Teaching Conflict Resolution by captainrhoades

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									Teaching Conflict
Resolution

       Chapter 12
      EDU 440/518
        DDavis
Objectives
 State the importance of teaching conflict
  resolution
 Explain the nature of conflict
 Define conflict resolution components
 List conflict resolution approaches
 Identify steps in problem solving negotiations
 Explain the role of mediator
 Define when to use arbitration
 Explain group conflict resolution
Overview
 Understanding conflict
 Responses to conflict
   Passive
          Do nothing
          Smoothing
          Withdrawing
     Assertive
          Confronting
          Standing firm
     Facilitative
          Compromising
          Problem solving negotiations
Overview (cont)
 Strategies for conflict resolution
   Negotiation
   Mediation
   Arbitration
   Group problem solving
 Components of conflict resolution
   Assessment
   Acknowledgment
   Attitude
   Action
   Analysis
Understanding Conflict
 Conflict = a struggle over values, status,
  power, and resources
 A normal/inevitable part of life
      Common sources of conflict
           Gender
           Ethnicity
           Age
           Physical size
           Status
           Socioeconomic differences
 Expect, and learn to manage, conflict
 Conflict Positive vs. Conflict Negative
Responses to Conflict (Borisoff & Victor, 1988)
 Five components that influence success
      Making an assessment of the nature/cause
           In order to choose an appropriate approach
      Acknowledgment that another person is involved
           Different perspective/set of beliefs
      Attitude refers to the willingness to engage in conflict
       resolution
           Resolve | open | cooperate
      Action is the integration of
           Assessment
           Acknowledgment of different perspectives
           Attitude
      Analysis means considering
           Needs/concerns of all parties met
           Proposed solutions are realistic
           Can be implemented effectively
           Have relationships improved
Passive Responses
     Neutral in nature
     Do not attempt to force resolution
 Do nothing
     Wait and see approach
     Overt action is delayed
     Agree to disagree
     Participants need to
          Observe and listen carefully
          Control emotions
          Be as objective as possible
          Control verbal/nonverbal behavior
Passive Responses
 Smoothing
     Used when relationship is more important than
      goal
     Purpose is to avoid confrontation
     Humor is a good smoothing device
     Active listening helps expression of feelings
      without challenge
     Avoid using inflammatory rhetoric
     When maintaining a relationship is important,
      SMOOTH
Passive Responses
 Withdrawing
     Best used when anger/emotions run high
          Reason/logic are lost
          Better to withdraw
          Let emotions cool
          Reason reassert itself
     Egos get involved
     When withdrawing
          Look for a quick way out
          Stop debating
          Get away from the situation
Assertive Responses
 You take action
 Useful when goal/objective is more important than
  the relationship
 Potential for evoking anger/hostility
 Confronting
      Focus is on getting issues out in the open
      This approach requires
           Open, honest communication
           Mutual respect
           Self esteem (accept criticism)
      Steps in the confronting process
           Establish a common goal
           Each communicates concerns
           Identify solutions
Assertive Responses
 Standing firm
   Standing up for rights/needs
           No other option
      Goal is to establish balance, reduce
       challenges
      Several components (Lee, Pulvino & Perrone
       (1998)
           Focus on the problem (not your feelings)
           Remain calm
           Comments should be specific (present problem)
           Physically stand your ground
           Make eye contact
           Face the other person squarely
Facilitative Responses
 Approaches intended to resolve problems
     Goal achievement and relationship important
 Compromising
     Those involved can not get what they want
     Each must give up a part…
     Meeting in the middle
     Advantage
          A relatively quick process
Facilitative Responses
 Problem solving negotiations
     Process seeking solutions
          Both achieve their goals
          Have their needs met
          Tension/anger is resolved
     Process
          Defining the problem
          Brainstorming possible solutions
          Selecting a solution acceptable to both parties
          Planning what each person will do
          Implementing the idea
          Evaluating the plan
Solving Conflicts
 Negotiation
     Unassisted problem solving process
     Process (Bodine, Crawford & Schrumpf, 1994)
          Agree to negotiate
          Gather points of view (active listening)
          Find common interests (focus on wants)
          Create win-win options (common interests0
          Evaluation options (provide benefits)
          Develop an agreement
             Who what, when, where, how
             Must meet needs of all parties
             Should help to resolve future conflicts
Solving Conflicts
 Mediation
     Extension of the negotiation process
     3rd party helps resolves conflict
          Lack of understanding of negotiation process
          Unsuccessful
     Mediator must first end hostilities
          Then follow negotiation process
     Mediators role is to help with the process
     Mediator may practice active listening
          May have parties switch roles
Solving Conflicts
 Arbitration
   The third party makes a final decision
   Responsibility to negotiate/resolve is shifted
   Process
           Individuals define the problem
           Each person tells their side, provides evidence
           Each person responds (rebuttal)
           Each person tells arbitrator what they want
           Arbitrator makes final decision

      Many times teachers combine mediation &
       arbitration (better than having no voice…)
Group Problem Solving
 Two general guidelines
    The discussion should be directed toward
     solving the problem
    The solution should not include fault-finding or
     punishment
 Criteria to evaluate options
    Is it fair to everyone
    Can it solve the problem
    Is it consistent with class/school rules/policies
 Group consensus
    Groups decision on what is best for the group
         Does not mean everyone agrees…

								
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