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Women's Inclusion in the Green Economy

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					Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy
   Ohio Roundtable Final Report

Convened by the United States Department of Labor,
                Women’s Bureau




     In collaboration with Hard Hatted Women




                     September 3, 2009

                  The City Club of Cleveland
                Prepared by Hard Hatted Women
                         Joshua Angelini
                         Vanessa LaValle
                         Richard Schulte
                            Joel Solow

     Roundtable and report project designed and managed by
        Susan Nelson, Principal, Improvement Works LLC

        © 2010 Hard Hatted Women. All Rights Reserved.
                   Executive Summary
At the request of Ms. Nancy Chen, Midwest Regional Administrator of the Women’s Bureau of the
United States Department of Labor (DOL), Hard Hatted Women hosted a Roundtable on Women and the
Green Economy on September 3, 2009 in Cleveland OH. The purpose of the Roundtable was to discuss
women’s participation in green jobs, especially those created by the American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The goal of the Roundtable was to gather valuable information and provide
input to the Secretary of DOL, Ms. Hilda Solis, who has made the inclusion of women in ARRA-created
jobs a national concern.

Since many green jobs are in areas that are non-traditional for women1 the organizers developed
questions that would elicit information, tools and suggestions that would specifically address
encouraging women and girls to enter green careers. The questions form the outline of this report.

Included in this Report are the opening remarks of Ms. Chen, an overview of the current state of green
job development in Ohio (especially as it relates to women) by four expert panelists, and a summary of
remarks by participants in small and large group discussions. Following is a brief summary of the
findings.


What are Ohio's demonstrated best practices in encouraging Women's participation in the Green
Economy?

Ohio's best practices include: excellent workforce development organizations, a strong educational
infrastructure, and a powerful tradition of mentorship.

    1. Workforce Development
       Ohio has a well established workforce development system with a number of organizational
       models and approaches capable of serving a wide range of workers, women, and communities.

    2. Educational Institutions, Networks and Practices
       Colleges and universities were identified as a major asset, as were the community colleges,
       which were described as being particularly flexible in their ability to identify opportunities and
       connect students with opportunities and employers.

    3. STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) Education
       STEM education was widely praised, especially the MC2STEM (Metropolitan Cleveland
       Consortium for STEM) Hub, a public-private partnership between the Cleveland Metropolitan
       School District , other school districts, colleges and universities, and business and industry
       partners. The Choose Ohio First Scholarship Program, which supports the retention of Ohio
       college graduates in Ohio, was also cited.

    4. Apprenticeships and Earn While You Learn




          1        Defined as women constituting less than 25% of the workforce in that job category
        Apprenticeships and earn while you learn arrangements were mentioned by many Roundtable
        participants as viable alternatives to post-secondary college and university education, giving
        women with fewer resources the opportunity to advance economically.

    5. Mentorship and Women in Leadership Roles
       One of the most widely cited best practices was mentorship. Mentoring was described by some
       participants as “the key metric” in determining successful retention of women in nontraditional
       occupations.

        Early mentorship was described as particularly effective, along with internships. Further,
        visibility of women mentors and leaders in the media was described as a positive influence in
        other fields that have achieved greater gender equity such as law and biological science.


What obstacles do we have and how might we work with them?

Definition of Green Jobs
The most commonly identified obstacle was the lack of a clear, definitive definition of the term “green
job”. As one participant said, “Most green jobs haven’t been defined yet”. The obstacles include defining
not only the term “green”, but also the job descriptions for the actual occupations included therein.

Attitudes and Stereotypes
Other obstacles commonly mentioned in the table discussions include the attitudes of employers,
coworkers and job-seekers. The attitudes of employers and coworkers emerged as participants
discussed potential causes for women’s poor representation in male-dominated fields, sometimes
referred to as “traditional values.” Many of the participants mentioned a lack of confidence on the part
of many job seeking women. Others pointed out that it is in middle school that girls’ math and science
scores begin to drop, due to “issues of popularity and cuteness,” and that girls are often “afraid of the
nontraditional roles”. Additionally, one participant mentioned a lack of confidence even among women
who are farther along in their careers.

Lack of Interest
One final theme that prevailed among table discussions was the lack of interest in nontraditional
occupations among women or the lack of encouragement for women to participate in such fields. It
seems that women are often “not knowledgeable about opportunities” available to them. This lack of
awareness seems to be yet another obstacle standing in the way of women who seek highly skilled,
high-wage work in the green economy.


What opportunities do we have and how might we work with them?

Roundtable participants’ responses were often similar to those mentioned as best practices. Many
responses made it clear that a particular program, model, organization, or policy had been effective in
one circumstance and ought to be scaled larger or expanded in order to increase interest and awareness
of opportunities among underserved populations. Organizational partnerships and networking were
identified as a key strategy, as was STEM education. Other responses spoke to the feeling that due to a
number of economic and political factors, now is the time for Ohio to approach women's workforce
development in a new way, especially in terms of the prospects for a new green economy.
Manufacturing Infrastructure
Ohio and the greater Midwest’s assets are perceived to lie in manufacturing and an abandonment of
those material and human assets would be wasteful. Manufacturing is what we do well but even more
than that, it represents part of our heritage and tradition, with a number of Roundtable participants
sharing that manufacturing has been in their family for generations.

Collaboration and Expansion of Existing Infrastructure To Increase Awareness and Interest in Green Jobs
There are a number of partnerships and agendas that tie into the wider goal of making green jobs more
accessible and desirable to women: partnerships between state departments and minority firms; the
ability of schools to help connect girls to colleges and the university system, businesses, and career
pathways; working with The Cleveland Foundation in order to incubate startup worker cooperatives
and other businesses; Hard Hatted Women, the Cleveland Metropolitan School District, and YWCA of
Cleveland to bring back Rosie's Girls2 and partnerships between existing employment organizations,
community action agencies, and women-focused professional clubs and organizations.

Another opportunity is to use research and databases to assess local needs and opportunities for
women seeking employment. An Ohio Board of Regents database of green jobs openings and training
was specifically cited.

A number of other strategies were put forward in order to increase awareness: use the strategies
around green jobs and any other nontraditional occupation, move away from 'traditional thinking'
regarding recruitment to faith-based approaches, outreach to the formerly incarcerated, and the
Veterans Administration system. Targeted outreach dependent on geography, niches, and opportunities
toward women was also mentioned.

Expanding Education
There were three educational practices that Roundtable participants thought showed promise for
expansion: STEM education, mentorship, and engagement with parents. Parents influence students'
choices and career outlook, and reaching out to them as well as students could give girls a more
supportive environment in which to consider green jobs, nontraditional occupations, and other choices.

Policy and Public Funds
A final set of opportunities acknowledged by Roundtable participants was the presence of supportive
public policy and public funds - specifically those coming from the American Recovery and Reinvestment
Act (ARRA).

Some emphasized that ARRA funds represent an opportunity for business development and inclusion of
women and minorities. In addition to the actual jobs created from programs like the Weatherization
Assistance Program (WAP), there are also training dollars available for underserved workers. Overall,
ARRA funds were the major public supports recognized by the Roundtable, though some attention was
also paid to the workforce development system and the City of Cleveland's strategy.


How can we continue to promote Women's participation in the Green Economy and improve our
efforts?




                                                                                          th
            2       Rosie’s Girls is a 3 week trades exploration camp for girls entering 6-8 grades.
A plurality (45%) of Roundtable participants' responses expressed an orientation towards the future:
where we need to go as a state and how the government (specifically the DOL) could serve as a helpful
partner and supporter.

The need to generate interest and increase awareness among women and girls regarding career
opportunities and pathways was the most frequently expressed need, with partnerships, mentorship,
and supportive policy also getting frequent mention. Some of the comments below were made during
the course of the individual Roundtable discussions, while others were brought up during the reports of
table discussions and full group discussions at the end of the event.

