Mid-Atlantic Crop Management Sch by fjwuxn

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									Announcing the
15th Annual




         Mid-Atlantic Crop Management School
                                              November 17-19, 2009
                             Princess Royale Hotel and Conference Center, Ocean City, MD

About the School                                              a place in the sessions of your choice) is $200 if
The school offers a 2 ½-day format with a variety of          paid by October 16. After that date the fee will be
breakout sessions. Individuals needing training in soil       $220 and must be received by November 11. Payment
and water, nutrient management, crop management and           of registration fee entitles you to participation in 2 1/2
pest management can create their own schedule by              days of sessions, handout materials, name badge, 3
choosing from 5 program options offered each hour.            continental breakfasts, 2 lunches, and refreshment
Emphasis is placed on new and advanced information            breaks.
with group discussion and interaction encouraged.
                                                              Remember: Enrollment is limited to 250 people and is
                                                              on a first-come, first-served basis. You are encouraged
Who Should Attend                                             to register online and pay by credit card or check. To
This school is designed for anyone interested in crop
                                                              do so, please visit www.mdcrops.umd.edu
management issues, including:
 agronomists                                                 Alternatively, you can either download or use the
 crop consultants                                            registration form and sessions schedule in the brochure
 extension educators                                         and fax to: 301-314-6693 or mail along with payment
 farmers and farm managers                                   to:
 pesticide dealers, distributors, and applicators                      Conferences & Visitor Services - CROP
 seed and agrichemical company representatives                         4321 Hartwick Road, Suite 500
 soil conservationists                                                 College Park, MD 20740
 state department of agriculture personnel
                                                              You may pay by check (payable to University of
Enrollment is on a first-come, first-served basis.            Maryland) or credit card. If paying by check, it
Breakout sessions will be limited to 50 participants in       must accompany your registration form and
each session. Evening sessions will be held Tuesday           proposed class schedule. Purchase orders will not
and Wednesday.                                                be accepted. You will be notified of receipt of your
                                                              registration form, fee and session schedule.
Continuing Education Credits                                  Cancellation Policy – If you register but cannot attend,
The 2009 Mid-Atlantic Crop Management School has
                                                              you may send a substitute. Please notify University of
been approved by the Mid-Atlantic Crop Adviser
                                                              Maryland Conference & Visitor Services about
Program and has been assigned CCA continuing
                                                              changes in your registration prior to the school. A
education units (CEU’s) in the following categories:
                                                              refund less a $25 processing fee will be issued only if
                                                              your request is received in writing or via email. Send
                Crop Management – 12.5
                                                              the refund request by mailto the address above or by e-
             Nutrient Management – 11.5
                                                              mail to crop_registration@umd.edu no later than
                Pest Management – 11.5
                                                              November 11, 2009.
           Soil and Water Management – 8.5
             Professional Development – 5                     Hotel Reservation Information
                                                              The Princess Royale Oceanfront Hotel and Conference
Total CEU’s earned will depend on course selection.           Center is located at 91st Street in Ocean City, MD.
This school also provides Pesticide Recertification           Room rate per night is $65 for Oceanview/Poolview
Credits for DE, MD, NJ, PA, WV, and VA and                    and $85 for Oceanfront. You are responsible for
continuing education for Nutrient Management                  making hotel reservations no later than October 19.
Consultants in DE, MD, VA and WV.                             Call 410 524-7777, ask for reservations and indicate
                                                              you are with the Crop Management School.
Registration Information
The early-bird registration fee (recommended for
      I.       Registration                                      Effects of Row Spacing and Plant Population on No-Till
                                                                 Corn Silage Production - Significant interest has developed
General registration will begin 8:30 a.m. on November 17.        over the last several years regarding reducing row spacing in
Registration packets and information regarding CEU’s and         corn for both silage and grain production. This presentation
re-certification credits will be available at the registration   will discuss three years of research on this topic in Virginia,
desk. A continental breakfast will be available.                 and will focus primarily on corn silage systems. Specifically,
There will be no general session and all breakout sessions       the focus will be on twin-row corn spacing at various
begin at 10:00 a.m. on November 17.                              populations and the resulting effects on yield and forage
                                                                 quality. Instructor: Brian Jones, Virginia Tech
II.        Crop Management Sessions
           Each Session is Worth 1 CEU in Crop Management.       Why Forage Quality is Important For Dairy Cows -
                                                                 Forages make up at least 50 to 60% of the dietary intake of
When Should You Plant Soybeans for Maximum Yield?                dry matter for lactating dairy cows. Forage quality sets the
Planting date is a critical aspect in soybean production, but    pace for intake and milk production. Poor quality forages
the date that produces maximum yield fluctuates from year        stuff the rumen limiting intake of nutrients. This talk will
to year. We analyzed 28 experiments to get a better estimate     discuss many factors that affect forage quality at harvest
of the average response. There was no yield advantage for        including the topics of maturity, wilting, forage particle size,
April or early May plantings in the Midwest, Upper South         whole plant processing for corn silage and silo management.
or Deep South, but yield began to decline rapidly (0.7 to 1.2     Instructor: Dr. Limin Kung, University of Delaware
percentage points per day) when planting was delayed after
late May or early June. Instructor: Dr. D.B Egli, University     Intensive Barley Production in the mid-Atlantic - Barley
of Kentucky                                                      is a staple crop in the grain rotation in the mid-Atlantic
                                                                 region; however plantings have decreased in recent years due
Getting Corn Plant Population Right - Corn plant                 to changing demand. The barley to ethanol facility proposed
populations have been increasing steadily over recent            by Osage Bioenergy could greatly change demand for barley
decades, pushed in part by recommendations by companies          in the region. In fact the plant is capable of using more than
that sell seed. This presentation will summarize results of      twice the amount of barley currently produced in the mid-
plant population trials conducted over a wide range of           Atlantic. This discussion will focus on intensive
conditions. We will discuss risk management in making            management practices that optimize the profitability of
corn plant population decisions, including the role of           barley production. Instructor: Dr.Wade Thomason, Virginia
hybrids and whether or not varying plant population within       Tech
fields is a cost-effective approach. Instructor: Dr.E.D.
Nafziger, University of Illinois                                 Addressing Orchardgrass Vigor and Persistence
                                                                 Problems in the mid-Atlantic - Mid-Atlantic farmers are
Bee Pollination and Vegetable Crops - Native bees have           experiencing reduced vigor and early death of orchardgrass
become all the buzz in recent years. However, both               (Dactylis glomerata L.). A task force to address the problem
honeybees (Apis mellifera) and native bees provide               was organized with representatives from Virginia, Maryland,
vegetable crops a valuable service. This presentation will       West Virginia and Pennsylvania. The potential causes of
cover some of the major bee groups, their foraging and           these problems are thought to be: cutting/grazing too
nesting requirements, and what can be done to increase their     short/frequently; pests (orchardgrass billbugs, grubs and a
numbers. The bee's pollination style and what crops they         disease called leaf streak); and improper fertilization. A
visit will also be discussed. Instructor: Heather Harmon         workshop in July 2009 will prepare a plan for elucidating
Disque, Delaware Department of Agriculture                       and developing solutions. This presentation will be an
                                                                 update of these efforts. Instructor: Bobby Clark, Virginia
Food Soybeans for the Japanese Market - Consumer                 Tech
preferences for commodities sold in a foreign market have
an influence on production practices used to supply the          Making the Most of Precision Agriculture Technologies –
commodity for that market. The nature of that influence          Farmers tend to make use of technology in ways that
and the practices that result are discussed from the             developers had not anticipated. One example is how
perspective of one regional farm business that exports           innovative farmers use yield monitors and other spatial
soybeans to Japan. This presentation reviews the                 technologies to aid in conducting field-scale on-farm
importance of variety development, measures needed to            experiments. Using a 7-year case study, the issues that
preserve identity and insure quality, timeliness of field        farmers struggle with using these technologies will be
operations, communication with customers, and enterprise         discussed. Suggestions on how to use these technologies that
logistics. Instructor: O. Bryan Taliaferro Jr., Montague         are based on practical experience from that case study will be
Farms, Inc.                                                      offered. Instructor: Dr.Terry Griffin, University of
                                                                 Arkansas
III.     Nutrient Management Sessions                            Manure Injection: Improve Nitrogen Use Efficiency and
       Each Session is Worth 1 CEU in Nutrient Management        Protect the Environment - Surface application of manure
                                                                 leads to significant losses of nitrogen through ammonia
Nitrogen Management Using N Stabilizers and Slow
                                                                 volatilization and increases nitrogen and phosphorus losses
Release Products - Ever changing and somewhat volatile
                                                                 in runoff. Manure injection can be compatible with no-till,
commodity and fertilizer prices are causing grain
                                                                 and greatly increases nitrogen use efficiency for producers
