TEA SMALL GRANTS GUIDE by galoperiscol

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									Teaching Excellence and Achievement
Program (TEA)

Alumni Small Grants Application
How-to-Guide



A program of the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs
of the United States Department of State, and implemented
by IREX (International Research & Exchanges Board)
              Teaching Excellence and Achievement Program (TEA)
                     Small Grants Application How-to-Guide



                                       ABOUT THIS GUIDE

This Small Grants Application How-to-Guide has been developed to help TEA alumni in the
development and writing process of the alumni small grant application. The Guide includes four
main sections or steps to help you in the successful completion of the application.

Step One: The Idea provides information about what applicants need to think about as they
consider submitting an application for consideration.

Step Two: Writing the Application guides you through each section of the application providing
helpful hints and examples on what each section should include.

Step Three: Creating Your Budget contains information about the steps and what applicants
need to think about when putting together a budget. It also walks you through the step-by-step
process of completing the budget template.

Steps Four and Five provide information about reviewing your budget and submitting your
application to IREX.

A glossary of terms is included at the end of the document to help understand terms used
throughout the application and small grants process that alumni may be unfamiliar with.


                           ABOUT THE TEA SMALL GRANTS PROGRAM

As part of TEA, all alumni are eligible and encouraged to apply for grants of up to $5,000 for four
categories of projects. This grant program is designed to complement the TEA goal of improving
teaching     in     participating    countries   and     promoting      mutual      understanding.




Teaching Excellence and Achievement Program
Alumni Small Grants Application How-to-Guide




                                       Step One: The Idea


Successful grant writing involves comprehensive advance planning and preparation. Before you
begin to work on a small-grant application it is very important to think through all of the
necessary steps it will take to successfully implement the project. You will have to coordinate,
plan, research, organize, write, prepare your budget, and submit your application, budget and
supporting documents. Then, if you are selected as a finalist, you will have to respond to follow-
up questions that the selection panel may ask in order to approve your proposal. It is important
to consider the time and planning a small grant project will involve before you begin the process.

Identifying a Need and the Type of Proposal to Submit

Once you have carefully considered all of the components of writing and implementing a small-
grant project you must determine the type of project you are interested in implementing. You
can do this by:
    • Formally or informally surveying the potential beneficiaries of the project, or
    • Through observation of the school/community and deciding on your own what need in
       your community you would like to address, and what sort of project to implement.

Based on survey results or observation of your school and community and availability of and
access to materials and collaborators, choose one of the four small-grant program types that
best fit the type of project you would like to apply for.

The four small-grant categories are:

    1. Collaborative School Grant- This grant is designed to provide funding for programs that benefit
       the teachers and/or students of the primary applicants’ home country in partnership with a
       collaborator. A collaborator can be a teacher/administrator from a TEA host internship
       secondary school, a TEA host university administrator/faculty member and/or TEA alumni from
       any TEA program year and any participating program country (Argentina, Armenia, Azerbaijan,
       Bangladesh, Bulgaria, Cambodia, Colombia, Dominican Republic, Egypt, El Salvador, Estonia,
       Georgia, Ghana, Guatemala, Honduras, Haiti, India, Jordan, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Latvia,
       Nicaragua, Peru, Poland, Russia, Senegal, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine, and Uzbekistan).
       Grants under this category will be awarded in amounts up to $5,000. Activities proposed under
       this category may include, but are not limited to:

          o   Cross-training projects between alumni of different program countries.
          o   Development of a sister-school relationship between the U.S. host and international
              school or between the alumni schools in TEA countries.
          o   Training workshop on incorporating technology in the classroom conducted by both a host
              university faculty member (perhaps via internet connection) and international alumni at the
              alumni’s school.
          o   Teacher Training Workshops on topics concerning secondary education in international
              alumni’s home country to share and expand impact of TEA to peers at home;
          o   Development of special programs in international alumni’s home schools (e.g. a peer
              mediation program, etc) modeled on a program currently implemented in a fellow TEA
              alumni’s home country.

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          o   Collaborative development and pilot-testing of teaching materials.
          o   Implementation of a Teacher Leadership workshop.
          o   Or other projects as deemed appropriate by the selection committee.


