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					 South Carolina
 Recreation Guide




2010
South Carolina
Developmental Disabilities Council
                    Table of Contents

Camps and Miscellaneous Activities                Page 4
Summer Reading Clubs                              Page 9
Accessible Parks and Playgrounds                  Page 10
Attractions and Points of Interest                Page 13
General Information and Other Resources           Page 39

                       Introduction

    This is only a partial listing of events and activities
        offered in South Carolina. Please note that
 listings do not imply endorsement by the South Carolina
      Developmental Disabilities Council. Contact the
 organizations to get additional information. Attractions
            and Points of Interest come from the
   South Carolina Department of Parks, Recreation and
                    Tourism’s visitor guide.
 We hope you enjoy this guide. We would appreciate any
    suggestions that you may have, or if you know of an
      activity not listed, please let us hear from you.
         We hope to continue expanding this guide,
                therefore we need your help.

                   You may contact us:

              ATTN: Jennifer Van Cleave
    South Carolina Developmental Disabilities Council
                 Office of the Governor
           1205 Pendleton Street, Suite 453
                  Columbia, SC 29201
                    803-734-0465
                 803-734-0241 (FAX)
            jvancleave@oepp.sc.gov (e-mail)
            www.scddc.state.sc.us (web site)
                            3
CAMPS

Aiken County Recreation
917 Jefferson Davis Highway
Graniteville, SC 29829
Contact: 803-663-6142
Activities include arts and crafts, current affairs, story
time, water class, sports, games, and movies. Facilities
include a picnic shelter, stone cottage, arts and crafts
building, and, basketball courts. Call for additional
information.

Camp Burnt Gin
DHEC
Box 101106
Columbia, SC 29211
Contact: Marie Aimone, 803-898-0455
www.scdhec.gov/campburntgin
Camp Burnt Gin operates four six-day sessions for 7-15
year olds, two six-day session for 16-20 year olds and a
four-day camp for 21-25 year olds. Burnt Gin serves
children who have a physical disability or chronic illness.
Priority is given to those who have no other camping
opportunities. There is no cost for campers. The camp
offers swimming, boating, arts and crafts, nature study,
sports and games, and drama.

Camp Happy Days
1622 Ashley Hall Road
Charleston, SC 29407
Contact: Teresa Bishop, 843-571-4336
E-mail: teresa@camphappydays.com
The camp is for children with cancer and their siblings
ages 4 to 16. The camp is held in Summerton with dorm
                              4
accommodations. The camp session will be July 4 through
10. Camp Happy Days is a non-profit organization healing
children diagnosed with cancer and their families by
providing year-round programs, special events, and access
to crisis resourses. The goal is to give children with cancer
hope, self-esteem, and the will to fight one more round. For
additional information, take a look at the camp’s Web site
at www.camphappydays.com.

Camp Lakey Gap
Contact: Elsa Berndt, 828-669-8977
elsa.berndt@yahoo.com
www.christmount.org/camplakeygap.htm
This camp is located in Black Mountain, NC and geared
towards people with Autism Spectrum Disorder or a
related communication disorder. The camp will include 6
sessions during the months of June and July. The cost is
$1,600 and financial assistance may be available. Campers
must be between the ages of 4 and 17.

Camp Low Country
PO Box 566
Cordesville, SC 29434
Contact: (843) 336-3251
Camp activities include arts and crafts, swimming,
horseback riding, nature, wierd science, archery, climbing
wall, challenge course, drama, dance, and adventure trips.
Call for additional information.

Camp Mac Boykin
Sumter Family YMCA
50 Willow Drive
Sumter, SC 29150
Contact: 803-773-1404
Activities include swimming, games, arts and crafts, fishing,
canoeing, and many other outdoor activities. Contact for
                              5
additional information. There is a $25 materials fee. Camp
cost is $85 for members and $105 for non-members.

Camp Sunshine
6429 Bishop Avenue
Columbia, SC 29203
Contact: Andrew Scott, 803-754-6720 ext. 203
E-mail:andrew@rcrc.state.sc.us
Camp Sunshine is a four-week summer day camp for
children and young adults with sepcial needs. The camp will
be held at Denny Terrace Community Monday through
Friday from 8 a.m. until 2 p.m. Camp dates are June 21
through July 2 and July 12 through July 23. Activities
include: music, creative dramatics, storytelling, games,
sports, dance, swimming, crafts, and several field trips.
Lunch will be served daily, except to those on
special diets.

Camp Treasure Chest
PO Box 129
Port Royal, SC 29935
Contact: Erin Womack, 843-470-6264
The camp includes swimming, bowling, movies, arts and
crafts, storytelling, and field trips. The camp is available
to any individual receiving services from DDSN. Cost for
the camp is $30. Sessions will begin on June 14.

Camp REACH
Contact: Pam Ardern, 864-650-0295
E-mail: pardern@clemson.edu
Camp REACH is a summer camp experience for adults with
disabilities and special needs who are looking for a great
week of camp activities. Campers enjoy swimming, fishing,
nature trails, arts and crafts, a talent show, dance,
carnival, performing arts and many other activities. Camp
                              6
REACH provides a safe, supervised environment where
campers can explore new areas of interest with
encouragement from trained counselors and staff. Camp
REACH is for individuals independent in their eating,
dressing, bathing and toiletry skills. 1:1 campers will be
accepted as long as an adult comes with the camper. The
camp is held at Camp Bob Cooper, located on Lake Marion
in Clarendon County. The camp will be conducted
May 31-June 4. The cost os $365.