Generating Interest and Awareness
The need to increase interest and awareness of green jobs and nontraditional occupations was one of
the only topics touched on in some way by all six discussion tables. A number of responses concerned
the need to define and publicize green jobs so that job-seekers know where the opportunities are and
understand how green jobs can meet their employment desires and needs. Others suggested that we
need to work on changing mind sets so that job-seekers take a longer-term view with regard to their
employment, trying to build careers with security rather than simply temporary jobs. We also need to
overcome biases toward apprenticeship programs and the trades in general. Others spoke specifically of
the need to reframe the trades as an equally valuable equivalent to a college or university education.
Finally, we need to demonstrate the pathways and benefits of green jobs and nontraditional
occupations to entice job-seekers to undertake the training and make the commitment to quality
employment, and keep them motivated.

Fostering Constructive Partnerships and Collaborations
Before the large group discussion, partnerships were addressed in some way by all six small discussion
tables. One of the major groups that participants claim need to partner more is workforce development
agencies and organizations. Other networks to better link trainees and job-seekers with employment
were also suggested.

Mentorships and Women Leaders
Encouraging mentorships, women leaders and role models was a strong theme. One participant
suggested the appointment of a “female czar”, similar to Andrew Watterson, City of Cleveland Chief of
Sustainability. Women in faculty positions and other visible academic and business roles were suggested
as well.

The need to take on stronger marketing and popular culture engagement, especially on TV, was also
expressed by some participants and intrigued many of those present.

Policy and Public Support
Though most participant responses dealt with general needs and suggestions for the workforce
development community, there were a number of more concrete prescriptions directed to the
Department of Labor. Some dealt with a need for greater communication with and responsiveness from
the DOL.

Others spoke instead to the need for more funding, and more narrowly focused and directed funding for
women, grant writing assistance and support for small businesses’ efforts to recruit women. There was
also an expressed need for stronger social service support (both financial and childcare) for women
trying to undergo training and apprenticeships.
Finally, some expressed the fact that the job market and opportunities available need to improve,
making the investment in training or education pay off.




                           “One of the things that I learned is that a JOB
                           is Just Over Broke. So the job-seekers need to
                           understand that the opportunities available –
                           to go from a bottom rung up to some of the
                           more advanced opportunities in that field –
                           are going to be great.” –John Hughes,
                           Statewide Apprenticeship Coordinator
                    Table of Contents
I.         Introduction pg. 8
II.        About this Report pg. 9
III.       Tables pg. 10
IV.        Report: What Happened at the Roundtable pg. 13
           a. Panel of Experts Presentations
           b. Roundtable Discussions
                  i.     Best Practices in Ohio pg. 16
                  ii.    Obstacles pg. 17
                  iii.   Opportunities pg. 19
                  iv.    Ideas, Suggestions and Recommendations pg. 21
V.         Appendices pg. 28
           a. Appendix i: Methods pg. 28
           b. Appendix ii: Outline for Comments, Current Status of
              Women and Work pg. 29
           c. Appendix iii: Letter from Environmental Engineer to Nancy
              Chen pg. 31
           d. Appendix iv: Hard Hatted Women Programmatic
              Information pg. 33




       7   Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio Roundtable Report
                               Introduction
At the request of Ms. Nancy Chen, Midwest Regional Administrator of the Women’s Bureau of the
United States Department of Labor (DOL), Hard Hatted Women hosted a Roundtable on Women and the
Green Economy on September 3, 2009 in Cleveland OH. The purpose of the Roundtable was to discuss
women's participation in green jobs, especially those created by the American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act (ARRA). The goal of the Roundtable was to gather valuable information and provide
input to the Secretary of DOL, Ms. Hilda Solis, who has made the inclusion of women in ARRA-created
jobs a national concern.

On Earth Day 2009, Hilda Solis, Secretary of DOL, along with White House Council on Environmental
Quality Chair Nancy Sutley, hosted a Roundtable with 35 representatives of labor, large and small
businesses, academia, advocacy groups and other green economy experts to “shine a light on the
important role that women will play in our green economy.”3 Many issues and opportunities were raised
at that first Roundtable4 that spoke to conditions throughout the whole country. The Women’s Bureau,
through their regional offices, is holding similar Roundtables.

Ohio’s is one of seven state-wide Roundtables being held in Region V, the Midwest. Invited participants
were carefully selected to ensure representation of diverse sectors, industries, and regions of Ohio. Each
attendee has expertise and/or experience with education and training, hiring, job placement, career
advising, economics research, public policy, science, engineering or the sustainability movement.

Since many green jobs are in areas that are non-traditional for women (less than 25% participation), the
organizers developed questions that would elicit information, tools and requests that would address
specifically encouraging women and girls to enter green careers. These questions form the outline of
this report:

    1. WHAT ARE OHIO'S DEMONSTRATED BEST PRACTICES IN ENCOURAGING WOMEN'S
       PARTICIPATION IN THE GREEN ECONOMY?
    2. WHAT OBSTACLES OR OPPORTUNITIES DO WE HAVE AND HOW MIGHT WE WORK WITH THEM?
    3. HOW CAN OHIO BE A MODEL OF INCLUSION OF WOMEN IN THE GREEN ECONOMY?
    4. WHAT CAN THE STATE, THE WOMEN’S BUREAU, AND THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR DO TO HELP
       WOMEN PARTICIPATE IN GREEN JOBS AND TRAINING?




            3 http://tinyurl.com/Earth-Day-Women-and-Green-Jobs article from Reuters
                 4 http://tinyurl.com/Green-For-All-Report report from one attendee


       8    Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio Roundtable Report
                     About This Report
This paper reports the information collected from the Ohio Roundtable, roughly in the order of the
Agenda. Here you will find the opening remarks of Ms. Nancy Chen, Midwest Regional Administrator of
the Women’s Bureau, an overview of the current state of green job development (especially for women)
in Ohio, and a summary of remarks by participants in small and large groups. Ms. Chen is convening
similar Roundtables in the remaining Midwest states and will report the findings to Secretary of the
Department of Labor, Hilda Solis.




                       Genevieve Tuchow, John Ryan, Anne Hill, Terri Sandu, Nancy Chen

The writers have endeavored to report, rather than interpret, the data. Tables summarizing the major
themes may provide a helpful context in which to understand the information presented. Readers will
also find helpful information in the Appendix on Methods, qualifying the information contained here.
For those wishing to act on the findings of the Roundtable, Hard Hatted Women’s website,
www.hardhattedwomen.org, contains tools and resources to get you started.

Hard Hatted Women, as the host of the Midwest Roundtable, welcomes your feedback and additional
information or resources. Please send any correspondence to Terri Burgess Sandu, Executive Director,
at tsandu@hardhattedwomen.org.




                              Panelists: Terri Sandu, Paolo DeMaria, Julie Graber, Genevieve
                                                  Tuchow and Nancy Chen


       9   Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio Roundtable Report
                                         Tables
The following tables are snapshots of the relative frequency with which themes were mentioned. The
first two tables show in descending order the primary themes mentioned throughout the Roundtable.

 Top 10 Overall Themes
 1    Ideas, suggestions and recommendations regarding access to information and opportunities
 2    Ideas, suggestions and recommendations regarding marketing
 3    Obstacles with access to information and opportunities
 4    Ideas, suggestions and recommendations for youth education
 5    Ideas, suggestions and recommendations for higher education
 6    Ideas, suggestions and recommendations for mentorship and role models
 7    Obstacles involving age and generational issues
 8    Opportunities for youth education
 9    Ideas, suggestions and recommendations regarding age and generational issues
 10   Opportunities regarding access to information and opportunities




 Top 15 Overall Subthemes (Top 13% of Subthemes by Frequency)
 1    Ideas, suggestions and recommendations regarding encouraging and increasing interest
 2    Ideas, suggestions and recommendations for defining career pathways
 3    Ideas, suggestions and recommendations for building networks and partnerships
 4    Obstacles related to the lack of a comprehensive definition of green jobs
 5    Ideas, suggestions and recommendations regarding the presence of women in leadership roles
 6    Obstacles related to employer and coworker attitudes
 7    Ideas, suggestions and recommendations related to government incentives and guidance
 8    Obstacles related to the attitudes of job seekers
 9    Ideas, suggestions and recommendations regarding rebranding and reframing
 10   Best practices among specific existing Ohio institutions and programs
 11   Obstacles to encouraging and increasing interest
 12   Ideas, suggestions and recommendations regarding access and opportunities in skills transfer
 13   Ideas, suggestions and recommendations for mentorship
 14   Opportunities in encouraging and increasing interest
 15   Ideas, suggestions, and recommendations regarding job-seeker attitudes




      10   Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio Roundtable Report
The themes of topics that arose at each table varied by the sectors represented or just by which
comments emerged first. Here the reader can see the distribution of topics by discussion.

