Strategic Plan to Strengthen Malaria Control and by edt34384

VIEWS: 38 PAGES: 42

									                                                           
                                                         
                    Strategic Plan to Strengthen Malaria 
                  Control and Elimination in the Greater 
                     Mekong Subregion: 2010–2014 
                                        




                                                                             
                                        
                                        
                                        
                       A Mekong Malaria Programme Partnership Initiative 
                                      Working Document 
                                        December 2009 
                                               
                                               
                                      
                                        Coordinated by: 
                                  WHO‐Mekong Malaria Programme 
                                                        




                                                                                 
       
  MMP Core Partners:  




 




                         ii
Acronyms 

ACT               Artemisinin‐based Combination Therapy 
ACTMalaria        Asian Collaborative Training Network for Malaria 
AED               Academy for Educational Development 
AFRIMS            Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences 
API               Annual Parasite Incidence 
APMEN             Asian Pacific Malaria Elimination Network 
ARC3              Artemisinin Resistance, Confirmation, Characterization and Containment 
BCC               Behavior Change Communication 
BMGF              Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation 
CDC               U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 
CNM               Cambodia National Centre for Parasitology, Entomology and Malaria 
                  Control 
GFATM             Global Fund to fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria 
GMP               WHO Global Malaria Programme 
GMS               Greater Mekong Subregion 
ID                Infectious Diseases 
IEC               Information Education Communication 
ITN               Insecticide‐Treated Net 
KIA               Kenan Institute Asia  
Lao PDR           Lao People’s Democratic Republic 
LLIHN             Long‐Lasting Insecticide Treated Hammock Net 
LLIN              Long‐Lasting Insecticidal Net 
M&E               Monitoring and Evaluation 
MC                Malaria Consortium 
MMS               MMP Malaria Strategy 
MMP               Mekong Malaria Programme 
MoH               Ministry of Health 
MSH‐SPS           Management Sciences for Health Strengthening Pharmaceutical Systems 
NIMPE             National Institute for Malariology, Parasitology and Entomology  
NMCP              National Malaria Control Program 
OD                Operational Districts (Cambodia) 
PHD               Provincial Health Department (Cambodia) 
PMI               President’s Malaria Initiative 
PPM               Private‐Public Mix 
QA                Quality Assurance 
QC                Quality Control 
RBM               Roll Back Malaria 
RDT               Rapid Diagnostic Test 
SEARO             WHO South‐East Asia Regional Office 
SOP               Standard Operating Procedure 



                                                                                       iii
USAID RDM‐A     United States Agency for International Development Regional 
                Development Mission ‐ Asia 
USP‐DQI         United States Pharmacopeia Drug Quality and Information 
URC             University Research Co., LLC 
VHW             Village Health Worker 
WHO             World Health Organization 
WPRO            WHO Western Pacific Regional Office 
WWARN           Worldwide Antimalarial Resistance Network 




                                                                               iv
 
Table of Contents                                                                                                                       
 
MMP Core Partners......................................................................................................................ii
Acronyms......................................................................................................................................iii
Table of Contents .......................................................................................................................... v

INTRODUCTION......................................................................................................................... 1
  Vision........................................................................................................................................... 3
  Goal.............................................................................................................................................. 3
  Modus Operandi........................................................................................................................ 4
BACKGROUND ........................................................................................................................... 5
  Brief Historical Background..................................................................................................... 5
  Burden of Malaria in the Global Context ............................................................................... 5
  Burden of Malaria in the Greater Mekong Subregion: Trends and Current Status......... 6
  SEARO......................................................................................................................................... 8
  WPRO.......................................................................................................................................... 8
  USAID ......................................................................................................................................... 9
MEKONG MALARIA PROGRAMME STRATEGY.............................................................. 11
MALARIA‐SPECIFIC STRATEGIES ....................................................................................... 11
  1. Policy and Program Management..................................................................................... 11
  2. Prevention Interventions .................................................................................................... 13
  3. Strengthening IEC/BCC interventions.............................................................................. 14
  4. Early diagnosis and prompt effective treatment of cases .............................................. 16
  5. Vulnerable Populations ...................................................................................................... 19
  6. Strategic Information .......................................................................................................... 20
SYSTEMS STRENGTHENING STRATEGIES ........................................................................ 25
  1. Regional cooperation .......................................................................................................... 25
  2. Public‐Private Partnerships................................................................................................ 26
  3. Engaging other Programs and Sectors ............................................................................. 27
ON TRACK TO THE TARGET................................................................................................. 29
  1. Elimination ........................................................................................................................... 29
ANNEX I...................................................................................................................................... 30
ANNEX II..................................................................................................................................... 31
ANNEX III ................................................................................................................................... 33
ANNEX IV ................................................................................................................................... 34
REFERENCES.............................................................................................................................. 36
 
 
 


                                                                                                                                                    v
 INTRODUCTION: 

While malaria remains a major public health and development challenge in the Greater 
Mekong  Subregion  (GMS),  tremendous  progress  has  been  made  in  scaling  up  both 
preventative  and  curative  interventions  with  resulting  improvement  in  morbidity  and 
mortality. The GMS, including Myanmar, Cambodia, Lao People’s Democratic Republic 
(PDR),  Thailand,  Vietnam  and  Yunnan  Province  in  China,  was  burdened  with  about 
316,000  confirmed  cases  of  malaria  and  2,000  malaria  deaths  in  2007,  although  the 
numbers are likely much higher because of remaining poor detection and reporting in 
underserved areas / populations where the disease is most likely to occur [1, 2]
 
Malaria control and elimination in the subregion faces many challenges unique from the 
larger  global  context.  The  epicenters  that  first  provided  the  world  with  chloroquine, 
sulfadoxine‐pyrimethamine, and mefloquine resistance at the Thai‐Cambodian borders 
are now demonstrating resistance to artemisinins [3‐6]. The emergence of these resistant 
strains  poses  a  major  threat  to  the  region  and  beyond  and  will  likely  increase  without 
concerted  targeted  interventions  [7,  8].  The  challenges  of  drug  resistance,  substandard 
and  counterfeit  drugs,  hard  to  reach  vulnerable  groups  with  low  coverage  of  malaria 
interventions,  difficulties  in  accessing  basic  health  services  by  migrant  workers  and 
ethnic  minorities,  need  for  cross‐border  initiatives,  and  weak  surveillance  and 
monitoring and evaluation systems face many of the Mekong countries. 
 

In light of these challenges, the following broad malaria and systems strategies are 
proposed for the 2010‐2014 Mekong Malaria Programme (MMP) to reach its goals and 
objectives:  

               Health systems strengthening and increased integration of malaria  

               Regional and private sector engagement and coordination 

               Strengthening malaria program management and capacity development 

               Effective case management through quality diagnosis  and access to 
               effective antimalarials with focus on counterfeit / substandard drugs 

               Preventing the spread of drug resistance 

               Improving surveillance, monitoring and evaluation systems 

               Conducting research addressing technical and operational challenges 
               relevant to the subregion 


                                                                                                   1
               Identifying and targeting vulnerable groups through appropriate 
               strategies in partnership with health and non‐health programmes   

               Emphasis on behavior change communication and community 
               mobilization 

               Approaching elimination when and where feasible  

In  an  effort  to  support  the  malaria  control  and  elimination  activities  of  the  national 
malaria  control  programs  in  the  GMS  and  the  MMP  Partnership  during  the  next  five‐
year  planning  cycle,  this  MMP  Malaria  Strategy  (MMS)  was  developed  by  the  World 
Health  Organization  Mekong  Malaria  Programme  (WHO‐MMP)  with  the  US  Centers 
for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The MMS, which is aligned with the Mekong 
monitoring  and  evaluation  (M&E)  framework  will  highlight  the  activities  of  the  MMP 
partners  starting  with  those  receiving  United  States  Agency  for  International 
Development  (USAID)  funding.  The  Mekong  M&E  framework  was  developed  by 
MEASURE  Evaluation  in  consultation  with  USAID,  CDC,  Malaria  Consortium,  WHO‐ 
MMP,  and  WHO  Western  Pacific  Regional  Office  (WPRO).    The  contribution  of  the 
USAID‐funded MMP partners has been highlighted under the strategic components to 
enable  a  more  coordinated  approach  amongst  the  partners  to  malaria  control  in  the 
subregion.  With  clear  overarching  objectives  and  strategies  increasing  coordination  is 
expected  to  facilitate  the  standardization  and  utilization  of  data  at  the  regional  level; 
establish  channels  of  communication;  provide  regional  expertise  and  training;  set  up 
regional  (or  multicentre)  studies;  provide  a  forum  for  border  strategies;  and  attract 
partners and donors [9].  

WHO‐WPRO  recently  developed  the  Regional  Action  Plan  for  Malaria  Control  and 
Elimination in the Western Pacific (2010–2015) [10] as the result of extensive consultations 
with  national  programs  and  multiple  stakeholders.  The  final  draft  was  reviewed  and 
revised in July 2009 in Manila, Philippines during a five‐day workshop attended by all 
national malaria programme managers and representatives from the ministries of health 
from all Mekong countries from the Western Pacific Region (Cambodia, China, the Lao 
Peopleʹs  Democratic  Republic,  and  Viet  Nam)  and  the  South‐East  Asian  Region 
(Myanmar  and  Thailand).  In  addition,  several  key  stakeholders  from  the  MMP 
partnership  (CDC,  Malaria  Consortium,  MEASURE/Evaluation,  USAID,  and  WHO‐
MMP) worked closely with WHO‐WPRO in refining the Regional Action Plan in order 
to  encompass  the  objectives,  activities,  and  indicators  suitable  for  the  GMS.  WHO‐ 
Southeast Asia Regional Office (SEARO) has been following the Revised Malaria Control 
Strategy  Southeast  Asia  Region  2006‐2010  [11]  and  plans  to  update  in  2010  for  the 
subsequent five years.  
 


