TV LICENCE FEES INCREASE TO BE USED FOR LOCAL

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					      TV LICENCE FEES INCREASE TO BE USED FOR LOCAL CONTENT SAYS FEDUSA
                                  5 August 2009

The South African Broadcasting Commission (SABC) announced on Tuesday that television licence fees
will increase by 11 %. The Federation of Unions of South Africa (FEDUSA) is of the view that the TV licence
increase was done in ill faith by not consulting with labour organisations, since labour plays such an
important role in the economy.
FEDUSA believes that in light of the current financial difficulties that the SABC has proven that they it does
not know how to adequately spend the funds that they receive from the public in the past.
“We are thus not sure if the SABC can be trusted enough, based on their past behaviour, to ensure that the
public funding does not go towards wasteful and fruitless expenditure, but rather to the growth of local TV
content,” says FEDUSA General Secretary Dennis George.
“The SABC should be held accountable to their public service mandate which promotes the use of locally
produced radio and TV content and as such they should have consulted with us all labour orgnisations. We
understand that the SABC is in a serious financial situation, a situation we believe could have been avoided
with the proper management,” says George.
“Currently the SABC is in a financial deficit to the tune of R800 million and the TV licence fees increase
may assist in generating revenue but we cannot stress enough how this money should be used to mobilize
our local radio and TV producers again, of who many has lost their jobs to the mismanagement of the SABC
management,” concludes George.


For more information:
FEDUSA GENERAL SECRETARY
Dennis George
084 805 1529
Teixeira George
Media and Communications officer

The Federation of Unions of South Africa (FEDUSA)
PO Box 7779
Westgate, 1734
Johannesburg, South Africa
media@fedusa.org.za
Tel: 011 279-1800
Fax: 011 279-1820/1
Cell: 079 470 8880