Animal Covers by maclaren1

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									                                                                                                                    TEACHER PACKET


                                                    Animal Covers
  This learning packet contains information and activities about the class topic. All of the following ideas can be used as either a
  class prep or follow-up.

  Each lesson is designed to correspond with the listed Tennessee State Standards, as well as TCAP Objectives. We hope that you
  will utilize our program to help you in teaching your yearly curriculum.

  Tennessee State Standards: Science 1.1a,b; 1.2a,b; 1.3a; 1.4a; 1.5b,c; 2.4b; 3.5a; Language Arts: Viewing and
  Representing; Speaking and Listening; Math: Number Sense and Number Theory; Spatial Sense and Geometric Concepts;
  Patterns, Functions, and Algebraic Thinking; Social Studies: Civics and Government St. 5; Geography St. 3,4,5; Visual Arts: I,
  II; Health: Environmental and Community Health St. 2; Counseling: Acquiring basic skills and attitudes for learning; Learning
  Effectively.
  TCAP Objectives: Science Obj#21,24; Reading/Language Arts Obj#1,6; Vocabulary Obj#37; Math Obj#10,14,15,16;
  Social Studies Obj#26


Clothing Design
Design new “clothes” for an animal you have seen in the wilds of Tennessee (could be your own backyard). What if the
squirrel were tired of being gray? Could a new look be designed? Does the new look provide the same protection and
meet the same needs as the old?

Camo Clothes
Have students design camouflage clothing for people in the following careers: football player, cowboy, gardener,
swimmer, teacher, lumberjack, computer programmer. Think of some others too!

Solar Sensation
Make two foil mittens, which completely cover your hands. Paint the top of one white and the other black. Hold both
hands under a bright light or go into the sun. Which one warms up first? How can an animal’s coloring affect its body
temperature?

Stuffed Animals
Have children bring in their own stuffed animals. Discuss their color and whether it would help or hinder the animal if it
were really in the wild. Have a parade of animals, and then take turns having show and tell. The students would explain
where the animal lives in the house, what it “eats”, and why it is special to that child. Where in the classroom could this
animal be camouflaged?

Hidden Colors
Scatter colored popcorn (jellybeans, macaroni, seeds, marbles, rocks, and toothpicks work well too) in a section of the
playground. Have the children find as many as possible within a certain time. Graph the results. Which colors were
hardest or easiest to find? Hold a relay race. The team that finds the most of their color is the survivor. Conclude with a
cleanup time to find the rest of the popcorn.

Feather or Fur
Animal coverings come in different colors, patterns, and textures. Ask the students to go outside and “hunt” for animals
in their yards. What kinds of coverings do they have? Where was the animal when it was spotted? Does this give a clue
to what kind of covering it has?
Fingerprint Animals
Discuss how each child has a stripe pattern on their body: fingerprints! Each fingerprint looks the same, but is unique to
each student; just as many animal patterns are the same, but different for every animal (i.e. zebras, cheetahs, giraffes,
tigers). Students can create fingerprint animals. Here are some examples of easy animals to get your students started:
fish, ladybug, butterfly, and bee.
Animal Coverings Big Book
Write a class big book about animal coverings. For example, have a page for green animals, spiky animals, scaled
animals, etc. Get creative with the materials used to decorate each page (i.e. scrap cloth, old brushes, toothpicks, and
straws).

Wacky Snake
For this “wacky snake,” each child will contribute one length of the snake’s body. Design and copy a large S-shape, about
four inches in width. Students cut out and decorate their S-shape using crayons, material scraps, glitter, stickers, or other
craft materials. Link all of the S-shapes together to form one long snake body. Be sure to add a head and a tail to
complete your “wacky snake.”
                                         Animal Covers (K-2)
  The following program is designed to correspond with suggested Tennessee State Standards and TCAP Objectives.
  Please use this resource as you make your trip through the zoo.

  Tennessee State Standards: Science 1.1a,b; 1.2a,b; 1.3a; 1.4a; 1.5b,c; 2.4b; 3.5a; Language Arts: Viewing and
  Representing; Speaking and Listening; Math: Number Sense and Number Theory; Spatial Sense and Geometric Concepts; Social
  Studies: Civics and Government St. 5; Geography St. 3,4,5; Visual Arts: I, II; Health: Environmental and Community Health
  St. 2; Counseling: Acquiring basic skills and attitudes for learning; Learning Effectively.
  TCAP Objectives: Science Obj#21,24; Reading/Language Arts Obj#1,6; Vocabulary Obj#37; Math Obj#14, 16; Social
  Studies Obj#26


As you and your students walk through the zoo, keep your senses alert! The following are questions and information
relating to the adaptations many animals have that allow them to be successful in their environments. Let your students
help you teach. Ask them questions that help them discover the information they want to learn.