    2. Non-collaborative School Grant- This grant is designed to provide funding for programs that
       benefit the teachers and/or students of the applicants’ home country and does not involve any
       collaborators. Grants under this category will be awarded in amounts up to $5,000. Activities
       proposed under this category may include, but are not limited to:

          o   Teacher training events in foreign participants’ home countries on topics such as lesson
              planning, teaching methodologies, or alternative education programs.
          o   Developing and/or pilot-testing teaching materials.
          o   Establishing teacher training resource centers, school newsletters or school-community
              related projects.
          o   Establishing parent-teacher associations or student government.
          o   Projects to purchase materials for alumni schools.
          o   Or other projects as deemed appropriate by the selection committee.


    3. Alumni Professional Development Grant- This grant is designed to provide funding for
       professional development activities that benefit TEA alumni. Applicants are required to
       collaborate with at least one other TEA alumnus to implement the project in their country. Grants
       under this category will be awarded in amounts up to $5,000. Activities proposed under this
       category may include, but are not limited to:

          o   Alumni training event on educating students with special needs.
          o   Alumni training on classroom management strategies.
          o   Alumni training on how to be a leader in the community.
          o   Alumni conference in which alumni demonstrate portions of lesson plans that they have
              developed and pilot-tested since their TEA program.
          o   Developing peer mediation or tolerance education programs in foreign participants’ home
              schools.
          o   Conducting alumni seminars on gender equity and gender sensitivity in the classroom.
          o   Alumni professional networking events.
          o   Or other projects as deemed appropriate by the selection committee.


    4. Community Service Grant- This grant is designed to provide funding for programs that benefit
       the community at large. Alumni are encouraged to work with students and volunteers to carry out
       program activities. Grants under this category will be awarded in amounts up to $5,000.
       Activities proposed under this category may include, but are not limited to:

          o   Organize a trip to a historical location for children from underprivileged schools
          o   Organize a national crafts workshop for children with disabilities
          o   Organize a series of leadership and team-building activities for children with disabilities
          o   Organize a day of fun and games at an orphanage or children’s hospital
          o   Organize a soccer camp for teens at a rehabilitation center
          o   Develop a training on healthy lifestyles for teenagers
          o   Develop a public awareness campaign on a social issues (i.e. Anti-drug campaign)
          o   Awareness raising campaigns or activities on a variety of issues are manifested in the
              school, but should be address in the community at large (gangs and violence prevention,
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              recycling, road safety, conservation, tolerance to diversity, etc.).
          o   HIV/AIDS Awareness Drives.
          o   Organize a book drive/ toy drive
          o   Organize a volunteer event (i.e. cleaning a schoolyard or a park)
          o   Develop a mentoring program at school for children with disabilities
          o   Or other projects as deemed appropriate by the selection committee.


Identifying a Potential Collaborator

You now have an idea of the project you want to developed and have identified the grant type
that it fits into based on the four grant categories identified above. If you want to develop a
collaborative project, you have to identify a collaborator. Throughout your TEA experience it’s a
good idea to keep in mind whether another TEA Fellow or a U.S. educator could collaborate
with you on a small grant.

When you hear of an idea or a project that you find interesting you should ask yourself the
question, “could this work/help my school/community back home?” People are generally helpful
when you approach them for professional assistance because this means that you have respect
for the work they do. Forming a network of professional contacts that you will have for the rest
of your career is one of the invaluable benefits of participation in a program such as TEA.

It can be helpful to “plant the seed” of potential collaboration by simply informing a colleague of
the opportunity before actually approaching them to officially collaborate. Then, once you have
the idea for the project approach them and collaborate with them to develop the idea into a
tangible project that you can propose and implement together.




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                                 Step Two: Writing the Application


Thus far, you have identified an idea for the project, you know what type of grant you will apply
for, and you have identified a collaborator should you choose to do a project with one. Now, you
must move on to the planning and writing stages of the application.


Writing a Statement of Need

The Statement of Need is the proposal component that expresses the issue, concern or problem
that you want to address in your grant. The statement of need explains:
     • What is the issue/problem/need you will address through your project?
     • How will the project have an impact in your school/community?
     • Why this is important to you?