Dorchester DSN Board Integrated Summer Services
P.O. Box 2950
Summerville, SC 29484
Contact: 843-871-1285
Open to those who qualify for SCDDSN services.

Mountain View Medical Day Care
340 Cedar Springs Road
Spartanburg, SC 29302
Contact: 864-582-4175
Activities include Bingo, ballgames, cooking, memory games,
Taboo, horseshoes, and crafts. Facilities are wheelchair
accessible and transportation is included. History and
physical required prior to enrollment. Transportation
included to and from facility. Contact the facility for
additional information.

Spectrum Family Camp
YMCA Camp Greenville
Contact Susan Huter, 864-836-3291, ext. 106
The camp is for families with children on the Autistic
Spectrum including Asperger’s, PDD-NOS, and ADD. The
camp will be held on May 7 through 9, October 29 through
31, and November 26 through 28. This is a
traditional camp experience for the whole family in a
                             7
supportive and safe environment to include archery,
riflery, canoeing, fishing, hiking, crafts, songs and a
campfire. The cost is $260 for a family of four. For
more information, go to special events at
www.campgreenville.org.

Teen Buddies
Mount Pleasant Recreation Department
Contact: Anne Selner, (843)-884-2528
Will be offered as a summer camp, focusing on teens with
disabilities. Teens without disabilities are also welcome.
Swimming, games, and daily field trips will be offered.
Teens requiring one-on-one assistance will be required to
provide his or her own assistant. Teens need to bring a
bag lunch, swimsuit and towel daily. The camp will be
offered July 12 through 16 from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Cost is
$140 for residents and $154 for non-residents.
Registration begins on April 1.




                            8
Summer Reading Programs
Chester County Libraries
(Chester, Great Falls, and Lewisville)
100 Center Street
Chester, SC 29706
Contact: Beth Harris, (803) 377-8145
The summer reading program will be held on Wednesdays:
June 9, 16, 23, 30 and July 7 and 14. There will be books,
stories, crafts, games, and puppet shows. The Tot Trot will
be held for 2 to 5 year olds from 10 until 10:30 and the
Book Trek will be for K5 through 5th grade from 11 to 12.

Colleton County Memorial Library
600 Hampton Street
Walterboro, SC 29488
Contact: Shiela Keaise, (843) 549-5621
A summer reading program will be held for the summer.
There is no cost and includes story hours, crafts, plays,
and music. The sessions will be held June 18 through
August 7 on Tuesday at 10 a.m., Wednesday at 10 a.m., and
on Thursday at 10 a.m. and 6 p.m.




                             9
Accessible Parks and Playgrounds
The All Children’s Park
Corner S. Hollywood at 10th Ave, S.,
Surfside Beach, SC
A barrier-free playground designed especially for the
pleasure of children with special needs. Activities
include swings, sliding boards, ramped access to a play
station, and a sand box especially made for children with
special needs. The park is open from dawn to dusk.

Beach Walkovers
3rd Avenue North, 3rd Avenue South, Melody Lane Ramp
Surfside Beach, SC
Ellen Taylor Park
Hazel Street, Cayce, SC
Open 8 a.m. and close at dark.

Floral Lake Clubhouse
Lakeside Drive South, Surfside Beach, SC
The park is open from dawn to dusk.

Fuller Park Playground
Surfside Drive, Surfside Beach, SC
The park is open from dawn to dusk.

Glenwood Park
Hazel Street, Cayce, SC
Opens at 8 a.m. and closes at dark.

Granby Garden
1800 Twelfth Street, Cayce, SC
Opens at 8 a.m. and closes at dark.


                            10
Guignard Park – “The Jewel of Cayce”
Corner of Knox Abbott Drive and Axtell, Cayce, SC
Opens 8 a.m. and closes at dark.

Kids Planet Playground
226 Oakland Avenue, Greer, SC
Accessibility designed and built so all abilities of persons
can play together side by side.

Lee Street Park
Lee Street, Cayce, SC
Opens at 8 a.m. and closes at dark.

Magnolia Park
Lexington, SC
This park is accessible and also has an accessible
playground.

Passive Park
Surfside Drive, Surfside Beach, SC
The park is open from dawn to dusk.

Public Boat Landing
New State Road, Cayce, SC
Opens at 8 a.m. and closes at dark.

Riverland Park
Riverland Drive, Cayce, SC
Opens at 8 a.m. and closes at dark.

Sunset Park
Fowler Circle, Mauldin, SC
Contact: City of Mauldin Recreation Department
This park has a paved wheelchair softball field. The

                            11
asphalt field was designed to meet national
Wheelchair Standards and includes an accessible restroom
specially-equipped for people with
disabilities.

State Street Park
“M” Avenue, Cayce, SC
Opens at 8 a.m. and closes at dark.


Town of Sullivan’s Island Park
Middle Street, between Station 20-22,
Sullivan’s Island, SC
Contact: Linda Tucker, 843-883-3198
Handicapped accessible playground. The park has a tot lot,
basketball, tennis, picnic areas, and scenic vistas.

The Virginia Hylton Park
Lexington, SC
Contact: Karla W. Childers, 803-359-4040
This park is accessible and also has an accessible
playground.

Wilkinson Street Park (Spires Recreation Center)
1500 Dunbar Road, Cayce, SC
Opens at 8 a.m. and closes at dark.




