Abraham Lincoln and the Union by P-Outrigger

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The history of the North had virtually become, by April, 1861, the history of Lincoln himself, and during the remaining four years of the President's life it is difficult to separate his personality from our view of national history.

Nathaniel W. Stephenson writes with energy and great attention to detail, regarding the way the North operated under Lincoln’s leadership.

This is a must-read for any student of history or those who wish to know our nation’s heritage and legacy.

More Info
									Abraham Lincoln and the Union
US Civil War

Author: Nathaniel W. Stephenson



Age Group: Age 12 to adult
Table of Contents

CHAPTER I -- THE TWO NATIONS OF THE REPUBLIC 2
CHAPTER II. THE PARTY OF POLITICAL EVASION 9
CHAPTER III. THE POLITICIANS AND THE NEW DAY 16
CHAPTER IV. THE CRISIS 22
CHAPTER V. SECESSION 28
CHAPTER VI. WAR 36
CHAPTER VII. LINCOLN 44
CHAPTER VIII. THE RULE OF LINCOLN 49
CHAPTER IX. THE CRUCIAL MATTER 58
CHAPTER X. THE SECRETARY OF THE TREASURY 66
CHAPTER XI. NORTHERN LIFE DURING THE WAR 70
CHAPTER XII. THE MEXICAN EPISODE 77
CHAPTER XIII. THE PLEBISCITE OF 1864 80
CHAPTER XIV. LINCOLN'S FINAL INTENTIONS 86
BIBLIOGRAPHICAL NOTE 89
Description

The history of the North had virtually become, by April, 1861, the history of Lincoln himself, and during the
remaining four years of the President's life it is difficult to separate his personality from our view of
national history.

Nathaniel W. Stephenson writes with energy and great attention to detail, regarding the way the North
operated under Lincoln’s leadership.

This is a must-read for any student of history or those who wish to know our nation’s heritage and legacy.
Excerpt

On the day following the inauguration, commissioners of the newly formed Confederacy appeared at
Washington and applied to the Secretary of State for recognition as envoys of a foreign power. Seward
refused them such recognition. But he entered into private negotiation with them which is nearly, if not
quite, the strangest thing in our history. Virtually, Seward intrigued against Lincoln for control of the
Administration. The events of the next five weeks have an importance out of all proportion to the brevity of
the time. This was Lincoln's period of final probation. The psychological intensity of this episode grew
from the consciousness in every mind that now, irretrievably, destiny was to be determined. War or
peace, happiness or adversity, one nation or two--all these were in the balance. Lincoln entered the
episode a doubtful quantity, not with certainty the master even in his own Cabinet. He emerged
dominating the situation, but committed to the terrible course of war.
Author Bio
Nathaniel W. Stephenson
Stephenson, Nathaniel W. (Nathaniel Wright), 1867-1935

								
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