Waste Wise Program Annual Report by lindayy

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									Waste Wise Program
  Annual Report


                      November 2002
Prepared by the Risk Management Office




                                Contact Details
                                Laura Kendall
                        Waste Wise Coordinator
                        Risk Management Office
                     The University of Melbourne
                          Victoria 3010 Australia
                            Tel: 61 3 8344 3472
                            Fax: 61 3 8344 4497


                                               1
                                                 Executive Summary
Having joined Ecorecycle Victoria’s Waste Wise Organisation Program in
November 2000, and renewed its Waste Wise status in 2001, the University of
Melbourne has committed to continue to take action reduce waste outputs from
the Parkville campus. This report outlines actions undertaken during the period
November 2001 - October 2002, and the subsequent outcomes.

A number of activities undertaken in 2002 by the sub-committees for Reuse and
Recycling, Management of Substances Hazardous to the Environment, and the
Energy Working Group stand out as being particularly successful. These include:
the establishment of the University of Melbourne’s Green Office Program,
certification of the University’s EMS (in accordance with ISO 14001) in five
further faculties, the Think Power Smart energy awareness campaign.

In contrast to these accomplishments, progress towards a few of the targets set
by the sub-committees in 2001 was disappointing. In particular, development of
green purchasing criteria for the University did not proceed in any measurable
way. Moreover, a system for composting organic waste from the campus failed to
be implemented. A review of the Management and Design Standard used by
Property and Buildings has been extended, and is now expected to be complete
by June 2003.

The University’s Waste Wise Organisation program will take on a clearer
direction in the next 12 months, following the appointment of a Waste Wise
Coordinator on a part time basis. The coordinator’s appointment will also mean
that increased human resources will be available to follow up on objectives and
targets set by the sub-committees, in addition to ensuring that objectives
associated specifically with this position are realised. The key objective currently
linked to the position of Waste Wise Coordinator is to increase the integrity of the
University’s Waste Wise program by enabling improved, quantitative
documentation of the results of the program’s actions. Specifically, this will
involve:

 Development of more appropriate performance indicators, against which the
  effectiveness of the University’s Waste Wise initiatives will be measured
 Establishment of systems for gathering and analyzing quantitative data
  related to the new performance indicators.

The first of these endeavors is already complete. 19 indicators have been
developed, based on recommendations provided by Ecorecycle Victoria, to
capture the future performance of the University’s Waste Wise initiatives. The
establishment of improved data collection systems is currently in progress.




                                                                                  2
Contents

  Introduction                                                                       2
  Waste Wise Action Plan for November 2001 – November 2002                           2
  Summary Outcomes of Implementing Waste Wise Actions                                4
    Updated Waste Wise Key Performance Indicators                                   15
  Implementation and Promotion of the Waste Wise Organisation Program               16
  Updated Waste Wise Action Plan for November 2002 – November 2003                  17
  Conclusions                                                                       20
  Appendices                                                                         21
    Appendix 1 – Findings of Green Office Assessment for the Office of International
    Programs                                                                         21
    Appendix 2 – Green Office Criteria                                               25
    Appendix 3 – Outline of the University of Melbourne’s Environmental Policy       26
Introduction
The University of Melbourne first joined Ecorecycle Victoria’s Waste Wise
Organisation Program in November 2000. Since then, the University has
introduced a range of measures to reduce waste outputs from the Parkville
campus, and to reduce demand for materials which form major components of
the University’s prescribed waste stream. This report outlines measures
introduced during the period beginning in November 2001 and ending in October
2002, and the subsequent outcomes.
At the University’s Parkville campus there are three sub-committees whose
activities have contributed to the University’s Waste Wise Program in 2002. The
sub-committee for Reuse and Recycling contributed seven actions to the
program, whilst the sub-committee for the Management of Substances
Hazardous to the Environment, and the Energy Working Group each contributed
four actions. Progress made with respect to each action is documented, and
each sub-committee’s actions for the coming 12 months are summarised.
A further function of this report is to document the changes that are being made
within the University’s Waste Wise Program. These changes include:

 Development of more appropriate performance indicators, against which the
  effectiveness of the University’s Waste Wise initiatives will be measured
 Establishment of systems for gathering and analyzing quantitative data
  related to the new performance indicators.



Waste Wise Action Plan for November 2001 –
November 2002
The 13 objectives and targets for improved waste outcomes at the University of
Melbourne for the past year are presented below, along with the sub-committees
responsible for their development and implementation.

REUSE AND RECYCLING MANAGEMENT SUB-COMMITTEE


Objectives                             Targets
1. Education of recycling program at  Educate staff and students on each
   the    University   of   Melbourne,    of the recycling programs, through
   Parkville.                             Orientation Day, SDT and through
                                          the implementation of the EMS in
                                          Faculties.
                                        Calculate       the     input    of
                                          paper/cardboard and commingle
                                          waste and increase the output of
                                          recycled by 10% by the end of
                                          2002.
2. Establish Green Office Program       Establish a Green Office Program in
                                          a trial Department.

                                                                              2
                                            Establish        information        for
                                             departments to implement a Green
                                             Office Program.
3. Establish a green purchasing policy      Analyse current purchasing policies.
   for the University of Melbourne.         Establish green purchasing criteria
                                             in conjunction with Property and
                                             Buildings.
                                            Communicate Green Purchasing to
                                             the University of Melbourne by
                                             October 2002.
4. Establish a system for composting        Evaluate the feasibility of setting up
   for the Parkville Campus and work         a system for ongoing composting
   with the Student Union to set up a        for the Parkville site.
   similar system.
5. Find alternative to paper hand towel.    Evaluate the feasibility of replacing
                                             paper hand towel with wall-mounted
                                             hand dryers.