                             12
Attractions and Historical
Points of Interest
Abbeville Opera House
The Town Square, Abbeville, SC
864-459-2157
Fanny Brice, Jimmy Durante and Groucho Marx played
this opulent old house during the great traveling road
show era. Now fully restored, live theater
presentations are held regularly.

Aiken County Historical Museum
133 Newberry Street, SW, Aiken, SC
803-642-2017
In “Banksai,” a former winter colony mansion, the mu-
seum displays artifacts from Indian times and early
settlement. A nature room offers exhibits on the
geology, flora and fauna of the grounds and adjacent
Hitchcock woods. Nearby is the Ergle log cabin furnished
with period pieces and thought to be the oldest standing
edifice in Aiken County. On the grounds is a one-room
schoolhouse, circa 1890.

Alabama Theatre
Barefoot Landing
4750 Hwy. 17 S., N. Myrtle Beach, SC
843-272-1111 or 1-800-342-2262
Throughout the year, shows may include this famed coun-
try music group, any of a number of top country artists,
or the signature show, Celebration ’99. This show, pro-
duced by Opryland, features fabulous production num-
bers, spectator dancing and zany comedy.


                           13
Anderson County Museum
In the Old Courthouse, Main Street, Anderson, SC
864-260-4737
Exhibits on local history and memorabilia from the area.

Avery Research Center for African-American History
and Culture
College of Charleston
125 Bull Street, Charleston, SC
843-953-7609
This beautifully restored site of Avery School is now a
research center to document and preserve the history and
cultural heritage of Lowcountry African-Americans. Read-
ing room and archives, Monday-Saturday, 12-5;
walk-in tours Monday through Saturday, 12-5.

Barnwell County Museum
Marlboro and Hagood Avenue, Barnwell, SC
803-259-1916
A collection of memorabilia and information pertaining to
the history of Barnwell County.

Berkeley Museum
Old Santee Canal State Park
S of Lake Moultrie off US 52, Berkeley, SC
843-899-5101
House exhibits and interpretive displays covering 12,000
years of cultural and natural history. Parking fee to enter
park.

BMW Zentrum
Exit 60 off I-85 on SC 101, Greer, SC
888-868-7269
This unique visitors center and museum is BMW’s only

                            14
North American automobile manufacturing plant.

Bob Jones University Museum and gallery
Bob Jones University, Greenville, SC
864-224-8811
One of the world’s most extraordinary collections of
religious art and Biblical antiquities which draws art
lovers and Biblical scholars to the Bob Jones campus. No
children under six admitted.

Broadway at the Beach
21st Ave. and US 17 Bypass, Myrtle Beach, SC
843-444-3200 or 1-800-386-4662
This 350-acre complex includes live theaters, a nightclub
district, restaurants, specialty shops, and more.
Well-known entertainers, such as Kenny Rogers, the Oak
Ridge Boys, and the Radio City Rockettes, perform in the
Palace Theater.

Brookgreen Gardens
US 17 south of Murrell’s Inlet, Murrell’s Inlet, SC
843-237-4218 or 1-800-849-1931
A showplace of art and nature developed in the 1930’s by
Archer and Anna Hyatt Huntington on the site of four
colonial rice plantations. Over 550 of America’s finest 19th
and 20th century sculptures and exhibits among 2,000
species of plants. Native animals and birds can be seen in a
wildlife park, and special guided nature cruises and kayak
trips wind through the tidal creeks and abandoned rice
fields for a closer peek at the area’s history and wildlife.
Open daily from 9:30 to 5:30.




                            15
Browntown Museum
SC 341, 9 mi. E of Lake City, Lake City, SC
843-558-2355
A classic old farmstead, including the Brown-Burrows
House, with cotton gin, corn crib, smokehouse and
outhouse dating from the early 19th century.

Calhoun County Museum
303 Butler St., St. Matthews, SC
803-874-3964
Art and history combine here with costumes, period
furniture, Indian exhibits, an archive collection, a
research room, and historic items from Calhoun County.
Archive research by appointment only.

Camden Archives and Museum
1314 Broad Street, Camden, SC
803-245-6050
History exhibits, early vital records, books, Kershaw
County memorabilia. 1825 town clock works.

Carolina Opry
Junction of US 17 Bus. And 17 Bypass, Myrtle Beach,
SC
843-238-8888 or 1-800-THE-OPRY
A variety of music, from country to bluegrass, as well as
comedy, show tunes and dance blended in a state-of-the-
art production.

Charles Pinckney National Historic Site
8 mi. N of Charleston off US 17 on Long Point Rd. in
Mt. Pleasant
Mt. Pleasant, SC
843-881-5516
Archeological remains of brick foundations and an
                            16
unfurnished 1820s tidewater cottage are the last
protected remnants of Snee Farm, the country estate of
Charles Pinckney, a drafter and signer of the Constitution.
This is a National Park site, with interpretive exhibits,
managed by Ft. Sumter.

Charles Town Landing-1671
Off SC 171 about 3 mi. NW of downtown Charleston,
Charleston, SC
843-852-4200
An unusual park located on the site of the first
permanent English settlement in South Carolina. Take a
guided tram tour of the original 1670 fortification. See a
replica of a 17th century trading ketch, explore seven miles
of pathways through beautiful English park gardens, walk
through the enclosed pathways of the Animal Forest, and
participate in activities in the Settlers’ Life Area, a
partial recreation of an early South Carolina village.