producers to rethink fertilizer management. Their goal is
                                                                 and reduces odors and nutrient losses in runoff. We will
to improve fertilizer use efficiency while maintaining crop
                                                                 report on two years of field trials with manure injection in
productivity. Enhanced efficiency fertilizers are designed
                                                                 Virginia. Instructor: Dr. Rory Maguire, Virginia Tech
to improve nutrient uptake while stabilized nitrogen
products prevent fertilizer N loss. Currently three types of     Variable Rate N Fertilizer for Wheat and Corn in the
products are being marketed that claim improvement in            mid-Atlantic - Matching the timing of N application with
nitrogen use efficiency: nitrification inhibitors, urease        peak crop demand can increase fertilizer use efficiency, as
inhibitors, and controlled-release fertilizers. These            can treating spatial variability in crop N needs that exist at a
products work by slowing one of the processes within the         sub-field level. The GreenSeeker Variable Rate
nitrogen cycle, thereby reducing N loss. These products          Application system is based on crop canopy reflectance
are only useful in specific situations, so it is important to    measurement and is capable of treating this variation on-
understand how they work and when they are beneficial.           the-go. Results from five years of testing in the region will
Instructor: Dr. Greg Schwab, University of Kentucky              be discussed. Instructor: Dr. Wade Thomason, Virginia
Soil Fertility in Organic Grain Systems - Soil fertility         Tech
management in organic grain cropping systems depends on          Nutrient Efficiency: Applying What You Need When
an integrated strategy of building long-term soil N pools        You Need It. - Fertilizer efficiency is paramount for
using crop rotations that include annual and/or perennial        improving farm sustainability, both environmentally and
legumes, and on using animal manure and other approved           economically. Focusing on the appropriate nutrient and the
materials. Sole reliance on any one of these sources of N is     proper application procedure is crop, soil, and fertilizer
often insufficient (e.g., legumes) and/or unsustainable          dependent. A brief overview of soil testing and the proper
(e.g., animal manure). This presentation will discuss some       ways to increase nutrient efficiency for common crops will
of the challenges and solutions for sustainable soil fertility   be discussed. Data will be presented from several research
management in organic grain cropping systems.                    studies as well as general information regarding soil
Instructor: Dr. John Spargo, USDA-BARC                           fertility. Instructor: Dr. Mark Reiter, Virginia Tech
Managing Nutrients in 2010 and Beyond - Nutrient                 Eastern Shore Agricultural R&E Center
management in today’s agriculture is quite different than        History of Nutrient Management in the mid-Atlantic -
previous generations. Managing nutrients for optimal             The Mid-Atlantic States, and particularly Maryland and the
environmental stewardship is a major concern in today’s          Port of Baltimore, have a rich history in nutrient
society. The goal of this presentation is discuss how            management dating back to colonial times. The
agriculture can maximize efficiency and optimize nutrient        development and rationale for nutrient management
inputs for maximum profitability and minimal                     practices and legislation from the time of European
environmental harm. Instructor: Dr. Greg Binford,                settlement to the present will be explored. The role of
University of Delaware                                           Justus von Liebig, often called the Father of the Fertilizer
                                                                 Industry, fraud in Maryland’s first nutrient management
Solving Plant Nutrient Problems Using Soil Tests and
                                                                 law (1848) and many other historical facts of regional
Plant Analysis - Soil testing is commonly used to
                                                                 importance will also be discussed. The past has influenced
diagnose nutrient problems but plant analysis is a greatly
                                                                 the current nutrient loading status in the region. Let’s use
underutilized tool. It is especially helpful where the
                                                                 the past as a helpful guide for the future. Instructor: Dr.
underlying nutrient problem is not simply due to a low
level of a nutrient in the soil. Details and examples of how     Trish Steinhilber, University of Maryland
to use soil testing and plant analysis with field                Revisiting the Phosphorus Site Index: What Have We
observations to monitor plant nutrition, and diagnose and        Learned? - In 1998 the Maryland Nutrient Management
solve nutrient deficiency problems will be discussed.            Law was passed requiring nitrogen (N) and phosphorus (P)
Instructor: Dr. Douglas Beegle, Penn State University            based planning for nearly all commercial agricultural
Subsurface Application of Poultry Litter - Subsurface            operations in the state. The law included a P site index as a
application of poultry litter provides more efficient use of     primary tool for ranking field vulnerability for P losses to
crop nutrients and helps prevent the problems associated         surface waters. At the time, an index that could accurately
with surface-applied litter: unpleasant odors, nitrogen loss     assess the risk across all of Maryland did not exist. Most of
via ammonia volatilization, and water-quality degradation        the P site indices are very similar to Maryland’s version.
when the nutrients are carried by storm runoff into streams      The current index will be discussed, its strengths and
and lakes. Learn about research using this innovative litter     weaknesses identified, and how it will evolve as new
application method and how new technology may make               science and data become available. Instructor: Dr. Josh
subsurface application a practical option for perennial          McGrath, University of Maryland
pastures and other no-till systems. Instructor: Dr. Dan
Pote, USDA-ARS, Arkansas
Using Manure Management Planner to Develop a                     to help suppress weeds include species selection,
Comprehensive Nutrient Management Plan - Manure                  establishment date, seeding rate, row spacing or
Management Planner (MMP) is a Windows-based software             arrangement, soil fertility, and termination method and date.
program developed at Purdue University for nutrient               This presentation will provide some guidance on how to
management planning and to create comprehensive nutrient         gain some weed control benefit from growing winter covers
management plans (CNMPs) for crop and animal feeding             and share on-going research results in this area.
operations. MMP supports CNMP development by                     Instructor: Dr. William Curran, Penn State University
including Maryland Specific Crop Nutrient
recommendations, RUSLE2, MD Phosphorus Site Index,               Management of Arthropods Through Modification of
and State Manure Application setback requirements.               the Crop Environment - Historically, entomologists have
Session will include an overview of MMP for planners,            called modifying the crop environment through purposeful
regulators, and third party vendors (TSPs), along with           manipulation of farming practices, cultural control. Cultural
discussion on State specific requirements for developing         control can be defined as manipulation of an agroecosystem
CNMPs in Maryland and Delaware. We will also discuss             to limit pest increase and damage. More recently this is
and answer questions regarding State CAFO requirements.          called ecological pest management. It is based on the notion
Instructors: Chris Gross/John Davis/Tim Pilkowski/Sally          that if you thoroughly understand a pest’s behavior as it
Kepfer, USDA, NRCS                                               relates to a cropping system, your odds of controlling that
                                                                 pest increase. Good pest managers are like first-rate boxers.
         IV. Pest Management Sessions                            When good boxers enter the ring, they know their
         Each Session is Worth 1 CEU in Pest Management.         opponents well. The better they know their opponents, the
                                                                 greater chance they have of exploiting their weaknesses and
Indirect Benefits of Bt-Corn forVegetable Crops - In             sending them to the mat. Ecological pest management is
recent years, Mid-Atlantic and Mid-West entomologists and        similar to boxing. The aim is to find “weak links” in the
crop consultants have observed lower European corn borer         insect’s life cycle within a specific cropping environment
(ECB) moths trap catches where Bt field corn has been            and exploit those weaknesses. This overview will provide
widely adopted. Although much research has documented            examples of how you can modify environmental factors to
the benefit of this technology for field corn, it appears that   knock out insect pests. Instructor: Dr. Cerruti Hooks,
there also may be an “area-wide suppression effect” on           University of Maryland
ECB that could benefit vegetable growers. Landscape-scale
suppression of ECB populations could indirectly lead to          Herbicide-Resistant Crops: What’s Next? Herbicide-
substantial reductions in insecticide use and pesticide          resistant crops have been a staple of American agriculture
residues in conventional and organic high-value vegetable        for the past 10 to 12 years. In the next five years a number
crops. Information will provided on the research conducted       of new herbicide-resistant crops should reach the
in the two regions to assess the extent of landscape-scale       marketplace. This presentation will be an overview of these
suppression of ECB. The development of new pest                  new traits and how might these new traits impact Delmarva.
management recommendations that incorporate the benefits         Instructor: Dr. Mark Vangessel, University of Delaware
of "area-wide suppression" will be discussed. Instructor:
                                                                 Weed Management in Pasture and Hay - This session
Dr. Galen Dively, University of Maryland
                                                                 will provide discussion on challenges involved in pasture
Wheat Rusts: Current and Future Threats - Stripe rust,           and hay weed management, cultural practices for crop/weed
leaf rust, and stem rust can cause significant yield and test    management, ideas for controlling weeds in annual forage
weight losses to wheat. This talk will focus on factors          crops, and updates on herbicide uses and labels. We will try
affecting the severity of these diseases in the mid-Atlantic     to incorporate some hands-on examples of the results of
states and on management strategies for minimizing losses.       different management practices as well as some common
Instructor: Dr. Gene Milus, University of Arkansas               pasture weeds. Instructor: Quintin Johnson, University of
                                                                 Delaware
 Fungicide Resistance Management: Guidelines for
Vegetable Crops Grown in the mid-Atlantic - New                              V. Soil and Water Sessions
fungicide chemistries with specific modes of action (MOA)          Sessions Earn 1 CEU in Soil and Water Management Unless Noted.
have been developed for use in vegetable production. Most        Pfiesteria, We Hardly Knew You - The Pfiesteria hysteria
have a high-risk for fungicide resistance development. The       of 1997 was precipitated by fish kills on the Pocomoke
number of fungicide chemistries available and differences        River, fish lesions and human health effects consistent with
in MOA can make it difficult to develop and follow season-       widely publicized events in North Carolina. In 1996 fish