MANAGEMENT OF SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO THE ENVIRONMENT
(MOSHE) SUB-COMMITTEE


Objectives                        Targets
1. Best Practice Laboratory        Set general guidelines for Best
                                     Practice Lab.
                                   Implementation of Best Practices in
                                     the Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry
                                     and Health Sciences on campus by
                                     the end of 2002.
                                   Finalisation of guidelines for the
                                     Faculty of Science.
2. Reduce and manage contaminants  Follow up on trials by establishing a
   in trade waste                    monitoring program for trade waste
                                     to measure pH.
                                   Achieve trade waste pH 6-10 for
                                     99% of measurement time, and
                                     within pH 5-11 for major outfalls
                                     monitored during 2002.
3. Monitor and manage stormwater  Compile and analyse results of
   discharges.                       stormwater monitoring to test for
                                     compliance with legislative limits set
                                     out in the SEPP.
                                   Introduce trial measures to reduce
                                     contamination of stormwater.
                                   Analyse stormwater samples for
                                     biological content.
4. Establish air emissions.        Undertake a literature review and
                                     mass balance of air emissions from
                                                                                  3
                                             the University Parkville site by
                                            September 2002.
                                            Assess likely emissions from
                                             campus boilers.

ENERGY WORKING GROUP


Objectives                           Targets
1. Establish base line indicator for  Establish baseline data of electricity
   electricity usage.                   consumption for 2001 by end of
                                        November 2001.
2. Review P&B Project Management  Establish a student to undertake the
   and Design Standard.                 review as part of a Masters program
                                        by December 2001.
                                      Review      and     recommendations
                                        completed by June 2002.
3. Energy Awareness Campaign.         Theme for Energy Awareness
                                        Campaign established by end of
                                        October 2001.
                                      Develop       Energy      Awareness
                                        Campaign by January 2002 to
                                        include;
                                        - Marketing Plan
                                        - Target Audience
                                        - Quantitative       Measure      for
                                            success

4. Development of Energy Website.           Establish an Energy Website to be
                                             part of the current Environment
                                             Website.
                                            To be established by the end of
                                             November 2001.




Summary Outcomes of Implementing Waste
Wise Actions
The objectives and targets listed in the previous section were used to develop an
action plan consisting of 15 actions for 2002. Progress made towards
implementing each action is documented below.

                                                                               4
Action 1: Education of recycling program at the University of Melbourne,
Parkville.

All new staff at the University undergo an induction program, which includes an
introduction to the University’s Environmental Policy, its Environmental
Management System (EMS), and the Environment, Health and Safety (EHS)
Manual. A new feature of this process is that new staff are specifically informed
about the University’s paper / cardboard and commingle recycling systems.
During induction, staff are also provided with details of who they can contact for
support and further information regarding waste issues in the workplace.

The University currently employs 5056 full-time equivalent staff. Staff awareness
of waste management and recycling practices on campus is therefore a factor
with significant impact on the amount and content of waste going to landfill from
the campus.

During 2002, 190 new staff have been educated on recycling programs through
Orientation Day.

Action 2: Certification of EMS 14001
The International Standards Organisation’s defining document for Environmental
Management Systems includes three requirements that are particularly relevant
to the overall goal of reducing waste outputs.

 It stipulates that organisations endeavouring to implement an EMS shall aim
  for continuous improvement regarding the impacts of its operations on the
  environment (AS/ISO 14001:1996).
 It also requires that organisations establish and maintain documented
  procedures to monitor the aspects of its operations that significantly impact on
  the environment, in order to track performance with respect to environmental
  objectives and targets.
 In addition, the Standard deems that organisations should set up systems to
  ensure that appropriate corrective action is taken, where environmental
  objectives and targets fail to be achieved.

In conjunction with the obligatory management review of the EMS, the three
requirements listed above guarantee that an organisation with a certified EMS
will achieve continuous improvement with respect to the waste that it generates.

Since November 2001, Lloyd’s Quality Register Assurance (LRAQ) has
accredited the University’s Environmental Management to five new areas of the
University. These are:

   Faculty of Music
   Melbourne Law School
   Melbourne Theatre Company (MTC)
   Academic Services
   Student Administration
                                                                                5
Additionally, the Faculty of Science, the Faculty of Engineering, and Property and
Buildings (ISO 14001 accredited in 2001) have undergone the surveillance which
must be completed every nine months in order to maintain ISO 14001
certification.

Action 3: Calculate Paper / Cardboard and Commingle Inputs and Increase
Recycling Outputs by 10% by the End of 2002
Successful implementation of this action has not yet been achieved. A lack of
human resources devoted to its realisation has been the main factor impeding its
achievement. The Reuse and Recycling Sub-committee accepts full
responsibility for this. In order to remedy this outcome, the job description for the
newly created position of Waste Wise Coordinator specifies that the Coordinator
is to determine inputs to the Parkville campus of major waste stream
components.

An estimate of paper, cardboard and toner cartridge inputs to the campus in the
past 12 months has been prepared, based on data for the period February –
September 2002. Changes to purchasing contract arrangements made in
February 2002 have obstructed the collection of purchasing data for the months
preceding this time. Purchasing records for October and November 2002 will not
be available until December.

Figure 1 shows that paper manufactured from virgin pulp currently accounts for
more than 99% of the A4 paper purchased by the University as an entity. This
highlights the urgency of developing a green purchasing policy for the University
in 2003 (see Action 5).