     Sample Statement of Need

     Literacy is a major concern in “x” country. Recent research by the statistic bureau, 2008 indicates that ninety percent
(90%) of the population of “x” country are literate. What is problematic, however, is that only twenty-three percent
(23%) of the people read for personal pleasure or specific information. Reading in school and only for school purposes,
like taking tests, characterizes the vast majority of reading completed by students. Thus, student skills in reading for a
variety of purposes are low as shown consistently in test results from the National Final Exam. Literacy and reading
skills remain a major problem. Unfortunately, this problem is made even more complicated by several factors, including:
• Financial Resources: Typically, Books are not available at an affordable price for many parents and therefore they
     and their children depend on the school budget to purchase reading materials;
• Motivation: Many reading materials are not well-written, not physically attractive (they don’t include beautiful
     illustrations), and therefore are not very engaging to students;
• Active Engagement: Many teachers in “x” country report that secondary school students do not perceive or
     experience reading as an enjoyable and informative activity.
• Developing Positive Dispositions: Like other academic disciplines, especially math and science, developing a
     positive disposition about reading is integral to reading success. Much reading instruction in “x” country’s secondary
     school focuses on teaching reading as word recognition. Less instruction, however, focuses on helping students
     develop a positive attitude about reading;
• Readability: In many instances in “x” country’s secondary schools, English textbook difficulty levels do not match
     the student reading levels.

Fortunately, several factors currently exist that make it possible to solve these issues. These factors include:
             o Administrators and teachers want to improve reading instruction at their schools;
             o Administrators and teachers want to develop reading materials that are more engaging and meaningful to
                 their students;
             o Administrators and teachers want to increase their knowledge of research-based instructional strategies
                 to increase reading achievement and support to use them in the classroom;
             o Teachers recognize weaknesses in the reading materials they currently use, .e.g textbooks, but are
                 authorized to select and purchase other books to supplement current reading materials; use for reading
                 instruction.
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This pilot project is designed to address these teacher needs.
Alumni Small Grants Application How-to-Guide


It is important to remember to be realistic about the needs you are trying to address and the
impact of your project given its size and scope. In the example above, literacy levels are a
nationwide problem that cannot be address within the scope of this grant. However, as the
applicant you can select to address the issue of literacy within your immediate school
community or its surroundings.


Identifying Program Goals and Objectives

State the project goals and objectives clearly and concisely. You should use active (not
passive) verbs. The “goal” of a project is the overall purpose toward which program activities are
directed. Goals are generally intangible, meaning they can not be measured.

The “objectives” are the intended outcome(s) of a project. Objectives are tangible and
measurable.

        Sample Program Goal


The goal of this pilot project is to provide professional development workshops to improve reading instruction
and increase student reading achievement in “y” secondary school.


        Sample Program Objectives


    •   To train teachers to develop content relevant reading materials related to their classroom discipline
    •   To train teachers to use a variety of research-based instructional strategies to increase student reading
        achievement.
    •   To raise awareness among school and education authorities about the impact of the use of new reading
        materials and strategies to increase student achievement.




Identifying the Targeted Beneficiaries

This section identifies who will benefit from your project. It is likely that you will have a clear
idea of who your target beneficiaries are as soon as you have your project idea. Here are
some questions that you need think about as you complete the targeted beneficiaries section of
the proposal application:

    •   How many people will my project directly impact?
    •   Who will indirectly benefit from my project?
    •   Where are the beneficiaries located?


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The targeted beneficiaries section should—at minimum—answer the three questions above. If
you have identified more details about your beneficiaries (such as what school(s), what districts,
how many men, women, girls, boys, etc.), you should include this information as well.

        Sample Targeted Beneficiaries:


Through the workshop and pilot testing, this project will directly reach:
   • Forty-five (45) teachers from nine schools in Parigi
   • Two (2) school-supervisors from the department of education in the Parigimoutong Regent, in Parigi.
   • Seven Hundred students grades 9th -11th served by the teachers who will attend the training.




Identifying Project Collaborator(s) Roles:

This section describes the roles and responsibilities of the principal applicant and, where
applicable, the collaborator(s) for each step of the program activities.

