Crop and Pasture Report by lindayy

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									June 2009
Released 4 September 2009


           Winter Crop Performance
           Released 4 September 2009




           Crop and Pasture Report




     Prepared by Rural Solutions SA for
     PIRSA Industry Development and Renewal
     Grains Industry Development
                                              CROP AND PASTURE REPORT SEPTEMBER 2009      2


CROP AND PASTURE REPORT
WINTER CROP PERFORMANCE
COMPILED 2ND SEPTEMBER 2009



RURAL SOLUTIONS SA DISTRICT REPORTERS                                                          3

CROP REPORTING DISTRICTS                                                                       4

SUMMARY OF CROP AND PASTURE CONDITIONS IN SOUTH AUSTRALIA                                      5

    Weather                                                                                    5

    Crops                                                                                      5

    Pastures                                                                                   5

DISTRICT REPORTS                                                                               6

    Western Eyre Peninsula                                                                     6

    Eastern Eyre Peninsula                                                                     6

    Lower Eyre Peninsula                                                                       6

    Yorke Peninsula                                                                            7

    Lower North                                                                                7

    Mid North                                                                                  8

    Upper North                                                                                9

    Central Hills, Fleurieu Peninsula and Kangaroo Island                                     10

    Northern Murray Mallee                                                                    10

    Southern Murray Mallee                                                                    11

    Lower Murray                                                                              12

    Upper South East                                                                          12

    Lower South East                                                                          12

CROP PRODUCTION ESTIMATES                                                                     14


                                                                                 Report Compilation
                                                                                     PETER FULWOOD
                                                                                  RURAL SOLUTIONS SA
                                                                                         PO BOX 245
                                                                                   NURIOOTPA SA 5355
                                                                                  Phone: (08) 8568 6400
                                                                                   Mobile: 0401 122 082
                                                                                    Fax: (08) 8568 6449
                                                               E-mail:   fulwood.peter@saugov.sa.gov.au




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                                        CROP AND PASTURE REPORT SEPTEMBER 2009    3




                   Rural Solutions SA District Reporters



                                 Eyre Peninsula
           Mr Neil Cordon                                Mr Kieran Wauchope
             PO Box 1783                                      PO Box 1783
       PORT LINCOLN SA 5606                             PORT LINCOLN SA 5606
        Phone 08 8680 6210                               Phone 08 8688 3409
         Fax   08 8680 5020                               Fax   08 8688 3407




                Northern Agricultural Districts & Yorke Peninsula
  Mr Michael Wurst               Mr Tom Yeatman                     Mr Peter Fulwood
 Mr Charlton Jeisman                PO Box 822                         PO Box 245
   Mr Barry Mudge                 CLARE SA 5453                    NURIOOTPA SA 5355
   17 Irvine Street             Phone 08 8842 6224                 Phone 08 8568 6400
JAMESTOWN SA 5491               Fax   08 8842 3775                 Fax   08 8568 6449
 Phone 08 8664 1408
 Fax    08 8664 1405




             Central Hills, Fleurieu Peninsula and Kangaroo Island
           Mr Tim Prance                                   Mr David Creeper
             PO Box 1439                                   C/- PO Lenswood
      VICTOR HARBOR SA 5211                              LENSWOOD SA 5240
         Phone 08 8552 8058                              Phone 08 8389 8826
         Fax   08 8552 8501                               Fax   08 8389 8899




                           Murraylands & South East
         Ms Tanja Morgan                                 Mr Chris McDonough
          Mr Mehdi Zaboli                                Mr Richard Saunders
           Mr Keith Bolto                                    PO Box 411
         Mr Linden Masters                                LOXTON SA 5333
        Ms Tamara Rohrlach                               Phone 08 8595 9100
            PO Box 469                                   Fax    08 8595 9199
      MURRAY BRIDGE SA 5253
        Phone 08 8535 6400
        Fax    08 8535 6427




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                                      Crop Reporting Districts




                                                 KEY LINKS
National Agricultural Monitoring System (NAMS): http://www.nams.gov.au
South Australia Land Condition: http://www.dwlbc.sa.gov.au/land/monitoring/current_reports.html



                                             Drought Hotline
Phone 180 2020 or log onto http://www.service.sa.gov.au/drought.asp
For drought related information on support services, local rural financial counsellors, information on Centrelink
payments and services, maintaining land condition, managing stock and crops in dry times, and the condition of
the River Murray and Murray-Darling Basin.