Charleston City Hall
Meeting and Broad Streets, Charleston, SC
Built c. 1801, the city council chamber contains valuable
works of art, including the John Trumbull portrait of
George Washington, dated 1791. Monday through Friday,
free.

Charleston Museum
360 Meeting Street, Charleston, SC
843-722-2996
America’s first and oldest museum interprets the cultural
and natural history of the Lowcountry through artifacts,
treasures, and exhibits. Monday through Saturday 9-5;
Sunday 1-5.


                             17
Charleston Visitor Center
Corner of Meeting and Ann Streets, Charleston, SC
Information on lodging, dining, sightseeing, shopping,
special events and transportation. The Downtown Area
Shuttle provides service throughout the downtown area.

Children’s Museum of South Carolina
2501 N. King’s Hwy., Myrtle Beach, SC
Hands-on science and technology exhibits entertain
children up to 12 years of age.

The Citadel
Follow Ashley Ave. to Hampton Park, Moultrie Street
leads to the grounds, Charleston, SC
843-953-5006
Established in 1842, this is one of the last two military
state colleges in the nation. Don’t miss the colorful dress
parade almost every Friday at 3:45 during the school
year. Also has an excellent museum of military artifacts
and equipment.

Clemson University Visitor Center
South Carolina State Botanical Garden
The Wren House
Uniquely Clemson in Newman Hall
Clemson University Campus, Clemson, SC
864-565-4789
Stop at the center for information, publications, and
guided tours. On the campus, visit the official state
Botanical Garden. Some 2,200 varieties of ornamental
plants are raised in the 270-acre consolidation of five
small gardens. The Wren House at the garden is a
Southern Living showcase home that features innovative
design ideas for home interiors and gardens.

                             18
Coastal Discovery, the Museum on Hilton Head Island
US 278, Hilton Head Island, SC
843-689-6767
This is primarily a natural history museum on the second
floor of the Hilton Head Chamber of Commerce Welcome
Center. The museum hosts a variety of historic and
environmental tours and beach walks and features the new
dream stop butterfly gardens.

Columbia Museum of Art
Main and Hampton Streets, Columbia, SC
803-799-2810
Housed in a newly constructed facility, the Columbia
Museum of Art is an eclectic collection featuring
contemporary art, the masterworks of the Baroque and the
Renaissance. Museum includes a children’s gallery and
traveling exhibits.

Cypress Gardens
SC 52, 24 mi. NW of Charleston
843-553-0515
Paths and water trails lead strollers and paddlers through
a 175-acre black-water swamp wonderland of cypress
forest, azaleas, camellias, and spring bulb floral displays.
New additions include a butterfly house and freshwater
aquarium.

Congaree Swamp National Monument
20 miles SE of Columbia off SC 48
803-776-4396
Self-guided canoe trails, a ¾ mile boardwalk for the
disabled and 18 miles of hiking trails lend access to this
dark-water wonderland, known for its biological diversity
and record-size trees. Administered by National Park
Service.
                             19
Cowpens National Battlefield
SC Scenic Highway 11 and SC 110, Cherokee County
864-461-2828
On Jan. 17, 1781, at the drover’s shelter called “The
Cowpens,” a war-scarred old Virginian named Daniel
Morgan led a rustic militia against Col. Banastre Tarleton
and an elite corps of British regulars. Featured at the
battlefield are a walking trail and marked road tour,
picnic ground and a visitor center with exhibits,
memorabilia and a multi-image slide presentation.

Cruse Vineyards and Winery
Woods Road, off SC 72, about 4 mi. N. of Chester,
Chester, SC
803-377-3944
Visit these vineyards and sample the finished reds, whites,
and blushes in this rare commercial Carolina winery.

Dillon County Museum
Main and Marion Streets, Latta, SC
843-752-9457
Once a medical office, the museum has old dental and
medical equipment, farming implements, and a collection
on indigo and local historical items.

Dixie Stampede
N. Junction of US 17 Business and 17 Bypass, Myrtle
Beach, SC
843-497-9700 or 1-800-433-4401
A four-course feast is served during a show with
audience participation that focuses on friendly North/
South rivalry. Music and comedy are featured, along with
trick horseback riding and a patriotic grand finale.



                            20
Dock Street Theatre
135 Church Street, Charleston, SC
843-720-3968
On the site of one of America’s first playhouses, the
theatre is a combination of an early Georgian playhouse
and the preservation of the Planter’s Hotel, c. 1809.
Admission for performances.

Drayton Hall
SC Scenic Hwy. 61, about 8 mi. past US 17,
Charleston, SC
843-766-0188
An immense two-story brick house, c. 1738, built by John
Drayton, a member of His Majesty’s council. It was the
only Ashley River home not vandalized by Union troops in
1865. Jointly owned by the National Trust for Historic
preservation and the state of South Carolina, this landmark
is considered one of the finest examples of colonial
architecture in the U.S. Also marsh and garden walks.

Du Pont Planetarium
University of South Carolina
University Parkway, Aiken, SC
803-648-6851, ext. 3313
The projector here displays over 9,000 stars down to the
eighth magnitude and is capable of simulating
three-dimensional travel through space.

The Eddie Miles Theater
701 Main Street, N. Myrtle Beach, SC
843-280-6999
Eddie Miles captures the magic and charisma of Elvis
Presley during “A Salute to Elvis.” Or take in the “Rock ‘n’
Roll Review,” a salute to rock and roll legends.