Identifying what roles each collaborator will have in the project is essential for good project
design and successful project implementation. You should discuss this with your collaborators
and identify who will be responsible for which components of the project. Identifying and setting
the expectations for each collaborator as you create your proposal will help for a smooth
implementation of the project. As part of your planning, you and your collaborator should review
the list of activities and consider the steps to complete each activity and determine who will be
responsible for each task. In the “Project Collaborators’ Roles” you should provide information
by person and write a concise, yet detailed description about what each person will be
responsible for in the implementation of the project.

        Sample(s) Project Collaborator(s)’s Roles:


Applicant will:
   • Organize the conference logistics
   • Manage and administer the grant finances
   • Co-develop the training materials
   • Co-facilitate the sessions on performance assessment during the training
   • Write the final report to be submitted to IREX

Collaborator / co-applicant will:
    • Develop training materials for the workshop
    • Facilitate the workshops on Project-Based-Learning and Assessment
    • Conduct presentations with students on U.S. education, culture and life
    • Contribute information to the applicant to write the final report to be submitted to IREX




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Outlining Program Activities

This section should carefully describe all of the activities that will be carried out in the project.
Each activity should include the following information:

    •   What will you do?
    •   When will you do it?
    •   Why?
    •   How long will the activity take to implement (days, months, etc)?
    •   How will you plan to implement the activity?
    •   If implementing a workshop, an illustrative workshop agenda must be included as an
        appendix.

    Sample Program Activities Outline


This project will include both workshops and piloting activities.

    •   Workshops: A workshop for teachers in City Z will be conducted 13 – 15 October. The workshops will be
        a full-day experience, starting at 8:00AM and ending at 4:00PM (with one hour for lunch). The workshop
        will train teachers about developing better and higher quality reading materials, matching texts to readers,
        pairing texts, research-based instructional strategies, and how to motivate students to read. See Appendix
        for a detailed workshop agenda.

    •   Piloting (in-service training): A follow-up research project will be conducted to monitor and observe the
        effectiveness of the strategies taught in the workshop. The pilot project will include the following activities:

            o   Support by lead applicant to participating teachers to address issues or concerns related to the
                implementation of the new reading strategies in their classrooms.
            o   Classroom observation sessions to assess the use and impact of the new reading strategies and
                materials.
            o   Support to develop tools to assess the impact of the new reading strategies and materials in student
                achievement in the teachers’ classrooms.
            o   An analysis of the data collected from observations, and other tools developed to assess the impact
                of new reading strategies and use of new reading material in the project.




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Writing a Monitoring and Evaluation Plan

The project’s Monitoring and Evaluation (M&E) plan is extremely important. The M&E plan
evaluates the impact of the project in the school or community once the project is complete.
The M&E plan should assess how many, and to what extent, the program objectives were met.

In the M&E plan, the following things need to be addressed:

    • What were the objectives?
    • What were the anticipated outcomes/what did you expect to accomplish with the project?
    • Did you achieve the intended results? How do you know?

    Sample Monitoring and Evaluation Plan


Project Monitoring and Evaluation

As this project has two main objectives:

    o   To train 45 teachers in the use of new reading strategies and develop reading materials.
    o   To evaluate the impact of the new reading strategies and reading materials.

Expected/anticipated outcomes :

    o   Teachers learn new reading strategies to implement in their classroom
    o   Teachers implement strategies in the classroom successfully
    o   Student achievement in the classroom is improved

The results of the project activities will be measured by the following:

    o   A workshop evaluation: This evaluation will assess what the participants learned about reading strategies
        and developing new reading materials. The evaluation questionnaires will include questions specifically
        related to the topics address during the workshop.
    o   Observation of workshop discussion groups and classroom observation while teachers implement
        strategies. The observations will look for answers to questions such as:
             o Are teachers successfully modeling the reading strategies taught in the workshop?
             o Are teachers using the skills from the workshop to develop new reading materials for their
                 classroom activities?
             o How are teachers adapting the strategies to fit their particular classroom context?
             o How are students responding to the use of the new teaching strategies and materials?
    o   Pre-and-post test evaluation for the classroom to measure student achievement using the new reading
        strategies, these tools will look for answers to the following questions
             o Have students improved their reading skills?
             o Are students learning and retaining content better?