                                                                                                    2
This  MMP  malaria  strategy  addresses  key  issues  in malaria  control  and  elimination  in 
the subregion in line with the monitoring and evaluation (M&E) framework. The WPRO 
Regional Action Plan 2010‐2015 objectives, WHO Southeast Asia Region (WHO SEARO) 
Revised  Malaria  Control  Strategy  2006‐2010  objectives,  and  USAID‐RDMA  malaria 
results  indicators  were  taken  into  account  and  highlighted  under  the  various  key 
components.  The  strategic  plan  provides  a  monitoring  and  evaluation  framework, 
ensuring  that  the  national  malaria  control  programmes  and  MMP  partners  deploy  an 
evidence‐based  and  comprehensive  package  of  interventions  that  are  appropriately 
targeted and evaluated. Finally, the strategic plan includes a matrix of partners and their 
expected contribution to address the various issues and challenges facing the GMS.  
 


Vision 
The  Mekong  Malaria  Programme’s  overarching  contribution  alongside  with 
Government  and  Non‐Government  Partners  is  to  improve  the  health  status  of  the 
population  with  special  focus  on  malaria  control  and  containment  of  malaria  drug 
resistance in the Greater Mekong Subregion.   



Goal 
The Mekong Malaria Programme aims to facilitate the implementation and monitoring 
of  a  comprehensive  MMP  Malaria  Strategy  endorsed  by  national  authorities  and 
stakeholders to address common Mekong challenges in order to further impact malaria 
morbidity and mortality.   
 
The  goals  of  the  Mekong  Malaria  Programme,  which  are  aligned  with  the  WHO 
Southeast Asia and Western Pacific Regions contribute to WHO member States and 
to the Millenium Development Goals. MMP goals are as follows: 
  
    To contain and eliminate the spread of multi‐drug resistant falciparum parasites; 
    To further reduce malaria mortality by at least 50% by 2014 as compared to 2007; 
    To further reduce the disease burden of malaria (incidence) by at least 50% by 2014 
    as compared to 2007; 
     To  contribute  to  malaria  elimination  efforts  (zero  transmission)  where  and  when 
    relevant   




                                                                                              3
 

 

Modus Operandi 
The Mekong Malaria Programme Partnership, mainly funded by USAID, is pooling the 
best  expertise  and  practices  in  malaria  control  from  national  programs  and  partners’ 
experiences. MMP is facilitating partner coordination and regular exchange of views to 
set‐up,  implement,  and  critically  review  strategic  malaria  control  interventions.    In 
facilitating this platform, the Mekong Malaria Programme will advocate for additional 
interest  and  expertise  from  local  and  international  partners  and  mobilize  funds  to 
rapidly  scale  up  control  or  deliver  pre‐elimination  malaria  interventions  where 
appropriate.  This  partnership  can  effectively  address  key  technical  and  operational 
challenges to further achieve ambitious impact goals stated by Mekong Member States. 




                                                                                              4
BACKGROUND 


Brief Historical Background: Contribution of the Roll Back Malaria Mekong 
Initiative  
The Mekong Malaria Programme, originally launched in Ho Chi Minh City in 1999 as 
the Mekong Roll Back Malaria Initiative, brought together all national programs and 
partners working on  malaria. It both  reinvigorated  existing strategic projects in  the 
Mekong  region  as  well  as  initiated  new  ones.  The  programme,  supported  mainly 
with  USAID  funds,  paid  particular  attention  to  the  following  technical  areas:  (1) 
monitoring therapeutic efficacy of antimalarial drugs used in the Mekong region to 
update national drug policies, (2) monitoring quality, access and use of antimalarials 
available  in  the  field,  (3)  increasing  capacity  of  national  staff  to  select,  plan  and 
monitor  malaria  control  activities,  (4)  setting  up  regular  exchange  forums  and 
technical  consultations  to  identify,  share  and  disseminate  best  practices  in  malaria 
control  including  cross  border  activity  projects  throughout  the  GMS,  (5) 
strengthening  Mekong  malaria  surveillance,  and  (6)  setting  up  and  monitoring  the 
malaria research agenda.  
  
As  a  result,  more  partners  became  actively  engaged  in  malaria  control  and  were 
supporting  national  authorities  to  successfully  reach  their  national  targets.  The 
Global  Fund  to  Fight  AIDS,  Tuberculosis  and  Malaria,  since  it  started  operating  in 
2002, has awarded more than USD 323 (to be updated) million in malaria control to 
Mekong countries [12].   

Burden of Malaria in the Global Context 
Malaria  remains  one  of  the  main  global                    Global Malaria Situation: Distribution of Malaria
health problems of our time, causing an                                    Cases by WHO Regions
estimated  247  million  case  that  led  to 
                                                            EURO
nearly  881,000  deaths  in  2006  [13]. 
                                                            PAHO
Approximately  86%  of  world’s 
                                                            EMRO
estimated cases and 91% of deaths occur                                                                        falciparum
                                                            WPRO
in  Africa  [13].  Malaria  is  the  leading                                                                   non-falciparum
                                                           SEARO
killer  of  children  in  Africa,  accounting 
                                                            AFRO
for  approximately  20%  of  all‐cause 
                                                                   0   50000   100000 150000 200000 250000
mortality  in  children  under  the  age  of 
                                                                         Estimated number of cases
five [14].  

                                                                                  Data Source: WMR 2008 [13]




                                                                                                               5
WHO‐  AFRO  region  bears  the  largest  burden  of  malaria,  especially  Plasmodium 
falciparum.
 
Globally,  malaria  not  only  has  a  toll  on  health,  it  negatively  impacts  economic 
development resulting in malaria‐endemic countries having lower rates of economic 
growth [15].  Especially in Africa, where malaria accounts for 30% to 50% of hospital 
admissions and up to 50% of outpatient visits in high‐transmission areas. The World 
Bank estimates that malaria alone slows African economies by 1.3% per year – a 32% 
reduction  in  African  GDP  over  35  years.  Malaria  costs  African  economies  US  $12 
billion annually (unknown in Asia).
 

Burden of Malaria in the Greater Mekong Subregion: Trends and Current Status  
Over  the  past  decade  the  Mekong  countries  as  a  whole  have  made  tremendous 
progress in reducing the number of malaria cases and deaths.  

        No. of cases                                                            No. of deaths

        500,000                                                                        6,000
        450,000
                                                                                       5,000
        400,000
        350,000
                                                                                       4,000
        300,000
        250,000                                                                        3,000
        200,000
                                                                                       2,000
        150,000
        100,000
                                                                                       1,000
         50,000
            -                                                                          -
                  1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007

                       Number of confirmed malaria cases             Malaria deaths
                                                                                                 
                                                           Source: Delacollette, 2009 [1] 
                                              
Over the past decade from 1998‐2007, the Mekong countries have collectively noted 
a  60%  reduction  in  the  annual  number  of  deaths  attributed  to  malaria,  and  a  25% 
reduction  in  the  number  of  confirmed  cases,  from  418,859  cases  in  1998  to  316,078 
cases in 2007 [1].  The reduction in mortality surpasses the targets previously set in 
1999 by the Roll Back Malaria Partnership to be reached by 2010 [9].  Multiple factors 
have contributed to the region’s achievements in improving the burden of malaria. 
Governments  and  partners  made  national  malaria  control  a  priority  by  increasing 
investments  in  malaria  control,  successfully  garnering  international  funds, 
strengthening  political  will,  integrating  malaria  control  programs  into  national 
health systems, and intensifying cross‐border collaboration. Environmental changes 
such  as  deforestation,  economic  development,  demographic  stabilization,  greater 


                                                                                                    6
   political  stability,  and  improved  coverage  of  basic  health  services  have  also  likely 
   impacted malaria morbidity and mortality in GMS [1]. 
    
                                     Cambodia                                                    Cambodia
     9                                                    10
C o n f irm e d m a la ria c a s e s p e r 1 ,0 0 0 p o p u la t io n
                                     China-Yunnan                                                China-Yunnan
                                                           9




                                                                        M a la ria d e a t h s p e r 1 0 0 ,0 0 0 p o p u la t io n
                                     Lao PDR
     8                                                                                           Lao PDR
                                     Myanmar               8
     7                               Thailand                                                    Myanmar
     6                               Viet Nam              7                                     Thailand
                                                           6                                     Viet Nam
     5
                                                           5
     4
                                                           4
     3                                                     3
     2
                                                           2
    
     1                                                     1
    
     0                                                     0
        1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007    1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007
    
                                                                             Source: Delacollette, 2009 [1]

    
   The malaria situation across the six countries of the Mekong varies tremendously. In 
   2007,  the  incidence  of  malaria  ranged  from  0.13  confirmed  cases  per  1,000 
   populations  in  Yunnan  Province  to  3.55  confirmed  cases  per  1,000  populations  in 
   Myanmar.  Malaria mortality also ranged from 0.02 deaths per 100,000 populations 
   in Yunnan  Province to 2.91 deaths per 100,000 populations in Myanmar. Myanmar 
   accounted for more than half of the malaria cases and approximately three‐quarters 
   of the malaria deaths in the GMS in 2006.  
    