                             21
Edisto Memorial Gardens and Horne Wetlands Park
Orangeburg Arts Center
US 301, Orangeburg, SC
803-536-4074
The gardens glorify the bank of the north fork of the
Edisto River with masses of azaleas, wisteria, and other
southern favorites. The Horne Wetlands Park in the
gardens takes visitors over a 2,700-foot boardwalk for a
close-up look at the plants and wildlife found in the
wetlands of this area. The adjacent Arts Center maintains
a gallery on its second floor.

Energy Adventure-Robinson Visitors Center
Off SC 151 NW of Hartsville, Hartsville, SC
Interactive exhibits tell the story of nuclear power at the
Southeast’s first commercial nuclear power plant.

Fairfield Ocean Ridge
45 mi. S of Charleston on Edisto Island,SC
Here villas serve as a base for days spent on the
shell-scattered beach, the golf course, or tennis courts.

Fantasy Harbour
Intracoastal Waterway near Waccamaw Pottery,
Myrtle Beach, SC
843-236-8500 or 1-800-681-5209
Catch performances from Larry Gatlin and the Gatlin
Brothers or direct from Broadway classics.

Ferne’s Miniature Dollhouse and Museum
Intersection of SC 135 and Flat Rock Road
Easley, SC
864-843-2486
Ferne’s Miniature Dollhouse Museum has over 700 dolls,
35 doll houses and a miniature collection on display.
                            22
Fine Arts Center of Kershaw County
Lyttleton and York Streets, Camden, SC
Exhibits of equine art and memorabilia, along with
periodic theater performances and concerts. A fine
150-year-old-home is also open for tours.

The Florence Museum and Timrod Park and Shrine
558 Spruce St., Florence, SC
843-662-3351
Museum features art and regional history displays and
exhibits of Oriental and primitive cultures. Children can
visit the Children’s Gallery and hands-on activity area. The
minuscule one-room schoolhouse adjoining was once
presided over by Henry Timrod, poet laureate of the
Confederacy.

Fort Hill
Clemson University Campus, Clemson, SC
864-656-2475 or 864-656-4789
This antebellum mansion was the home of John C.
Calhoun, vice president under Andrew Jackson and John
Quincy Adams, U.S. Senator and one of the South’s most
notable statesmen. The site of an architecture college, it
is filled with family mementos and furnishings.

Fort Moultrie National Historic Site
1214 Middle Street, Sullivan’s Island, SC
843-883-3123
Here in 1776 Col. William Moultrie and his men drove off
a squadron of British warships at the Battle of Sullivan’s
Island. The current structure was completed in 1809.
Administered by the National Park Service.



                            23
Fort Sumter National Monument
Charleston, SC
Fort 843-883-3123
Boat tours 843-722-1691
Boat tours embark from City Marina and Patriots Point
Maritime Museum. Possibly the most historic military site
in the nation, the first shots of the War Between the
States were fired at Fort Sumter from Fort Johnson in
1861. The restored national monument is under the
supervision of the National Park Service. Fee for boat
tours.

First Baptist Church
1306 Hampton Street, Columbia, SC
803-256-4251
The first Secession Convention was held here in December
1860, a year after the church was built. The business of
secession moved then to Charleston. The pulpit
furnishings, slave gallery and brick pillared portico are as
they were then.

Francis Marion College Planetarium
US 301 N. Florence, SC
843-661-1250
Planetarium is on the second floor of the Cauthen
Educational Media Center.

The Gardens of Park Seed Company
SC 254, 7 miles N. of Greenwood, Greenwood, SC
864-223-8555 or 800-845-3369
The test gardens of this venerable seed supplier, whose
catalogs and products go the world around, are at their
most brilliant from about May through July.



                             24
Gibbes Museum of Art
135 Meeting Street, Charleston, SC
843-722-2706
Outstanding collections of American art and portraits
relating to Southern history. The collection of miniatures
is one of the world’s finest. Tuesday through Sunday, 1-5.

Glencairn Gardens
Charlotte and Edgemont Avenues, Rock Hill, SC
803-329-5540
A quiet place for strolling, nature watching and
contemplation, these eight acres of sculpted terraces and
flower beds incline toward a grassy area with a serene
reflecting pool and fountain.

Governor’s Mansion and Governor’s Green
800 Block of Richland Street, Columbia, SC
803-737-1710
One of three historic houses on Governor’s Green is the
Governor’s Mansion, built in 1855 to house officers of a
military academy. Governors have lived in the home, which
is furnished with fine antiques, since 1868. A gift shop is
also on the grounds in the Boylston House.

Greenville County Museum of Art
420 College Street, Greenville, SC
864-271-7570
A collection of 24 watercolors by Andrew Wyeth, works
by Jasper Johns and Georgia O’Keefe highlight a large
collection of Southern Art.

Greenville Zoo
Cleveland Park, E. Washington Street, Greenville, SC
864-467-4300
Over 250 residents, native to habitats all over the world,
                           25
live in this facility—not even counting those in the reptile
house. A playground and picnic area add to this friendly
zoo.

Greenwood Museum
106 Main Street, Greenwood, SC
864-229-7093
Miss the old-time general store? The drug store that
smelled of herbal remedies and chocolate? The one-room
school, where a woodstove maintained warmth and a hickory
limb kept order. They’re all on the village street displayed
with the museum, along with other turn-of-the-century
relics, minerals, Indian artifacts and natural history
exhibits.