 Top 5 Themes By Table
 Table 1
 1    Ideas, suggestions and recommendations for access to information and opportunities
 2    Ideas, suggestions and recommendations for higher education
 3    Obstacles to accessing information and opportunities
 4    Obstacles in Higher Education
 5    Obstacles in Age and Generational Issues
 Table 2
 1    Ideas, suggestions and recommendations for mentorship and role models
 2    Best practices for youth education
 3    Opportunities for marketing and outreach
 4    Opportunities in youth education
 5    Best practices for mentorship and role models
 Table 3
 1    Ideas, suggestions and recommendations for access to information and opportunities
 2    Obstacles to accessing information and opportunities
 3    Ideas, suggestions and recommendations for higher education
 4    Opportunities for higher education
 5    Ideas, suggestions and recommendations for personal finance and support
 Table 4
 1    Ideas, suggestions and recommendations for access to information and opportunities
 2    Ideas, suggestions and recommendations regarding marketing
 3    Opportunities in youth education
 4    Ideas, suggestions and recommendations for youth education
 5    Ideas, suggestions and recommendations regarding age and generational issues
 Table 5
 1    Obstacles in Age and Generational Issues
 2    Ideas, suggestions and recommendations regarding marketing
 3    Opportunities in youth education
 4    Best practices for mentorship and role models
 5    Best practices for youth education
 Table 6
 1    Ideas, suggestions and recommendations for access to information and opportunities
 2    Ideas, suggestions and recommendations regarding marketing
 3    Ideas, suggestions and recommendations for youth education
 4    Obstacles to accessing information and opportunities
 5    Ideas, suggestions and recommendations for personal finance and support




      11    Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio Roundtable Report
The report writers deliberately coded the data with as value-free a system as possible. To understand
what types of information are included within the major themes, these tables list the sub-themes most
frequently mentioned.

 Top 5 Sub-Themes Within Question Categories
 Best Practices
 1   Existing institutions and programs
 2   STEM skills
 3   Mentorship
 4   Women in leadership roles
 5   Earn while you learn
 Obstacles
 1   Defining ‘Green Jobs’
 2   Employer and Coworker attitudes
 3   Job-seeker attitudes
 4   Encouraging and increasing interest
 5   Defining career pathways
 Opportunities
 1   Encouraging and increasing interest
 2   Partnerships and networks
 3   STEM skills
 4   Opportunities for higher education
 5   University system
 Ideas, Suggestions and Recommendations
 1   Encouraging and increasing interest
 2   Defining career pathways
 3   Partnerships and networks
 4   Women in leadership roles
 5   Government incentives and guidance




                                  “Sustainability and the green economy
                                     and the green workforce is about
                                  management and leadership and even
                                creating new careers that we may not be
                                 aware of. Technology of course is going
                                    to be a huge part of our future, but
                                there's also this people side that needs to
                                           be informed as well.”




     12    Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio Roundtable Report
         Precis of Panel Comments
                                               Setting the Stage: Opening Presentations

                               Nancy Chen, Midwest Regional Administrator of the Women’s Bureau,
                               Opening Comments

                                Ms. Chen spoke of the importance of women’s inclusion in the green
                                economy – on both regional and national scales. She noted that getting
                                women into green career pathways is directly aligned with the mission of
                                the Women’s Bureau – by securing high-wage, highly-skilled employment
                                for women, Ohio and the rest of the country can help to improve working
                                conditions and employment opportunities for women. Ms. Chen
                                explained that the recent “good news” for women – that the gender
                                employment gap has been closing during the recession – isn’t necessarily
                                as positive as it seems, since most women (~80%) are still clustered in the
lowest-paying occupations. She explained that rather than resting on their laurels over this small victory,
women’s advocates must push for the recruitment and training of women in green career pathways, so
that they may obtain the high wage jobs with benefits that they deserve. Ms. Chen concluded her
remarks by citing a letter written to her by an Ohioan who was unable to attend the Ohio Roundtable;
Gwendolyn McDay, an environmental engineer, presented her belief that green jobs are best matched
to those who are motivated by societal benefits – and that women typically fit this description (see
Appendix for full letter).

                                          The Panel of Experts

Four panelists gave the attendees an overview of Ohio’s current state of inclusion of women and girls in
green jobs and the education and training to qualify for them. The panelists are accomplished experts in
                       their fields yet limited their remarks to maintain the focus on the Roundtable
                       discussions. Their topics covered the economic impact of education and well-
                       paying jobs on women, the State’s programs for education, training and green
                       job creation, an employer’s perspective on recruitment and retention of women,
                       especially in non-traditional jobs and awareness of resources and tools that
                       already exists to encourage women to pursue non-traditional careers.

                       Julie Graber, Senior Associate for Strategic Planning at OSU. The Ohio State
                       University’s Institute on Women, Gender and Policy

                          Julie Graber, representing The Ohio State University's Institute on Women,
Gender, and Policy; provided much of the framework for the Roundtable by describing some of the
Institute's findings, a compilation of research and data on the lives of women and girls in Ohio and

      13    Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio Roundtable Report
worldwide. First she addressed some of the gendered consequences of the current economic downturn.
As many commentators deal with the 'he-cession' and as women approach 50% of the workforce, Ms.
Graber reminded participants of the particular stresses still felt by women in Ohio. Female-headed
households suffer from higher-than-average rates of unemployment and poverty; women make up a
smaller proportion of management than men and have a greater wage gap than the rest of the nation as
a whole. She also pointed out the key role education plays in women’s economic status: it takes 4 years
                       of college (or the equivalent in training) for women’s median income to exceed
                       men's median income with a high school diploma. African American and
                       Appalachian women were cited as particularly underserved – with college
                       graduation rates well below the Ohio average (which is already well below that of
                       the United States as a whole). Ms. Graber concluded by stressing the opportunity
                       we have to improve our economic situation by investing strongly in women’s work
                       and education, as proved by gains internationally with similar investments.

                      Paolo DeMaria, Executive Vice Chancellor, Ohio Board of Regents

                      Representing the Ohio Board of Regents, Mr. DeMaria discussed the role the
                      University System of Ohio plays – and aspires to play – in driving the emergence
of the green economy and in preparing subsequent generations of the green workforce. He explained
that the work of the Board of Regents remains anchored in the State’s strategic plan, adhering to its
primary goal of improving educational attainment across the board. In order to accomplish this goal,
three umbrella strategies have been established: to graduate more students; to keep graduates in Ohio;
and to make Ohio an attractive destination for graduates from elsewhere. In addition to training the
State’s emergent workforce, Mr. DeMaria explained, Ohio’s institutions of higher learning play an
                        important role in research and economic development – essential factors in
                        Ohio’s imminent economic recovery and growth. The Board of Regents is eager
                        to participate as a partner in green initiatives.

                        Genevieve Tuchow, Vice President of Human Resources, American Electric
                        Power (AEP)

                         As a representative of AEP and its workforce of 22,000, MS. Tuchow conveyed
                         the perspective of a large-scale employer in the utilities industry. She spoke
                         optimistically of the potential opportunities for women in the near future,
                         especially in relation to an impending “reset” in the workforce – when nearly
                         25% of current utility workers who are eligible to retire may do so. Ms. Tuchow
                         emphasized the value of diversity in an organization’s workforce and the
                         importance of introducing young girls to a wide range of careers early in life.
                       She also stressed the positive consequences of media exposure for green jobs, as
                       this publicity informs potential workers about the range of opportunities
                       available to them.