   Viet Nam and Thailand have reduced malaria deaths from 4,646 in 1991 to 20 in 2007 
   and from around 740 in 1999 to 97 in 2007, respectively, by using innovative control 
   approaches  through  well  supervised  vertical  control  systems.  As  the  burden  of 
   malaria  decreases,  these  national  programs  are  facing  many  different  challenges 
   which  includes  the  disinterest  of  policy  makers  and  stakeholders,  the  subsequent 
   growing  shortage  of  financial  and  human  resources,  the  growing  importance  of 
   unsupervised  and  unmonitored  private  sector  services,  and  the  constant  threat  of 
   introducing  parasites  in  previously  well  controlled  areas  through  migration  (e.g. 
   from  Myanmar  to  Thailand).  Maintaining  malaria  control  interventions  and 
   strengthening surveillance systems will be paramount in these countries to prevent 
   epidemics  and  persistent  reintroduction  of  cases.  During  the  past  ten  years,  other 
   Mekong  countries  like  Cambodia  and  Lao  PDR  have  also  shown  a  significant 
   decrease  in  malaria  trends  due  to  an  increased  commitment  by  their  national 
   Governments  together  with  substantial  additional  financial  and  technical  support 
   from  the  international  community.  The  Province  of  Yunnan  in  PR  China  is  mainly 


                                                                                                                                      7
affected by P. vivax, with a limited P. falciparum burden, and accounts for 38% of all 
malaria  cases  and  80%  of  deaths  in  China.  Although  Yunnan  has  demonstrated  a 
decline in malaria morbidity and mortality, malaria control efforts are hampered by 
the continuous influx of migrants from Myanmar. Among the six Mekong countries, 
the malaria burden is highest in Myanmar which is receiving limited support from 
the  international  community.  However,  with  the  engagement  of  the  private  sector 
and  the  provision  of  RDTs  and  ACTs,  Myanmar  has  almost  halved  their  malaria 
deaths  in  the  past  decade  but  needs  an  estimated  USD  240  million  to  effectively 
control the disease during the next 5 years (WHO‐MMP, informal report, 2009).   
 
To  further  consolidate  and  improve  upon  their  national  achievements,  a  regional 
approach looking beyond country boundaries, is needed.  To ensure harmonization, 
this  subregional  approach  will  highlight  the  corresponding  objectives  of  the  South 
East  Asian  Region  Malaria  Control  Strategy,  the  recently  drafted  Western  Pacific 
Regional Action Plan [10], and the USAID Performance Management Plan.  
 

SEARO 
The strategic plans for the two SEARO countries, Myanmar and Thailand, have been 
guided by the regional strategy drafted in 2006, The Revised Malaria Control Strategy: 
South‐East Asia Region 2006‐2010 [11].  The following broad strategies were proposed 
to  reach  their  goals  of  50%  reduction  of  malaria  morbidity  and  mortality  by  2010 
from 2000 levels and the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals in the 
member countries by 2015: 
 
        Reform approaches to program planning and management 
        Revamp surveillance and strengthen monitoring and evaluation 
        Scale up coverage and proper use of insecticide‐treated mosquito nets 
        Target interventions to risk groups 
        Scale up control of P. vivax malaria 
 
These broad strategies encompassed human resource development, development of 
a  multi‐sectoral  approach,  identifying  and  targeting  interventions  to  vulnerable 
groups, monitoring of drug resistance and drug quality, intensifying communication 
for behavior change, and increasing collaboration with private sector. 

 

WPRO 
WHO‐WPRO  recently  developed  the  Regional  Action  Plan  for  Malaria  Control  and 
Elimination in the Western Pacific (2010–2015) [10] which was reviewed and revised by 
national  malaria  program  managers  and  representatives  from  the  ministries  of 


                                                                                            8
health from all six Mekong countries. The overall goal of the Regional Action Plan is 
to consolidate and build on the recent achievements in malaria control in the region 
and progressively eliminate malaria, where possible.  

        Objective  1:  Strengthen  malaria  programme  management  based  on  firm 
        political commitment and strong partnerships 
        Objective 2: Ensure full coverage of the population at risk with appropriate 
        vector control measures 
        Objective  3:  Maximize  utilization  of  malaria  control  services  (through 
        appropriate  information,  education  and  communication  materials  and 
        behaviour change communication) and dramatically strengthen community 
        mobilization efforts 
        Objective  4:  Ensure  access  for  all  to  early  diagnosis  and  affordable,  safe, 
        effective  and  prompt  antimalarial  combination  treatments  through  active 
        public and private sector initiatives  
        Objective  5:  Ensure  comprehensive  coverage  of  vulnerable,  poor  and/or 
        marginalized populations at high risk of malaria with appropriate malaria 
        control measures 
        Objective  6:  Establish  and/or  strengthen  the  routine  malaria  surveillance 
        system (all species) and ensure adequate outbreak response capability 
        Objective  7:  Accelerate  malaria  (all  species)  elimination  efforts  in 
        participating countries 



USAID [16] 
 
USAID/  Regional  Development  Mission  ‐  Asia  (RDMA)  oversees  an  extensive 
portfolio  of  infectious  disease  (ID)  programs  covering  malaria,  tuberculosis,  and 
other public health threats. As a key subset of the ID program, the Mekong Malaria 
Intiative  aims  to  prevent  the  development  and  spread  of  drug‐resistant  malaria.  
RDMA’s  malaria  activities  focus  on  strengthening  case  management  by  improving 
diagnostics,  ensuring  the  rational  use  of  first‐line  treatment  drugs,  implementing 
surveillance  for  drug  resistance,  using  strategic  information  in  policymaking,  and 
strengthening regional networks.  
 
In order to achieve the overriding strategic objective of preventing the development 
and  spread  of  drug‐resistant  malaria,  the  following  intermediate  results  (IR)  have 
been prioritized by the USAID/RDMA programs:   
             
        IR 1: Access Increased to Prevention Interventions 
        IR 2: Access Increased to Care, Support, and Treatment 



                                                                                              9
       IR 3: Access Increased to Strategic Information 
       IR 4: Enabling Environment Strengthened 
       IR 5: Model Programs Expanded and Use of Best Practices Strengthened 
     
All or some of the above objectives are currently supported by the following USAID‐ 
funded core MMP Partners: 
 
       Academy for Education Development (AED) based in Washington DC, USA: 
       http://www.aed.org/ 
       Asian Collaborative Training Network for Malaria (ACTMalaria) based in 
       Manila, Philippines: http://www.actmalaria.net/home/ 
       Malaria Consortium (MC) based in Bangkok, Thailand with headquarters in 
       London, U.K.: http://www.malariaconsortium.org/   
       MEASURE Evaluation based in Washington DC, USA: 
       http://www.macrointernational.com/Survey/Demographic/measure.aspx  
       Management Sciences for Health‐Strengthening Pharmaceutical Systems 
       (MSH‐SPS) based in Arlington, VA, USA: http://www.msh.org/global‐
       presence/sps.cfm  
       University of Maryland, based in College Park, MD, USA: 
       http://www.wwarn.org/home/ 
       University Research Co., LLC (URC) based in Cambodia: http://www.urc‐
       chs.com/  
       U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention based in Atlanta (CDC), GA, 
       USA: http://cdc.gov/malaria  
       U.S. Pharmacopeia Drug Quality and Information (USP DQI) based in 
       Rockville, MD, USA: http://www.usp.org/worldwide/   
       World Health Organization Mekong Malaria Programme based in Bangkok 
       (WHO‐MMP), Thailand: 
       http://www.whothailand.org/EN/Section3/section113.htm  
       Kenan Institute Asia (KIA) based in Bangkok, Thailand: 
       http://www.kiasia.org/  

    




                                                                                 10
 MEKONG MALARIA PROGRAMME STRATEGY 
 
       A  special  session  on  Mekong  malaria  challenges  was  organized  in  Chiang 
Mai  in  October  2006  with  USAID‐funded  partners  to  take  stock  of  past  5‐year 
achievements  and  pave  the  way  to  construct  the  next  5‐year  phase  of  the  Mekong 
Malaria  strategic  framework.  During  a  subsequent  ACTMalaria  meeting  in 
Cambodia,  all  Mekong  malaria  programme  managers  expressed  their  views 
pertaining  to  the  potential  added  value  of  the  Mekong  Malaria  Programme  with 
common  Mekong  goals  and  technical  focus  areas  to  be  supported  with  available 
USAID funds. Many partners have progressively been engaged and some progress 
has been made in the past two years. However, many of the challenges identified in 
2006  still  remain  with  often  fragmented  approaches  from  partners  lacking  a 
comprehensive  perspective.  We  have  harmonized  the  different  contributions  from 
the  core  USAID  partners  under  a  strategic  plan  in  line  with  the  new  M&E 
framework  to  provide  a  more  comprehensive  approach  and  measuring  progress. 
The  strategic  framework  encompasses  both  malaria‐specific  measures  and  more 
integrated  systems‐specific  measures.  It  also  incorporates  the  new  WHO  regional 
plans, the USAID intermediate results, and new targets such as malaria elimination. 
Where  applicable,  corresponding  SEARO,  WPRO,  and  USAID  objectives  are 
highlighted. 
 
 

MALARIA‐SPECIFIC STRATEGIES 
 
1. Policy and Program Management 
 
Objective 
• Strengthen malaria program management to ensure that it is operational at all 
    levels of the health system. 
• Improve  capacity  of  host  country  governments  to  obtain,  use,  and  disseminate 
    quality information for surveillance, and respond to malaria in border provinces 
    and emergence of drug‐resistance 
 
 
             SEARO: Reform approaches to programme planning and management 
               
               
            WPRO: Strengthen malaria programme management based on firm political 
               
            commitment and strong partnerships. 
              
              
            USAID:  Enabling Environment Strengthened 
           
                    • Increased use of strategic information for policy‐making 
           


                                                                                        11
            
    1.1 Development of strategies and policies.  
    Achievements 
    To  date,  WHO‐MMP  for  all  GMS  countries,  URC  in  Cambodia,  and  KIA  in 
    Thailand have been integral in providing technical assistance to updating the 
    national  antimalarial  drug  policies  and  case  management  guidelines.  WHO 
    and  Malaria  Consortium  have  also  extensively  assisted  national  malaria 
    control programmes to submit and successfully garner GFATM funding.  
 