                                                                                   6
                 Mixed source A4                   Estimated tonnes of paper purchased centrally (Nov 01 - Nov 02)
                 paper: 1.1002068    Recycled paper of
                      tonnes        other sizes: 0 tonnes   Virgin Paper of other
  100% post consumer                                          sizes: 0.0449064
   waste recycled A4                                               tonnes
                                                                                                 Virgin A4 Paper
    paper: 0.879417
        tonnes

                                                                                                 !00% post-
                                                                                                 consumer waste
                                                                                                 recycled A4 paper

                                                                                                 A4 paper made
                                                                                                 from a mix of virgin
                                                                                                 & recycled pulp
                                                                                                 sources
                                                                                                 Virgin Paper of
                                                                                                 other sizes


                                                                                                 Recycled paper of
                                                                                                 other sizes



                             Virgin A4 Paper:
                           212.2613262 tonnes




  Figure 1 – Summary of types and estimated amounts of paper purchased by the
  University’s Purchasing Division in the 12 months to November 2002.


               Estimated toner cartridges purchased (Nov 01 - Nov 02)




                                                                                                         Remanufactured
                                                                                                         toner cartridges



                                                                                                         New toner
                                                                                                         cartridges
                                                          Number of
New toner cartridges:                                remanufactured toner
       570                                             cartridges: 514.5




  Figure 2 – Summary of the types of toner cartridges purchased by the University as an
  entity in the 12 months to November 2002.

                                                                                                           7
Figure 2 also emphasises the need for a green purchasing policy to be
developed, with less than half of toner cartridges purchased centrally being
remanufactured.

Information collected on the paper and toner cartridges purchased in the 12
months to November 2002 will be used as a benchmark for future Waste Wise
reports. In particular, tracking future changes to purchases will be used to gain a
clearer understanding of changes to the relative amounts of paper / cardboard
waste being recycled.

Action 4: Establish Green Office Program
The position of Green Office Coordinator has been created within the Risk
Management Office. Key aspects of this position in 2002 have been:
    To establish a Green Office Program (GOP) in a trial department
    To assist other Departments in setting up their own GOPs, by providing
      the necessary information and support

The current Green Office Coordinator, Monique Bayer has worked together with
departmental staff to establish a GOP in the International Programs Office (IPO).
An assessment of how well the IPO met the 10 Green Office criteria (see
Appendix 1) was conducted in March 2002, and targets were set to improve the
environmental performance of the office. Initiatives were subsequently put in
place to help ensure that targets are met. Waste-related initiatives included:
    ensuring every office has a one-sided paper tray
    providing stickers to each staff member to convert any box into a one-
       sided paper tray
    education and encouragement to double side photocopy and to avoid
       printing unnecessary emails.
    updating printing facilities to a printer with double-sided printing facility
    establishment of plastic/glass/metal co-mingle recycling system
    addition of toner/ink cartridge recycling bin

Margarethe Hoppach is the Environment Representative at the IPO, and is now
responsible for coordinating the Green Office Program in the department.

Many other departments have appointed Environment Representatives during
the course of 2002. More than 40 departments have initialized Green Office
Programs with the help of the Green Office Coordinator. The Green Office
Coordinator distributes a weekly e-bulletin and poster to departmental
Environment Representatives, with information about current Green Office
themes on campus and ideas for new Green Office initiatives.

The Green Office Coordinator has run 3 training sessions for departmental
Environment Representatives during 2002. The aim of these sessions is to
provide reps with skills to enable them to instigate the cultural changes
necessary to ensure the successful implementation of each GOP. The training
sessions draw on experience and knowledge gained through setting up GOPs at
the International Programs Office and at Monash University.
                                                                                 8
Further, the Green Office Coordinator meets regularly with departmental
Environment Representatives on an individual basis to address specific issues
that arise in departments as they put each GOP into action.

Running the course for the Certificate of Environmental Change Management for
10 undergraduate participants has been a further initiative of the University of
Melbourne’s GOP this year. One important outcome of the course was the full
assessment of five further departments against the 10 Green Office criteria (see
Appendix 2). Assessments were performed by course participants, in teams of
two, for the following departments:

 Architecture, Building and Planning
 Learning, Education and Development
 Property and Buildings (Engineering)
 School of Graduate Studies, University of Melbourne Post Graduate
  Association
 Venue and Conference Management – Office of the Vice Principal
  (Development)

The assessments focused on determining the potential for reducing energy
wastage and reducing office wastes – particularly paper. Through these
assessments, each of the five departments was provided with clear benchmark
data to assist them with setting Green Office performance targets for the future. It
is envisaged that five such assessments will be performed every semester from
now on, as the course for the Certificate of Environmental Change is to become
a permanent feature of the University of Melbourne’s GOP.

Providing departmental assessments, training, and other resources for
departmental Environment Representatives are just a few of the UMGOP
initiatives which seek to improve waste outcomes at the University in the context
of broader environmental change.

Action 5: Establish a green purchasing policy for the University of
Melbourne.
After making little progress towards achieving this objective, the Reuse and
Recycling Sub-Committee recognizes the need to employ someone to embark on
this task specifically. In 2003 the University will employ a person to undertake the
job of analyzing current purchasing policies and establishing green purchasing
policies.

