total Spent                       Total Infrastructure
                                                                                        Spending
         $1,972,799,798                          $675,573,215                         $48,003,878



Project Status (by number of reports)


  Completed 50% or More                               30

 Less than 50% Complete                               74

           Not Started                                27

   +   Updated February 25, 2010.




                                             Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 49
Appendix 3

ARRA Job Reporting: Changes
The updated job counting guidance for the second reporting period included the following measures:

       Recipients were directed to divide the hours worked in the reporting quarter by the hours in a full-
        time schedule. Thus, a full-time job counts as one job, while a half-time job accounts for one half
        of a job. Recipients only track one set of numbers for each quarter. This approach responds to
        recommendations from the Government Accountability Office (GAO) and bipartisan Members of
        Congress to standardize and simplify the period of measurement.

The GAO also recommended that the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) make ―more explicit that
‗jobs created or retained‘ are to be reported as hours worked and paid for with Recovery Act funds.‖

       In response, we are clearly defining the terms for a ―job created or retained‖ as those funded in the
        quarter by the Recovery Act. Jobs funded partially with Recovery Act funds will only be counted
        based on the proportion funded by the Recovery Act. Jobs funded with non-Recovery Act funds
        will not be counted. The new approach is an easier-to-use format for recipients.

These changes are designed to make definitions clear, simplify the process, and increase accuracy so we
achieve the transparency and accountability the process was designed to promote.

ARRA Job Reporting: Questions & Answers
These questions and answers are based on information provided from the Federal Office of Management
and Budget.

The Patrick- Murray Administration is committed to providing the American people with the best information
possible. We are equally committed to making the information that we report easy to navigate and user-
friendly.

The changes outlined in the new guidance -- linking job creation and retention directly to ARRA funding and
removing subjective assessments -- will make it easier for recipients to identify supporting documentation.
We firmly believe that the updated guidance to how jobs are counted are commonsense improvements and
will make it easier for people to understand the true impact that the Recovery Act is having in their
communities.

These questions and answers are based on information provided by the Federal Office of Management and
Budget.

Why has the job counting methodology changed? Has the job counting started over?

       This is an effort to make the reporting process as easy and as streamlined as possible, not start
        the job count over. The Office of Management and Budget has listened to recipients and outside
        experts on ways to improve the unparalleled data collection at Recovery.gov. The update to job
        counting is their latest effort.

       Improvements to the reporting system should be expected each successive quarter.

                                               Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 50
What do the job estimates with the new methodology represent?

      The data collected from the January recipient reports represent the total jobs directly funded with
       Recovery Act dollars (these data do not count indirect jobs, such as when Unemployment
       Insurance recipients spend their benefits and create more economic activity). This allows the
       public to see the job activity being specifically paid for using Recovery Act funds. In some cases,
       these funds are creating new jobs or sustaining jobs that would have been lost. In other cases,
       these funds are being used to pay for ongoing employment, thereby freeing up funds for other
       important activities and expenditures.

How does this differ from the job estimate from the October report?

      In the October reporting period – our first reporting effort – job estimates captured a different but
       related measure – employment activity that would not have occurred without the enactment of the
       Recovery Act. This estimate was useful for isolating the specific impact the Recovery Act is having
       on job creation and avoiding layoffs. However, generating this type of estimate proved
       burdensome for recipients to report and challenging for auditors and others to validate.

Are the October job data inaccurate?

      No.

      The October data provided reliable information directly from recipients about the use of their
       funding at the state and local level. That data provided an unparalleled look at the positive
       difference that the Recovery Act is having on the economy across the country.

Do you expect the new methodology to drive the jobs numbers up? Down? Same?

      The update as to how jobs are counted is intended to make the reporting process simpler and
       more user-friendly. We do not yet know exactly what impact on the job numbers will be. What we
       do know is that the updates reflect the right public policy and are consistent with what we believe to
       be sound recommendations from the Government Accountability Office (GAO) and input from
       bipartisan Members of Congress who are tracking this issue closely.

How should the October reports be compared with the January reports under this updated formula?

      Both measures provide useful data on the job impact of Recovery Act dollars. However, they are
       not measuring the same type of impacts and thus comparing one number to the other would not be
       meaningful.

      The two measures should be seen as complementing one another in providing an assessment of
       the overall job impact of Recovery Act dollars.

Will you be able to compare the October data with what you learn in January and in subsequent
reporting periods?

      The changes that we‘re making will mean that the October and January data won‘t be exactly
       comparable to each other. However, the data will continue to provide an unprecedented look at an
       important part of the Recovery Act‘s benefits at the local level: the job impact of direct spending on

                                              Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 51
       Recovery Act projects. The complete job impact of the Act—including both direct and indirect
       jobs—will continue to be published quarterly by the Council of Economic Advisors.

Will job estimates reported in future quarters be comparable to the data provided under the new
methodology?

      Yes.

      The new data that comes out at the end of January will serve as a baseline view of jobs being
       funded by Recovery Act dollars. While each quarter‘s report will stand on its own, future quarters
       will allow us to assess, as money is spent, how the overall impact on job activity changes.

      The difference with this quarter is that, based upon input from Congress, GAO, and stakeholders,
       the jobs guidance has changed. No longer are recipients using methodologies for jobs--they are
       counting funded jobs. This change makes it a different snap shot and not comparable.

      Recipients should be prepared to justify their job reporting estimates. Under the guidance,
       recipients must use reasonable judgment in determining the appropriate sources of information.




                                             Commonwealth of Massachusetts | Recovery Act Update 52

				
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