    Strategies 
    • Support  NMCPs  in  developing  national  strategic  policies  that 
       comprehensively  address  aspects  of  malaria  prevention,  treatment, 
       vulnerable  groups,  monitoring  and  evaluation,  human  and  financial 
       resources,  supply  chain,  operational  research,  and  health  systems 
       integration, which is updated at least every five years.  
    • Aid countries in obtaining and keeping external funding e.g. GFATM for 
       malaria 
    • Create,  maintain,  and  disseminate  best‐practice  guides  and  reference 
       resources  
 
    1.2 Training and capacity building 
     
    Achievements  
    Although  all  MMP  partners  have  been  involved  with  training  and  capacity 
    development,  the  Asian  Collaborative  Training  Network  for  Malaria 
    (ACTMalaria)  has  been  during  the  last  10  years  a  leader  in  implementing 
    regional  best  practices  and  up‐to‐date  training.  Their  flagship  course, 
    Management of Malaria Field Operations (MMFO), was conducted in 2009 by 
    the Thai Ministry of Public Health (MOPH) with the assistance of CDC, MC, 
    and  WHO.  ACTMalaria  is  also  very  active  in  coordinating  and  refreshing 
    training  courses  in  microscopy  including  accreditation  of  microscopists  and 
    quality  assurance  systems.  They  have  successfully  conducted  in  2008  a 
    workshop  on  vector  management.  They  partnered  with  MSH‐SPS  and  the 
    National Institute for Malariology, Parasitology and Entomology (NIMPE) to 
    conduct  a  Pharmaceutical  Management  &  Quantification  for  Malaria 
    workshop.  MSH‐SPS  and  URC  have  also  developed  training  materials  and 
    trained  health  workers  on  procurement  management  systems.  WHO  in  all 
    Mekong countries and KIA in Thailand have been extensively involved with 
    therapeutic efficacy study training sessions at both subregional and national 
    levels.  Country  missions  have  been  coordinated  by  WHO  to  assess  PCR 
    laboratory  capacity  in  order  to  fully  perform  in‐vivo  therapeutic  efficacy 
    studies (e.g. determination of reinfection vs. recrudescence) locally. WHO has 


                                                                                    12
      also  been  involved  with  courses  on  case  management  and  IEC/BCC 
      workshops and training sessions. URC whose focus is in Cambodia have been 
      involved with many aspects of training. URC has been involved with training 
      lab  workers  on  the  use  of  RDTs  including  Combo  tests,  procurement/ 
      assessment of cooler boxes, and use (and maintenance) of microscopes. URC 
      has reviewed existing training curricula and developed plans and job aids for 
      case  management,  including  severe  malaria  management.    They  have  also 
      provided  training  for  private  providers,  pharmacists  and  drug  outlets  to 
      improve use of correct drugs, identify spurious drugs, and give appropriate 
      referrals when needed. They are supporting a community network of village 
      malaria  workers  and  strengthening  management  capacity  of  malaria 
      programme  managers  in  Cambodia.  URC  conducted  workshops  on 
      communications and behavior change strategies for training of trainers. USP‐
      DQI  has  provided  training  to  customs,  drug  regulatory  agencies,  and  police 
      officials  to  assist  them  in  counterfeit  identification  and  sample  handling 
      techniques.  They  continue  to  provide  Minilab®  laboratory  trainings  on 
      analysis  of  medicines  as  first  field  screening  for  counterfeits.  ACTMalaria, 
      MEASURE  Evaluation,  and  CDC/MC  will  collaborate  on  developing  and 
      conducting a regional course on M&E.
       
      Strategies 
      • Asses existing capacity development efforts in Mekong countries 
      • Implement programmes and work plans that are data‐driven at all levels‐ 
          national, provincial, and district  
      • Support  NMCPs  to  develop  national  malaria  workforce  forecasting  and 
          framework  to  accommodate  changing  national  policies  e.g.  shifting  from 
          malaria control to elimination 
      • Review  and  update  curriculum  of  existing  training  courses  taking  into 
          account new Mekong challenges and recent elimination objectives 
      • Conduct  workshops/  courses  to  encourage,  exchange,  and  teach  best 
          practices  for  malaria,  M&E,  drug  quality  monitoring,  and  supply  chain 
          management, etc. 
      • Training courses evaluated and program follow up of participants 
 
 
2. Prevention Interventions 
 
Objective 
• To deliver prevention measures appropriate to local vector biology, transmission 
    settings, and population characteristics. 
• To  achieve  high  coverage  to  accelerate  the  impact  on  malaria  morbidity  and 
    mortality especially amongst the vulnerable groups. 


                                                                                        13
  
 
            SEARO: Scale up coverage and proper use of insecticide‐treated mosquito 
            nets 
 
            WPRO: Ensure full coverage of the population at risk with appropriate vector 
 
            control measures 
 
            USAID: Access Increased to Prevention Interventions 
 
         
        2.1 Increased coverage of preventive measures 
         
        Achievements 
        To  date,  KIA  has  provided  LLINs  for  migrant  laborers  in  Phuket,  Thailand. 
        URC contributed to ITN distribution in Cambodia. WHO has been involved 
        in  the  re‐impregnation  of  at  least  90,000  nets  in  containment  Zone  1  of  the 
        Cambodia containment plan as an emergency measure. ACTMal is playing a 
        coordinating role in setting up the insecticide resistance network in the GMS.   
        
        Strategies 
        • Integrated  vector  management  strategies  adopted  and  implemented  by 
             countries 
        • Increase  coverage  of  ITN/LLIN/LLIHN  and  IRS  to  at‐risk  populations, 
             when suitable 
        • Research  vector  control  measures  appropriate  to  regional  and  local 
             settings  both  in  terms  of  the  vector  (vector  behaviors)  and  the 
             communities  (additional  personal  protection  measures  beyond  LLIN  or 
             LLIHN) 
        • Monitor and map vectors’ resistance to insecticides through sentinel sites  
        • Monitor counterfeit insecticides  
        • Evaluate contribution of preventive measures to the containment project 
              
              
3. Strengthening IEC/BCC interventions 
 
Objective 
• Empowering  the  hard‐to  reach  population  at  risk  (mainly  in  remote  areas)  to 
    understand the disease through culturally‐appropriate communications. 
• At‐risk  groups  will  have  the  knowledge  and  skills  to  prevent  malaria  and  to 
    appropriately seek care during a febrile illness by 2012 
 
               SEARO: Scale up coverage and proper use of insecticide‐treated 
               mosquito nets 

                                                                                             14
 
 
        WPRO: Maximize utilization of malaria control services (through appropriate 
        IEC/BCC) and dramatically strengthen community mobilization efforts. 
 
        USAID: Access Increased to Prevention Interventions 
          • Increased use of malaria prevention measures
     
 
    3.1 IEC/ BCC 
     
    Achievements 
    Remote  or  hard‐to‐reach  populations  and  migrants  are  the  most  at  risk 
    populations  in  the  GMS.  URC  has  been  visiting  health  facilities  and 
    communities  to  identify  IEC/BCC  needs  for  patients,  community  members, 
    health  care  providers,  managers,  and  mobile  migrant  population  in  the 
    catchment areas in Cambodia. They have conducted a baseline survey in four 
    provinces to better understand current practices and information provided to 
    both the target populations and providers with regards to malaria prevention 
    and  control.  They  have  drafted  an  IEC/BCC  strategy  which  focuses  on 
    advocacy,  community  mobilization,  public  education  using  local  media  and 
    mass media, and mobile migrant population. Based on the IEC/BCC strategic 
    framework,  they  are  developing/  adapting  materials  and  messages  for  the 
    various target groups such as providers, patients, care givers, managers, and 
    communities,  including  mobile  migrants.  They  have  produced  job  aids  for 
    providers, pharmacists, and laboratories; posters, educational pamphlets, and 
    billboards located at the entrance of highly endemic areas. They are working 
    with  national  and  local  TV  and  radio  stations  to  disseminate  key  malaria 
    prevention and control messages.  URC is involved in Malaria Week, a large‐
    scale  IEC/BCC  dissemination  opportunity  in  Cambodia,  which  occurs  once 
    per  year  to  raise  awareness  about  bednet  distribution,  treatment,  and 
    diagnosis through community and school‐based activities. USAID in order to 
    strengthen efforts in education and behavior changes communication broadly 
    in  the  GMS  has  announced  the  C‐Change  project  which  was  awarded  to 
    Academy for Educational Development (AED). 
 
    Strategies 
    • Review current IEC/BCC strategies 
    • Conduct  household  and  qualitative  surveys    to  identify  barriers  to 
       effective prevention and case management 
    • Identification  and  scale  up  of  innovative  IEC  approaches  addressing 
       language, literacy, and cultural barriers 


                                                                                    15
       •   Develop a framework to engage partners in planning, implementing, and 
           evaluating effective IEC/BCC plan 
       •   Increase  focus  on  community  mobilization  and  engagement  of  civil 
           society on malaria control efforts 
        
 
4. Early diagnosis and prompt effective treatment of cases 
 
Objectives 
• Confirmation  of  all  malaria  cases  with  parasite‐based  diagnosis  and  universal 
    access to recommended artemisinin‐based combination treatments (ACTs)  
• All  GMS  countries  assisted  by  USP  will  have  capacity  to  conduct  in‐country 
    testing for counterfeit/ substandard antimalarials 
• Quality  assurance  (QA)  and  quality  control  (QC)  systems  for  testing 
    antimalarials and parasite‐based diagnostics (Rapid Diagnostic Tests (RDT) and 
    microscopy) will be in place 
 
 
            SEARO: Scale up control of P. vivax malaria
 
            WPRO: Ensure access for all to early diagnosis and affordable, safe, effective 
            and prompt antimalarial combination treatments through active public and 
            private sector initiatives. 
 