Action 6: Establish a system for composting for the Parkville Campus and
work with the Student Union to set up a similar system.
Most organic waste at the Parkville campus is generated in Union House, since
the majority of campus food outlets are located there. Melbourne University
Student Union received a quote for the removal of organic wastes from the Union
Building from Organic Recyclers. Under the proposed arrangement Organic
Recyclers would compost this waste and sell it as a horticultural product. The

                                                                                  9
current MUSU administration declined to enter into a contract with Organic
Recyclers. No reasons for this were provided.

Action 7: Find alternative to paper hand towel.
Electric dryers were found by Property and Buildings to be the only acceptable
potential alternative to paper hand towel. Life cycle analysis provided to Alan
Smith (P&B) asserted that electric hand dryers require seven to eight times as
much energy per use than paper towel. This finding, along with financial
considerations was deemed to outweigh the fact that paper towel creates more
solid waste per use than electric hand dryers.

Action 8: Best Practice Laboratory
Ms Natasha Cooper from MDU is to advise on progress towards this action in
late 2002.

Action 9: Reduce and manage contaminants in trade waste
Grab samples are taken on a monthly basis at 11 locations on the Parkville
campus which generate trade wastes. Operators of these 11 facilities are not
informed of when sampling occurs. Sampling locations are as follows:

 Chemistry Neutralising PIT
 Biochemistry
 Gate 12
 Medicine Neutralising PIT
 Microbiology
 Chemical Engineering Neutralising PIT
 Dong McDonald Building
 John Medley Building
 Micro/Howard FI Neutralising PIT
 Medical Neutralising PIT
 Vet Science Parkville

Trade waste components measured are:

          •   Metals: AI, Ag, As, B, Ba, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb,
              Sb, Se, Sn, Sr, Ti, TI, V, Zn
          •   Nutrients: Total nitrogen and sulfate.
          •   Water parameters: Temperature, pH, electric conductivity (EC), and
              turbidity.
          •   Color

Only data for the months of August, September and October 2002 were available
at the time of writing.


                                                                             10
With the exception of a sample obtained from a neutralizing tank in Veterinary
Science in August, all trade waste samples for this period had pH within the
target range of 6 – 10.

A neutralizing tank in Veterinary Science used for the treatment of low or high pH
waste recorded a pH 11. That is higher then the permissible pH 10 set by City
West Water (the University’s trade waste contractor). Following this result a
meeting was held on August 23, 2002 with Property & Buildings (responsible for
monitoring and adjusting levels of neutralization tanks throughout the university)
to advise them of the problem.

A contributing aspect to this problem is the selection of chemical agent used in
this process. At present, sodium carbonate (soda ash), with pH 11.3, is used in
neutralization tanks throughout the university. This chemical has two
disadvantages. Firstly, it can only be used for low (acid) pH neutralization. If
mixed with non-acid waste the resulting output potential is for pH 11 to be
discharged into the trade waste. Secondly, from a safety perspective, clear
liquids (water-like) with pH 11 can cause problems if staff do not handle them
correctly.

To overcome the problems listed above, a replacement chemical is being
proposed - sodium hydrogen carbonate (sodium bicarbonate), which has pH 8.3.
This has the double advantage of being able to neutralize both acids and bases,
and will not pose a safety hazard to staff using it.

Following further tests in September and October where the results showed
normal levels (pH7.5) for the neutralization tank at Veterinary Science, City West
water were satisfied with our corrective actions.

Action 10: Monitor and manage stormwater discharges.
Stormwater is monitored via ‘grab sampling’ at 12 locations on the Parkville
campus each month. At the time of writing, only data for August, September and
October were available.
Monitored parameters are:
         • Metals: AI, Ag, As, B, Ba, Be, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Fe, Mn, M0, Ni, Pb,
            Sb, Se, Sn, Sr, Ti, TI, V, Zn
         • Nutrients: Total nitrogen and sulfate.
         • Water parameters: Temperature, pH, electric conductivity (EC), and
            turbidity.
         • Color

Most water samples measured were consistent with previous readings. There
were two exceptions. The first was a high level of zinc in one sample. The source
is yet to be determined.
The second surprising result was that sodium in areas bounding the ILFR
building was higher than expected. This may be a result of sodium leaching from
fertiliser used on the lawns.

                                                                               11
Biochemistry’s stormwater pit contained 300 mm of sludge; this will obviously
impact on the quality of water discharged to stormwater drains leaving University
property. Maintenance has been informed and the area will be examined with
next set of measurements.

Action 11: Establish air emissions.
Sharmin Nasrin, a postgraduate student in Civil and Environmental Engineering
has conducted an investigation of air emissions at the University of Melbourne’s
Parkville campus and a final report will be delivered in December 2002.

Originally the sub-committee for the Management of Substances Hazardous to
the Environment resolved to commission a mass balance to determine emissions
from the Parkville campus. It was subsequently deemed that a sufficiently
accurate estimate could be obtained using other techniques. The analysis carried
out by Ms Nasrin relied on:

 Knowledge of the operating parameters of each of the 77 boilers on campus,
  including operating hours, fuel used, and manufacturers specifications.
 ‘Emissions factors’ obtained from literature.

Her preliminary findings are summarised in Table 1.4.

Table 1.4: Estimated boiler emissions for 2002
Species                                   Estimated total emissions from
                                          boilers on the Parkville campus in
                                          2002 (kg)
NOx                                       52 000
CO                                        27 000
CO2                                       53 000

The estimates produced by Ms Nasrin in her final report will be used as a
benchmark for future emissions reduction strategies.

Action 12: Establish base line indicator for electricity usage.
Electricity consumption is monitored by Technical Services, a division of Property
and Buildings. Figure 3 depicts the steady increase in the University’s electricity
demand that occurred in the 10 years to 2001.