                       Terri Burgess Sandu, Executive Director, Hard Hatted Women

                       Ms. Sandu discussed the exciting potential for large-scale advancement for
                       women in the current political and social climate. Building on national best

      14    Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio Roundtable Report
practices honed over the last thirty years, organizations like Hard Hatted Women, Wider Opportunities
for Women and Tradeswomen Now and Tomorrow are in a position to use all of the existing resources
and expertise to help make the category “nontraditional occupations” a thing of the past for women.
Ms. Sandu praised recent developments in this arena, lauding industry-led efforts that have come to the
front as of late. She pointed out that businesses across all sectors are now recognizing the importance of
diversity and read a quotation with the culminating message: “Diversity is Strategy.” Having a diverse
work team, with its notably more efficient problem-solving skills, is finally being identified as a
competitive advantage in the workplace. Hard Hatted Women, under the direction of Ms. Sandu,
developed a Toolkit for the recruitment and retention of women that is available on their website:
http://tinyurl.com/ykgvhg3.


                                        Roundtable Discussions

Three questions were taken up in small group discussions. The questions were:

    1. WHAT ARE OHIO'S DEMONSTRATED BEST PRACTICES IN ENCOURAGING WOMEN'S
       PARTICIPATION IN THE GREEN ECONOMY?
    2. WHAT OBSTACLES OR OPPORTUNITIES DO WE HAVE AND HOW MIGHT WE WORK WITH THEM?
    3. REFLECTING ON THE BRIEF REPORT OUTS, WHAT REACTIONS, QUESTIONS DO YOU HAVE?
       WHAT NEW IDEAS OR INSIGHTS DOES THIS TABLE GROUP HAVE NOW?

Additional questions were asked of the group as a whole.

    1. HOW CAN OHIO BE A MODEL OF INCLUSION OF WOMEN IN THE GREEN ECONOMY?
    2. WHAT CAN THE STATE, THE WOMEN’S BUREAU, AND THE DEPARTMENT OF LABOR DO TO HELP
       WOMEN PARTICIPATE IN GREEN JOBS AND TRAINING?

The conversations were robust and yielded good ideas. Since participant responses frequently did not
conform to the parameters set by questions as they were asked above, the summary has been
organized into question sections that more accurately reflect participant responses:

    1. WHAT ARE OHIO'S EXISTING BEST PRACTICES?
    2. WHAT ARE THE OBSTACLES PREVENTING WOMEN FROM ACHIEVING GREATER
       REPRESENTATION IN GREEN CAREERS?
    3. WHAT ARE THE OPPORTUNITIES THAT OHIO
       HAS NOT YET FULLY EXPLOITED AND COULD
       TAKE ADVANTAGE OF?                       “If we can lead in terms of doing our work
    4. WHAT ARE THE SUGGESTIONS AND              with data and actually have the data we
       RECOMMENDATIONS FOR NANCY CHEN,           need to stimulate these discussions and
       HILDA SOLIS, AND THE DEPARTMENT OF       facilitate action and ground us in the facts
       LABOR? WHAT SUPPORT DO WE NEED TO           of what is growing and where are the
       ENCOURAGE WOMEN’S PARTICIPATION IN        opportunities and what the occupations
       THE GREEN ECONOMY?                        are, I think that would be a huge win for
                                                                          the State”
Below is a summary of how participants responded.

      15    Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio Roundtable Report
Best Practices: Where Is Ohio Already Succeeding?
Joel Solow

While Roundtable participants were less prone to open up about Ohio's best practices in introducing
green jobs and nontraditional occupations to women (of the four questions, the best practices theme
made up 15% of responses), there are still a number of conclusions that can be drawn regarding Ohio's
assets. Ohio lays claim to a number of excellent workforce development organizations (1), has a strong
educational infrastructure (2), and has demonstrated the power and potential of STEM (Science,
Technology, Engineering, and Math) education (3), apprenticeships and earn while you learn
arrangements (4), and mentorship and women in leadership roles (5).

1. Workforce Development Organizations

Most responses focused on specific organizations with which Roundtable participants were familiar.
YouthBuild (http://www.youthbuild.org), a national program with 15 locations in Ohio was identified as a
model for trades training and low-income youth empowerment. Two Greater Cleveland organizations,
Towards Employment (http://www.towardsemployment.org), which works on training and case
management for hard-to-place individuals; and Employment Connection
(http://workforce.cuyahogacounty.us/en-US/employment-connection.aspx), geared more towards
qualified and displaced workers in need of retraining, were singled out as local model initiatives. Hard
Hatted Women's Toolkit for the Recruitment and Retention of Women
(http://www.hardhattedwomen.org/publications.asp) also serves as an effective model for promoting
women's workforce development, and includes resources and information on community colleges, joint
vocational schools, WIA Area boards, apprenticeship and pre-apprenticeship programs, and numerous
other training and support services.

2. Educational Institutions, Networks and Practices

        “One of the things I do is work with the students to ensure that there's an awareness through
        emails, through local meetings like this, through mentoring with different organizations and
        bringing those careers into the schools. Because once our students see that the opportunity is
        right there at their fingertips, then they actually start to study it. If they see it just on TV or in the
        newspaper, they shy away from it because the reality isn't there.”


Cleveland State University was identified as a major asset, as were the community colleges, which were
described as being particularly flexible in their ability to identify opportunities and connect students with
opportunities and employers.

The Cleveland Metropolitan School District (CMSD) was also mentioned favorably by a number of
Roundtable participants. Even with the stresses on the urban district, one thing the CMSD has managed
to do well has been to get students involved in career exploration programs that introduce them to the
legal profession, construction, engineering, and others.

3. STEM Education

      16    Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio Roundtable Report
In a similar vein, STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics) education was widely
praised. The MC2STEM (Metropolitan Cleveland Consortium for STEM) Hub
(http://www.mc2stemhub.org/home.aspx), a public-private partnership between the CMSD, other
school districts, colleges and universities, and business and industry partners was singled out as a
valuable model for developing students' problem-solving and critical thinking skills, while incorporating
sustainability principles into its curriculum. Another program promoting STEM education is the Choose
Ohio First Scholarship Program (http://uso.edu/opportunities/partnership/chooseohio1st/index.php),
which also supports the retention of Ohio college graduates.

4. Apprenticeships and Earn While You Learn

While the strengths of Ohio's education system were widely praised, apprenticeship programs leading to
employment in the skilled trades and nontraditional occupations (which form the basis for many
emerging green jobs) were cited by many Roundtable participants as a viable alternative to a four-year
and graduate educational path. Some strengths of apprenticeship programs are low cost to participants,
clear career pathways, helpful bridge packages, ATS (Advanced Technology Services) degree credit for
journeypeople, and most significantly, earn while you learn arrangements, which allow women to
support themselves and their families financially as they work towards even more gainful employment.


5. Mentorship and Women in Leadership Roles

        “What's important to keeping them in those jobs and to making them successful, the key metric
        is mentorship. The mentoring conversation needs to deal with very specific situations that
        women will find themselves in today where they are alone in their careers and having to deal
        with the dynamics of the mixture of the male/female world”


One of the most widely cited best practices (rather than specific programs, organizations, or institutions)
was mentorship. Mentoring was described by some participants as “essential” and “the key metric” in
determining successful retention of women in nontraditional occupations.

Early mentorship was described as particularly effective, along with internships. The importance of
having female role models as leaders and faculty members was also emphasized by a number of
participants. One specific program cited was the Society of Women Engineers and Cleveland Engineering
Society road show (http://www.cesnet.org/roadshow.asp), which visits local middle and high schools to
introduce women to the fields of engineering.

Finally, women mentor and leader visibility in media was described as a positive influence in other fields
that have achieved greater gender equity such as law and biological science.

Obstacles: What Obstacles Do We Encounter in Encouraging Women’s Participation in the Green
Economy?
Josh Angelini


      17    Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio Roundtable Report
The identified obstacles span a wide range of topics, from the lack of consensus on a definition of the
term “green” to the persistence of traditional values and stereotypes and its effect on women’s ability
to advance confidently in nontraditional fields. Mention of obstacles was often accompanied or followed
by related ideas or suggestions for improvement but for purposes of continuity and a reporting structure
parallel to that of the questions being answered, identified opportunities and participants’ ideas and
suggestions will be discussed in subsequent sections.