            USAID: Access Increased to Care, Support, and Treatment 
                       • Improved case management for malaria 
        USAID partners: MSH‐SPS, URC, USP‐DQI, WHO 
                       • Strengthen the rational use of first‐line ACT 
        Potential Collaborators: see Annex III 
         
         
        4.1 Towards quality malaria diagnosis 
         
        Achievements 
        Assuring  quality  parasite‐based  diagnosis  with  microscopy  or  RDTs  at  all 
        levels  of  the  system  is  of  critical  importance.  WHO  is  currently  supporting 
        retraining  and  accreditation  of  national  level  microscopists  and  developing 
        materials  to  assist  them  in  maintaining  quality  microscopy  within  their 
        national  programmes.  URC  has  been  working  to  improve  laboratory 
        diagnostic  capabilities  at  provincial  level  and  health  facilities  in  their  target 
        areas  in  Cambodia.  Their  work  has  included  conducting  laboratory 
        assessments of provincial laboratory facilities, routine laboratory monitoring, 
        updating  malaria  laboratory  standard  operating  procedures  (SOPs)  and  QC 
        procedures,  revising  microscopy  training,  updating  testing  algorithms, 
        modifying  job  aids  and  training  manuals,  and  improving  the  central  and 


                                                                                                16
facility  storage  for  RDTs.  They  have  also  strengthened  procedures  for 
tracking  laboratory  supplies  and  updated  the  forecasting  system  at 
operational districts (OD), Provincial Health Departments (PHD), and health 
facilities. MSH‐SPS in collaboration with Thai MOPH and KIA implemented 
activities  to  increase  availability  and  improve  distribution  of  antimalarials 
and RDTs.  
 
Strategies 
• Pursue efforts to improve, maintain and monitor QA and QC systems for 
    combo RDTs and microscopy 
• Maintain  quality  microscopy  through  management  of  slide  bank  and 
    refresher courses for microscopists 
• Support  scaling  up  and  monitoring  of  cooler  boxes  and  assessment  of 
    RDTs in field conditions 
• Improve  storage,  transport,  and  inventory  management  systems  place  at 
    all levels of the health system for malaria commodities 
• Explore  testing  practical  clinical  algorithms  and  complementary  field 
    appropriate  diagnostic tools to manage non‐malarial febrile diseases  
• Assess  the  effect  of  RDTs  on  case  management  in  the  private  and  public 
    sectors 
• Support  operational  research  on  improving  G‐6‐PD  screening  and  safe 
    integration of primaquine therapy for radical treatment of P. vivax  
• Support emerging methods e.g. PCR for survey and diagnostic needs 
 
4.2 Access to effective and quality antimalarials with emphasis on 
monitoring counterfeit and substandard drugs 
 
Achievements 
URC,  in  Cambodia,  with  CNM  and  counterparts  conducted  a  rapid 
assessment of knowledge and skills of health workers, lab technicians, private 
providers,  and  pharmacists  in  treating  malaria  patients.  URC  can  also 
provide supplies/ equipment for severe case management at the district and 
provincial  hospitals  if  necessary  in  the  target  areas  in  Cambodia.  They  have 
reviewed the existing referral system for both public and private sectors. URC 
reviewed current drug procurement, storage and distribution at all levels and 
developed  strategies  for  improving  logistics  management  and  tracking  of 
ACTs. URC also plans on developing a public‐private model which includes 
provider/drug  outlet  accreditation  at  local  levels  to  promote  correct  use  of 
drugs  as  well  as  to  discourage  use  of  non‐registered  drugs  and 
monotherapies.  MSH‐SPS  has  provided  support  to  Bureau  of  Vector  Borne 
Diseases  (BVBD)  in  Thailand  to  improve  pharmaceutical  management 
practices  during  expansion  of  malaria  posts  under  GF  Round  7.  MSH 


                                                                                    17
    supported  the  national  malaria  program  in  Lao  PDR  to  improve 
    pharmaceutical  management  practices  and  procurement  forecasting  to 
    prevent  stock‐outs.  They  also  worked  with  URC,  USP,  KIA,  and  WHO  in 
    Cambodia  to  develop  a  matrix  for  pharmaceutical  management.  WHO  has 
    provided TA and supported national workshops in Lao PDR and Cambodia 
    to conceptualize / initiate strategic private‐public mix (PPM) approaches and 
    set up a task force in WPRO to strategize PPM practices in the region. 
     
    The  increasing  production,  circulation  and  use  of  counterfeits  and 
    substandard  drugs  pose  a  major  challenge  in  the  region.  USP‐DQI  has 
    supported sentinel site drug quality testing in Laos, Cambodia and Viet Nam. 
    Mekong  drug  quality  monitoring  study  from  July  2003  ‐  Sept  2007  showed 
    that 20% of artesunate in Cambodia and 29% in Lao PDR were fake. USP DQI 
    has  also  created,  with  the  Pharmaceutical  System  Research  and  Intelligence 
    Center  (PSyRIC)  in  Thailand,  an  antimalarial  drug  quality  database  under 
    Asian Network of Excellence in Quality Assurance of Medicines (ANEQAM). 
    They  have  also  produced  video  public  service  announcements  to  increase 
    awareness. They are currently testing a protocol in the field for a randomized 
    antimalarial medicines quality survey in selected Cambodia‐Thailand border 
    provinces.  
     
    Strategies 
    • Engage  community‐based  agents  especially  in  remote  areas  to  deliver 
        malaria prevention and treatment packages  
    • Improve  pharmaceutical  management  practices  to  prevent  stock‐outs  or 
        overstocks of ACTs and RDTs 
    • Support  revising  clinical  algorithms  and treatment  of  non‐malaria febrile 
        illnesses 
    • Engage through win‐win approaches the private sector to improve 
        management of malaria according to national guidelines 
    • Continue to collect reliable and up‐to‐date data on the quality trends of 
        essential anti‐infective medicines in the region including 
        pharmacovigilance data 
    • Raise  public  awareness  through  various  means  about  the  dangers  of 
        counterfeit and substandard medicines 
    • Assess  the  performance  of  the  web‐based  surveillance  system  set  up  by 
        WHO to monitor counterfeits in the region 
 
 
 
 
 


                                                                                    18
5. Vulnerable Populations 
 
Objectives 
• Increase delivery of comprehensive package of interventions to the most at risk 
• Empower  the  vulnerable  populations  to  understand  and  tackle  the  disease 
    through  appropriate  communications,  preventive  measures,  and  access  to 
    health care services. 
 
            SEARO: Target interventions to risk groups
 
            WPRO: Ensure comprehensive coverage of vulnerable, poor and/or 
            marginalized populations at high risk of malaria with appropriate malaria 
            control measures.  
        
        
 
       5.1 Ensuring comprehensive coverage of vulnerable populations with 
       malaria control measures 
        
       Achievements 
       WHO  has  finalized  strategy  for  ethnic  minority  groups  (EMG)  in  the  GMS 
       and  are  coordinating  development  of  strategies  for  migrants  and  mobile 
       populations  as  part  of  the  containment  project.  WHO  has  worked  with  the 
       MOH and partners in Thailand on financial options to increase access and use 
       of  health  services  by  (unrecorded)  migrants.  MC  has  completed  a  migrant 
       bibliography.  MC/CDC  will  also  conduct  qualitative  research  on  migrant 
       laborers, a high‐risk group in Western Cambodia. URC has been involved in 
       mapping  of  mobile  migrant  populations  and  updating  the  strategy  so  that 
       services can be provided to this most at‐risk but hard‐to‐reach population.  
     
       Strategies 
       • Identification  of  vulnerable  groups  in  the  country  context  in  addition  to 
           children under five and pregnant women 
       • Research innovative approaches to effectively reach identified vulnerable 
           groups 
       • Expand upon existing malaria services to ethnic minority groups 
       • Collect data disaggregated by the different vulnerable populations 
       • Collect  and  analyze  data  on  movement  patterns  of  migrants  and  health 
           seeking behavior related to malaria  
     
     
     
 


                                                                                         19
6. Strategic Information 
 
Objectives 
• Containment  and  elimination  of  artemisinin  resistant  P.  falciparum  infections  in 
    the GMS  
• Strengthening  the  surveillance  system  at  all  levels  to  efficiently  gather 
    epidemiological data and map populations at risk, including those from remote 
    locations 
• Surveillance systems able to detect and respond to epidemics in a timely manner.   
 
 
            SEARO: Revamp surveillance and strengthen monitoring and evaluation
 
            WPRO: Establish/strengthen the routine malaria surveillance system (all 
 
            species) and ensure adequate outbreak response capability.  
 