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Creating a Project Timeline

The project timeline should include all activities leading up to, during and after the actual
implementation of a project. The timeline is different to an agenda you would create for a
workshop in that it includes pre-planning and post-program tasks/activities. The timeline must,
at minimum, include the following information:

   •   Date (range of dates) when a particular activity will happen
   •   Name of the task

If you have the division of labor clearly identified, you should include a column for who will be
responsible to carry out the task as in the sample below. The timeline can be created in Word
or Excel. Below are a sample and template that you can use to create your own timeline.

       Sample Project Timeline

    Dates                         Activity                       Person
                                                               Responsible
Preparation
July 15 – 20  Inform school authorities about project        Lili
              implementation
August 3 – 5  Identify and secure facilities and equipment   Lili
August 10-11  send letters of invitation out                 Lili
August 20 – Registration of workshop participants            Lili
25
September 10 Make arrangements for food and stationary       Lili
-12
August 10 -30 Prepare workshop          and other project    Lili and
              materials with collaborator                    collaborator
Workshop
September 1 - Print workshop materials                       Lili
5
September 20 Conduct workshop                                Lili and
- 23                                                         Collaborator
Pilot
October 1 – Conduct classroom observation and support        Lili
November 15   consultations with teachers
November 15 - Conduct project evaluation                     Lili
26
Reporting
December 3 -9 Write project report                           Lili and
                                                             Collaborator
December 15     Submit project report                        Lili




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Timeline Template

   Dates                      Activity                  Person
                                                      Responsible




Curriculum Vitae (CVs)

As you prepare your proposal application, you must remember to include your curriculum vitae
(CV) and your collaborator(s)’. Most of you already have a CV, but in the event that you do not
have one, this is a sample template that you can use to create your own. The CVs you submit
with your application must be no more than 2 pages.


                                               NAME
                           Contact Information (address, phone, email)


CAREER SUMMARY


EXPERIENCE



EDUCATION



SKILLS




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Support Materials

Support Materials are letters that confirm or support information about you and your grant
proposal, and agendas for any workshops, conferences or other events. You must include the
following support materials:

          •   Support letter from participating U.S. and international schools;
          •   Support letter from primary applicant’s home school that also certifies full-time secondary
              teaching employment;
          •   Support letter from institutions/individuals providing in-kind donations for the project;
          •   Detailed agendas for any proposed workshops, conferences, or other events.




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                         Step Three: Creating a Project Budget


The project budget is one of the most important elements of your proposal. The budget is the
reflection of your project in numbers. It should include all the necessary costs to carry out every
step of your project. Here are a few steps to help you in the planning and development process
for your budget.

Quotes/Estimates

You need to start planning your budget as soon as you start thinking of the activities you want to
implement in your project. It takes planning and research to put a budget together. The first
step is to think about each activity that you will be carrying out and making a list of each
expense you anticipate that you will have in order to conduct each activity. The goal is to think
about every single thing that you will need to pay for to complete the activity successfully.

Once you have made your list, you need to find out the price of the items that you will need.
The task of finding the prices should be simple: you need to identify stores or vendors from
which you can purchase the items and/or services you will need. Possible resources include
local shops, the internet, your collaborator(s), other TEA alumni who may have done a similar
project before, your professional colleagues, etc. It is important to compare prices as you reach
out to vendors. Shop around and get a couple of quotes or price estimates to make sure that
you are getting the best price for what you need.

Here are some examples of prices you can get with different vendors:

School supply/stationary store
   • The cost of stationary material, flip chart paper, books

Local restaurants:
   • Cost of supplying snacks and lunch

Computer and equipment rental stores:
  • Cost to rent any audio/visual equipment that you may need

Local community center/hall:
   • If you are paying for the cost of the venue to carry-out an event you can seek out
       community centers, community halls, schools who may rent space to find out how much it
       would cost you to rent the venue to hold your event.

Local bank:
   • Contact your local bank to find out about wire fees that you may be charged when
       receiving money from the U.S.
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Internet:
    • Airfare prices through sites such as www.travelocity.com, www.kayak.com,
       www.sidestep.com, www.cheaptickets.com just to name a few
    • Visa costs for your U.S. collaborator can be found through your country’s embassy
       website in the U.S.