long fungicide programs. A fungicide resistance                  kills at a fish farm near the Pocomoke River appeared to be
management guide has been developed for vegetable                due to another small dinoflagellate now called Karlodinium
growers in the region to help growers i) understand the          veneficum that was also present at some of the kills in the
importance of knowing FRAC codes, ii) determine proper           Chesapeake during the Pfiesteria hysteria. We now know
fungicide chemistry rotations, and iii) help reduce the          Karlodinium is a toxic species of significant environmental
potential for fungicide resistance development. Instructor:      concern globally. Instructor: Dr. Dan Terlizzi, Center of
Dr. Andy Wyenandt, Rutgers University                            Marine Biotechnology, University of Maryland
Managing Cover Crops to Help Control Your Weed                   Using Sensor Networks for Real-Time Irrigation
Problems - Cover crops can be manipulated to help                Scheduling - We are using wireless sensor networks on
improve weed management in annual crop production                three farms to provide us with real-time soil / substrate
systems. Factors that can impact the ability of a cover crop
moisture status, at the micro-scale level. The data is              What Are the Effects of Vertical Tillage on Ground
transmitted wirelessly from the field to an office computer,        Cover and Ammonia Volatilization? - Vertical tillage
where it can be viewed graphically by a user with minimal           implements, such as the Turbo-till or Phoenix harrow, are
computer experience, to better schedule irrigation and other        frequently used in the Mid-Atlantic region as a means to
cultural practices. We will demonstrate these systems and           maintain high surface-residue cover, yet provide some
show how these farmers are using this information, to make          degree of surface-soil mixing. A field evaluation of three
better daily management decisions. Instructors: Dr. John            vertical tillage implements and three conventional tillage
Lea-Cox and Dr. David S. Ross, University of Maryland               implements was conducted at the Beltsville Agriculture
                                                                    Center using various speeds and various implement settings
Characterization, Utilization, and Remediation of                   for tillage intensity. The effect of each implement on
Derelict Poultry House Pad Soils - There are over 2000              percent total ground cover and percent surface-exposed
derelict poultry houses on Delmarva Peninsula and many              ground cover was determined using the line-intersect
more in other poultry producing areas of the country. The           method. Ammonia volatilization from manure applications
pad soils underneath these houses are rich with nutrients           was also measured on selected implements using wind
that have diffused from the litter above over the years.            tunnels. The results from these studies will be discussed
These soils are high in salts with significant amounts of           along with a comparison of the advantages and
ammonium, nitrate, and potassium. In this session, results          disadvantages of vertical tillage compared to conventional
from research characterizing the nutrient loading and               tillage techniques. Instructor: Dr. Jack Meisinger, USDA-
salt content of these sites will be presented along with field      ARS, Beltsville Agriculture Research Center
trial results using excavated pad soils as a fertilizer for field
crops and vegetables. Another aspect of this project is             Composting Animal Carcasses - A Food and Drug
identifying salt tolerant crop species that can be used to          Administration ban on the use of brains and spinal cords
plant on these sites as well as other remediation approaches        from cattle 30 months of age and older in animal feed
such as the addition of high carbon materials to tie up             recently went into effect. As a result, many renderers are no
excess nitrogen. This research is the basis for a pilot cost-       longer accepting cattle mortalities creating a need for
share program in Delaware for decommissioning derelict              alternatives for the disposal of large animal carcasses.
poultry houses. Aspects of this cost-share program will be          Guidelines that farmers can use to compost animal
detailed. Instructor: Gordon Johnson, University of                 carcasses in a biosecure and cost-effective manner will be
Delaware                                                            discussed. Instructor: Dr.Jennifer Becker, University of
                                                                    Maryland
Improving Soil and Water Quality with Continuous No-
Till Systems - No-till cropping systems are built on the            NRCS Conservation Activity Plans/EQIP 2009
premises of continuous no-till, crop diversity, and cover           Programs - USDA – Natural Resources Conservation
crops to occupy fallow periods. We will review the impact           Service Financial Assistance Programs are available for
on these systems on key indicators of soil quality (such as,        farmers. This presentation will include discussion on
soil carbon, soil aggregation, and myccorhizae), and of             Environmental Quality Incentive Programs (EQIP) for 2009
water quality (soil erosion, nitrate leaching, and phosphorus       including Conservation Activity Plans and other EQIP
runoff). Instructor: Dr. Sjoerd Duiker, Penn State                  Programs. Learn about program requirements for
University                                                          Producers and Technical Service Providers, Eligible
                                                                    Practices and Practice Payments. If you are a Technical
Agriculture’s Role in Nutrient and Carbon Trading -                 Service Provider or in the Ag Service industry looking to
Water quality and carbon trading provide opportunities for          diversify your income and to provide services to farmers
farmers and landowners to receive compensation for                  under NRCS EQIP Programs, you should attend this
implementing conservation practices on their lands.                 session. Instructors: Tim Garrahan and Tom Morgart,
Trading provides additional resources that supplement               USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service (1 CEU
existing conservation program funding. Farmers sell the             PD)
amount of nutrients reduced or carbon sequestered by
conservation practices. Facilities, like wastewater treatment       NRCS Conservation Practices to Address Soil & Water
plants, buy the reductions to help meet regulatory                  Resource Concerns - The presentation will show examples
requirements that limit the amount of nitrogen and                  of conservation practices from the NRCS Technical Guide
phosphorous that may be discharged in their wastewater to           and discuss the resource concerns addressed by the
local waterbodies. These regulated facilities may find that         practices. It will include structural and non-structural
it is less expensive to pay producers to implement                  practices and combinations of practices. A portion of the
conservation practices than it is to install enhanced               presentation will focus on poultry farms and how to address
treatment technologies. Instructor: John Rhoderick,                 the CAFO regulations currently imposed on existing and
Maryland Department of Agriculture                                  new operations. Instructor: Ann Baldwin, USDA Natural
                                                                    Resources Conservation Service
Time                                                             Day 1: Tuesday, November 17, 2009
8:30 -10:00                                                                       Registration
                       Pest Management                   Crop Management           Nutrient Management                         Soil & Water Mgt.                Fifth Session
10:00 - 10:50    Indirect Benefits of Bt-Corn for   When Should You Plant             Nitrogen Management Using N          Pfiesteria, We Hardly Knew       Food Safety Issues on
                 Vegetable Crops – Dively,          Soybeans for Maximum Yield?       Stabilizers and Slow Release         You – Terlizzi – Center of       the Farm – Kline,
                 University of Maryland             – Egli, Univ. of Kentucky         Products – Schwab, University of     Marine Biotechnology,            Rutgers University (PD)
                                                                                      Kentucky                             University of Maryland
11:00 – 11:50    Indirect Benefits of Bt-Corn for   When Should You Plant             Nitrogen Management Using N          Pfiesteria, We Hardly Knew       Food Safety Issues on
                 Vegetable Crops – Dively,          Soybeans for Maximum Yield?       Stabilizers and Slow Release         You – Terlizzi – Center of       the Farm – Kline,
                 University of Maryland             – Egli, University of Kentucky    Products – Schwab, University of     Marine Biotechnology,            Rutgers University (PD)
                                                                                      Kentucky                             University of Maryland
11:50 – 1:00                                                                                  Lunch
1:00 – 1:50      Wheat Rusts: Current and Future    Getting Corn Plant Population     Soil Fertility in Organic Grain      Using Sensor Networks for        New Developments
                 Threats – Milus, University of     Right – Nafziger, Univ. of        Systems – Spargo, USDA – ARS,        Real-Time Irrigation             with Corn and Soybean
                 Arkansas                           Illinois                          Beltsville Ag. Research Center       Scheduling – Lea-Cox and         Seed Treatments –
                                                                                                                           Ross, Univ. of Maryland          McLeod, Pioneer (PM)
2:00 – 2:50      Wheat Rusts: Current and Future    Getting Corn Plant Population     Soil Fertility in Organic Grain      Using Sensor Networks for        New Developments
                 Threats – Milus, University of     Right – Nafziger, Univ. of        Systems – Spargo, USDA – ARS,        Real-Time Irrigation             with Corn and Soybean
                 Arkansas                           Illinois                          Beltsville Ag. Research Center       Scheduling – Lea-Cox and         Seed Treatments –
                                                                                                                           Ross, Univ. of Maryland          McLeod, Pioneer (PM)
2:50 – 3:10                                                                                 Break
3:10 – 4:00     Fungicide Resistance              Bee Pollination and Vegetable     Managing Nutrients in 2010 and         Characterization, Utilization,   Thoughts on Corn
                Management Guidelines for         Crops – Harmon-Disque,            Beyond – Binford, University of        and Remediation of Derelict      Hybrid Selection –
                Mid-Atlantic Vegetable Crops –    Delaware Dept. of Agriculture     Delaware                               Poultry House Pad Soils – G.     Nielsen, Purdue
                Wyenandt, Rutgers University                                                                               Johnson, Univ. of Delaware       University (CM)
4:10 – 5:00     Fungicide Resistance              Bee Pollination and Vegetable     Managing Nutrients in 2010 and         Characterization, Utilization,   Thoughts on Corn
                Management Guidelines for         Crops – Harmon-Disque,            Beyond – Binford, University of        and Remediation of Derelict      Hybrid Selection –
                Mid-Atlantic Vegetable Crops –    Delaware Dept. of Agriculture     Delaware                               Poultry House Pad Soils – G.     Nielsen, Purdue
                Wyenandt, Rutgers University                                                                               Johnson, Univ. of Delaware       University (CM)
Night Session 7:00–9:00 pm         Great Crop School Debates – G. Johnson and R. Taylor , University of Delaware