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            Summary of Crop and Pasture Conditions in South Australia
                                            Winter Crop Performance

WEATHER 1
South Australian rainfall data for the last month is available from the Bureau of Meteorology website:
http://www.bom.gov.au/weather/sa/observations.shtml
• Maximum temperatures were near average in July, but up to 2-3°C above average in August.
• Minimum temperatures were generally 1-2°C above average in July and August, with a notable lack of
    frosts in most districts.
• Strong to gale force winds on several occasions in August caused leaf tipping to moisture-stressed crops in
    drier areas.
RAINFALL
•   July rainfall varied from average to above average in most districts, while August rainfall was below
    average on Eyre Peninsula, much of the Mid and Upper North and Murray Mallee districts.
•   Growing season rainfall to date (April-August) ranges from above average on much of Western Eyre
    Peninsula, Yorke Peninsula and Kangaroo Island to below average in the Northern Murray Mallee.
PREVIOUS SEASONS
•   Last season (2008) saw a patchy start, quite good winter rains but an exceptionally dry spring, resulting in
    below average yields and variable grain quality. Season 2007 was similarly variable with below average
    production following the severe state-wide drought of 2006.
SEASON TO DATE
•   Paddock preparation and seeding got underway following good falls in late April, although light, patchy
    rainfall during May slowed some seeding operations. Seeding was completed during June and crop
    establishment took place in mostly favourable conditions. Good rains during July and warmer temperatures
    in August enabled crops in most districts to grow rapidly. Apart from the Murray Mallee districts, stored
    soil moisture is now good in most other areas, however favourable spring weather is needed to realise
    current crop yield potential.
CROPS
•   Crops in most districts have continued to grow rapidly with the exception of parts of Eastern Eyre
    Peninsula, the Upper North and Murray Mallee where below average rainfall has seen crops struggling.
•   The majority of cereals are at jointing to mid booting, with the earliest now flowering.
•   Canola crops range from stem extension to late flowering, with peas and beans also flowering.
•   Waterlogged conditions in a few southern districts have caused patches of crop to be affected.
•   Additional nitrogen was applied to many cereal and canola crops during July and August.
•   Stripe rust is now widespread in wheat crops, with fungicide applications commenced or planned.
•   Net form net blotch and more recently leaf rust are widespread in susceptible barley crops.
•   Aphids, native budworm and diamondback moth larvae have been reported in some districts.
•   Current yield potential of the crop on a statewide basis is estimated to be above the long-term average with
    good upside potential, but remains dependent on adequate and timely spring rainfall.
PASTURES
•   Most pastures have put on good growth during July-August.
•   Paddock feed is more than adequate for stock requirements in all but the driest districts.
•   There is good potential for hay and fodder production during spring.
•   Initial hay cuts have started in some districts.


1
 Acknowledgment
Weather information:- Climate and Consultative Services Section of the Bureau of Meteorology: Internet: http://www.bom.gov.au




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                                        DISTRICT REPORTS

Western Eyre Peninsula
WEATHER
•   Temperatures were up to 1-2°C above average in July and up to 2-3°C above average in August.
•   Strong to gale force winds on a couple of occasions as frontal systems moved through.
RAINFALL
•   July rainfall varied from 33 mm (Nullarbour) to 120 mm (Streaky Bay), while August rainfall varied from
    14 mm (Nullarbor) to 35 mm (Elliston).
•   Growing season rainfall to date (April-August) varies from near average for the Far West to above average
    for the remainder of Western Eyre Peninsula.
CROPS
•   Crops are generally looking good and have continued to grow rapidly in response to milder temperatures
    during August, despite below average rainfall.
•   Cereal growth stages vary from late stem elongation to flowering.
•   Post-seeding activities such as weed control, trace element and nitrogen application have been completed. It
    is reported that more nitrogen has gone out this season.
•   From mid August net form net blotch has been widespread in Maritime barley crops particularly in coastal
    areas.
•   There has been some fungicide application for stripe rust in wheat, with wheat leaf rust and oat rust also
    being reported.
•   There is the potential for above average crop yields provided weather conditions for the next 4-6 weeks are
    favourable.
PASTURES
•   Pasture growth and quality are good.
•   Paddock feed is sufficient for stock requirements.
•   Lambing percentages and wool cuts have been good.