Thinking Questions:
   • Look carefully at the animal. What is it covered in? How is its covering useful?
   • What are some observations you can make about the animal(s) in the exhibit? Does it have any unusual
       behaviors?

Please pay special attention to the signs at every exhibit. Answers to most questions can be found there. If you would like
to learn something further, please feel free to ask any zoo volunteer or staff member. And remember, HAVE FUN!

African Penguins
The penguin is a most unique bird. It is covered in feathers that help it to “fly” underwater! Yes, they swim! When their
outer feathers are wet, they form something like a coat so that the inner feathers won’t get wet. This way the penguin
can stay warm and not worry about being waterlogged. What colors do you see? Penguins have light colored bellies and
dark colored backs. This helps them to blend in. Imagine yourself underwater looking up, what color would you see?
White or light colors because of the sun and sky. If you were in the water and were looking down, what color would you
see? Dark colors because there is no light at the bottom of the ocean!

African Crowned Crane
The African Crowned Crane is the most brilliantly colored and ornately plumaged of all the cranes. What colors do you
see? Does it have any patterns or features that are different from other birds? Its feathers serve not only the practical
function of flight, but also for attracting mates. Groups of crowned cranes display their regal crests and plumage by
moving together in what are seemingly choreographed movements, like a dance.

African Lion
Wow, do these mammals have hair, or what!? Look at the different types of hair that can be found on a lion’s body. What
are some of the differences? What purposes do they serve? The hair next to the body is very short and easy to maintain.
The hair around the head of male lions is very long and bushy. This will sometimes scare away predators or other lions.
Also, with hair that big, it’s hard to find a neck. An animal trying to fight a male lion could just get a mouth full of hair!

Chimpanzee
Do these guys look like any other mammals you know? Chimps are the closest relatives to humans! Why are they so
thickly covered with hair? It helps to keep them warm. What colors do you see? Why do you think that they have those
colors? Take a look at their feet! They have thumbs on their feet! Why? So that they can hold on to things with both their
hands and their feet!
White Rhinoceros
Look very closely. Can you see any hair on the white rhino? They actually DO have hair, but not very much of it. They
have very thick skin. This, along with their horns, helps to protect them from predators and other dangers in the wild.
The white rhino is not actually white, but gray. The world “welt,” an African world meaning “wide,” was used to describe
the rhino’s wide mouth. Many who heard this began to call it the “white” rhino!

North American River Otter
The river otter’s fur is made up of two layers of hair. The inner layer is a very soft undercoat that insulates the body. The
outer layer is made of guard hairs that, when wet, seal together to keep the inner layer completely dry! The North
American River Otter has the thickest fur of any animal that lives in North America.

West African Gaboon Viper
Can you find it? The Gaboon Viper is hard to spot because it has very special coloring. Its colors and patterns help it
blend in with the fallen leaves. This helps it to hide from predators AND from prey!

Chinese Alligator
The alligator has rough skin that looks like the bark from a tree. This is so that when it swims slowly at the surface of the
water looking for food, no one can see it. It looks like a log floating in the water!

Snake-Necked Turtle
What’s the difference between the colors on the top and the colors on the bottom of this kind of turtle? The top is dark
green. This is so that any animal looking down on it while it is swimming in the water will have a hard time seeing it…it
blends in with the dark colors for the waters beneath it. Any animal looking up at a swimming snake-necked turtle will
see only light colors. This helps the turtle to blend in with the lights from the sun above. They blend in with their
surroundings from all angles!

Blue-Tongued Skink
The skink has very smooth skin. Even though it is a reptile and has scales, its scales are not as rough as those of other
reptiles. Look closely to see if you can make out the scales. If the skink opens its mouth, you might get to see its blue
tongue. It has a blue tongue to scare away predators!

Andean Condor
What is this bird covered with? That’s right, feathers! Even though this bird looks like it weighs a ton, its feathers and
bones are light and hollow so that it can still fly. Why don’t they have feathers on their heads? Well these guys eat dead
meat, and they don’t use forks and knives! Having baldheads allows any food that is crusted on the head to be baked by
the sun and fall off. Clean as a whistle!

								
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