U.S. Collaborator (if applicable):
   • Your collaborator can be a great source for information regarding costs such as taxis,
      airfare, or visas in the U.S. Working with your collaborator to find out about prices in the
      U.S. is also another way of including them in the process.

Other alumni:
   • You should always tap into your networks. If there are alumni who have applied for an
      alumni grant before. It is likely that they will be able to steer you in the right direction and
      provide information not only about costs, but also about the materials or goods you may
      need to complete your activities. Reach out to alumni either directly or through the
      Google group or list serve. They are likely to respond and can be one of your best assets
      in this process.

Local Authorities/Accountants:
   • You need to be aware of any taxes that you may be liable for in your home country for
      receiving funds for this grant. Contact the local revenue service, a certified accountant,
      or other authority in your country that can advise you on the potential personal income
      tax, and other taxes you may be responsible for, include this in your budget.

Once you have identified where you need to go to get the information you need, you can
request quotes or estimates. Remember to shop around for the best prices.




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Creating your budget

At this point, you have done your homework, know what you need, how much things will cost
based on your research and pre-planning. You are now ready to create your budget. IREX has
created an online budget template for the alumni small grants with you in mind. The template is
an easy to use format to help you complete this task.

The following items can be included in the different categories of the budget:

   • Travel Expenses: Under this category you should include any anticipated expenses for
      ground transportation (taxis, buses, trains, car rentals) and air transportation (international
      and domestic) for you and/or your collaborators.

   • Per Diem: Per diem is made up of two separate expenses 1) lodging and 2) meals and
      incidentals (M&IE)

   • Lodging: Under this category you should include any anticipated expenses for hotels or
      other accommodations that the applicant or collaborator(s) have to pay for to implement
      the project (on the way to your country, and in-your country).

   • Meals and Incidentals: under this category you should include the cost of meals for you (if
      you are traveling as part of the grant) and/or your collaborator(s). Incidentals refers to 1)
      laundry fees, fees and tips given to porters, baggage carriers, bellhops, hotel maids and
      hotel servants in foreign countries; and 2) Transportation between places of lodging or
      business and places where meals are taken, if meals can’t be found within or near hotel.

   • Other Costs: This section is where all the expenses not identified in any of the previous
      sections must be included. See the following explanations for each subcategory for
      explanations of the type of expenses that should be included:

   • Venue Rental: If you proposed an activity that will require you to pay for space to carry-out
      your activity such as a workshop or fair, you would include the cost of renting that space
      under this category.

   • Participant Transportation: Under this subcategory you would include expenses such as
      bus fares, train fares, taxis, etc. that you will incur to bring project participants to activities
      that you will implement under your project such as a workshop.

   • Participant lodging: Under this category you would include the cost of hotels, guest house,
      or other accommodation that you have to pay for your project participants attending an
      activity such as workshop that you will be implementing.

   • Activity meals and refreshments: Under this subcategory you will include any anticipated
      expenses to provide food to activity participants. For example, if you are conducting a
      workshop or holding an after-school club, you might have to buy snacks, sodas, tea,
      coffee etc. to provide to your participants.

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   • Materials & Supplies:     Under this subcategory you should include expenses such as;
      paper, books, booklets, pens, markers, pedagogical materials, etc. that you will need to
      carry out your project. This category excludes supplies and materials for participants
      directly associated with a workshop.

   • Visa fees:      This subcategory refers to the cost of obtaining a visa(s) for your
      collaborator(s) to get to your country (this includes, transit and visitor’s visas).

   • Communications: Under this subcategory you should include anticipated expenses such
      as telephone calls, telephone cards, internet café expenses, etc.

   • Equipment Rental: Under this subcategory you should include any anticipated expense to
      rent equipment such as (projectors, laptop audio/visual equipment, etc.)

   • Taxes: Under this sub-category you should include any tax costs that you anticipate that
      you will have in connection with this grant; this includes personal income tax that you may
      be responsible for in your home country for receiving this grant.

   • Other Expense: These subcategories have been added to enter other expenses that you
      anticipate to have in connection with your grant that do not fit in any of the categories
      above. You may change the name of the subcategory (ies) highlighted in yellow to
      identify the expense that you are adding.