Defining Green Jobs and Pathways

The most commonly identified obstacle was the lack of a comprehensive definition of the relatively
novel term “green job”. This issue was discussed by eleven individuals and raised independently in four
of the six table discussions. Several participants discussed the novelty of this branding, with one
suggesting that we are “still trying to wrap our heads around green jobs”, and another expressing a need
to “make the definition of “green job”’ less nebulous”. As one participant said, “Most green jobs haven’t
been defined yet” – the obstacles include defining not only the term “green”, but also the job
descriptions for the actual occupations included therein.

This need for definition is evidenced by the fact that another of the most frequently mentioned
obstacles was the need to define career pathways in the green sector. This topic was mentioned by
seven individuals. One declared the need for “communication of what a career pathway looks like” in
the green sector, and another expressed the need for the “opportunity for advancement” in such fields
of work.

Employer, Coworker, and Job-seeker Attitudes

Other obstacles commonly mentioned in the table discussions include the attitudes of employers/
coworkers, and job-seekers (by eleven and ten individuals, respectively). The first obstacle, the attitudes
of employers and coworkers, emerged as participants discussed potential causes for women’s poor
representation in male-dominated fields. One common observation was the persistence of so-called
“traditional values” or biases held by employers. Participants cited a “lack of inclusive work
environments” and an “old boys’ network,” among others, as obstacles standing between women and
employment. As one participant said, it can be “very difficult with skilled workers -- women are not
wanted, so they are set up for failure;” another suggested that training should include “specific
situations that women will find themselves in today where they are alone in their careers and having to
deal with the dynamics of the mixture of the male/female world.”

An attitude of job-seeking women, lack of confidence, was a frequent topic of conversation. As one
participant said, some women have the idea that they’re “not talented enough, not clever enough” to
attain the level of education or training required for many nontraditional jobs. Another pointed out that
it is in middle school that girls’ math and science scores begin to drop, due to “issues of popularity,
cuteness,” and that girls are often “afraid of the nontraditional roles.” Additionally, one participant
mentioned a lack of confidence even among women who are farther along in their careers; he or she
has noticed that often “men seek out opportunities for board appointments where women hold back”.
Thus it seems a lack of confidence may apply not only to job-seekers, but also to women who are well
established in their positions and deserve recognition or advancement.


      18    Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio Roundtable Report
Increasing and Encouraging Interest

One final theme that prevailed among table discussions was the lack of interest in nontraditional
occupations among women, or the lack of encouragement for women to participate in such fields. This
lack of interest or encouragement was identified as an obstacle by nine different people and emerged in
discussions at all but one of the six tables. As one person noted, it can be “extremely difficult to get girls
or women to fill out an application; basic interest is difficult;” another pointed out that “attracting
women to the jobs is part of the problem.” One other part of the problem is that women are often “not
knowledgeable about opportunities” available to them. This lack of awareness seems to be yet another
obstacle standing in the way of women who seek highly skilled, high-wage work in the green economy.


Opportunities: How Can We Lead the Nation? Where Are Our Best Practices Underutilized? Where Is
There Room For Expansion?

Joel Solow

Roundtable participants' responses dealing with opportunities were often similar to those regarding
best practices. Many responses made it clear that a particular program, model, organization, or policy
had been effective in one circumstance and ought to be scaled larger or expanded in order to increase
interest and awareness of opportunities among underserved populations. Organizational partnerships
and networking were identified as a key strategy, as was STEM education. Other responses spoke to the
feeling that due to a number of economic and political factors, now is the time for Ohio to approach
women's workforce development in a new way, especially in terms of the prospects for a new green
economy.

Manufacturing: Our Past and a Way Forward

        “We can lead by framing the discussion in terms of our traditional assets, such as manufacturing
        in Ohio.We need to transition from what we have into what we hope to have. It cannot be
        sustainable to throw away all the years of experience and all the tools we've had in the past and
        try to jump into something unknown ... 'cause we know manufacturing better than anyone else.
        We know it’s about the workers and the employers working together.”

One opportunity described by Roundtable participants focused on Ohio's existing manufacturing
infrastructure. As the above quote suggests, Ohio and the greater Midwest's assets are perceived to lie
in manufacturing, and an abandonment of those material and human assets would be wasteful.
Manufacturing is what we do well, but even more than that it represents part of our heritage and
tradition, with a number of Roundtable participants sharing that manufacturing has been in their family
for generations:

        “We also need to learn from the people that have worked in the traditional jobs ... My mother is
        a manufacturer in Toledo. It is her hard work and the work of my grandfather - them working on
        the assembly lines and steel mills - that I see as transitioning us into this new economy. So I think
        we need to use that legacy to forge a path to the future and that's how we keep working
        together.”

      19     Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio Roundtable Report
Using Collaboration and the Expansion of Existing Infrastructure to Increase Awareness and Interest in
Green Jobs

There are a number of partnerships and agendas that tie into the wider goal of making green jobs more
accessible and desirable to women. One participant described partnerships between state departments
and minority firms. Others spoke to the ability of schools to help connect girls to the university system,
businesses, and career pathways. Some specific partnerships described included working with The
Cleveland Foundation in order to incubate startup worker cooperatives and other businesses;
partnerships between Oberlin College and local schools; partnerships between Hard Hatted Women, the
CMSD, and the YWCA to bring back Rosie's Girls; and partnerships between existing employment
organizations, community action agencies, and women-focused professional clubs and organizations.

        “If we can lead in terms of doing our work with data and actually have the data we need to
        stimulate these discussions and facilitate action and ground us in the facts of what is growing
        and where are the opportunities and what the occupations are, I think that would be a huge win
        for the State.”

Another opportunity was to use research and databases to assess local needs and opportunities for
women seeking employment. An Ohio Board of Regents database of green jobs openings and training
was specifically cited. One participant described the need to use statistics on women's advancement for
advocacy and awareness building.

A number of other strategies were put forward in order to increase awareness and reach out to the
communities and individuals who could benefit from green jobs. To one participant, there was little
difference between strategies around green jobs and any other nontraditional occupation. One
described a number of means of outreach, suggesting that we need to move away from “'traditional
thinking” regarding recruitment: a faith-based approach, outreach to the formerly incarcerated, and the
VA system. Targeted outreach dependent upon geography, niches, and opportunities toward women
was also mentioned. Finally, partnerships with the education system were also brought up a number of
times.

Expanding Education

In addition to expanded partnerships, there were three educational practices that Roundtable
participants thought showed promise for expansion: STEM education, mentorship, and engagement
with parents.

Participants highlighted an upcoming women's summit in March that will heavily emphasize STEM
education and leadership as well as the need for a “STEM corps,” more research on women and STEM
education and the need to “make math and science in school real.” They also re-emphasized the need
for mentorship programs and women role models, which have the opportunity to fundamentally change
mindsets about nontraditional versus traditional occupations. Finally, Roundtable participants made it
clear that outreach to parents could also be helpful in making STEM fields more accessible to girls.
Parents influence students' choices and career outlook, and reaching out to them as well as students


      20    Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio Roundtable Report
could give girls a more supportive environment in which to consider green jobs, nontraditional
occupations, and other choices.


                                                       “My mother is a manufacturer in Toledo. It is her hard
                                                       work and the work of my grandfather…working on the
                                                      assembly lines, and steel mills, that I see as transitioning
                                                      us into this new economy. So I think we need to use that
                                                       legacy to forge a path to the future and that’s how we
                                                       keep working together. Partnerships like this are really
                                                           what's going to bring us together and push this
                                                       economy…” –Shanelle Smith, State Coordinator of the
                                                                         Ohio Apollo Alliance



Policy and Public Funds

A final set of opportunities acknowledged by Roundtable participants was the presence of supportive
public policy and public funds – specifically those coming from the American Recovery and
Reinvestment Act (ARRA).

Some emphasized that ARRA funds represent an opportunity for business development, but that there
ought to be more input from local employers on the deployment of such funds. Others noted the
opportunities that ARRA funds present to women and minorities specifically. In addition to the
construction and actual jobs created from programs like the Weatherization Assistance Program (WAP)
and other infrastructure programs, which give extra weight to employers using women and minority
workers, there are also training dollars available for underserved workers. Overall, ARRA funds were the
major public supports recognized by the Roundtable, though some attention was also paid to the
workforce development system and the City of Cleveland's strategy.