Eastern Eyre Peninsula
WEATHER
•   Temperatures were up to 1-2°C above average in July and up to 2-3°C above average in August.
•   Strong to gale force winds on a couple of occasions as frontal systems moved through.
RAINFALL
•   July rainfall varied from 23 mm (Cowell) to 81 mm (Wharminda), while August rainfall varied from 12 mm
    (Cowell) to 36 mm (Cleve).
•   Growing season rainfall to date (April-August) is near average for most of the district, with the driest area
    being Cleve-Cowell-Arno Bay.
CROPS
•   Most crops are looking quite good despite below average rainfall, however crops in the area east of Cleve
    through to Cowell are struggling.
•   Crops grew rapidly in response to milder temperatures during August and crop development is estimated to
    be 2-3 weeks earlier than normal.
•   Cereal growth stages vary from late stem elongation to flowering.
•   Post-seeding activities such as weed control, trace element and nitrogen application have been completed.
•   From mid August net form net blotch has been widespread in susceptible barley crops particularly in coastal
    areas.




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•   Fungicide application for stripe rust in wheat crops has commenced or is planned, with priority given to
    varieties rated as susceptible or moderately susceptible to the rust.
•   There is the potential for above average crop yields in most areas provided weather conditions for the next
    six weeks are favourable.
PASTURES
•   Pasture growth and quality are generally quite good.
•   Paddock feed is sufficient for stock requirements.

Lower Eyre Peninsula
WEATHER
•   Temperatures were near average in July, but up to 1-2°C above average in August.
•   Strong to gale force winds on a couple of occasions as frontal systems moved through.
RAINFALL
•   July rainfall varied from 56 mm (Tumby Bay) to 116 mm (Coulta), while August rainfall varied from 32
    mm (Mount Hope) to 83 mm (Port Lincoln).
•   Growing season rainfall to date (April-August) is near average throughout the district.
CROPS
•   Crops are generally looking very good and have continued to grow rapidly in response to milder
    temperatures during August.
•   Cereal growth stages vary from late stem elongation to flowering.
•   Canola and pulse crops are all flowering.
•   Additional nitrogen has been applied to many crops.
•   Waterlogged conditions in some paddocks have caused patches of crop to be affected.
•   Net form net blotch has been widespread in susceptible barley crops for some weeks, with barley leaf rust
    reported more recently.
•   From mid August stripe rust has been reported in wheat crops and fungicide applications have commenced
    or are planned.
•   Reports of canola aphids building up particularly on crop edges, and diamondback moth larvae becoming
    active in canola crops.
•   There is the potential for above average crop yields given favourable spring weather.
PASTURES
•   Feed levels are high and quality is good.
•   Those with perennials have great feed levels.

Yorke Peninsula
WEATHER
•   Temperatures were near average in July and up to 1-2°C above average in August.
•   A few light frosts during July and early August in northern parts of the district.
•   Gale force winds on the 24th August as a frontal system moved through.
RAINFALL
•   July rainfall varied from 22 mm (Kadina) to 126 mm (Warooka), while August rainfall varied from 15 mm
    (Port Victoria) to 68 mm (Stenhouse Bay).
•   Growing season rainfall to date (April-August) ranges from near average on northern Yorke Peninsula to
    above average on central and southern Yorke Peninsula.




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CROPS
•   Crops in most areas are looking very good, although drier conditions in parts of northern Yorke Peninsula
    saw growth slow somewhat.
•   There were reports of minor waterlogging in some parts of southern Yorke Peninsula during July.
•   Crops have continued to grow rapidly in response to milder temperatures during August, with many crops
    flowering earlier than normal.
•   The earliest sown cereals are now out in head, with canola, peas and lupins flowering and starting to pod up.
•   Additional nitrogen was applied to many cereal and canola crops during July and later in August when
    conditions were suitable.
•   Stripe rust began to show up in wheat crops later in August and many growers have been applying
    fungicides to susceptible varieties.
•   Net form net blotch and more recently leaf rust are now widespread in barley crops with many growers
    applying fungicides.
•   Rhizoctonia continued to be reported in crops during July-August, particularly on some of the poorer soils.
•   Aphids and native budworm have been reported in pulse crops mainly on northern Yorke Peninsula.
•   Most crops have excellent yield potential and should realize very good yields given favourable spring
    weather.
PASTURES
•   Pastures have put on good growth during July-August in response to the generally favourable weather
    conditions.
•   Paddock feed is ample for stock requirements.
•   Initial hay cuts have just started, some three weeks earlier than normal.