Hampton County Museum
802 First St. W. (UA 601 S), Hampton, SC
803-943-5484
The museum is in a 115-year old jail and features a military
room, a genealogical research room, a country store and
other items relating to the country’s history and natural
history.

Hanover House
Clemson University Campus, Clemson, SC
864-656-4789
A Huguenot family built this plantation house in 1716 on
what is now the site of the Santee-Cooper project. In
1941, when the homesite was to be flooded, the house was
dismantled and moved to Clemson.

Hartsville Museum
222 N 5th St. Hartsville, SC
843-383-3005
The museum offers monthly changing special exhibits plus
                          26
permanent displays of early domestic implements, clothing
and photographs.

Historic Brattonsville
Off SC 322, 10 mi. W. of Rock Hill
803-684-2327
An 18th and 19th century restoration site. Working living
history farm. Over 28 structures.

Historic Columbia Foundation
Museum Shop: 1616 Blanding Street, Columbia, SC
Administrative Offices: 1601 Richland Street
Columbia, SC
Contact: Ann Posner, 803-252-1770, ext. 2
The first floor of the Woodrow Wilson House; the lower
level of the Mann-Simons Cottage; the grounds and
gardens of the Hampton-Preston, Woodrow Wilson,
Robert Mills, and Mann-Simons house museums.

Hobcaw Barony’s Visitors Center
US 17, 1 mile north of Georgetown, Georgetown, SC
843-546-4623
Once the home of Rooservelt-era statesman Bernard
Baruch and his daughter Belle, the center features
terrariums, aquariums, and displays on the nature research
of the Baruch Institutes. Museum hours Mon.-Fri., 10-5.
Tours of the house and grounds by advance reservation
Tuesday and Thursday.

Horry County Museum
438 Main Street, Conway, SC
843-248-1542
Archaeological and historic exhibits in an old post office
building. Open Monday through Sat. 9-5.

                            27
House of Blues
Barefoot Landing
4640 US 17 S, N. Myrtle Beach, SC
843-913-3740
This attraction showcases many of today’s top artists,
It’s an exciting blend of live music, regional cuisine and
original art work.

Kiawah Island Resort
21 mi S of Charleston on Kiawah Island, Kiawah
Island, SC
A 10,000-acre island with two resort villages, plush
villas, an inn, restaurants, shopping, tennis, abundant
wildlife, two meeting centers and 10 miles of broad
beach. Championship golf courses. Catamarans and
bicycles may be rented.

Jennings-Brown House and Marlboro County Historical
Museum
123 S Marlboro St., Bennettsville, SC
843-479-5624
The 1826 Jennings-Brown house with its detached kitchen
and period furnishings shares the grounds with the
museum, with exhibits detailing the country’s history,
farming methods and early businesses.

Legends in Concert
US 17 Bus. And 3rd Ave. S., Surfside Beach, SC
843-238-7827 or 1-800-963-7469
This show is a recreation of the performances of a select
group of “superstars.”




                            28
Magnolia Plantation and Its Gardens
SC Scenic Hwy. 61, about 10 mi. past US 17
Charleston, SC
843-571-1266 or 1-800-367-3517
Adjoining Drayton Hall Plantation, this world famous 300-
year old plantation has been in the same family since the
arrival of Thomas Drayton from Barbados in 1671. It
includes the country’s oldest garden planted for
year-round color. The Plantation House dates from the
Reconstruction era and is open for tours. The garden
features the Barbados Tropical Garden, a nature train
tour, a petting zoo, wildlife observation tower, nature
trails, wildlife art gallery, rental bikes and canoes, an 18th
century herb garden, a Biblical garden, topiary garden
horticultural maze and antebellum cabin. Garden ticket
required, but extra charge for house and nature train.

McKissick Museum of the University of South Carolina
and South Caroliniana Library
USC Horseshoe, Sumter Street, Columbia, SC
803-777-3131
Houses art exhibits, geology and gemstone exhibits, a
display of silver collected by Bernard Baruch and the
university archives. South Caroliniana Library, dating from
1840, was the first separate college library building in
America and now draws researchers to its special
collections in the state history and genealogy.

Memorial Park
Hampton and Gadsden Streets, Columbia, SC
The largest monument of its type outside of Washington,
DC, stands here as a memorial to 980 South Carolinians
who died in Vietnam.



                              29
Mepkin Abbey
1098 Mepkin Abbey Road, 10 mi. SE of Moncks
Corner, Monks Corner, SC
843-761-8509
Mepkin Plantation on the Cooper River was the home of
patriot Henry Laurens, who was imprisoned in the Tower
of London. Mepkin Plantation, burned by the British and
again by the Union, was last the home of Henry and Clare
Booth Luce, who are buried on the grounds. Their gift to
the Catholic Church, it is now a monastery of
extraordinary peace and beauty. Its garden and chapel are
open to the public.

Middleton Place
SC Scenic Hwy 61, Charleston, SC
843-556-6020 or 1-800-782-3608
America’s oldest formal landscaped gardens rise from the
river in sweeping terraces, at the foot of which is a pair of
butterfly lakes. Intricate walks, vast plantings of
camellias, azaleas, roses, and magnolias accent the French
and English landscape designs. Middleton Place House
Museum, c. 1755, offers a history of the renowned
Middleton family from 1741 through 1865, along with
exhibits of priceless silver, china, furniture and artwork.
The story of the African-American community is explored
at Eliza’s House. On a busy day in the plantation
stableyards, a visitor can see demonstrations by the
blacksmith, potter, weaver, and carpenter.