   
            USAID: Access Increased to Strategic Information 
                      • Improved surveillance for drug‐resistant malaria 
                      • Existence and use of M&E plans for program management 
                      • Existence of an operational research agenda that contributes to 
                      improved understanding of malaria control  
     
     
       6.1 Surveillance, Monitoring & Evaluation 
        
       Achievements 
       The  Mekong  countries  have  been  reporting  the  so‐called  bi‐regional 
       “Kunming”  indicators  since  1999.  All  countries  were  having  difficulties 
       reporting  on  these  agreed  upon  20  standardized  indicators  due  to  various 
       reasons.  As  a  result,  the  “Kunming”  indicators  have  been  critically  reviewed 
       in  2006  by  WPRO  and  a  revised  set  of  indicators  were  recently  proposed  at 
       the Workshop on the Regional Action Plan for Malaria Control and Elimination in 
       the  Western  Pacific  (2010‐2015).  Furthermore,  WHO‐MMP  and  MEASURE 
       Evaluation  held  an  Informal  Consultation  to  initiate  the  Greater  Mekong 
       Sub‐Region  Malaria  Monitoring  and  Evaluation  Framework  in  Bangkok, 
       Thailand  in  October  2008.  Participants  during  the  consultation  revisited  the 
       issues and challenges of M&E for malaria programmes within the region and 
       started  the  process  of  developing  a  consolidated  sub‐regional  malaria  M&E 
       framework.  The  updated  M&E  framework  expected  to  oversee  the  multiple 
       existing  donor driven M&E  plans and guidance  for  the Mekong is currently 
       being  finalized  by  MEASURE  Evaluation  with  input  from  countries  and 
       partners e.g. WHO, CDC, and MC (see Annex I).  The M&E framework with 


                                                                                         20
its  malaria‐specific  strategies  impacting  on  mortality  and  morbidity  and 
systems strengthening elements will assist national malaria control programs 
and partners to refine their Mekong malaria indicators. Emphasis was put on 
better  balancing  data  expected  to  be  routinely  generated  through  routine 
health information systems and those to be generated from surveys. MC/CDC 
will  assess  the  M&E  capacity  within  the  country  programmes  and  assist  in 
drafting  M&E  plans,  improving  M&E  and  surveillance  systems  and 
supporting surveys when needed to measure progress and guide programme 
management.  MC  has  conducted  the  Cambodian  national  surveys  in  2004 
and 2007  and  their expertise will contribute to the  development of Mekong‐
adjusted  tools  for  both  household  and  health  facility  surveys  including 
Malaria Indicator Surveys adapted to lower transmission settings (MIS). They 
have  also  assisted  in  developing  the  Cambodian  National  M&E  guidelines 
with standardized tools for malaria program and assisted Lao PDR with their 
net  survey.  URC  has  been  monitoring  program  performance  with  malaria 
data  collection  from  all  participating  facilities  in  Cambodia,  field  testing  on 
malaria  case  management  information,  reviewing  facility  data  at  OD  level 
quarterly,  facility/community  level  data  monthly,  and  analyzing  data  using 
Plan‐Do‐Study‐Act cycle.  
 
Strategies 
• Standardized  Mekong  M&E  /  surveillance  framework  and  indicators  in 
     place 
• Complete regional inventory of M&E capacity  
• Strengthen the national surveillance system to the periphery to detect and 
     respond  to  epidemics,  to  fine  tune  on  a  real  time  basis  the  malaria  risk 
     stratification down to the village level, and to conduct active investigation 
     of index cases    
• Assess  and  refine  surveillance  methodologies  for  low  /  no  transmission 
     settings (prevention of reintroduction of malaria cases / transmission) 
• Improve  household  and  health  facility  survey  methodology  including 
     new assessments for lower transmission settings i.e. serologic surveys  
• Review overall disease mapping capacities and needs in the region 
• Explore  incorporation  of  simple  technologies  (e.g.  SMS)  to  improve 
     surveillance systems 
• Assess priority M&E needs for GFATM grant management  
• Integrate malaria surveillance into HMIS to capture the disease burden by 
     age, gender, ethnicity, travel history, and occupational categories 
• Develop  M&E  curriculum  and  training  for  further  capacity  development 
     in M&E and uptake of new framework 




                                                                                       21
    6.2 Malaria Multi‐Drug Resistance (MDR)

    Achievements 
    Since  the  1970s,  the  border  area  between  Cambodia  and  Thailand  has  been 
    the epicenter of emerging malaria drug resistance, starting with resistance to 
    chloroquine,  followed  by  resistance  to  sulfadoxine‐pyrimethamine,  then 
    mefloquine,  and currently  showing  increasing  failure  rate  of  P.  falciparum  to 
    ACTs  [3‐5].    WHO‐MMP  has  been  instrumental  in  supporting  therapeutic 
    efficacy  studies  across  Mekong  countries  in  selected  sentinel  sites  by 
    promoting  the  use  of  WHO  standardized  therapeutic  efficacy  protocols  to 
    monitor  P.  falciparum  and  P.  vivax  resistance  to  antimalarial  drugs  [17].  
    Currently,  26  sentinel  sites  have  been  set  up  across  the  GMS  to  conduct  in‐ 
    vivo monitoring of antimalarial drug efficacy using the WHO standard 28‐day 
    follow‐up protocol. The MMP has also set up a team to assess laboratory capacity 
    for  PCR in each Mekong country to decide whether to establish reference centers for 
    PCR at the national or regional level.  WHO‐MMP has conducted an  assessment of 
    common  capacity  needs  for  therapeutic  efficacy  studies  to  identify  where  technical 
    assistance  should  be  provided  and  has  supported  training  courses  targeting  staff 
    involved  in  therapeutic  efficacy  studies  (TES)  in  all  Mekong  countries.  KIA  in 
    Thailand has also supported Pf in‐vivo studies in 7 sites and HRP2 based in‐vitro 
    sensitivity studies of Pf in 8 sites till 2008. 
         
    Since  2003,  evidence  has  been  accumulating  that  ACTs  are  less  effective 
    against  P.  falciparum  at  the  Thai‐Cambodia  border  [5,  18‐20].  A  Mekong 
    Malaria MDR taskforce (TF) was set up in January 2007 in Phnom Penh at the 
    WHO  Informal  Consultation  on  Containment  of  Malaria  Multi‐Drug 
    Resistance on the Cambodia‐Thailand Border [21]. The MDR TF was set up to 
    address the emerging problem of artemisinin resistance at the Thai‐Cambodia 
    border  by  conducting  additional  TES  studies  on  the  border  to  confirm  the 
    situation  and  to  develop  a  bi‐country  emergency  response.  The  bi‐country 
    containment  response  was  first  discussed  during  a  WHO  Meeting  on 
    Containment  of  Artemisinin  Tolerance  in  Geneva  in  January  2008  [22] 
    followed by a second workshop in Bangkok with four principal investigators 
    looking  at  artemisinin  resistance,  confirmation,  characterization  and 
    containment  (ARC3  project).  A  third  informal  consultation  [23]  was 
    organized  by  the  WHO  MMP  to  define  a  strategy  to  contain/eliminate 
    Plasmodium  falciparum  parasites  with  altered  response  to  artemisinins 
    followed  by  a  National  Stakeholder  Planning  Workshop  in  Phnom  Penh  at 
    end of February 2008.  Since then, intense operational planning has occurred 
    with  successful  funding  garnered  from  the  Bill  and  Melinda  Gates 
    Foundation (BMGF) and activities starting in January 2009. 
 



                                                                                             22
Strategies 
• Strengthen TES network to monitor  falciparum and vivax resistance to 1st 
     line  antimalarials  in  the  Mekong  region  in  order  to  update  antimalarial 
     drug  policies  and  monitor  the  geographical  extension  of  Pf  resistance  to 
     ACT 
• Support  studies  on  MDR  including  falciparum  resistance  and  factors 
     influencing the emergence of malaria MDR in the GMS 
• Support  laboratory  networks  and  centers  of  excellence  to  strengthen 
     quality of methodological procedures and diagnostics  
• Convene  regular  technical  meetings  to  facilitate  exchange  of  results/ 
     information on malaria MDR  
• Implement  and  evaluate  the  containment  strategy  in  Cambodia  and 
     Thailand 
• Support  operational  research  addressing  different  components  of  the 
     containment  project  such  as  the  focused  screening  and  treatment 
     intervention  (FSAT)  strategy  and  evaluation  of  migrants  /  mobile 
     population at the Thai‐Cambodian border  
 
 
6.3 Molecular Markers 
 
Achievements 
USAID  plans  to  support  activities  to  improve  the  molecular  markers 
laboratory capacity within countries and have recently awarded this scope of 
work  to  University  of  Maryland,  Worldwide  Antimalarial  Resistance 
Network  (WWARN).    Their  objective  will  be  to  enhance  the  ability  of  the 
NMCPs  in  Cambodia,  Yunnan,  Lao  PDR,  Thailand,  Vietnam  (GMS  minus 
Myanmar) to control drug resistant malaria through a network of molecular 
laboratories  by  providing  technical  assistance,  equipment  if  needed  and 
support to improve laboratory capacity. These activities will be implemented 
in  collaboration  with  the  MOHs  but  may  also  involve  the  private  sector  as 
well as NGOs.  
 
Strategies 
• Support  the  MOH  laboratories  to  perform  independently  and  accurately 
     molecular assays associated with drug resistant malaria.  
• Improve  standards  by  ensuring  that  standard  operating  procedures  exist 
     and  are  regularly  updated  and  internal  and  external  QC  and  QA  are 
     strengthened.  
• Develop systems for regular equipment maintenance and effective sharing 
     of accurate information among sites  



                                                                                    23
    •   Ensure  that  biological  specimens  are  properly  analyzed  through 
        standardized procedures in national laboratories first and quality checked 
        through agreed upon reference labs in the GMS  
     
     
    6.4 Operational / field research 
     
    Achievements 
    Operational  research  is  essential  in  assessing  innovative  preventive  and 
    curative  interventions  and  subsequent  scale‐up  of  these  interventions  in  the 
    Mekong context. To date, URC has conducted operations research in proper 
    storage of RDTs and on characteristics of patients visiting health facility. CDC 
    and  MC  have  been  involved  in  the  design  of  the  qualitative  assessment  of 
    MSAT  within  the  containment  project  to  assess  community  perceptions  and 
    uptake.    They  are  also  initiating  a  qualitative  assessment  of  malaria  illness 
    perceptions  and  access  to  care  amongst  migrant  laborers  in  Western 
    Cambodia. 
         