Lower North
WEATHER
•   Temperatures were mostly near average in July, but up to 1-2°C above average in August.
•   Very few frosts during July-August.
•   Gale force winds on a couple of occasions as frontal systems moved through.
RAINFALL
•   July rainfall varied from 41 mm (Robertstown) to 151 mm (Eden Valley), while August rainfall varied from
    19 mm (Owen) to 75 mm (Williamstown).
•   Growing season rainfall to date (April-August) varies from near average in western parts of the district to
    above average elsewhere.
CROPS
•   Crops are generally looking very good, although drier conditions in August saw growth slow somewhat in
    eastern parts of the district.
•   Crops have continued to grow rapidly in response to milder temperatures during August, with many crops
    flowering earlier than normal.
•   The earliest wheat and barley crops are now out in head, with the majority of cereals at mid-late booting.
•   Most canola crops are at mid-full flowering, with beans flowering and podding and peas flowering.
•   Additional nitrogen was applied to cereal and canola crops either during July or in some cases later in
    August when conditions were again suitable.
•   Stripe rust was reported in wheat crops in early August, however the outbreak appears to have been largely
    contained with judicious use of fungicides and more resistant varieties being sown.
•   From mid August net form net blotch has been widespread in susceptible barley crops with many growers
    applying fungicides for control.
•   Most crops have excellent yield potential and should realize very good yields given favourable spring
    weather.




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PASTURES
•   Pastures have put on good growth during July-August in response to the favourable weather conditions.
•   Paddock feed is ample for stock requirements.
•   Initial cereal hay cuts have started, some three weeks earlier than normal.
•   A few growers have cut some medic hay.

Mid North
WEATHER
•   Many showery days occurred through July, with many windy days.
•   Temperatures were cool to cold with several frosts.
RAINFALL
•   August rainfall was below average, with mild conditions and some strong winds.
CROPS
•   Crops are generally growing exceptionally well; farmers are becoming increasingly confident in a good
    season and realisation of current average or better yield potential.
•   Subsoil moisture has been somewhat replenished by the winter rains.
•   During July growers were frustrated in not being able to spray crops for weeds due to the weather.
•   Herbicide coverage of weeds in crops is being limited by canopy closure.
•   Crops have few ryegrass numbers following the use of a newly released pre-emergent herbicide.
•   Nitrogen fertiliser was spread widely on cereal crops during July, with little applied at seeding.
•   Strip rust and net form of net blotch have become widespread on susceptible varieties. Some growers
    applied fungicide with late herbicide applications, which has slowed disease development.
•   Many susceptible varieties have been sprayed with fungicide to control disease, particularly stripe rust.
•   Dry and windy conditions during August have stressed crops in lower rainfall areas and reduced yield
    potential in the rest of the district.
•   Canola crops had additional nitrogen fertiliser applied during July.
•   Canola crops are beginning to pod and continuing to flower.
•   Pulse crops are growing well with most in full flower.
PASTURES
•   Conditions have been ideal for pasture growth following the excellent germination, particularly legume
    pastures species.

Upper North
WEATHER
•   Conditions during July were cold, however August has been relatively mild with significantly fewer frosts
    compared to the same period in recent years.
•   Strong north-west winds experienced towards the end of August saw many crops dry out and considerably
    reduce crop yield potential.
RAINFALL
•   Average to above average rainfall was recorded across the district in July, while totals were substantially
    less in August.
CROPS
•   Crops throughout the district had excellent yield potential in mid August.
•   The dry conditions and strong winds in the last few weeks of August have significantly reduced yield
    potential, particularly in the northern part of the district where headlands and crops on heavy soils began to
    die.




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•   Early sown crops in the western part of the district had well above average potential, but also began to
    suffer moisture stress towards the end of August.
•   Many barley crops in the eastern part of the district became severely nitrogen deficient during early August,
    but by mid August crops had recovered.
•   Net form of net blotch and barley scald have been widespread in barley crops in the western part of the
    district with a large number of crops being sprayed.
•   Rains toward the end of August have only helped maintain instead of lifting crop yield potential.
•   Most break crops have grown well with good bulk and establishment following early winter rains. Like
    cereals these have began to wither in the last few weeks.
PASTURES
•   July and August saw pasture growth increase dramatically, particularly in mid-late August as warmer
    weather and increased day-length helped pastures get away.
•   Lambing has continued throughout the district with good percentages.
•   Livestock prices have remained high with good prices received for most categories of sheep.
•   Cereals that were grazed have responded well to the good rainfall in July.