                                                                Day 2: Wednesday, November 18, 2009
 Time                 Crop Management                  Nutrient Management        Nutrient Management                        Soil & Water Mgt.                  Fifth Session
8:00 – 8:50      Food Soybeans for the Japanese     Solving Plant Nutrient Problems   Subsurface Application of          Improving Soil and Water           Dectes Stem Borer in
                 Market – Taliaferro, Montague      Using Soil Tests and Plant        Poultry Litter – Pote, USDA-       Quality with Continuous No-        Soybean – Whalen,
                 Farms, Inc.                        Analysis – Beegle, Pennsylvania   ARS, Boonesville, Arkansas         Till Systems – Duiker,             Univ. of Delaware (PM)
                                                    State University                                                     Pennsylvania State Univ.
9:00 – 9:50      Food Soybeans for the Japanese     Solving Plant Nutrient Problems   Subsurface Application of          Improving Soil and Water           Dectes Stem Borer in
                 Market– Taliaferro, Montague       Using Soil Tests and Plant        Poultry Litter – Pote, USDA-       Quality with Continuous No-        Soybean – Whalen,
                 Farms, Inc.                        Analysis – Beegle, Pennsylvania   ARS, Boonesville, Arkansas         Till Systems – Duiker,             Univ. of Delaware (PM)
                                                    State University                                                     Pennsylvania State Univ.
9:50 – 10:10                                                                                 Break
10:10 – 11:00    Effects of Row-Spacing and         Manure Injection to Improve N     Variable Rate N Fertilization of   Agriculture’s Role in Nutrient     Corn Growth &
                 Plant Population on No-Till        Use Efficiency and Protect the    Wheat and Corn in the Mid-         and Carbon Trading –               Development:
                 Corn Silage Production - Jones,    Environment - Maguire, Virginia   Atlantic – Thomason, Virginia      Rhoderick, Maryland                Pollination and Seed
                 Virginia Tech                      Tech                              Tech                               Department of Agriculture          Fill – Nielsen, Purdue
                                                                                                                                                            University (CM)
11:10 – 12:00   Effects of Row-Spacing and        Manure Injection to Improve N     Variable Rate N Fertilization of   Agriculture’s Role in Nutrient   Corn Growth &
                Plant Population on No-Till       Use Efficiency and Protect the    Wheat and Corn in the Mid-         and Carbon Trading –             Development:
                Corn Silage Production - Jones,   Environment - Maguire, Virginia   Atlantic – Thomason, Virginia      Rhoderick, Maryland              Pollination and Seed
                Virginia Tech                     Tech                              Tech                               Department of Agriculture        Fill – Nielsen, Purdue
                                                                                                                                                        University (CM)
12:00 – 1:00                                                                               Lunch
1:00 – 1:50     Why Forage Quality is             Nutrient Efficiency: Applying     History of Nutrient                What Are the Effects of          Osage Bioenergy and
                Important for Dairy Cows –        What You Need When You            Management in the Mid-             Vertical Tillage on Ground       Barley Ethanol
                Kung, University of Delaware      Need It – Reiter, Virginia Tech   Atlantic - Steinhilber,            Cover and Ammonia                Production – Scruggs,
                                                                                    University of Maryland             Volatilization? – Meisinger,     Osage Bio Energy (PD)
                                                                                                                       USDA-BARC
2:00 – 2:50     Why Forage Quality is             Nutrient Efficiency: Applying     History of Nutrient                What Are the Effects of          Osage Bioenergy and
                Important for Dairy Cows –        What You Need When You            Management in the Mid-             Vertical Tillage on Ground       Barley Ethanol
                Kung, University of Delaware      Need It – Reiter, Virginia Tech   Atlantic - Steinhilber,            Cover and Ammonia                Production – Scruggs,
                                                                                    University of Maryland             Volatilization? – Meisinger,     Osage Bio Energy (PD)
                                                                                                                       USDA-BARC
2:50 – 3:10                                                                                Break
3:10 – 4:00     Intensive Barley Production for   Revisiting the Phosphorus Site    Using Manure Management            Composting Animal Carcasses      Slug Mgt. in Corn and
                the Mid-Atlantic – Thomason,      Index: What Have We Learned?      Planner to Develop                 - Becker, University of          Soybean in Northern
                Virginia Tech                     – McGrath, University of          Comprehensive Nutrient             Maryland                         Shenandoah Valley –
                                                  Maryland                          Management Plans – USDA,                                            Clark, Virginia Tech
                                                                                    NRCS Staff                                                          (PM)
4:10 – 5:00     Intensive Barley Production for   Revisiting the Phosphorus Site    Using Manure Management            Composting Animal Carcasses      Slug Mgt. in Corn and
                the Mid-Atlantic – Thomason,      Index: What Have We Learned?      Planner to Develop                 - Becker, University of          Soybean in Northern
                Virginia Tech                     – McGrath, University of          Comprehensive Nutrient             Maryland                         Shenandoah Valley –
                                                  Maryland                          Management Plans – USDA,                                            Clark, Virginia Tech
                                                                                    NRCS Staff                                                          (PM)
Night Session 7:00 – 9:00 pm                      Your Role as a CCA for Agriculture in Your Community – McGowan & Johnson, University of Delaware