Museum of York County
Mt. Gallant and Museum Roads, York, SC
803-329-2121
Museum features more than 200 animal exhibits from
seven continents and Native American artifacts

                             30
reflecting the heritage of the first Canadians. Other
attractions include a planetarium, three art galleries, a
nature trail and museum store.

Neeses Farm Museum
US 321, Neeses, SC
803-247-5811
A collection of antique farm and domestic implements and
items. Open by appointment.

Ninety Six National Historic Fort
SC 248, 2 miles S of Ninety Six, Ninety Six, SC
864-543-4068
The National Park Service operates this frontier
settlement and Revolutionary War battle site, with its
historic star fort. A visitor center, interpretive trail,
current archaeological digs and restorations offer insights.

Nippon Center and Yagoto
500 Congaree Road, Greenville, SC
864-288-8471
Cultural programs are offered at this 14th century style
Japanese mansion featuring a pond of lotus flower, cherry
trees in spring, a rock garden and a 5-star restaurant.

Old Edgefield Pottery
230 Simkins Street, Edgefield, SC
803-637-2060
A display of old Edgefield pottery, an alkaline glazed,
traditional pottery made in the area in the 1800’s. A
potter at the wheel gives demonstrations of the craft.




                             31
Orangeburg National Fish Hatchery
US 21 Bypass S of Orangeburg, Orangeburg, SC
803-534-4828
Aquariums show many fish, including striped bass,
redbreast sunfish and the endangered shortnose sturgeon.

Carowinds
Off I-77, 8 mi. N. of Rock Hill, Rock Hill, SC
803-548-5300 or 800-888-4FUN for schedules
Experience this 100-acre theme park which brings motion
pictures and television programs to life—with you in the
center of the action. Enjoy thrilling rides, spectacular
shows, life-size character and a water park.

Parris Island Museum
Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Beaufort, SC
843-525-2951
Displays detail the history of Parris Island from 1564 to
the present. Marine uniforms and weapons are featured.
Also at Parris Island are famous monuments to 1564
Huguenot pioneer Jean Ribaut, the flag-raising on Iwo
Jima and the Iron Mike monument.

Pee Dee State Farmers Market
One mi. W of I-95 on US 52, Florence, SC
843-665-5154
Area farm families sell fresh fruits and vegetables in
season, hanging baskets, flower and vegetable plants and
homemade goods here.

Pendleton District Agriculture Museum
US 76 west of Pendleton, Pendleton, SC
864-646-3782 or 800-862-1795
Antique farm tools and equipment including a cotton gin
that pre-dates Eli Whitney’s.
                            32
Pendleton Farmers Society Hall
Pendleton Town Square
Pendleton, SC
864-646-3782 or 800-862-1795
Pendleton attracted the well-to-do from the Lowcountry as
well as upland farmers. Farmers Hall was built in 1826 as
the Court House; division of the district took the court
away, so farmers assumed the hall and it has been in use
ever since. The Square is a lively business district of shops
and restaurants facing the Village Green, where many
events are held. On one corner of the Square is Hunter’s
Sore, the heart of commerce in 1850 and now the home of
the Pendleton District Historical, Recreational Tourism
Commission.

Penn Center
Martin Luther King Jr., St Helena Island, SC
843-838-8562
Here was established during the Civil War the first school
for freed slaves in the South. The center is still active in
community services; its York W. Bailey Museum interprets
the history of Penn Center, the Gullah culture and the
African-American connection to West Africa.

Pickens County Museum
Johnson and Pendleton Street, Pickens, SC
864-898-5963
The turreted old Pickens County “Gaol,” historic in itself,
houses a historical collection on the first floor and an art
museum upstairs, offering changing exhibits.




                             33
Pratt Memorial Library
Webel Museum
123-A and 123-B Wilson St., Ridgeland, SC
Pratt Library holds 250 rare books on the history of the
Lowcountry area, Indian artifacts from Jasper County and
200 relevant portraits and maps. Webel Museum houses
Indian artifacts, rice culture dioramas and historical
materials on the Revolution and Civil Wars.

Prince George Winyah Episcopal Church
301 Broad Street, Georgetown, SC
843-546-4358
Established in 1721 by the Church of England to serve
colonists in this area. Monday through Friday 11:30 to
4:30, March through October; worship services on
Sunday.

Ripley’s Believe It or Not Museum!
N. Ocean Blvd. At 9th Ave. Myrtle Beach, SC

Riverbanks Zoo and Garden
Off I-126 at Greystone Boulevard, Columbia, SC
803-799-8717
City business could be a continent away, instead of a mile,
as one passes through a microcosmic rainforest, desert,
undersea kingdom and a southern farm. Ranked among
the top 10 zoos in the nation, Riverbanks uses water and
light to create the illusion of privacy and wild, unlimited
space for 2,000 animals and their visitors. Endangered
species have reproduced here, helping to prevent their
extinction.




                            34
Riverfront Park and Historic Columbia Canal
At the end of Laurel St. behind the Southern Bell
Office on Huger Street, Columbia, SC
803-733-8331
The city’s original 1906 waterworks, with the pump house
still in place, and first hydroelectric plant provide this
placid setting for strolling, cycling and jogging along the
Congaree River.

Santee National Wildlife Refuge
Off US 301-15, 7 miles S of Summerton, Santee, SC
803-478-2217
A foot trail and observation tower aid in observing
sanctuary frequented by migrating waterfowl. Visitor
center offers information and interpretive exhibits.