Central Hills, Fleurieu Peninsula and Kangaroo Island
WEATHER
•   Temperatures for July were average, however above average temperatures during the second week of
    August caused some concern for growers.
RAINFALL
•   Good falls were received in all areas for July; on Kangaroo Island heavy rainfall over two days caused a
    private dam to be breached in the headwaters of the Harriet River.
•   While August rainfall has not been as uniform across the district, pastures and crops are growing very well
    with no signs of moisture stress.
•   Rainfall during spring will now be extremely important to capitalise on the excellent seasonal conditions
    thus far.
CROPS
•   Crops are generally showing good growth.
•   Some crops around Wellington have suffered as a result of lower rainfall, while crop yields on Kangaroo
    Island could be affected by waterlogging in some areas as a result of frequent rainfall during July and
    August. This has also impacted on the ability of farmers to get onto paddocks to spray weeds, apply
    nitrogen and other crop management activities.
•   No major pest issues have been recorded in crops at this stage, however continued rain and larger crop
    canopies will expose cereal and pulse crops to fungal diseases.
PASTURE
•   Pasture growth throughout the district is excellent, however those pastures sown later will require good
    spring rains to finish well.
•   Pasture growth during the last week of August has been quite noticeable as temperatures increase.
•   Continued rain during spring will provide farmers with a great opportunity to conserve and replace fodder
    reserves used during the past two dry seasons.
•   Further areas of kikuyu are planned to be planted on Kangaroo Island in spring as a high water use perennial
    pasture which can withstand heavy grazing.
•   Frequent significant rainfall events throughout July and August have produced runoff which has flowed into
    dams and water courses in all parts of the district.




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Northern Murray Mallee
WEATHER
•   There were numerous frosty mornings recorded in the second half of July, but warmer spring weather
    seemed to be experienced from mid August.
RAINFALL
•   After a very dry June the Northern Mallee had close to average rainfall in July, but only half its average
    rainfall for August, coming right at the end of the month.
•   The Loxton Research Centre recorded 25.4 mm in July very close to its average July rainfall of 29 mm,
    followed by 15.6 mm for August well below the 30 mm average.
CROPS
•   After initially generally good crop establishment and early growth, the lack of rainfall through most of
    August and lack of subsoil moisture has caused a great deal of stress to Northern Mallee crops.
•   Most early sown crops are beginning to push up heads.
•   Heavy flats, shallow stone and deep sands have been hardest hit, with many areas browning out and are
    unlikely to recover.
•   Loamy sand to sandy loam soils are hanging on a bit better and will respond to the late August rains,
    maintaining reasonable yield potential, depending on spring rains.
•   The few canola crops have been out in flower for some time, but will not yield highly this season.
•   Rhizoctonia continues to provide significant problems in paddocks through this run of poor seasons.
•   There has been very little post nitrogen application this season.
•   While there has been one stripe rust report in the Northern Mallee, the weather has not been conducive to its
    spread and there does not appear to be any major threat here this season.
PASTURES
•   The lack of winter pasture growth has meant that paddock feed is running out.
•   While there has been some talk among farmers about feeding off crops, generally this has only been in sown
    cereals for feed that may have been harvested if the season showed more promise.
•   Grassy weeds are coming out in head and spray-topping will be required soon.

Southern Murray Mallee
WEATHER
•   Drier conditions were experienced in the first three weeks of August.
•   Strong wind events have been common in the last two months causing drift on bare hills and tipping to
    moisture-stressed crops.
•   Winter temperatures have been generally mild, with some unseasonably warm days experienced.
RAINFALL
•   Rainfall for July varied between decile 4 and 6 with patchy falls across the district.
•   August rainfall was very welcome on thirsty crops.
•   Rainfall has been very patchy in general, with some areas receiving 215 mm of growing season rainfall and
    some areas receiving only 110 mm of growing season rainfall.
CROPS
•   Early sown crops are out in head, with late sown crops still tillering.
•   Canola and pulse crops are flowering.
•   Dry August conditions and warm temperatures have caused moisture stress symptoms in most crops and
    reduced yield potential.
•   Crops were very stressed and some were dying in patches prior to the rains received in late August.
•   Follow-up rain is required soon in September to buffer crops against warm spring temperatures.




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•   Reports of aphids, although not all crops have required spray treatment.
•   Some nitrogen application in early July, however dry conditions ceased activity early.
PASTURES
•   Paddock feed in good supply, although warm conditions have hastened flowering and maturity of grasses.

Lower Murray
WEATHER
•   Rainfall has been variable, with many areas below average for the July-August period.
•   There was a long dry period between late July through to late August.
•   Strong winds and dry conditions resulted in a little erosion.
•   Frosts have been rare and of low severity.
RAINFALL
•   For July mean temperatures in Murray Bridge were average, while rainfall of 55 mm was well above the
    average of 35 mm.
•   For August mean temperatures were 2°C above average, while 34 mm of rain fell, just below average of 37
    mm.
CROPS
•   Prior to rains in late August crops suffered moisture stress.
•   Moisture stress has been more severe in the warmer northern areas.
•   Crops are well advanced and early sown ones have heads emerging.
•   There have been reports of aphids in the Murray Bridge to Mannum area.
•   Ground cover is good with the exception of late sown crops.
•   Stored soil moisture is limited.
PASTURES
•   Almost all livestock producers have sufficient pasture feed.
•   Many pastures have suffered moisture stress.
•   In some situations there has been a reduction in medic density.
•   Most pasture paddocks have sufficient cover for erosion prevention.
•   Medic pastures are flowering with grazing management implications.