                                                              Day 3: Thursday, November 19, 2009
 Time                Pest Management                   Pest Management           Crop Management                            Soil & Water Mgt                Fifth Session
8:00 – 8:50     Managing Cover Crops to Help      Management of Arthropods          Addressing Orchardgrass Vigor      NRCS Conservation Activity       Feeding Hay to Horses
                Control Your Weed Problems –      Through Modification of the       and Persistence Problems in the    Plans/EQIP 2009 Programs –       – Burk, Univ. of
                Curran, Pennsylvania State        Crop Environment – Hooks,         Mid-Atlantic – Clark, Virginia     Garrahan (DE) and Morgart        Maryland (CM)
                University                        University of Maryland            Tech                               (MD), USDA-NRCS (PD)
9:00 – 9:50     Managing Cover Crops to Help      Management of Arthropods          Addressing Orchardgrass Vigor      NRCS Conservation Activity       Feeding Hay to Horses
                Control Your Weed Problems –      Through Modification of the       and Persistence Problems in the    Plans/EQIP 2009 Programs –       – Burk, Univ. of
                Curran, Pennsylvania State        Crop Environment – Hooks,         Mid-Atlantic – Clark, Virginia     Garrahan (DE) and Morgart        Maryland (CM)
                University                        University of Maryland            Tech                               (MD), USDA-NRCS (PD)
9:50 – 10:10                                                                               Break
10:10 – 11:00   Herbicide-Resistant Crops:        Weed Management in Pasture        Making the Most of Precision       NRCS Conservation Practices      New Wipers for Weed Mgt
                What’s Next? – Vangessel,         and Hay – Q. Johnson,             Agriculture Technologies –         to Address Soil & Water          in Pastures and Hayfields,
                University of Delaware            University of Delaware            Griffin, University of Arkansas    Resource Concerns – Baldwin,     Chandran, West Virginia
                                                                                                                                                        Univ. (PM)
                                                                                                                       USDA-NRCS
11:10 – 12:00   Herbicide-Resistant Crops:        Weed Management in Pasture        Making the Most of Precision       NRCS Conservation Practices      New Wipers for Weed Mgt
                What’s Next? – Vangessel,         and Hay – Q. Johnson,             Agriculture Technologies –         to Address Soil & Water          in Pastures and Hayfields,
                University of Delaware            University of Delaware            Griffin, University of Arkansas    Resource Concerns – Baldwin,     Chandran, West Virginia
                                                                                                                                                        Univ. (PM)
                                                                                                                       USDA-NRCS
12:00                                                                                    Adjourn
                     VI. Fifth Sessions
      Each session’s CEU category is designated at end of abstract.   Osage Bio Energy and Barley Ethanol Production -
Food Safety Issues on the Farm - Food safety concerns                 Representatives from Osage Bio Energy will discuss the
continue to increase at the state and federal level. Wholesale        development of a new ethanol plant in this region and the
fruit and vegetable growers are under continual pressure              potential for ethanol production from barley. The type,
from wholesale buyers to develop their food safety plant and          quantity and quality of barley feed stock necessary for
pass a third party audit. This, combined with the new federal         production of ethanol and Barley Protein Meal will be
food safety initiative, will affect all produce and livestock         discussed with an opportunity for participants to discuss the
producers in the United States. The main areas of concern –           impact of the proposed ethanol plant on barley and double-
water use, worker hygiene, manure use, animal and livestock           cropping systems. The session will also focus on
management, and post harvest handling – will be discussed.            management considerations in relation to starch, protein and
The objective of this presentation is to give everyone                mycotoxins in barley. Instructor: Bill Scruggs, Osage Bio
baseline information on food safety so they are better                Energy (1CEU PD)
prepared to interact as discussions move forward.
Instructor: Dr. Wes Kline, Rutgers University (1CEU PD)               Slug Management in Corn and Soybean in the Northern
                                                                      Shenandoah Valley of Virginia - Managing slugs is the
New Developments with Seed Treatments: Corn and                       most significant factor that is preventing farmers from no-
Soybeans - Although seed treatments for insect and disease            tilling additional acres in the Shenandoah Valley of
management have been available for field corn for a number            Virginia. During 2008 and 2009; 10 replicated field trials
of years, their use on soybeans has been limited until recent         evaluated the effectiveness of Deadline Slug Bait (4%
years. In addition, seed treatments for nematode management           Metaldehyde) at controlling slugs. Bait and no bait
in field corn are now being evaluated. This presentation will         treatments were evaluated using plant population and yield.
focus on insect, disease and nematode management using                This presentation will review these results and discuss
currently available as well as promising new chemistries.             future plans. Instructor: Bobby Clark, Virginia Tech
Instructor: Dr. Murdick McLeod, Pioneer Hi-Bred Intl. (1              Cooperative Extension (1CEU PM)
CEU PM)
                                                                      Feeding Hay to Horses - This presentation will provide an
Thoughts on Corn Hybrid Selection - This agronomic                    overview of feeding hay to horses. Specific topics will
decision is one of the most important ones growers make               include: hay quality standards needed when feeding hay to
each growing season, but one that many growers often fail to          horses, selection of hay to meet nutritional requirements of
do enough homework to really select the most consistently             different classes of horses, low carbohydrate hay needs of
performing hybrids for their situation. I’ll give some food           “carb sensitive” horses and new research on the palatability
for thought and challenge the lazy way that many folks go             and digestibility of novel hays (i.e. reed canarygrass and
about making this important decision. Instructor: Dr. Bob             teff) fed to horses. Instructor: Dr. Amy Burk, University of
Nielsen, Purdue University (1CEU CM)                                  Maryland (1 CEU CM)