                                                                                12
Figure 3 – Annual electricity consumption for the Parkville campus 1991 – 2001

These data are to be used as a baseline for determining the impacts of energy
conservation measures implemented in 2002.

Action 13: Review P&B Project Management and Design Standard.
Following a failure to appoint a suitable Civil and Environmental Engineering
student to review P&B’s Project Management and Design Standard, David
Swinson, Compliance Manager, Property and Buildings has taken on the task.
Mr Swinson intends to complete the review by June 2003.
The review will set out recommendations on whether more explicit and
comprehensive clauses need to be added to the Standard to better reflect the
University’s waste minimisation policies.

Action 14: Energy Awareness Campaign.
An energy awareness campaign with the theme “Think Power Smart” was
conducted at the Parkville campus in 2002.
The aim of the campaign was to inform the campus community of measures that
they can take to save energy during their day-to-day activities on campus, and to
encourage all staff and students to be pro-active in managing energy demand on
campus.

Key tools for communicating these ideas have been the Energy Management
and Think Power Smart web-sites, constructed by Property and Buildings this
year. T-shirts, posters, coffee mugs, stationery and mouse pads encouraging
staff and students to Think Power Smart were distributed to offices across the
Parkville campus during Environment Awareness Week to raise the profile of
energy issues.
In addition, weekly e-bulletins distributed by the University’s Green Office
Program had energy conservation as their theme during the months of
September, October, November and December.
By conducting an energy awareness campaign, the University seeks to minimise
the waste of energy (primarily electricity), thereby reducing its greenhouse gas

                                                                              13
emissions and its demand for electricity produced from non-renewable brown
coal.

Action 15: Development of Energy Website.
The department of Property and Buildings established its Energy Management
web-site in 1999. In 2002 P&B has linked the Think Power Smart page
(http://www.pb.unimelb.edu.au/eng/energymanagement/thinkpowersmart/index.p
hp3) to the Energy Management site.

Key features of the Think Power Smart web-site are:
 The provision of information about current energy use patterns
 Information on the University’s commitment to purchasing Green Power
 General tips on how to save energy in offices, computer laboratories and
   lecture theatres
 Energy fact sheets for maintenance staff, security staff, building supervisors
   and departmental environment representatives
 A list of contacts available to assist with energy conservation measures

The Think Power Smart web-site is to be linked to Property and Buildings’ main
page as part of the current upgrade of P&B web resources, making it easier to
locate and access.

Office for Environmental Programs

The Office for Environmental Programs, established in July 1999, is a section of
the School of Graduate Studies and is funded as a result of a cooperative
arrangement between ten faculties with environmental interests (Architecture
Building and Planning, Arts, Economics and Commerce, Education, Engineering,
Institute of Land and Food Resources, Law, Medicine Dentistry and Health
Sciences, Science, and Veterinary Science). In order to develop the Graduate
Environmental Program, the following tasks were undertaken: identification of
particular strengths within the University in environmental education and
research; assisting in the rationalisation of teaching; development of collaborative
links with environmental agencies and industry; and provision of information to
enrolled undergraduate and postgraduate students. This led to a restructure of
the University’s postgraduate environmental courses culminating in the
development of a full fee, course work based graduate program.

In addition to the initial and ongoing development and maintenance of the new
Graduate Environmental Program, the Office for Environmental Programs serves
as a focal point for enquiries from students, industry and the general public
seeking information on environmental courses and contacts at the University.
Staff at the Office can provide an overview of the environmental expertise in
teaching and research provided by the world-class researchers at the University
of Melbourne, making sense of the vast array of courses and subjects available.




                                                                                 14
Office for Environmental Programs – Achievements in 2002

   •   The enrolments in the program for its first year of operations, 2002, far
       exceeded expectations. A total of 92 students were enrolled in the
       program which involves 50 academics from 10 faculties.
   •   Evaluation of entry interview forms to provide catchment statistics.
   •   A new stream entitled “Governance, Policy and Communications” has
       been added to the Program.
   •   A new subject entitled “Environmental Policy” has been added to the
       Program.
   •   The Office and the students established the Green Postgraduate Group to
       facilitate networking between the students and to provide a forum for
       guests speakers.
   •   The OEP hosted a number of international and national speakers
       prominent in the environment field.
   •   The OEP coordinated a seminar series on campus
   •   The OEP will hold a forum to review the first year of operations with
       academic staff, students the Academic Advisory Committee and the
       Community Industry and Advisory Board.
   •   Development of promotional material and distribution at open days and
       conferences as well as to prospective students (national and international)
       and target organizations.
   •   Maintenance of the OEP website



Updated Waste Wise Key Performance Indicators
The University of Melbourne is a comparatively large and complex organisation,
with correspondingly complex systems for dealing with the waste it produces. A
comprehensive set of indicators has been developed to capture changes in the
performance of these multi-faceted systems as accurately as possible. Baseline
data relating to each indicator are currently being gathered, so that the
University’s performance as a Waste Wise Organisation can be evaluated
quantitatively in future. Preliminary data related to many of the following
indicators are already available, but are not considered to be sufficiently reliable
for inclusion in this report. The indicators are:

 Existence of the University of Melbourne’s Environmental Policy.
 Inclusion of information on the University’s involvement in the Waste Wise
  program as part of the staff induction procedure across all sectors of the
  University
 Amount of solid waste to landfill produced by the University annually (mass /
  volume) per effective full-time student
 Amount of recycled waste (mass / volume) produced annually by the
  University per effective full-time student
 Proportion of recyclable waste not recycled
 Proportion (%) of total waste recycled
 Proportion (%) of paper purchased that enters prescribed waste stream.
                                                                                 15
 Change in amount of solid waste to landfill produced for the current reporting
  period
 Change in amount of recycled waste produced for the current reporting period
 Change in proportion (%) of total waste recycled for the current reporting
  period
 Annual costs ($) associated with removal of solid waste to landfill
 Annual costs ($) associated with removal of recycled waste
 Financial benefits ($) incurred as a result of the implementation of waste
  actions and initiatives for the current reporting period
 Mass (kg) of paper purchased per effective full-time student annually
 Mass (k) of recycled paper purchased per effective full-time student annually
 Overall proportion of recycled paper purchased
 Proportion (%) of discarded A4 paper printed on both sides
 Amount (volume) of compostible waste disposed of via prescribed waste
  stream
 Amount (volume) of waste composted

Implementation and Promotion of the Waste
Wise Organisation Program
Appointment of Waste Wise Coordinator
2002 has seen the creation of the part-time position of Waste Wise Coordinator
at the University of Melbourne. In September, Laura Kendall was appointed to
this position, and currently works on the program one day each week.
At present, the Waste Wise Coordinator’s primary objectives are to establish
systems for monitoring waste outputs from the campus, as well as the inputs of
materials which become major components of waste and recycling outputs. The
purpose of this is of course to allow the University to quantitatively measure the
effects of implementing Waste Wise actions in future.

Sub-Committees Contributing to Waste Wise Program
Up until now, the activities of three separate sub-committees (MOSHE, Reuse
and Recycling Sub-Committee, Energy Working Group) have contributed to the
University’s Waste Wise initiatives in a somewhat indirect manner.
As of the beginning of 2003, the position of Waste Wise Coordinator is to
incorporate membership to these three sub-committees. This means that the
activities of the sub-committees will be more clearly directed towards improved
waste outcomes, and that greater human resources will be focused on actually
achieving the targets set by the sub-committees each year.

Dissemination of information on the Program to University Employees
A number of activities aimed at increasing awareness of waste issues among
staff have been undertaken in 2002. These include the Green Office Program’s
waste theme for the months September – December, the inclusion of information
on the University’s waste management and recycling strategies in staff induction
and training, and various actions undertaken by the Office for Environmental

                                                                               16
Programs. Dissemination of more specific information on the University’s
involvement in the Waste Wise Organisation Program will commence in
December 2003.


Updated Waste Wise Action Plan for November
2002 – November 2003
The three sub-committees whose activities contribute to the University’s Waste
Wise Program met in October and November 2002 to set new objectives and
targets for the 12 months to November 2003. These are summarised here. A
short summary of the OEP’s targets for the coming year is also provided.


REUSE AND RECYCLING MANAGEMENT SUB-COMMITTEE


Objectives                                Targets
1. Continue to enhance the Green Office       Educate staff and students on each of
   Program                                     the recycling programs, through
                                               Orientation Day, SDT and through the
                                               implementation of the EMS in Faculties
                                              Calculate input of paper/cardboard and
                                               commingle waste and increase the
                                               output recycled by 10% by end of
                                               2003.

2. Establish a Green Purchasing Policy for    Analyse current purchasing policies
   the University of Melbourne (by Oct        Establish green purchasing criteria in
  2003).                                       conjunction with Property & Buildings

3. Establish a Communication Plan to          Establish communication processes via
  Raise Awareness                              the web, notices of events, ‘student
                                               diary’, and forums.
                                              At Orientation, communicate to 90% of
                                               the staff and 50% of the students.
                                              Encourage more senior people (eg
                                               Deans) to increase the profile.
4. Establish a Waste Wise Program             Monitor the reduction of waste in order
                                               to quantify data.
                                              Establish system to gather quantitative
                                               data for Waste Wise reporting




MANAGEMENT OF SUBSTANCES HAZARDOUS TO THE ENVIRONMENT
(MOSHE) SUB-COMMITTEE
                                                                                   17
Objectives                               Targets
1. Best Practice Laboratory               Continue to refine guidelines for
                                            Best Practice Lab.
                                          Implementation of Best Practice for
                                            further departments
                                          (eg. Immunology)
                                          Finalisation of      guidelines for
                                            Chemistry
                                          Further develop the Green Lab
                                            program under Best Practice

2. Reduce and manage contaminants in        Maintain trials by establishing a
   trade waste                               monitoring program for trade waste to
                                             measure pH.
                                            Achieve trade waste pH 6-10 for ≥99%
                                             of measurement time, and within pH 5-
                                             11 for major outfalls monitored during
                                             2002.
                                            Cut down use of chemicals in
                                             treating trade waste
3.    Monitor and    manage stormwater      Compile and analyse results of
discharges                                   stormwater monitoring to test for
                                             compliance with legislative limits set
                                             out in the SEPP.
                                            Introduce      measures   to   reduce
                                             contamination of stormwater (eg grates
                                             to prevent litter)
                                            Analyse stormwater samples for
                                             biological             content.

4. Establish air emissions                  Investigate the resource management
                                             of the 2002 study on air emissions.
                                            Assess      likely   emissions      from
                                             surrounding areas and place campus
                                             emissions in context.
5. Manage electronic scrap                  Investigate existing practices and
                                             opportunities.