Upper South East
WEATHER
•   Temperatures were near average in July and 1-2°C above average in August.
RAINFALL
•   July rainfall varied from 36 mm (Cooke Plains) to 106 mm (Keith), while August rainfall varied from 40
    mm (Cooke Plains) to 74 mm (Wolseley).
•   Currently there is a full profile of moisture in the soil around Keith, but slightly drier in the north of the
    district.
CROPS
•   Crops are currently looking the best they have for a few years at this time of year.
•   Lucerne and canola are flowering.
•   Weed sprays are complete and some insecticides are now being applied.
•   Around Coomandook some barley crops have been treated for spot form net blotch and rust.
•   Small amounts of powdery mildew have been found in barley further south and a small amount of chocolate
    spot in beans.




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•   Some crops in southern parts of the district received nitrogen applications in early-mid July.
PASTURES
•   A few cereal aphids have been found in lucerne pastures, but no other real problems at the moment.
•   After the winter rains there is still plenty of feed in paddocks, which are all looking to be in good condition.
•   Farmers are about a month off cutting hay around the district.

Lower South East
WEATHER
•   Temperatures were mostly near average in July, but up to 1-2°C above average in August.
•   A couple of light frosts during July.
•   Strong to gale force winds on several occasions as frontal systems moved through.
RAINFALL
•   July rainfall varied from 52 mm (Coonawarra) to 180 mm (Cape Jaffa), while August rainfall varied from
    68 mm (Cape Jaffa) to 159 mm (Mount Gambier).
•   Growing season rainfall to date (April-August) is now near average throughout the district.
CROPS
•   Crops are generally looking very good and have continued to grow rapidly in response to milder
    temperatures during August and the notable lack of frosts.
•   Persistent heavy rainfall has caused some waterlogged patches in paddocks particularly in southern and
    western parts of the district towards the coast, preventing growers from applying post-emergence herbicides
    in some cases.
•   The majority of cereals are now at the end of tillering through to early stem elongation.
•   Most canola crops commenced flowering in the past couple of weeks.
•   Additional nitrogen has been applied to crops from early August mostly by plane, with some aerial
    application of post-emergence herbicides as well.
•   Net form net blotch has been reported in susceptible barley crops with most growers having recently put out
    their first fungicide application.
•   Foliar diseases are currently at manageable levels, but will be dependent on spring weather conditions.
•   Most crops now have excellent yield potential and should realize very good yields given favorable spring
    weather.
PASTURES
•   Pastures have put on good growth during July-August in response to the favourable weather conditions.
•   There is now an abundance of paddock feed.
•   Lambing percentages have been excellent, with some producers turning off lambs earlier to capitalize on
    good prices.
•   There is very good potential for hay and fodder production during spring.




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                                       Crop Production Estimates



          PRIMARY INDUSTRIES AND RESOURCES SOUTH AUSTRALIA - FIELD CROP PRODUCTION ESTIMATES                                     Pg 1

                September 2009                                                         Contact: Peter Fulwood
                                                                                       Phone 08 8568 6400           Mobile 0401 122 082
                                                                                       Fax    08 8568 6449
CROP            Western Eyre   Lower Eyre   Eastern Eyre     Yorke         Upper           Mid         Lower
                                                                                                                      Subtotal
                 Peninsula      Peninsula    Peninsula     Peninsula       North          North        North
WHEAT                465,000      133,000       370,000      158,000       220,000         227,000       44,000       1,617,000 ha
                     535,000      319,000       462,000      388,000       340,000         465,000      110,000       2,619,000 t

DURUM                      0            0              0      30,000        12,000           7,700        5,000          54,700 ha
                           0            0              0      69,000        23,000          18,000       11,500         121,500 t

BARLEY               110,000       90,000       110,000      187,000       135,000         132,000       37,000         801,000 ha
                     148,000      216,000       149,000      459,000       225,000         285,000       94,000       1,576,000 t

OATS                  20,000        3,200         5,000         5,000        9,000           8,000        2,000          52,200 ha
                      20,000        5,100         5,000         9,500       12,000          15,000        3,800          70,400 t

RYECORN                    0            0              0               0           0              0             0                0 ha
                           0            0              0               0           0              0             0                0t