Dectes Stem Borer in Soybeans: Are Your Grower’s                      Newer Wipers for Weed Management in Pasture and
Experiencing Problems? - If you think your growers are                Hayfields - Tall growing weeds like ironweed, hemp
seeing an increase in lodging damage they may be                      dogbane, milkweed, spiny pigweed, thistles etc., compete
experiencing an increase in damage from the Dectes                    with mineral nutrients, water, and sunlight and reduce the
(soybean) stem borer. Although it has been a pest in our              overall productivity of a pasture or hayfield and may affect
region since the 1980’s, producers and consultants continue           the quality of hay. Broadcast application of herbicides
to report an increase in the number of fields with lodging            effective to manage these weeds may cause injury to
losses from this pest. This presentation will focus on the            legumes. Selective weed management using wick
biology and life history of this insect pest, cultural                applicators is possible due to height differences between the
management strategies, a review of our 2009 survey results            crop and weed. Studies were conducted at West Virginia
and results from grower demonstration and replicated                  University to evaluate two types of weed wipers for this
research trials evaluating potential thresholds and treatment         purpose. The first wiper consisted of a stationary tube filled
timings. Instructor: Joanne Whalen, University of                     with herbicide solution and covered by a patented fabric,
Delaware (1CEU PM)                                                    mounted and moved across the hayfield on an ATV. The
                                                                      second weed wiper consisted of a rotary drum covered by a
Corn Growth and Development: Pollination and Grain                    patented fabric onto which a herbicide solution was sprayed
Fill - In our previous discussions of corn growth and                 intermittently, hauled by an ATV. The pros and cons of
development at the Mid-Atlantic Crop Management                       each of these weed wipers will be discussed. The weed
Conference, I have never fully covered the reproductive               species and herbicides studied for efficacy will also be
phase for corn growth and development. This session will              discussed. Instructor: Dr.Rakesh Chandron, West Virginia
focus on these very important stages in the life of the corn          University (1 CEU PM)
plant; from the perspectives of “what goes on” and how
stress can impact yield during these stages. Instructor: Dr.
Bob Nielsen, Purdue University (1CEU CM)
             VII.     Evening Sessions