    Strategies 
    • Conduct  operational  research  symposium  to  bring  together  program 
        managers,  academic  institutions,  and  researchers  from  the  GMS  to 
        develop a Mekong research agenda 
    • Assist  country  programs  to  establish  operational  research  steering 
        committees and develop a national operational research agenda 
    • Advocate for donor funding to support identified research priorities 
    • Influence programming and policy formulation with research findings 
     
 




                                                                                         24
SYSTEMS STRENGTHENING STRATEGIES 
1. Regional cooperation  
 
Objectives 
• Strengthen  regional  linkage  mechanisms  to  exchange/disseminate  quality, 
    standardized,  comparable  data  on  drug  quality,  and  behaviors  contributing  to 
    emergence & spread of resistance 
• Cross‐border initiatives for provinces bordering Myanmar are in place to deliver 
    effective preventive and curative services to those at most risk for malaria 
• Supranational  meetings  conducted  or  other  communication  plan  in  place  to 
    inform country programs, donors, and partners on progress made 
 
              SEARO: Reform approaches to programme planning and management 
 
              WPRO: Strengthen malaria programme management based on firm political 
              commitment and strong partnerships. 
 
              USAID: Enabling Environment Strengthened 
                       • Strengthened supranational networks for malaria control 
 
 
        1.1 Sub‐regional collaboration supporting cross border actions 
         
        Achievements 
        Phase  I  of  the  Mekong  Malaria  Initiative  did  not  encourage  enough  cross 
        border  initiatives  or  projects  to  address  specific  malaria  issues.  KIA 
        conducted  a  rapid  assessment  on  migration  and  malaria  on  the  Thai‐
        Cambodia  border.  WHO  and  MC  has  been  supporting  cross  border 
        coordination between Thailand and Cambodia which has become paramount 
        in  the  efforts  to  contain  artemisinin  resistant  P.  falciparum.  URC  has  been 
        facilitating cross border meetings as part of the larger containment strategy. 
         
        Strategies 
        • Strengthen  relationships  among  host  country  governments  and 
            implementing  partners  to  exchange/disseminate  quality,  standardized, 
            comparable data on infectious diseases in border provinces in GMS 
        • Explore  methods  to  ensure  sustainability  of  the  border  collaboration 
            within  formal  regional  government  structures  (e.g.,  Association  of  South 
            East  Asian  Nations,  Mekong  Basin  Disease  Surveillance,  Ayeyawady  ‐ 
            Chao Phraya ‐ Mekong Economic Cooperation Strategy, etc.) 




                                                                                           25
       •   Initiate mechanisms to facilitate learning exchange on good practices and 
           lessons  learned  in  cross‐border  prevention  and  control  of  malaria  in  the 
           GMS 
       •   Support a regional collaborative effort on timely reporting and sharing of 
           the medicine quality data amongst national and provincial authorities.   
       •   Develop  joint  proposals  across  Mekong  countries  addressing  specific 
           technical issues 
       •   Facilitate  Mekong  country’s  participation  in  supranational  networks  e.g. 
           Asian Pacific Malaria Elimination Network (APMEN) 
 
 
2. Public‐Private Partnerships 
 
Objectives 
• Develop strategic private‐public partnerships for the delivery of malaria 
    prevention and control efforts at all levels of the health system 
• Increasing the coverage of quality peripheral health services including 
    encouragement of successful public‐private partnerships in such a way that 
    population at risk can easily access health information and services 
 
 
             SEARO: Reform approaches to programme planning and management 
 
             WPRO: Strengthen malaria programme management based on firm political 
             commitment and strong partnerships. 
 
             USAID: Model programs expanded and use of best practices 
              strengthened. 
 
 
 
       2.1 Sub‐regional private sector engagement 
        
       Achievements 
       In  many  countries  within  the  GMS,  private  sector  is  a  large  contributor  to 
       health care delivery. A recent study from Cambodia [23] found that over 90% 
       of  initial  fever  cases  were  treated  outside  the  public  sector  when  no  village 
       malaria workers were present. A Lao study [24] found that 37% of fever cases 
       initially sought care outside the public sector.  The private sector represents a 
       heterogeneous group from private physicians to vendors to traditional healer, 
       which  are  largely  unregulated.  Private‐public  partnerships  have  yet  to  be 
       fully  incorporated into the MMP partnerships’ scopes of work. KIA has had 


                                                                                             26
      some engagement to mobilize public‐private partnerships for healthy tourism 
      and  elimination  of  malaria.    The  contribution  of  the  private  sector  in  the 
      management  of  malaria  cannot  be  ignored  and  must  be  incorporated 
      especially as programs move towards elimination.  
       
      Strategies 
      • Assess the contribution of private sector to the delivery of preventive and 
          curative  services  and  their  potential  role  in  reaching  hard‐to‐reach 
          populations 
      • Support  countries  to  develop  and  implement  public‐private  partnership 
          policies 
      • Support  countries  to  pilot  and  monitor  public‐private  partnership 
          activities including AMFm in Cambodia 
      • Increase  linkage  of  malaria  diagnosis  and  treatment  in  private  sector 
          through training of private practitioners 
      • Explore  strategies  to  capture  private  sector  data  and  integration  into  the 
          public health information systems 
       
       
3. Engaging other Programs and Sectors 
 
Objectives 
      • Develop and implement integrated control approaches as part of health 
          systems and decentralization 
       
 
            SEARO: Reform approaches to programme planning and management 
 
            WPRO: Strengthen malaria programme management based on firm political 
            commitment and strong partnerships. 
 
 
            USAID: Enabling Environment Strengthened 
 
 
      3.1 Integration/Coordination with Other Government Sectors 
       
      Achievements 
      URC  has  worked  with  Ministry  of  Education  and  Ministry  of  Womenʹs 
      Affairs  to  disseminate  IEC/BCC  information  in  Cambodia.  USP  DQI 
      collaborated with INTERPOL and the World Health Organization (WHO) in 
      a  mission  to  thwart  counterfeit  medicines  production  in  Southeast  Asia. 
      ʺOperation  Stormʺ  targeted  manufacturers  and  distributors  of  antimalarial, 


                                                                                         27
anti–tuberculosis,  anti–HIV/AIDS  medicines  and  antibiotics  for  pneumonia 
and  child–related  illnesses.  Data  from  the  USP  DQI  medicines  quality 
monitoring  program  in  Cambodia,  Lao  PDR,  Thailand,  Vietnam,  and  the 
Philippines were used in covert operations to identify fake medicines, which 
resulted in 27 arrests and the seizure of $6.65 million of counterfeit medicines. 
WHO  has  collaborated  in  Thailand  with  IOM  and  interested  NGOs  to 
improve access by (unrecorded) migrants to health services through various 
models which have been translated into a successful GF proposal.  WHO has 
also  been  very  active  with  UN  and  non  UN  partners  to  set  up  and  support 
cross border interventions between Myanmar and Thailand.  
 
Strategies 
• Convene  technical  meetings  with  health  programs  other  than  malaria 
    facing similar challenges particularly targeting vulnerable group 
• Collaborate  with  other  health  programs  such  as  EPI  or  reproductive 
    health to improve delivery of preventive measures 
• Collaborate  with  Ministry  of  Agriculture  and  other  relevant  sectors  as 
    countries move towards an integrated vector management strategy.   
• Continue interagency collaboration (USP‐DQI, WHO, Ministries of Health 
    (drug regulatory authorities) and  relevant Ministries (e.g. Interior, police, 
    and  customs)  in  the  international  and  regional  fight  against  counterfeit 
    and substandard medicines 




                                                                                  28
ON TRACK TO THE TARGET 
 
1. Elimination 
 
Objective 
• To contribute to malaria elimination efforts (zero transmission) where and when 
    relevant   
• Shrinking the malaria transmission map of GMS with focal elimination efforts at 
    sub‐national levels  
 
             WPRO: Accelerate malaria (all species) elimination efforts in participating 
             countries. 
         
        1.1 Intensified well‐managed control operations may lead to elimination 
         
        Achievements 
        Currently  none  of  the  six  Mekong  countries  have  reoriented  their  control 
        programs towards elimination.  China has reoriented their national program, 
        but  did  not  include  Yunnan  Province  in  their  short‐term  elimination  plans. 
        Within  Thailand,  KIA  has  begun  work  on  focal  elimination  with  the  Phuket 
        malaria  pre‐elimination  project.  They  further  held  a  forum  on  applying 
        effective  practices  and  lessons  learned  for  developing  a  strategy  for  malaria 
        elimination  in  Thailand.  They  have  also  engaged  with  the  private  sector  to 
        mobilize  public‐private  partnerships  for  healthy  tourism  and  elimination  of 
        malaria.  USAID  in  order  to  continue  to  support  elimination  efforts  has 
        announced the Greater Mekong Subregion – Responses to Infectious Diseases 
        (GMS‐RID) project which was awarded to Kenan Institute Asia.  
         
