Native American Health Center Circle of Healing - PowerPoint by salazarcannon

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									Native American Health Center Circle of Healing
HIV & HIV Prevention Services
Presentation by Maritza Penagos

Native American Health Center

 A CBO founded in 1972  Provides a full range of primary medical, dental, substance abuse, mental health and HIV/AIDS care.  One of the largest urban Indian clinics in the nation  We have clinics in Oakland, Sacramento, Santa Barbara and San Francisco  HIV Department located in SF clinic

Circle of Healing
 HIV & HIV Prevention Services in a caring, supportive, culturally rich and community focused environment  Derives from the Native American indigenous cosmologies which reverend the healing power of the Sacred Hoop; when all things are connected in the Sacred Hoop, balance and harmony can be attained.

HIV Services: Native American Center of Excellence
 Primary Medical Care  Nurse Case Management  Substance Use Services: assessments, counseling, case management, referrals/linkage  Psychiatric Services (collaboration with SFCCC)  Subcontract with Native American AIDS Project
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Peer Advocacy Mental Health Services

HIV Services: Holistic Native Network
 Collaboration with Friendship House
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SPNS initiative looking at the health outcomes of HIV+ Native Americans receiving comprehensive HIV services HIV Education/CTR to high risk Native Americans Streamlined access to residential treatment services for HIV+ Native Americans

Holistic Native Network
 55 clients enrolled
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48% describe active substance abuse 44% have CDC defined AIDS 55% fit HUD’s homelessness definition 56% identify as AI/AN; 37% as multi-racial AI/AN

HIV & Prevention Services: Cultural Medicine
       Sweat lodges Weekly beading classes Traditional healers Talking circles Community outreach/cultural events Working closely with other Native organizations Weekly Massage & Acupuncture from IEP

HIV Prevention Services: CDC funded interventions
 Prevention case management (Wellness Support Counseling)  HIV CTR using Oraquick Rapid Test  Partnership for Health

HIV Prevention Services: Target Populations
 MSM, MSM/IDU, IDU and high-risk Heterosexual Native Americans who are HIV negative, or of unknown status  High risk Non-Natives  HIV+ Native Americans & their partners

Outreach for Prevention Services
Outreach

Conventional Outreach

Drop In Center

Community Events

Conventional Outreach
 Shelters & Mayor’s Project Connect  SFCCC Mobile Van (CTR/RT eventually)

 Friendship House (CTR & PCM)
 Forensic AIDS Project/County Jail (PCM)

Drop In Center
 Implemented January, 2005
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Holding open space/Cultural Center Weekly beading class Community Events

Community Events
 Monthly Workshops that blend cultural traditions with HIV Prevention
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Loving Our Community Weaving Our Traditions Celebration of Life Voices of Bravery

Voices of Bravery

Prevention Case Management
 Implemented February, 2005  Difficulties
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In-house referrals Poor (sustained) Retention Ambiguity of PCM

Wellness Support Counseling
 Accomplishments
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Risk Reduction Assessments at Friendship House MOU with Forensic AIDS Project Caseload is growing Linking HIV CTR with WSC

HIV Counseling, Testing & Referral/Linkage
 Implemented March, 2005
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Offered at NAHC & off-site at NAAP
Friendship House Sacramento & Oakland clinics SAGE & SafeHouse

 Expansion: 2006
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HIV Testing
 We’ve provided HIV testing since 1991  In the last 5 years:
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246% increase in testing 45% of individuals receiving tests are AI/AN 50% of all confirmed positives were to AI/AN Risk Factors for individuals testing positive: MSM, MSM/IDU, IDU

Partnership for Health
 Implemented January, 2005  At time of audit, June 30, 2005:
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45 UDC Average of 5 visits per UDC 42 had received at least one PfH prevention message

 Average of 2 prevention messages per UDC in the first six months of the intervention

Partnership for Health
 Are we missing the target?
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Critical care/drop ins least likely to receive the message Critical care/drop ins: are they the individuals that have lowest adherence to meds and more psychosocial issues that may make them most ‘at-risk’ of transmission?

Capacity Building Assistance
 BSSV Program (Dr. Amanda Houston)
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Evaluation tool for community events
Team building & strategic planning Motivational Interviewing

 NNAAPC
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