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The next step is for you to carefully read the budget instructions included in the application.
Once you have read the instructions you are ready to begin your budget. Remember, the
instructions indicate that you must enter all costs in U.S. dollars, and not in your local currency.

If you have a collaborator travelling, you should start your budget by entering the expected
travel costs and per diem for that person’s travel.

Item Description            Unit           Unit   Units    Total       Cost         Notes
                            Type           Cost   Needed   Requested   Share (In-
                                                           from IREX   Kind
                                                                       Donations)
Travel expenses

 Round Trip International
Airfare
 Round Trip Domestic          Round-
Airfare                     trip airfare   300    1        300
 Ground Transportation
(US)
 Ground Transportation
(Int'l)
 Subtotal Travel                                           $300

Per-Diem
Hotel Room (in-country)     Per night      29     8        232
Hotel Room (in-transit)
Meals and Incidentals       Per day        35     8        280
Subtotal Per Diem                                          $512




Teaching Excellence and Achievement Program                                                 18
Alumni Small Grants Application How-to-Guide

Before you finish each section, make sure that you write your budget notes. The purpose of the
budget notes is to explain to the budget reviewer any assumptions, and details behind the
numbers.

                                                                                               BUDGET NOTES


Item Description            Unit           Unit   Units    Total       Cost         Notes
                            Type           Cost   Needed   Requested   Share (In-
                                                           from IREX   Kind
                                                                       Donations)
Travel expenses

 Round Trip International
Airfare
 Round Trip Domestic          Round-                                                 Cost of ticket to bring
Airfare                     trip airfare   300    1        300                      collaborator to my region
 Ground Transportation
(US)
 Ground Transportation
(Int'l)
 Subtotal Travel                                           $300

Per-Diem
Hotel Room (in-country)                                                             8 nights for collaborator in a
                            Per night      29     8        232                      local hotel
Hotel Room (in-transit)
Meals and Incidentals       Per day        35     8        280                      8 days of meals and incidentals
Subtotal Per Diem                                          $512




Teaching Excellence and Achievement Program                                                        19
Alumni Small Grants Application How-to-Guide

Continue by completing each section of the budget as indicated. If you have costs that are cost
shared enter them as you go along completing each section under the In-Kind Donation column.


                                                                                            COST SHARE


Item Description            Unit           Unit   Units    Total       Cost         Notes
                            Type           Cost   Needed   Requested   Share (In-
                                                           from IREX   Kind
                                                                       Donations)
Travel expenses

 Round Trip International
Airfare
 Round Trip Domestic          Round-                                                 Cost of ticket to bring
Airfare                     trip airfare   300    1        300                      collaborator to my region
 Ground Transportation
(US)
 Ground Transportation
(Int'l)
 Subtotal Travel                                           $300

Per-Diem
Hotel Room (in-country)                                                             8 nights for collaborator in a
                            Per night      29     8        232                      local hotel
Hotel Room (in-transit)
Meals and Incidentals       Per day        35     8        280                      8 days of meals and incidentals
Subtotal Per Diem                                          $512

Other Costs
Venue Rental                                                                        Meeting space is being
                            Per day        100    8        400         400          provided at a 50% discount
 Participant                Per                                                     Participants will pay for their
Transportation              person         40     20                   800          own transportation
 Participant lodging
 Activity meals and                                                                 Breakfast and lunch for 20
refreshments                One-time       30     20       600                      participants
 Materials & Supplies
 Visa Fees
 Communications
 Equipment rental
 Taxes




Teaching Excellence and Achievement Program                                                        20
Alumni Small Grants Application How-to-Guide

Continue to complete each remaining section as shown below:


Activity meals and                                                            Catered breakfast and lunch for
refreshments            One-time    30         20    600                      20 participants
 Materials & Supplies                                                         Materials for poster-making
                                                                              activity and other workshop
                        One-time    150        1     150                      needs
Visa Fees
Communications                                                                The venue will donate $55 to
                        Per month              1                55            cover the internet access fees
Equipment rental                                                              Projector and audio visual
                        One-time    150        1     150                      equipment will cost $150 to rent
Taxes
Bank Fees                                                                     It is anticipated that the bank
                        Per                                                   will charge $15 for each wire
                        transfer    15         2     30                       transfer received from IREX
Subtotal Other Costs                                 $1930      $1255


Total costs                                          $2742      $1255



Congratulations! You have now completed your budget.