Hard Hatted Women's Toolkit for the Recruitment and Retention of Women
(http://www.hardhattedwomen.org/publications.asp) also provides lists of relevant Ohio public and
nonprofit resources.


Ideas: How to be a Model in Promoting Women's Employment in Good, Green Jobs
Joel Solow

A plurality (45%) of Roundtable participants' responses expressed some kind of suggestion for
improvement or request to the Department of Labor. Many of these comments were not directed at the
Department of Labor per se, but registered general desires and impressions of need. Some were more
specific and directed than others but most participants expressed some orientation towards the future
and where we need to go as a state as well as how the government could serve as a helpful partner and
supporter. The need to generate interest and increase awareness among women and girls regarding
career opportunities and pathways was the most frequently expressed need, with partnerships,
mentorship, and supportive policy also getting frequent mentions. Some of the comments below were


      21    Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio Roundtable Report
made during the course of the individual Roundtable discussions, while others were brought up during
the table report-outs and full group discussion at the end of the event.

Generating Interest and Awareness

        “A lot of people have the opportunity and the skill sets to do the job, they just don't know what
        those skill sets are. So we need to have a definition of what the skill sets for those new careers
        are. We also need to get away from jobs and more towards careers ... One of the things that I
        learned is that a job is Just Over Broke. So the job-seekers need to understand that the
        opportunities available – to go from a bottom rung up to some of the more advanced
        opportunities in that field – are going to be great.”

        “Sustainability and the green economy and the green workforce are about management and
        leadership and even creating new careers that we may not be aware of. Technology of course is
        going to be a huge part of our future, but there's also this people side that needs to be informed
        as well.”

        “We need to try to take the stigma – and that’s a hard word, but for right now that's the best I
        can do – off the apprenticeship programs, and not view them as an alternative because you can't
        succeed in a four year institution; but you're choosing an apprenticeship program because you
        want to work with your hands and that’s where your passion and desire is.”

The need to increase interest and awareness of green jobs and
nontraditional occupations was one of the only topics touched on in
some way by all six discussion tables and was brought up by 21 of
the 50 Roundtable participants. As the quotes above demonstrate,
many concerns were closely related but still varied. A number of
responses concerned the need to define and publicize green jobs so
that job-seekers know where the opportunities are and understand
how green jobs can meet their employment desires and needs.
Others suggested that we need to work on changing mindsets so                 Valerie Catchings, Partner at
that job-seekers take a longer-term view with regard to their                 Catchings Consultant Group
employment, trying to build careers with security rather than simply
temporary jobs. We also need to overcome biases, towards apprenticeship programs and the trades in
general as indicated in the quote above. As one other participant said: “We have to get people back into
the trades; ”craftspeople” is a better word, a whole lifetime of training, perfecting a craft.” On a similar
note, others spoke specifically to the need to reframe the trades as an equally valued equivalent to a
college or university education. Finally, we need to publicize the pathways and benefits of green jobs
and nontraditional occupations, to entice job-seekers to undertake the training and make the
commitment to quality employment, and get them excited.

Some participants expressed this need without offering prescriptions. Others emphasized the value of
partnerships, mentorship, STEM education, and increased visibility of women role models.


Fostering Constructive Partnerships and Collaborations

      22    Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio Roundtable Report
        “One of the things we can keep doing as young people is to keep bringing together the powers
        that need to be at the table as far as business and labor and environment and community
        organizations. These are the four entities that will be impacted as we transition into this green
        economy...

        Partnerships like this are really what's going to bring us together and push this economy and
        also bring women to the table and keep being loud and boisterous”

Before the large group discussion, Partnerships were addressed in some way by all six small discussion
tables. One of the major groups that participants claim need to partner more is workforce development
agencies and organizations. “Workforce development is not typically engaged with employers, more with
employees. We need to encourage collaboration with small businesses.” “Agencies and universities
cannot work in silos!”

Other networks were also suggested to better link trainees and job-seekers with employment.
“Community colleges are more nimble in being able to identify opportunities and addressing them. We
need a direct connection between school and work;” “regional networks of training programs; to bring in
people from far away is expensive; anticipate the future of the workforce needs.” “How can we tell
Ohio's story? Water and wind may let us step out in a leadership position, but we need to establish
collaborative relationships to understand the complete picture;” “connecting with manufacturers and
employers from different job training programs.”

Mentorships and Women Leaders

Again, encouraging mentorships and women leaders and role models was a strong theme. One
participant suggested the appointment of a 'female czar', similar to Andrew Watterson, City of Cleveland
Chief of Sustainability, or Chicago's Sadhu Johnston, formerly Chief Environmental Officer and Deputy
Chief of Staff in Chicago, now taking up the mantle in Vancouver. Women in faculty positions and other
visible academic and business roles were suggested as well.

The need to take on stronger marketing and popular culture engagement was also expressed by some
participants. “Some of the TV shows need to show engineering and sciences, we need women in those
fields to make them seem sexy – this might most influence people.”
“Marketing – we need passionate people to get into areas to talk to
young men and women;” “we need to publicize and tell the stories
of successful women,” “we need to get media involved – you don't
see any great people doing normal things on TV!”


Policy and Public Support

Though most participant responses dealt with general needs and             Hollie Hinton, Director of Governor’s
suggestions for the workforce development community, there were             Office for Women’s Initiatives and
a number of more concrete prescriptions directed at the                                  Outreach
Department of Labor. Some dealt with a need for greater

      23    Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio Roundtable Report
communication and responsiveness with the DOL: “What we need from the DOL is guidance and policy.
And all the talking we're doing today is all fine and dandy, but when the rubber meets the road, we need
somebody from higher up in the DOL to not issue edicts, but instruct and guide Ohio and other states in
how we can have inclusion”, “we need liaisons between the Department of Labor and us.”

Others spoke instead to the need for more funding, and more narrowly focused and directed funding:
“DOL provides Workforce Investment Act (WIA) money … can we get a specialized pot of money for
women like there is for youth and recognize that there is a gender gap in pay and representation?”
“Help with the grant process would be necessary. We need seed money at small businesses to pay grant-
writers, to write grants to get business to the next level. We need someone to meet small businesses
halfway.”

There was also an expressed need for stronger support (both financial and childcare) for women trying
to undergo training and apprenticeships: “The State needs to be more helpful in assisting women who
are heads of households while they are in their apprenticeship programs or educational programs, so
they can be successful in all aspects of their live.” “It would be important for these single parents or
women that’s out there to receive funding while they are going to school. Apprenticeship programs pay
you while you learn, so somehow they need to be paid while they are in school and being retrained to
help them along. Not just with child care but everyday
care.” “The eligibility rate for child care has dropped
from 200 to 150 percent of the poverty rate. And if you             “We need, ideally, to get to a point
continue to put barriers in front of women to get jobs             where new jobs are of the quality of
and education and you continue making policies that                       manufacturing jobs”
erode away from things that help women get that way
regardless of whether it’s a green job or a job, we are not going to make it.”

Finally, some expressed the fact that the job market and opportunities available need to improve.




  “We need demand in place with jobs
                                                      “We need to encourage the Board of
   that reinforce the skills learned in                  Regents to actually recognize
               classroom”                              certificates so that the universities
                                                          will be encouraged to accept
                                                          stackable certifications from
                                                       women. Because people do carry
                                                        along a lot of transferrable skills
                                                      and we want those to be recognized
                                                       and converted to degrees, so that
                                                         we can work with the business
                                                       community to make them begin to
                                                          shift their job descriptions to
                                                       recognize those 'new' certificates”

      24    Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio Roundtable Report
                                          Credits
Hard Hatted Women Project Team

Terri Burgess Sandu, Executive Director

Kathleen Wildman, Community Relations Consultant

Linda Mihalik, Education Consultant

Data Collection and Analysis and Report

Josh Angelini, M.S. , HHW Green Jobs Outreach Coordinator, AmeriCorps VISTA

Richard Schulte, HHW Career Pathways Coordinator, AmeriCorps VISTA

Joel Solow, HHW Special Projects Intern

Report Photography and Layout

Vanessa LaValle, HHW Outreach and Communications Coordinator, AmeriCorps VISTA


Roundtable and Report Project Management
Sue Nelson, Improvement Works LLC

Anyone can make a good first impression. But over time, the key to being successful and being seen as
successful is proving that what you do IS successful. That is the mission and success of Improvement
Works. When you contract with Improvement Works, you tap into a network of exceptional
professionals who not only value your contribution to Northeast Ohio—we can help you put an
objective and explainable value on what you do.