ENERGY WORKING GROUP


                                                                                  18
Objectives                          Targets
1. Continue Energy Awareness        • Orientation Week
   Campaign                         • Green Office Program
                                    • Student Union
2. Reduction of Energy              • Quantify reduction of energy
3. Review       P&B       Project   • Energy         section     reviewed     and
   Management      and    Design       recommendations completed by June 2003.
   Standard                         • Project Management and Design Standard
                                       ratified by P&B and guidelines used in all
                                       design projects.

More objectives and targets are to be added following the appointment of a
Utilities Officer by Property and Buildings in early 2003.

THE OFFICE FOR ENVIRONMENTAL PROGRAMS

In 2002 the Graduate Environmental Program (GEP) became operational and in
March 2003 completes one year of student intake. The following points
summarise OEP’s 2002-2003 targets.

   •   The developmental phase of the Program continues, as the Office
       explores further opportunities for new specializations and seeks to capture
       international markets.
   •   The Office continues to focus on the integration of University academic
       policy into the GEP, including facilitating the re-badging of 400 and 500
       level units. Similarly, the framework for a quality assurance audit is
       progressing.
   •   In 2002/03 the OEP will continue to collaborate with the Australian
       Association of Environmental Education.
   •   There is a continuing review of student selection procedures and student
       selection of subjects which culminates in January and July with academic
       advice changes.
   •   Ongoing development of a public relations and marketing strategy,
       especially targeting international students is part of the annual plan.
   •   As well, the OEP is specifically reviewing the experience of its
       international students.
   •   Throughout 2002/03 the OEP continues to build partnership relationships
       with suitable industry and government agencies.
   •   Within environmental education the OEP will coordinate seminar
       programs, participate in meetings with visiting delegations, and generally
       contribute to enhancing multi-disciplinary initiatives.
   •   Links to professional environmental organizations in business and industry
       are also targeted, beginning this year with BATE, MAV, PIA and Helios
       BP; and continuing with EIA in 2003.




                                                                               19
Conclusions
A number of activities undertaken in 2002 by the sub-committees for Reuse and
Recycling, Management of Substances Hazardous to the Environment, and the
Energy Working Group stand out as being particularly successful. These include:
the establishment of the University of Melbourne’s Green Office Program,
certification of the University’s EMS (in accordance with ISO 14001) in five
further faculties, the Think Power Smart energy awareness campaign.

In contrast to these accomplishments, progress towards a few of the targets set
by the sub-committees in 2001 was disappointing. In particular, development of
green purchasing criteria for the University did not proceed in any measurable
way. Moreover, a system for composting organic waste from the campus failed to
be implemented. A review of the Management and Design Standard used by
Property and Buildings has been extended, and is now expected to be complete
by June 2003.

The University’s Waste Wise Organisation program will take on a clearer
direction in the next 12 months, following the appointment of a Waste Wise
Coordinator on a part time basis. The coordinator’s appointment will also mean
that increased human resources will be available to follow up on objectives and
targets set by the sub-committees, in addition to ensuring that objectives
associated specifically with this position are realised. The key objective currently
linked to the position of Waste Wise Coordinator is to increase the integrity of the
University’s Waste Wise program by enabling improved, quantitative
documentation of the results of the program’s actions.




                                                                                 20
Appendices
                        Appendix 1 – Findings of Green Office
                     Assessment for the Office of International
                                                     Programs
Ten point plan rating and performance analysis

The IPO’s environmental performance can be summarised by the UMGOP 10-point plan
rating, which provides a current rating out of 100 for each specific area surveyed, as well
as a target to work towards for future improvements.

An overall environmental behavior rating is also calculated, along with a target.




10 point plan rating – International Programs Office
Jan/Feb 2002
All ratings out of 100




            1. Reducing paper use (% of staff)               46

2. Paper Recycling (% of staff recycling paper)                             80

                       3. Cardboard Recycling                                     100

       4. Drink container recycling (% of staff)        38

                  5. Recycling Print Cartridges               50

                  6. Computer use (% of staff)     18

              7. Other Appliances (% of staff)                         65

8. Purchasing remanufactured toner cartridges                 50

                     9. Env responsible paper                 50

                   10. Mugs, Cutlery, crockery                              78

                                           Total                  57

                                         Target                                  94




                                                                                        21
OPPORTUNITIES FOR IMPROVEMENT


                                             IPO Waste Stream

                                           15%



                                             Landfill
                                              w aste                         38%
                               13%
                                 Com post/organic               Recyclable
                                      w aste                      paper


                                       Cardboard

                                                          One-sided
                                     19%                paper for reuse

                                                               15%




Paper Usage and Consumption

Paper recycling

The waste audit revealed that paper and cardboard constitute 72% of the IPO waste stream.
Although the 10 point rating rated staff behaviour in regards to recycling highly (80 out of 100),
the waste audit shows that waste can be reduced by 72% if all paper was reused and recycled!

Reducing paper use

The IPO currently rates at 46 for reducing paper use, indicating that staff behaviour could
improve substantially.
Green Office initiatives to curb paper consumption include
   • ensuring every office has a one-sided paper tray. UMGOP stickers were provided to each
       staff member to convert any box into a one-sided paper tray.
   One-sided paper can used to draft print and photocopy as well as provide scrap notepaper.
   • discouraging the printing of unnecessary emails.
   • education and encouragement to double side photocopy.
   • updating printing facilities to a printer with double-sided printing facility. When looking
       to update, the IPO should contact the Green Office team for advice on which printer is
       suitable, both in regards to paper, energy and ink use efficiency.