TRITICALE              2,000          900         4,500         2,000        2,800           4,000        1,000          17,200 ha
                       2,000        1,700         4,500         4,000        4,400           7,700        2,200          26,500 t

PEAS                   7,500        8,100         6,000       41,000        22,000          24,000       11,000         119,600 ha
                       7,500       11,000         6,000       61,000        28,000          35,000       18,000         166,500 t

LUPINS                 1,200       24,000         5,000         1,500        3,500           2,900          900          39,000 ha
                       1,100       33,000         5,000         2,200        4,000           3,900        1,300          50,500 t

BEANS                      0        6,900           200       12,000         6,500          13,000        6,000          44,600 ha
                           0       11,000           150       22,000         9,000          22,000       11,000          75,150 t

CHICKPEAS                  0          300              0        8,000          800           2,600         800           12,500 ha
                           0          300              0        9,600        1,000           3,300         800           15,000 t

LENTILS                    0        1,300              0      40,000         2,500           3,700        3,000          50,500 ha
                           0        1,800              0      60,000         3,000           4,700        4,200          73,700 t

VETCH                    200          700           500         2,000        5,000           2,600         300           11,300 ha
                         150          500           300         2,000        2,000           2,100         300            7,350 t

CANOLA                 1,500       50,000         3,000       17,000        14,000          36,000        8,000         129,500 ha
                       1,000       72,000         2,400       26,000        18,000          45,000       12,000         176,400 t

HAY                   10,000        6,000         8,000       25,000        23,000          29,000       16,000         117,000 ha
(not included         16,000       18,000        15,000       75,000        65,000          90,000       59,000         338,000 t
in total)




TOTAL ha             607,400      318,400       504,200      503,500       433,100         463,500      119,000       2,949,100 ha
TOTAL t              714,750      671,400       634,350    1,112,300       669,400         906,700      269,100       4,978,000 t




                                                                                                  Prepared by Rural Solutions SA
                                                                CROP AND PASTURE REPORT SEPTEMBER 2009            15




          PRIMARY INDUSTRIES AND RESOURCES SOUTH AUSTRALIA - FIELD CROP PRODUCTION ESTIMATES                                   Pg 2


                September 2009                                                         Contact: Peter Fulwood
                                                                                       Phone 08 8568 6400           Mobile 0401 122 082
                                                                                       Fax    08 8568 6449
CROP             Kangaroo       Central Hills   Lower        Nth Murray   Sth Murray      Upper        Lower
                                                                                                                            TOTALS
                  Island         & Fleurieu     Murray         Mallee       Mallee      South East   South East
WHEAT                 5,500           6,600       63,000        200,000     125,000         69,000       25,000        2,111,100 ha
                     11,600          13,200       75,000        200,000     175,000        138,000       72,000        3,303,800 t

DURUM                       0            300         800            700            0         3,500              0        60,000 ha
                            0            500         800            500            0         7,000              0       130,300 t

BARLEY                2,700           8,600       60,000         50,000     120,000         92,000       18,000        1,152,300 ha
                      5,900          17,200       72,000         50,000     168,000        175,000       48,000        2,112,100 t

OATS                  3,300            1,700       3,000          3,000        4,000         8,500        4,000          79,700 ha
                      6,600            3,100       3,000          3,000        4,200        14,000        9,800         114,100 t

RYE                         0               0      1,500          4,000        3,000           900              0         9,400 ha
                            0               0      1,200          4,000        3,400           700              0         9,300 t

TRITICALE               600            2,300      10,000         18,000      28,000          7,800        2,000          85,900 ha
                      1,200            4,600      12,000         18,600      38,000         11,700        5,200         117,800 t

PEAS                    200            1,100       1,600              0        1,000         3,800          400         127,700 ha
                        350            1,800       1,300              0          800         6,100          900         177,750 t

LUPINS                2,000            1,500       1,000          1,500        5,000        17,000        3,500          70,500 ha
                      3,200            2,400         800          1,000        4,000        23,000        5,200          90,100 t

BEANS                   200              300         100              0            0        11,500       14,500          71,200 ha
                        300              500          80              0            0        19,500       32,000         127,530 t

CHICKPEAS                   0               0            0            0            0           300          400          13,200 ha
                            0               0            0            0            0           300          400          15,700 t

LENTILS                     0               0            0            0            0         1,500          100          52,100 ha
                            0               0            0            0            0         1,800          150          75,650 t

VETCH                       0               0        200              0        1,000           400              0        12,900 ha
                            0               0        150              0          800           400              0         8,700 t

CANOLA                4,000            1,200       2,000          3,000        6,000        28,000        9,000         182,700 ha
                      6,000            1,700       1,500          1,500        4,800        35,000       15,500         242,400 t