We research and measure your impact on the community. We do the research to show you how you
stack up against similar organizations or programs. And where results don’t match the words, we can
help you identify where you can make improvements. We become your #1 cheerleader, helping you
convey your message and value in concrete terms that will excite and attract funders, potential clients
and board members.

To find out how Improvement Works can help your organization expand its impact, go to
www.improvementworks.net.




      25    Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio Roundtable Report
This Roundtable was successful because of the generous support given by many people. Particular
thanks go to:

For Supporting the Roundtable Event
The City of Cleveland, Frank G. Jackson, Mayor, and
  Tracy Nichols, Director, Department of Development
The City Club of Cleveland, catering and audio/visual departments

For the Green Banner Design
Minnesota Women in Green Jobs Roundtable



                     About the Women’s Bureau of the U.S. Department of Labor

The Women’s Bureau (http://www.dol.gov/wb/) was created by law in 1920 to formulate standards and
policies to promote the welfare of wage-earning women, improve their working conditions, increase
their efficiency, and advance their opportunities for profitable employment.

The Women's Bureau promotes 21st Century solutions to improve the status of working women and
their families. Better Jobs! Better Earnings! Better Living!

Region V

The headquarters for the Regional Office is in Chicago, Illinois. The Regional office provides services to
women living in the six Midwestern States of Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Ohio and Wisconsin.
The Region is a combination of rural and urban with over nine metropolitan areas and a wide range of
small communities.

The Region V States have diverse industries, which
include finance, agriculture, automotive
manufacturing, food processing, chemical,                     “To empower women to achieve
pharmaceutical, coal and steel. Women are employed           economic independence by creating
in many of these industries.
                                                               workplace diversity in trade and
                                                                    technical careers.”
            About Hard Hatted Women

Hard Hatted Women was formed in 1979 by three tradeswomen who recognized a need for a support
system for women in nontraditional occupations. Hard Hatted Women's mission is to empower women
to achieve economic independence by creating workplace diversity in trade and technical careers.
Because the vast majority of women we assist are unemployed or low income women in low-wage jobs,
a major result of HHW's programming is to assist women and their families to escape the cycle of
poverty. In expanding and diversifying the workforce, HHW helps to ensure the viability of the greater
Cleveland and Ohio economies, particularly in sectors which are poised to receive significant public
investments through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA).

      26    Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio Roundtable Report
Overcoming challenges and helping women to succeed is what we do well. Over 30 years, we have
helped thousands of women and girls learn about nontraditional careers. Over a 17 year period, our Pre
Apprenticeship Training (PAT) program successfully prepared over 500 women for high wage careers in
trade and technical fields, with an average placement rate of 70%. Over 90% of the women HHW
trained were low-income and two-thirds were single parents. Today, HHW serves the women workforce
through Tradeswomen TOOLS (Training, Outreach, Opportunity, Leadership and Support). TOOLS
provides outreach, education, supportive services and mentoring to help women learn about a wide
range of high wage careers, get into those careers, move up and then give back to help others follow in
their path. To view the Toolkit for Recruitment and Retention of Women visit our website:
http://tinyurl.com/ykgvhg3.

Barriers exist for women and girls of all ages. Our experience has shown us that with a comprehensive
approach that addresses young girls' particular challenges, we are better able to diversify the trades and
technical careers. Girls are discouraged from considering careers in the trades early and often, limiting
their career choices, incentives to graduate from high school, and the ability to realize their full
potential. Because of this, HHW also reaches out through youth education programs, which have
provided students with experiences and resources that counter career-related gender bias and sex-role
stereotypes. In 2005, HHW was proud to be the first site in Ohio to host the national Rosie’s Girls
program. Rosie’s Girls is a three-week trade’s exploration camp for girls entering 6th – 8th grades. To
help girls to incorporate vocational trades in the array of careers they consider, Hard Hatted Women has
created programs for children in elementary through high school, which we have provided to thousands
of children. These programs have garnered praise from educators, parents and participants.

Our experience has also taught us to look beyond the vital work of preparing women to deal with the
trades workforce system. With Superior Workforce Solutions, our first social enterprise, HHW is
striving to change the system in which those women work towards greater economic independence.
Superior Workforce Solutions works with contractors to outline and pursue specific strategies to achieve
hiring and retention goals. SWS uses its extensive knowledge of national best practices to help public
and private entities develop innovative solutions to recruiting and retaining a diverse workforce,
ultimately providing an important edge to employers and training providers in a competitive
environment.




This year, Hard Hatted Women was selected to host seven VISTA members through the AmeriCorps
program. Several of them were highly involved in the Women's Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio
Roundtable and writing this report.




      27    Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio Roundtable Report
                                 Appendices
                                         Appendix i: Methods

The Agenda of the Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio Roundtable forced compact
discussions on large questions. Following a quick overview of Ohio’s current state, two questions were
discussed at tables of eight participants. Table recorders, who were also participants, took notes of the
discussions. While the recorders took very good notes, there was variance in the styles of note-taking.
Comments are reflective of the discussions, but are not weighted. The first two questions were:
    What do we know or do in Ohio to encourage women’s participation in the green economy?
    What obstacles or opportunities do we have and how might we work with them?

Following discussion of the first two questions, brief one-minute reports were made from each table to
the whole group of the most significant idea that arose in the small discussion. Then the small groups
returned to their own tables to answer these two questions:
        Reflecting on the brief report outs, what reactions, questions do you have? What would you like
        to hear more about?
        What new ideas or insights does this table group have now?

The discussion returned to the large group as participants addressed Nancy Chen in response to these
questions:
        How can Ohio be a model of inclusion of women in the green economy?
        What can the State, the Women’s Bureau and the Department of Labor do to help women
        participate in the green jobs and training?

Following the Roundtable, the report writers took the notes and summaries from each table, and
combined this text with transcriptions from the video recording during the large group discussion. After
some consideration, it was decided that the resulting text would be analyzed by using the grounded
theory approach. The goal was to become deeply familiarized with the data and to develop a system of
‘coding’, or labeling, all of the text so as to identify both the broad and discrete themes that emerged
during the discussion. Developing an appropriate codebook was difficult since groups often strayed
substantially off of the questions, although much of what was said was highly applicable to the goals of
the Roundtable.




      28    Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio Roundtable Report
                                 Appendix ii. Outline for Comments


                                Current Status of Women and Work

Presentation by:        Julie Graber
                        The Institute on Women
                        614.859.9469
                        jgraber@instituteonwomen.org
Intro
The mission of the Institute on Women is to improve the lives of the 5.8 million women and girls in Ohio,
with a focus on:
        compiling information that describes their day to day existence,
        using available research from around the world to extend our understanding of those conditions,
        and
        fostering collaboration and leadership development among women to address these issues.