        Strategies 
        • Support  implementation  of  pilot  projects  for  focal  elimination  of  malaria 
            in Thailand 
        • Assist countries in assessing the feasibility of elimination 
        • Explore  elimination  activities  which  could  include  innovative  strategies 
            such as community‐based approaches and sero‐epidemiologic studies 
        • Support operational research on elimination interventions (e.g. new tools 
            on diagnosis / treatment) 
        • Support cross border elimination strategies, planning and implementation 
        • Assess the added value of a Mekong Malaria Elimination Network 
        • Facilitate country level participation in the Asian Pacific Malaria 
            Elimination Network 




                                                                                            29
ANNEX I  
 
Draft Proposed Mekong M&E framework (to be finalized at ACTMalaria meeting 
by NMCPs in March 2010) 
 
 
 
 




 
 
 
 
 
 
 




                                                                        30
ANNEX II 


Summary of Mekong malaria strategy by topic and country  
                                                                 STRATEGIES
                                                                                                                                GOAL
                                         Malaria Strengthening                                Systems Strengthening
                                                                                                       Public-
               Policies &                    Case                 Vulnerable Strategic    Regional
                            Prevention                 IEC/BCC                                         Private   Integration   Elimination
              Management                  Management               Groups    Information Cooperation
                                                                                                     Partnership
  Countries

  Cambodia         x            x              x          x           x          x            x           x           x

  PR China         x                           x          x                      x            x           x

  Lao PDR          x                           x          x           x          x            x           x           x

  Myanmar          x            x              x          x           x          x            x                       x

  Thailand         x            x              x          x           x          x            x           x           x            x

  Viet Nam         x            x              x          x           x          x            x           x           x            x




                                                                                                                                        31
Overview of Strategic Interventions in the GMS and Contributions by Core MMP Partners  
                                                                    STRATEGIES
                                                                                                                                       GOAL
                                            Malaria Strengthening                                Systems Strengthening
                                                                                                            Public-
                  Policies &                    Case                 Vulnerable Strategic    Regional
                               Prevention                 IEC/BCC                                           Private     Integration   Elimination
                 Management                  Management               Groups    Information Cooperation
                                                                                                          Partnership
    Partners

    ACTMalaria        x                                                                          x             x            x

    AED               x                                                                          x             x

    CDC/MC            x                                                  x          x            x             x            x             x

    KIA               x            x              x          x           x          x            x             x            x             x

    MEASURE           x                                                             x            x             x            x

    MSH-SPS           x                                                                          x             x            x

    URC               x            x              x          x           x          x            x

    USP               x                           x                                 x            x

    WHO-MMP           x            x              x                      x          x            x             x            x             x
    U. of
                      x                                                             x            x
    Maryland

 
 




                                                                                                                                                    32
ANNEX III 
 
FY08 USAID funds by partners  
                                          USAID Funds Received (FY08) 
Partners                                   
ACTMalaria                                $315,000 
CDC/MC                                    $699,000 
MEASURE                                   $150,000 
MSH‐SPS                                   $ 50,000 
URC                                       $959,385 
USP                                       $300,000 
WHO‐MMP                                   $1,685,000 
Total                                     $4,158,385  
 
FY09 USAID funds by partners and External Evaluation (To be checked further) 
                                         Planned USAID Funds (FY09) 
Partners                                  
WHO including ACT Malaria Foundation  $2,130,731      
CDC/MC                                   $1,000,000 
University Research Co (URC)             $800,000 
University of Maryland                   $675,000 
C‐Change Academy for Educational         $500,000 
Development (AED) 
USP/DQI                                  $400,000 
GMS‐RID (Kenan Institute Asia)           $400,000 
MEASURE                                  $350,000 
MSH‐SPS                                  $150,000 
External evaluation                      $150,000 
                                          
                                          
Total                                    $6,555,731  
 
 
 




                                                                            33
ANNEX IV 
 
List of Core MMP Partners supported by USAID RDM‐Asia (FY09) 
 
Academy for Educational Development (AED) 
ACTMalaria Foundation 
Kenan Institute Asia 
Malaria Consortium 
MEASURE Evaluation  
Management Sciences for Health Strengthening Pharmaceutical Systems  
WHO SEARO and WPRO 
University of Maryland 
University Research and Co (URC) 
U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention 
United States Pharmacopeia Drug Quality and Information 
 
 
MMP partners engaged in MMP activities (to be updated) 
 
ACTMalaria Foundation (ACTMal) 
Armed Forces Research Institute of Medical Sciences (AFRIMS) 
American Refugee Committee (ARC) 
Asia Pacific Malaria Elimination Network (APMEN) 
Asian Development Bank (ADB) 
Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF) 
CDC MOH Thailand (TUC) 
Center for Disease Control (CDC) Atlanta 
Family Health International (FHI) 
Health Unlimited (HU) 
Institute Pasteur Cambodia 
Institute of Tropical Medicine (ITM) Antwerp, Belgium  
International Office for Migrations (IOM) 
INTERPOL 
Japanese Ministry of Health 
Kenan Institute Asia (Kenan) 
Mahidol‐Oxford‐Wellcome‐trust Research Unit (MORU) 
Malaria Consortium 
Management Sciences for Health (MSH) 
MEASURE / evaluation 
Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) 
Medicine for Malaria Venture (MMV)  
MEKONG COUNTRIES (MOH/ national malaria programmes) 


                                                                        34
National academies / Research Institutions 
Partners for Development (PFD) 
Population Services International (PSI) 
SEAMEO TROPMED 
SOKHLO Malaria Research Unit (SMRU) 
Tropical Diseases Research (TDR) 
University Research Co (URC) 
US Pharmacopeia / DQI 
USAID‐RDM‐Asia 
World Food Programme (WFP) 
WHO CCs 
          o WHO CC for Research and Training on Malaria, Myanmar (Head Dr 
              Ye Htut) 
          o WHO CC for reference and research on biological characterization of 
              malaria parasites, Thailand (Head Pongchai Harnyuttanakorn) 
          o WHO CC for Clinical Management of Malaria, Thailand (Head Prof 
              Polrat Wilairatana) 
          o WHO CC for Environmental Management for Vector Control, 
              Australia (Head Prof Brian H. Kay) 
          o WHO CC for the Molecular Epidemiology of Parasitic infections, 
              Australia (Head Prof Andrew Thompson) 
          o WHO CC for Malaria, Australia (Prof George Dennis Shanks) 
          o WHO CC for Malaria, Schistosomiasis and Filariasis, China (Head Prof 
              Tang Linhua) 
          o WHO CC for ecology, taxonomy and control of vectors of malaria, 
              filariasis and dengue, Malaysia (Head, Dr Sazaly Abubakar) 
          o WHO CC for malaria diagnosis, Philippines (Head Dr Fe Esperanza 
              Espino) 
 
WHO country offices in the GMS 
WHO Regional Offices (SEARO‐WPRO) 
WHO HQ 
 




                                                                              35
REFERENCES 

 
 
1.    Delacollette, C., et al., Malaria trends and challenges in the Greater Mekong
      Subregion. Southeast Asian J Trop Med Public Health, 2009. 40(4): p. 674-691.
2.    WHO, Malaria in the Greater Mekong Subregion: Regional and Country Profiles
      2008, World Health Organization.
3.    Rogers, W.O., et al., Failure of artesunate-mefloquine combination therapy for
      uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in southern Cambodia. Malar J,
      2009. 8: p. 10.
4.    Dondorp, A.M., et al., Artemisinin resistance in Plasmodium falciparum malaria.
      N Engl J Med, 2009. 361(5): p. 455-67.
5.    Wongsrichanalai, C. and S.R. Meshnick, Declining artesunate-mefloquine
      efficacy against falciparum malaria on the Cambodia-Thailand border. Emerg
      Infect Dis, 2008. 14(5): p. 716-9.
6.    Noedl, H., et al., Evidence of artemisinin-resistant malaria in western Cambodia. N
      Engl J Med, 2008. 359(24): p. 2619-20.
7.    Enserink, M., Malaria. Signs of drug resistance rattle experts, trigger bold plan.
      Science, 2008. 322(5909): p. 1776.
8.    Noedl, H., D. Socheat, and W. Satimai, Artemisinin-resistant malaria in Asia. N
      Engl J Med, 2009. 361(5): p. 540-1.
9.    RBM, Implementation of Roll Back Malaria in the Six Mekong Countries. 2000,
      World Health Organization: Ho Chi Minh City.
10.   WHO, Regional Action Plan for Malaria Control and Elimination in the Western Pacific
      (2010-2015) 2009, World Health Organization Western Pacific Region: Manila.
11.   WHO, The Revised Malaria Control Strategy: South-East Asia Region 2006-2010.
      2006, World Health Organization Regional Office for South-East Asia.
12.   Delacollette, C., Malaria in the Greater Mekong Subregion: Regional and Country
      Profiles. 2008, World Health Organization Mekong Malaria Programme:
      Bangkok.
13.   WHO, World Malaria Report 2008. 2008, World Health Organization: Geneva.
14.   Abdullah, S., et al., Patterns of age-specific mortality in children in endemic areas
      of sub-Saharan Africa. Am J Trop Med Hyg, 2007. 77(6 Suppl): p. 99-105.
15.   Sachs, J. and P. Malaney, The economic and social burden of malaria. Nature,
      2002. 415(6872): p. 680-5.
16.   USAID, Regional Development Mission/ Asia Infectious Disease Performance
      Management Plan. 2009, United States Agency for International Development:
      Bangkok.
17.   WHO, Monitoring P. falciparum and P. vivax resistance to antimalarial drugs in
      the Greater Mekong Subregion. Report from an informal consultation. 2007,
      World Health Organization: Phuket, Thailand.
18.   Denis, M.B., et al., Efficacy of artemether-lumefantrine for the treatment of
      uncomplicated falciparum malaria in northwest Cambodia. Trop Med Int Health,
      2006. 11(12): p. 1800-7.
19.   Denis, M.B., et al., Surveillance of the efficacy of artesunate and mefloquine
      combination for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Cambodia.
      Trop Med Int Health, 2006. 11(9): p. 1360-6.


                                                                                        36
20.   Vijaykadga, S., et al., In vivo sensitivity monitoring of mefloquine monotherapy
      and artesunate-mefloquine combinations for the treatment of uncomplicated
      falciparum malaria in Thailand in 2003. Trop Med Int Health, 2006. 11(2): p.
      211-9.
21.   WHO, Containment of Malaria Multi-Drug resistance on the Cambodia-Thailand
      Border. Report of an informal consultation, Phnom Penh, 29-30 January 2007. .
      2007, World Health Organization: Phnom Penh.
22.   WHO, Global Malaria Control and Elimination: report of a meeting on
      containment of artemisinin tolerance. 2008, World Health Organization: Geneva.
23.   Yeung, S., et al., Access to artemisinin combination therapy for malaria in remote
      areas of Cambodia. Malar J, 2008. 7: p. 96.
24.   Nonaka, D., et al., Public and private sector treatment of malaria in Lao PDR.
      Acta Trop, 2009.

 




                                                                                     37

								
To top