Seabrook Island Resort
23 mi. S of Charleston, Seabrook Island, SC
Guests stay in luxurious villas and enjoy a private beach
club with two swimming pools, restaurants, lounges, tennis
courts, and two golf courses. An equestrian center and
trail network, rental fishing gear, sailboats and bicycles
are also featured.

The Serenade Show at the Charleston Music Hall
37 John Street, Charleston, SC
843-853-2000 or 1-800-746-9845
This theater was once one of America’s first passenger
train stations, The Camden Depot. Enjoy the Serenade
Christmas Special during the holidays. Call for show times
and tickets.




                             35
South Carolina Hall of Fame
Myrtle Beach Convention Center
21st Ave. N. and Oak Street, Myrtle Beach, SC
843-448-4021
Pays tribute to outstanding South Carolinians through
interactive video displays. Monday through Friday, 8-5.

South Carolina Archives and History Center
8301 Parklane Road, Columbia, SC
803-896-6100
Preserving 300-plus years of South Carolina’s historical
records, the center offers research , exhibits, special
programs, and educational opportunities.

The South Carolina Artisans Center
334 Wichman St., Walterboro, SC
843-549-0011
Shop for one-of-a-kind pieces of handcrafted jewelry,
pottery, baskets, and more…all made by SC artists and
craftsmen.

South Carolina Criminal Justice Hall of Fame
5400 Broad River Road, beside Criminal Justice Acad-
emy, Columbia, SC
803-896-8199
Created in honor of lawmen who died in the line of duty,
the Hall of Fame details the history of law enforcement
with exhibits. The Melvin Purvis gun display is featured;
Purvis was the FBI agent who collared John Dillinger.

South Carolina State Museum
301 Gervais Street, Columbia, SC
803-898-4921
A vast field of interest, including art, history, natural
history, and science and technology is covered on four home
                            36
floors of renovated textile mill, the first in the world to
be totally electric. Lots of hands-on exhibits; a section on
laser technology and others on South Carolinians who
pioneered in fields as diverse as submarine technology
and space exploration.

South of the Border
I-95 S of SC/NC Border, Dillon, SC
843-774-2411, 1-800-922-6064 in SC or
1-800-845-6011
Food, lodging, gas, recreation, amusements, postcards,
firecrackers, gimcracks, doolollies, and more.

State Farmer’s Market
Across from the USC football stadium on Bluff Road
Columbia, SC
803-737-4664
Peaches, potatoes, turnips or tomatoes—all arrive daily
by the truckload in season at one of the largest produce
markets in the Southeast. Visitors and customer
welcome.

The State House
Main and Gervais Streets, Columbia, SC
803-734-2430
Rocked by Sherman’s cannonballs, this magnificent survivor
wears bronze stars on the wounds in its western wall.
Newly renovated, it’s home of the General Assembly, which
convenes each January; the Governor’s Office and The
State House Gift Shop.

Sumter County Museum
122 N. Washington St., Sumter, SC
803-775-0908
The Williams-Brice House, built in 1845, is a Victorian
                          37
with fine period furnishings, historic objects,
formal gardens and archives to aid genealogical research.

Thoroughbred Hall of Fame
Hopeland Gardens, Whiskey Road and DuPree Place,
Aiken, SC
803-642-7630
The Aiken Jaycees started this collection of horse racing
memorabilia to commemorate locally bred and trained
horses that have won fame on tracks and fields across the
country. Two of the best-known are Kelso, five times
national champion, and 1981 Kentucky Derby and Preakness
winner Pleasant Colony.

Trinity Episcopal Cathedral
100 Sumter Street, Columbia, SC
803-771-7300
The historic neighbor of the Capitol building, modeled
after England’s York Minister, was consecrated in 1847. It
was miraculously spared when Sherman burned Columbia in
1865. Today, it is one of the 20 largest Episcopal churches
in the nation. Six governors are buried in its churchyard.

University of South Carolina Visitor Center
Pendleton and Assembly Street, Columbia, SC
803-777-0169
At the visitor center, displays showcase university
programs, faculty and students. Maps and brochures
available.

Waterfront Park
Along the east side of Charleston Harbor at the foot
of Vendue Range, Charleston, SC
This city park includes a pier, garden and unique water
sprays to refresh joggers and enthusiastic children.

                            38
Wild Dunes Resort
Northern tip of Isle of Palms
15 mi. N of Charleston, Isle of Palms, SC
Wild Dunes offers luxurious villas, an inn, restaurants, a
conference center, numerous swimming pools, 2 ½ miles of
beach, a racquet club and two spectacular gold courses
that skirt either the ocean or the Intracoastal Waterway.
A marina offers a variety of boats for sport and deep-sea
fishing.

World of Energy
Intersection of SC 130 and SC 183, north of Seneca
864-885-4600 or 800-777-1004
On Lake Keowee beside the Oconee Nuclear Plant, Duke
Power Co.’s energy-education center has much to say in an
audiovisual tower with animated displays, computer games
and a short nature trail.



General Information
City/town park and recreation programs, YMCA’s, Boys
and Girls Clubs and general information sites are listed.
However, not everyone responded to our request,
therefore contact your local park and recreation
departments, YMCA’s, Boys and Girls Clubs to see if they
have summer programs available. Also, contact your local
library to see about summer reading programs.




                            39
Notes




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