When we looked across our information model, there were four critical issues that emerged for women
and girls in Ohio:
         Economic status, including work force participation, earnings, occupations and leadership
         participation
         Educational attainment – addressing a critical need within our state to encourage more women –
         and men – to pursue higher education
         Health issues, including the rate of death from a number of illnesses and health risk behaviors
         And Political involvement

Economic Status
Much has been written about the impact of the current economic climate on men and women’s labor
force participation – we've heard the references to the “man-cession” and “he-cession.” But the focus
on payroll reports that show women approaching 50% of the workforce overshadow some of the critical
ways this economy is impacting women specifically:
        The unemployment rate – nationally – for female headed households has been climbing at an
        alarming rate - nearly a full percentage point each of the past couple of months – from 11% to
        11.7% to 12.6%
        here in Ohio, 52% of female headed households with children under the age of 5 live in poverty
        as it is – certainly exacerbated by the climbing unemployment
        And the labor force participation rate – again, nationally - for women age 65 and over is more
        than 13% - highest it has been since the Labor Department started calculating statistics in 1948
        (and the unemployment rate among these women is actually higher than that of men the same
        age)

For women in Ohio:
       We make up nearly 48% of the workforce
       Hold 35% of managerial positions

      29    Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio Roundtable Report
        ◦   The gender wage gap in Ohio for women is $.73 to the dollar – median earnings of $33,000
            vs. $44,000 – ranking Ohio 35th among the states and Washington DC – lower than the
            national rate of $.78
        ◦   Of the 280,000 Ohioans that earn six figures, only 18% are women – only 2% of women who
            work in the state compared to 7% of men
        ◦   Only one Fortune 500 company in Ohio has had a female CEO – Wendy's
        ◦   And in research done in 2007, only 5 of the top 200 private companies were headed by
            women

Educational Attainment
One of the major drivers of women’s economic status is educational attainment – the data deals
specifically with getting a college education – what we know is:
          78% of the girls in the class of 2005 from High School – 72% of boys – but among 18 to 24 year
          old in the state, only 34% are enrolled college
          Only 23% of women age 25 and old in Ohio have 4 or more years of college – Ohio ranks 39th
          among 50 states and DC
It's also important to note that educational attainment among women varies substantially by race and
geography in Ohio:
          Among African American women, the rate is – 14.3%
          Women in Appalachia – 14%
Having 4 years of college (or the equivalent in training):
          Is what it takes to increases women’s median earnings to a level that exceeds that of a man with
          a High School Diploma ($36K for women vs. $33K for men with a HS diploma)
          Reduces the a woman’s chances of living in poverty by 68% over a woman with a HS diploma

We can make Ohio a better place to live for the women and girls in our state. And research has shown
that improving the lives of women and girls improves the lives of everyone – one of the most critical
investments we can make is in programs that improve the status of women.




      30    Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio Roundtable Report
                   Appendix iii. Letter from Environmental Engineer to Nancy Chen

                                                                                        August 28, 2009

Ms. Chen,

Women tend to seek careers that benefit society. When comparing males and females in terms of the
reasons they chose a particular field of work, men are more apt to have accepted jobs providing the best
financial returns. They are more likely to feel their passions or philanthropic aims could be fulfilled
during personal time. The women I know, however, wanted jobs that gave back to the community.

Many women want to “make a difference” and to help the planet and people – from their own children
to families a world away – during regular business hours. Matching “green jobs” to those motivated by
societal benefit makes sense – the workers are energized and we all enjoy the rewards. I believe it is
essential to increase the number of women in STEM (science, technology, math and engineering)
careers and in the pipeline for hard-hatted jobs. We need diverse perspectives and innovations now
more than ever in order find a path to economic, environmental and community sustainability.

There are a number of challenges facing women considering green jobs. The legacy of a male-dominated
workplace is still evident in STEM classrooms, where it is rare to find female professors and mentors.
Construction, manufacturing, engineering and research firms are male-dominated and can be
intimidating when coworkers have outdated expectations. Being the only female to take a rigorous
technical course or to be the first woman in a manufacturing department is tough. Providing incentives
for more women to pursue these careers would increase the numbers in those class- and conference-
rooms. These incentives could include scholarships and loan forgiveness for individuals from
demographics representing less than 30% of the current STEM or construction workforce (so racial and
ethnic minorities would likely be included as well). These benefits would depend on gaining a
certificate, maintaining a certain GPA and being sustaining a job in the field. Tapping into the power of
numbers, growing groups of like-minded women in these careers can then build their own networks to
support and encourage one another.

Incentives to employers would also be helpful. Government support for companies that pay for
advanced degrees or certification of women in STEM topics would be great. Maybe insurance companies
could quantify the risks that are averted by having a diverse and inclusive board of decision-makers and
lower premiums as appropriate. Mentors, male and female, also need to step up and then be
acknowledged for their roles in educating, hiring and promoting women. Losing the “old boys network”
will be difficult for some people, and we also need to acknowledge that change and celebrate all leaders
who embrace the coming changes.

I have benefited from a number of amazing mentors in achieving my engineering degree and the career
success I’ve had to date. Although I am not a native, I have found Ohio to be welcoming to newcomers,
especially toward young professionals with a passion for making a difference. This state has a rich


      31    Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio Roundtable Report
history built upon the STEM innovations of the industrial revolution. Ohio also has the land and water
resources to support the businesses of the future, and we can serve as an example to the myriad cities
and states having to reinvent in the face of a dramatically shifting economy. What we need, however, is
the inclusive workforce and its diverse ideas to connect our past to a green and brighter future.
Wherever women are a significant part of that workforce, we will see the fresh perspectives and
energized approach that will make the difference between business-as-usual and walking the path to
sustainability.

With appreciation,

Gwendolyn McDay




      32    Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio Roundtable Report
                   Appendix iv. Hard Hatted Women’s Programmatic Information

HHW Mission: To empower women to become economically independent by creating workplace
diversity in trade and technical careers.

A 2008 study found that 40% of the families headed by a single woman in Ohio live in poverty.

Women and Economic Development: Nontraditional employment for women is an "underutilized but
effective strategy by which women can access higher-wage jobs."



        “Many community-based women’s organizations began offering nontraditional training 25 years
        ago…..While most were successful, few of the strategies were institutionalized into
        mainstream job training and vocational education systems…to become a successful strategy
        for moving families out of poverty, it is critical to address the…barriers that prevent workforce
        development and welfare systems from institutionalizing nontraditional employment for
        women.” The Self-Sufficiency Standard for Ohio 2008



HHW: A Record of Success

        Through Tradeswomen TOOLS (Training, Outreach, Opportunity, Leadership and Support),
HHW helps women find out, get in, move up and give back in their chosen career. Women working in
nontraditional fields serve as role models and mentors. HHW supports women to overcome barriers to
success and maintain a long-term career pathway/vision.



        HHW pioneered Pre-Apprenticeship Training (PAT) nearly two decades ago. HHW proudly
shared our curriculum and expertise with the Cleveland Building Trades Council to support the launch of
UCIP-ASAP and today is working with UCIP-ASAP to increase women’s participation.



        From 1992 to 2008, HHW prepared 516 women to enter a high wage, skilled career that lifts
families out of poverty. Starting wages are $13 to $18 per hour. A recent survey of graduates over the
past two years found that 71% are still working in the field or pursuing advanced education.




      33    Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio Roundtable Report
        Despite our success, PAT and other HHW programs have seen significant funding cuts.



        Who we serve: 2/3 are single parents, majority low-income, between 24 and 45 years of age at
entry, and over half City of Cleveland residents, representing the diversity of the city and region.


       Since January 2009, 87% of women who attended an Orientation to Nontraditional Careers
workshop are City of Cleveland residents (73 out of 84); 68% report incomes of less than $10,000. 453
women contacted HHW in the past year for information on nontraditional careers.



         Youth Education: In 2004, HHW became the first site in Ohio to host the national Rosie’s Girls®
program. Over four summers, HHW served 156 girls age 11 to 13, a majority being students from low-
income, urban neighborhoods. Rosie’s Girls and other HHW Youth Education programs are designed to
build self-esteem, perseverance, and leadership through learning and applying basic skills in the trades,
other hands-on activities, and creative arts. Girls develop a stronger sense of themselves and their
capabilities, learn independence, apply real world math skills, and increase awareness of nontraditional
fields.



www.hardhattedwomen.org

(216) 861-6500

4220 Prospect Avenue, Cleveland Ohio 44103




© 2010 Hard Hatted Women. All Rights Reserved.




      34    Women’s Inclusion in the Green Economy Ohio Roundtable Report

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Description: Convened by the United States Department of Labor, Women’s Bureau in collaboration with Hard Hatted Women, the Ohio Roundtable on Women's Inclusion in the Green Economy was hosted by HHW at the City Club of Cleveland. The results from this event have been compiled into this final report.