Review your Budget
Once you have completed your budget, make sure to review it to insure that:

    •   You have included all the costs that you anticipate to have
    •   You have entered the correct figures in each cell
    •   Your subtotal and total costs are correct (check your arithmetic!)
    •   You have completed the budget notes for each item in the budget
    •   You have included some cost share and provided explanation in the notes




Teaching Excellence and Achievement Program                                                  21
Alumni Small Grants Application How-to-Guide




              Step Five: Prepare all your documents for submission


Make sure that you have completed the following:

        Applicant(s) information form

        Proposal-Application

        Applicant(s) CVs

        Support letters/materials

        Budget and budget notes

        Agendas for any workshops / conferences


Submit your application

Submit you application online through the online application system. You are done!




Teaching Excellence and Achievement Program                                          22
Alumni Small Grants Application How-to-Guide




                                               Glossary



Beneficiaries: the individual or group of individuals that will receive benefit from the
implementation of the project.

Collaborator: the person (s) that you plan to work jointly with on your project.

Goal: overall purpose toward which the project activities are directed.

In-kind Donation: are goods (i.e. materials, equipment, food, etc) and/or services (parents or
colleagues time volunteered to carry-out project activities) that the applicant is able to receive
from other sources such as school, community, private business, etc. to use towards the
implementation of the project.

Lodging: this is term is used to referred to the cost of hotel, guest house or other sleeping
accommodations for an applicant or collaborator during project related travel.

Monitoring and Evaluation: refers to the plan to assess the impact of the project activities
against the goals and objectives of the project.

Objective: refers to what the project aims to achieve, it is the tangible outcome of the project.

Outcomes: refers to the expected tangible results of the project (i.e. 45 teachers trained, 1 book
developed, etc.).

Per Diem: refers to the cost for lodging and meals and incidentals (M&IE) while on project
related travel of an applicant or collaborator.

Quote/estimate: refers to the prices provided by vendors for goods and/or services for items
necessary to implement project activities.

Support Materials: this is the term use to refer to additional documents required to back-up
your application. In this guide support documents refers to:
          •   CVs
          •   Support letter from participating U.S. and international schools;
          •   Support letter from primary applicant’s home school that also certifies full-time secondary
              teaching employment;
          •   Support letter from institutions/individuals providing in-kind donations for the project;
          •   Detailed agendas for any proposed workshops, conferences, or other events.

Timeline: a schedule outlining the project activities and tasks


Teaching Excellence and Achievement Program                                                     23
                            Grant Proposal Flowchart
           THIS IS A VISUAL REPRESENTATION OF SOME KEY ELEMENTS OF A GRANT PROPOSAL
                 NOTE HOW ONE THING LEADS TO THE NEXT IN A GOOD PROJECT DESIGN




                                               STATEMENT OF NEED
1. What is the problem      Students in my school do not have well-developed critical
or need you want to          thinking skills because teachers only use lecture-based
address?                                     teaching in the classroom.



                                                                                           Collaborators

2. What is the goal of
your project?                                        GOAL
This should be your               To improve students’ critical thinking skills and
response to the need you                 teaching methods in my school.
have identified.




3. What are your
objective(s)?                                       OBJECTIVE
These should be             Teachers regularly use non-lecture based techniques, and
something you can           students practice critical thinking skills in the classroom.
measure.
                                                                                           Monitoring &
                                                                                            Evaluation

                                                       ACTIVITIES
 4. What activities will    1. Develop example lesson plans
 you do to achieve          2. Purchase materials to support group work in the classroom
 your objectives and        3. Conduct workshops for teachers on project-based learning
 goal?                      and critical thinking pedagogy
                            4. Observe classroom teaching of participating teachers




                           DIRECT BENEFICIARIES                           INDIRECT BENEFICIARIES
 5. What is the
 anticipated impact        35 teachers will be trained                    500 students will practice
 of your project?          in project-based learning                     problem-based learning and
                            techniques and critical                         critical thinking in the
                               thinking pedagogy                                   classroom
24

								
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