Environmentally Responsible Paper Purchasing

Although the IPO purchases 50% recycled and 50% virgin paper, the aim would be to purchase
80-90% recycled or environmentally responsible paper. Some of the best and most cost-effective
on the market are:



                                                                                              22
Canon 100 Copy Paper - $6.38/ream+ , $31.90/carton+
    100% post-consumer recycled paper.
    Many recycled papers contain pre-consumer waste, which is the waste pulp from
      woodchips. Using this in recycled paper defeats the purpose of buying recycled, as it
      maintains demand for the use of forest for paper pulp.
    Some other recycled papers use post-consumer paper, but only in the range of 30-70%.

Cane Fields Copy Paper - $4.98/ream+ *, $24.90/carton+ *
    An innovative new product!
    Manufactured from sugar-cane waste pulp, not woodchip pulp.

Both these papers are more cost-effective per ream/carton than REFLEX copy paper
($6.48/ream+, $32.40/carton+), which is manufactured from pulp sourced from old growth
temperate rainforest throughout Victoria’s water catchment area.

They have both been trialed for weight and moisture content in university photocopiers and have
received no negative response.
+
 RRP from Officeworks as at 23/03/02
*Currently at a reduced price. Normal price still more cost effective than Reflex Copy Paper.

Energy Consumption

Computer Use

This is an area in which the IPO could make significant improvements. Computer use rated at
only 18, but has the potential to rate at 90! Here are some simple energy saving techniques,
especially for computers:

    •   Activating low energy “sleep mode” on computers, where available
    •   Switching off monitor when not in use
    •   Ensuring all computers are turned off at night and weekends, preferably at
        the power point.
    •   Ensuring all future computer investments carry Energy Star capabilities
        and high energy efficiency.
    •   Minimising screen size on new computer investments.

Other appliances

Although this scored quite highly (65), it is an area that has much potential for
improvement. These initiatives are also some of the simplest
    • Switching off all appliances at night, preferably at the power point.
    •   Utilising natural light to a fuller extent
    •   Replacement of current fluorescent lights with more energy efficient
        tubing, such as tri-phospor
    •   Updating printer/fax/photocopier to an all-in-one multi-purpose unit.
    •   Updating appliances to higher energy efficiency, such as Energy Star.

Other Recycling


                                                                                                23
Two new recycling systems were put in place to further assist in decreasing
waste to landfill.

   •   Establishment of plastic/glass/metal co-mingle recycling system
   •   Addition of toner/ink cartridge recycling bin

Even though the IPO doesn’t consume many co-mingle recyclables, the facilities
still need to be in place for their disposal.
The addition of the ink/toner cartridge recycling bin from Corporate Recycling
provides ease of recycling of ink/toner cartridges, which are then remanufactured
into resources such as rulers, park benches and other plastic items.




                                                                              24
                          Appendix 2 – Green Office Criteria
 A GREEN OFFICE…
1.    Uses environmentally responsible paper and remanufactured printer/toner
      cartridges.
 2.   Uses scrap paper for ALL drafts and notes, including when printing and
      photocopying.
 3.   Recycles all paper waste, using the VISY bins under each desk.
 4.   Double sides and reduces when phhotocopying.
 5.   Does NOT print emails unless necessary.
 6.   Has computers and lights OFF when absent for over 45 minutes.
 7.   Has SLEEP MODE activated on computer, or turns monitor off when
      computer isn’t in use.
 8.   Turns all appliances OFF when going home. i.e. printers , microwaves,
      heaters, air-con, etc.
 9.   Recycles all drink bottles, glass and plastic by using the VISY bins in the
      kitchen.
 10.  Uses and offers durable cups, mugs and crockery to avoid disposables.




                                                                              25
                 Appendix 3 – Outline of the University of
                      Melbourne’s Environmental Policy
Guiding Value
The University of Melbourne, in its role as an international teaching and research based
University offering undergraduate and postgraduate education, is committed to
embracing environmental management goals within University activities. These goals
will extend to providing community leadership on environmental issues through quality
research and education programs and to the provision of expert advice on environmental
matters of public interest.

Academic Programs
The University recognises its role in educating future leaders who will be in a position to
make decisions enhancing Australia's environmental sustainability. As the University
plays a part in moulding environmental values, Faculty Deans will be responsible for
ensuring that programs are made available to enable students and staff to be aware of
and to actively support environmental education programs and research.

Environmental Impact Reduction
Programs and quantitative targets will be established to minimize pollution and to meet
principal environmental challenges including improved efficiency of resource use,
minimising waste generation and reducing discharges to the environment from
University                                                                    activities.

Management and Reporting
The University is committed to developing and sustaining a fully documented
Environmental Management System (EMS) in compliance with ISO 14001. This system
will provide the framework to comply with legislative requirements, contractual
obligations and the measurement of continual improvement targets and outcomes. The
University aspires to be an exemplary model for other institutions. The Vice-Chancellor
will report to Council on environmental performance at least twice yearly, and will
provide     an    annual    environmental   report     available     to   the   public.

Communication and Involvement
The involvement of regulatory authorities, suppliers, contractors, academic colleagues,
students and community groups will be sought in documenting and achieving
environmental objectives and targets. The University supports the promotion of
environmental awareness within the wider community.

Accountabilities
The Vice-Chancellor is accountable for communication of this policy and for compliance
with its undertakings. A Senior Executive Officer of the University will ensure effective
implementation, management and monitoring of the environmental management system
and its subsequent outcomes. Heads of budget divisions will provide necessary support
for environmental plans within their areas. The University will provide for staff and
students of the University community a process for identifying and managing
environmental risks associated with their activities.




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