HAY                   7,700          26,400       13,000          4,000       8,000         55,000       43,000         274,100 ha
(not included        27,000          95,000       33,000          7,500      18,000        165,000      160,000         843,500 t
in total)




TOTAL ha             18,500          23,600      143,200        280,200     293,000        244,200       76,900        4,028,700 ha
TOTAL t              35,150          45,000      167,830        278,600     399,000        432,500      189,150        6,525,230 t




                                                                                                 Prepared by Rural Solutions SA
                                                          CROP AND PASTURE REPORT SEPTEMBER 2009        16



                                            South Australian Field Crops
                 Area sown for grain, grain production, five year average and current year estimates
Crop              Unit         2004/05      2005/06      2006/07      2007/08    2008/09        5yr Av          2009/10
Wheat             Area (ha)    2,057,000    1,977,400    2,035,781    2,101,227   2,043,000    2,042,900        2,111,100
                  Prod (t)     2,686,700    3,699,700    1,481,974    2,250,970   2,347,000    2,493,300        3,303,800

Durum              Area (ha)       60,750       59,850        50,250       54,750        59,100       56,900       60,000
                   Prod (t)       110,600      154,300        25,700       95,400        88,700       94,900      130,300

Barley             Area (ha)    1,119,900     1,170,500    1,154,060    1,225,163    1,210,500     1,176,000    1,152,300
                   Prod (t)     1,825,100     2,545,900    1,029,030    1,776,660    1,795,000     1,794,300    2,112,100

Oats               Area (ha)       67,400       72,300        82,383       85,659        72,100       76,000       79,700
                   Prod (t)        87,800      119,400        44,362       95,457        80,200       85,400      114,100

Rye                Area (ha)        7,650        10,000         8,600       9,000        11,000        9,300           9,400
                   Prod (t)         4,550        11,900         2,700       4,800         7,300        6,300           9,300

Triticale          Area (ha)       88,900       83,400        89,880       93,967        85,700       88,400       85,900
                   Prod (t)        98,000      125,500        53,379       97,649        86,600       92,200      117,800

Peas               Area (ha)      119,800      143,130       145,190      146,874      128,500       136,700      127,700
                   Prod (t)       147,700      257,910        91,084      152,909      129,100       155,700      177,750

Lupins             Area (ha)       63,750       72,420        84,792       83,372        74,000       75,700       70,500
                   Prod (t)        72,288      121,460        46,795       77,898        69,600       77,600       90,100

Beans              Area (ha)       94,648       70,420        73,607       70,877        72,400       76,400       71,200
                   Prod (t)       135,434      168,540        39,398      105,494        82,880      106,300      127,530

Chickpeas          Area (ha)        2,950         1,590         4,640       5,993        11,550        5,300       13,200
                   Prod (t)         2,580         2,230         2,173       5,075         9,200        4,300       15,700

Lentils            Area (ha)       55,900       54,410        57,620       54,603        46,500       53,800       52,100
                   Prod (t)        57,675      101,890        23,456       55,952        36,870       55,200       75,650

Vetch              Area (ha)       24,200        14,520       16,431       15,756        15,900       17,400       12,900
                   Prod (t)         9,400        15,243        3,639        8,629         4,980        8,400        8,700

Canola             Area (ha)      193,500      147,600       157,672      163,351      178,200       168,100      182,700
                   Prod (t)       228,850      213,400        72,938      152,989      192,600       172,200      242,400

Hay                Area (ha)                    277,700      170,000      220,000      288,000       238,900      274,100
(not included      Prod (t)                   1,084,800      250,000      520,000      831,000       671,500      843,500
in total)




            TOTAL Area (ha)     3,956,300     3,877,500    3,960,900    4,110,600    4,008,500     3,982,800    4,028,700
            TOTAL Prod (t)      5,466,700     7,537,400    2,916,600    4,879,900    4,930,000     5,146,100    6,525,200

Notes:
Current year estimates assume average rainfall and temperature conditions for the remainder of the growing season.
Grain estimates are for total grain production and include grain delivered for immediate sale and warehousing
plus grain retained on farm for seed, feed and future sale.
Hay estimates are for total hay production and include all pasture, cereal and other crops cut for hay, both dryland
and irrigated.
The estimates are based on information provided by Rural Solutions SA District Reporters from a variety of sources,
and are updated throughout the season as conditions change and further information becomes available. They are
intended to provide an indication of crop potential current at the time of preparation of the report.

The estimates are updated using ABS census data as available.

Prepared 2 September 2009



                                                                                          Prepared by Rural Solutions SA

								
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