    Tuesday, November 17, 2009, 7:00-9:00 PM

The Great Crop School Debates - In this session, current
practices related to nutrient management, soil and water
management, crop management, and pest management will
be debated. Topics of debate will be those where research is
contradictory or subject to multiple interpretations. In the
first part of the session, the debate will be between the
instructors (to provide examples of how to debate an issue).
In the remainder of the session, participants will be divided
in to teams to debate each other given opposite sides of a
management issue. Research results and critical
information will be provided for teams to develop debating
points. Judges will be on hand to score debates. The 2
teams with the best scores from the initial round will go
head to head in the final round. Instructors: Gordon
Johnson and Dr. Richard Taylor, University of Delaware
(0.5 CEU in PM, CM, NM, and SW)

  Wednesday, November 18, 2009, 7:00–9:00 PM

Agriculture as Part of the Community – Your Role as a
CCA - The CCA is a professional certification that provides
evidence of a level of knowledge in agronomic fields,
provides for continuing education and improvement, and
sets a code of conduct to follow. As a professional, it is
important to consider how you interact with the community
at large. In this session we will explore the role a CCA
might play as a citizen in the community. From
environmental issues to land use, business and economic
development to feeding the hungry in your community;
immigration reform and farm labor to food safety concerns;
community improvement projects to road safety; buy local
programs to support your neighbor initiatives; you as a CCA
can offer your experience and expertise into decision
making and make a positive impact in your community.
Instructors: Dr. William McGowan and Mr. Gordon
Johnson, University of Delaware (2 CEU PD)
                                                     Registration Form
                                  Mid-Atlantic Crop Management School
                         Princess Royale Oceanfront Hotel and Conference Center
                                          Ocean City, Maryland
                                         November 17-19, 2009

EITHER Register ON-LINE at www.mdcrops.umd.edu OR Complete this and the following page and mail or
fax to Conferences & Visitor Services {contact information below}.

Name ______________________________________________________

Company or Affiliation _______________________________________

Address ____________________________________________________

____________________________________________________________

City __________________________ State ____________ Zip __________

Telephone _______________________ FAX ________________________

e-mail ________________________________________________________
CCA Certification Number ______________________________________

Nutrient Management Certification Number __________________ State______

Pesticide Certification Number ___________________________                            State______

Registration fee on or before October 16 is $200.00.                 Registration fee after October 16 is $220.00.

