Children by P-TaylorFrancis

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									Children
Ideas

Author: David Archard
Table of Contents

1. John Locke's Children Part 1 2. The Concept of Childhood 3. The Modern Conception of Childhood Part
2 4. Liberation or Caretaking? 5. Arbitrariness and Incompetence 6. Children's Rights to Vote and Sexual
Choice 7. The Wrongs of Children's Rights Part 3 8. Bearing and Rearing 9. Family and State 10.
Parental Rights to Privacy and Autonomy 11. Collectivism 12. The Problem of Child Abuse Conclusion: A
Modest Collectivist Proposal Notes Bibliographical Essay
Description

Whether children have rights is a debate that in recent years has spilled over into all areas of public life. It
has never been more topical than now as the assumed rights of parents over their children is challenged
on an almost daily basis. David Archard offers the first serious and sustained philosophical examination
of children and their rights.Archard reviews arguments for and against according children rights. He
concludes that every child has at least the right to the best possible upbringing. Denying that parents
have any significant rights over their children, he is able to challenge current thinking about the proper
roles of state and family in rearing children. Crucially, he considers the problem of how to define and
understand 'child abuse'.
Reviews

'An exhaustive and meticulously comprehensive examination of children's rights from both a moral and a
legal perspective...a fine basic text, and a worthwhile introduction to the complex issue of children's
rights.



'This is an intellectually stimulating and sometimes controversial philosophical analysis of children and
their rights of both general and professional interest.



'The argument is clear, it is well reasoned and balanced ... this is a thought-provoking text and as such a
highly recommendable read. Its audience could range from policy-makers to sixth-formers.



'The argument is clear, it is well reasoned and balanced ... this is a thought-provoking text and as such a
highly recommendable read. Its audience could range from policy-makers to sixth-formers.

								
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