Total amount enclosed $____________
Check, money order or credit card information must accompany the registration form and class choices.
Make check or Money Order payable to: University of Maryland
Credit Card (circle one)               VISA                 MasterCard                  Discover
        Credit Card No: ____________________________________________________
        Expiration Date: ___________               Name on Card: ___________________________

Mail completed form, class choices, and payment (no purchase orders) to:
        Conference & Visitor Services - CROP                         Phone: 301-314-7884
        4321 Hartwick Road, Suite 500                                FAX: 301-314-6693
        College Park, MD 20740

Questions? - Please call – Dr. Bob Kratochvil (301-405-6241)

Sponsored by the University of Delaware, University of Maryland, and West Virginia University Cooperative Extension Systems in
conjunction with the Mid-Atlantic CCA Board, and the USDA/NRCS..
Mid-Atlantic Crop Management School - Session Schedule
        Note: There will be no general session. Registration will begin 8:30 am on November 17. Breakout sessions will
begin at 10:00 am on November 17 and at 8:00 am on November 18 and 19.
        Please examine the following schedule of course offerings. Course availability is on first-come, first served basis.
Each session runs for fifty minutes and provides 1 CEU in the assigned category unless otherwise noted. You can mix and
match across topic areas – crop production, pest management, nutrient management, and soil and water. Please read across
each time frame and rank (1-5) by your preference (1 for first choice and 5 for last choice). If your choices are
unavailable, you will be assigned to another session. You will receive a schedule noting your assigned sessions.
  Day 1 – Tuesday, November 17, 2009
          .             Pest                  Crop                    Nutrient               Soil & Water                   Fifth
       Time          Management             Management               Management              Management                    Sessions
   10:00 - 11:50    Bt Corn Use:         When to Plant           Managing N with         Pfiesteria, We           Food Safety Issues
   (2 sessions)    Benefits for          Soybeans to Maximize     Stabilizer/Slow          Hardly Knew You -         on the Farm – Kline
                   Vegetable Crops -     Production - Egli        Release Products -       Terlizzi                  (PD)
                   Dively                                         Schwab
   1:00 - 2:50      Wheat Rusts:         Getting Corn Plant  Soil Fertility in           Sensors for Real         Developments with
   (2 sessions)    Current and Future    Population Right –       Organic Grain            Time Irrigation           Corn and Bean Seed
                   Threats - Milus       Nafziger                 Cropping Systems -       Scheduling –              Treatments – McLeod
                                                                  Spargo                   Lea-Cox and Ross          (PM)
   3:10 – 5:00      Fungicide Res.  Bee Pollination              Managing                Remediating              Thoughts on Corn
   (2 sessions)    Mgmt for              and Vegetable Crops      Nutrients in 2010 and    Former Poultry House      Hybrid Selection -
                   Vegetable Crops -     – Harmon Disque          Beyond - Binford         Sites - Johnson           Nielsen (CM)
                   Wyenandt
   Night session: 7:00 – 9:00 p.m.        Great Crop School Debates – Johnson & Taylor
    Day 2 – Wednesday, November 18, 2009
       Time         Soil & Water            Crop                     Nutrient                  Nutrient                     Fifth
                    Management            Management                Management                Management                   Sessions
   8:00 – 9:50      Improving Soil       Food Soybeans        Solving Nutrient           Subsurface              Dectes Stem Borer
   (2 sessions)    & Water Quality       for the Japanese       Problems with Soil Tests   Application of Poultry    in Soybean – Whalen
                   with No-Till -        Market                 & Plant Analysis –         Litter - Pote             (PM)
                   Duiker                - Taliaferro           Beegle
   10:10 – noon     Ag’s Role in         Row Spacing           Manure Injection for  Variable Rate N              Corn Growth and
   (2 sessions)    Nutrient and Carbon   and Population for     N Efficiency and           Fertilization for Wheat   Development:
                   Trading - Rhoderick   No-Till Corn Silage    Environment Protection     and Corn - Thomason       Pollination & Seed Fill
                                         - Jones                - Maguire                                            – Nielsen (CM)
   1:00 – 2:50      Effects of          Forage Quality        Nutrient Efficiency:       History of               Osage Bio Energy
   (2 sessions)    Vertical Tillage      for Dairy Cows -       What You Need When         Nutrient Management       and Barley Ethanol -
                   - Meisinger           Kung                   You Need It - Reiter       - Steinhilber             Scruggs (PD)
   3:10 – 5:00      Composting           Mid-Atlantic          Revisiting the            Manure Mgmt.             Slug Mgmt. in
   (2 sessions)    Animal Carcasses -    Barley Production      Phosphorus Site Index      Planner for Nutrient      Corn and Soybeans
                   Becker                – Thomason             - McGrath                  Mgmt. Plans – USDA,       - Clark (PM)
                                                                                           NRCS Staff
   Night session: 7:00 – 9:00 p.m.        Your Role as a CCA for Agriculture in Your Community – McGowan & Johnson
  Day 3 – Thursday, November 19, 2009
       Time            Pest                  Pest               Crop Management              Soil & Water                   Fifth
                    Management            Management                                         Management                    Sessions
   8:00 – 9:50      Managing             Arthropod             Orchardgrass Vigor        Conservation             Feeding Hay to
   (2 sessions)    Cover Crops to        Mgmt: Modifying        and Persistence Problems   Activity Plans/EQIP       Horses – Burk (CM)
                   Manage Weeds -        Crop Environment -     in the Mid-Atlantic -      2009 –Garrahan &
                   Curran                Hooks                  Clark                      Morgart (PD)
   10:10 – noon     Herbicide            Weed Mgmt in          Making the Most of        NRCS                     New Wipers for
   (2 sessions)    Resistant Crops:      Pasture and Hay -      Precision Ag.              Conservation Practices    Weed Mgmt in Pastures
                   What’s Next? -        Johnson                Technologies - Griffin     to Address Soil &         and Hayfields –
                   Vangessel                                                               Water Concerns -          Chandron (PM)
                                                                                           Baldwin
Announcing the
15th Annual




        Mid-Atlantic Crop Management School
                                                   November 17-19, 2009
               Princess Royale Hotel and Conference Center, Ocean City, MD
Sponsored by the University of Maryland, University of Delaware, and West Virginia University Cooperative Extension Systems, Mid-
Atlantic Certified Crop Advisor (CCA) Board, and the United States Department of Agriculture-Natural Resource Conservation Service
(USDA-NRCS).

Issued in furtherance of Cooperative Extension work, acts of March 8 and June 30, 1914, in cooperation with the U.S. Department of
Agriculture, University of Maryland, College Park, and local governments. Dr. Cheng-i Wei, Director of University of Maryland
Extension. The University of Maryland Extension’s programs are open to all citizens without regard to race, color, gender, disability,
religion, age, sexual orientation, marital or parental status, or national origin.




Dr. Bob Kratochvil
University of Maryland
1112 H.J. Patterson Hall
College Park, MD 20742

								
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