Monroe County Community School Corporation Vision Statement

Document Sample
Monroe County Community School Corporation Vision Statement Powered By Docstoc
					Strategic Planning Report to the Board
MONROE COUNTY COMMUNITY SCHOOL CORPORATION BOARD OF SCHOOL TRUSTEES Regular Meeting, June 13, 2006

A committee to develop a strategic plan for the Monroe County Community School Corporation held its first meeting on November 30. Initially 24 people were invited to join the Strategic Planning committee and eight others were added the group, all chosen because of what they could contribute to the discussion. The committee is lead by Lynn Black, Director of Strategic Planning and Development. Committee members include: Jason Banach, Bloomington City Council Tarrey Banks, Rogers Elementary School Principal-I.U. Community Steve Bryant, Bloomington Life Sciences Director Leonard Burrello, I.U. Professor Jeannine Butler, MCCSC Administrator-retired Lynn Coyne, I.U. Administrator and Former School Board Member Jim Ellsberry, DeWitt Institute for Professional Development Myra Farmer, Tri-North Middle School Teacher Paul Farmer, BHS South Teacher and MCEA Vice President John Fernandez, Former Mayor of Bloomington Valerie Gliessman, Templeton Elementary School Teacher Donald Griffin, Pastor and Retiree from Bloomington Police Department Gale Hill, Tri-North Middle School Principal Barry Lessow, Executive Director of United Way Carol Maloney, Franklin Initiative Phil Meyer, WFIU Television and Stone Belt Andrea Mobley, Bloomington High School North Assistant Principal Tina Peterson, Foundation of Monroe County Community Schools David Pillar, BHS North Teacher Linda Richardson, Monroe County Education Association President A. John Rose, Textillery Weavers Lois Sabo-Skelton, MCCSC School Board Scott Smart, Eli Lilly Faculty Fellow at I.U. Kelley School of Business Daria Smith, BHS North Teacher Jim Smith, IVY Tech Community College Karin St. John, Parent Jennifer Staab, Coordinator of Drug Education and Wellness Program Pam Terrell, Templeton Elementary Secretary Gracia Valliant, Templeton Elementary Teacher Sue Wanzer, MCCSC School Board President Jessica Willis, BHS North Teacher

The process has centered around six planning themes: Academic Performance: monitor academic achievement, which can include state, national and/or international measurements; emphasize preparation for postsecondary life, including school to work, twoyear community college and four-year college aspirations. Innovation: utilize cutting-edge applications and out-of-the-box strategies for problem solving; develop a culture of trust that supports risk-taking and applying technology in all areas. Research and Development: use research to assess best practices; understand what is and what is not research; use results that support the development of our teachers and administrators. Equity of Access: provide equal opportunities for success to all students, challenge all students to work toward their capacity; provide equal training and resources for all teachers. Leverage: maximize educational opportunities and resources that allow a competitive advantage for our students, attract highly qualified teachers and administrators while prioritizing the needs of the district. Family and Community Partnerships: involve parents; effective use of community resources; expand community outreach programs. Committee Process: Committee members divided into six groups for each theme and solicited community input through a variety of focus sessions. The following questions were asked (1) (2) (3) What do you believe are currently the greatest strengths of the Monroe County Community School System? What are currently the problems or issues that you believe must be addressed by the MCCSC? If you could grant one wish that would make MCCSC the best it could be what would you wish?

A summary of responses is included on the attached table. This information was very helpful to the committee as members finalized a recommended mission statement, vision statement and goals for the school system.

Monroe County Community School Corporation MISSION STATEMENT MCCSC educates the students of today for the world of tomorrow. We commit to working with our community to deliver an appropriate and safe learning environment with a curriculum dedicated to excellence that honors the unique and diverse needs of our students.
May 15, 2006

Monroe County Community School Corporation Vision Statement

We, the members of the Monroe County Community School Corporation, envision a worldclass community of schools which educates its citizens to be literate, civic-minded, independent thinkers who are socially and ethically responsible and who productively contribute to our global community. High expectations for excellence have always been a cornerstone of Bloomington schools. On the basis of academic performance our schools rank first in Indiana. Rigorous and relevant curriculum and instruction with authentic assessment begins with our highly qualified and effective faculty, administration, clerical and support staff. Creativity and the appreciation of the aesthetic aspects of human existence encouraged throughout our schools are accented by the lifestyle important to the citizens of our community. Our school corporation leads Indiana in research and development of innovative programs implementing best practices in instruction and professional development, and health and wellness strategies envied by other schools. Faculty and staff work in partnership with students, staff, families and the community to provide the finest and most appropriate learning climates that develop student’s intellectual, physical, social and emotional growth in a safe and orderly environment. Our visionary and well-informed Board of Education oversees policies and procedures that clearly align with daily practices so that the corporation is held accountable for assuring that resources and opportunities are dedicated equitably to meet unequal needs for all students; thus, fully nurturing each student’s potential. They also work with local businesses, the teacher’s association, and higher education to provide a professional environment that attracts and holds the very best teachers and administrators. Additionally, the Board reviews a strategic planning process that aligns with Public Law 221, thereby making it possible to keep all schools, the Board of Education, central office personnel, families, and the community focused on achieving top priority targets for improvement initiatives that benefit all students. Our programs of instruction and extra-curricular activities emphasize the mastery of 21st Century skills including, but not limited to: global awareness, civic literacy, financial and economic literacy, multi-media communication skills, critical thinking and problem-solving skills, interpersonal and teamwork skills, and the capacity to be a responsible citizen with a passion for learning. Families, local businesses, social and civic agencies, and institutions of higher learning work creatively and cooperatively to expand outreach programs that serve to enrich classroom learning experiences with career exploration and internships that enhance this mastery of 21st Century skills giving students, parents, and the community voice and ownership in the process of educating each student. Through the cooperative efforts of all stakeholders, the Monroe County Community School Corporation offers the community an extensive program of instruction and activities that enable faculty and staff to prepare each learner with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes necessary to compete in a global economy while achieving a rewarding and productive life style.

“Educating the students of today for the world of tomorrow.”

Vision Statement for MCCSC We, the members of the Monroe County Community School System, envision a world-class community of schools which educates its citizens to be literate, civic-minded, independent thinkers who are socially and ethically responsible and who productively contribute to our global community. Working in partnership with students, staff, families, and the community, these world-class schools promote:              Excellent and appropriate learning environments that develop student’s intellectual, physical, social and emotional growth A rigorous and relevant curriculum and instruction with authentic assessment High expectations for academic excellence for all students Creativity and the appreciation of the aesthetic aspects of human existence Health, emotional and physical well-being Application of ethical principles Social responsibility toward the common good Respect and understanding of diversity Passion for learning Self-reliance and resiliency in an evolving and diverse world Student and parent voice, participation, and ownership in each student’s education Equality of access in order to fully nurture each student’s potential Responsible allocation of resources to meet unequal needs

 Safe and orderly schools.

MCCSC Strategic Planning Focus Sessions Results from the Business Community
Note: next to each item is the frequency of how often the item was given as an answer to the question if more than once.

Question #1 – Greatest Strengths (42 answers)
Academic Performance Curriculum Equity and Access For ALL students
Advanced GT opportunities (2) Special Education Diversity (3)

Family and Community Outside influences
Community Support (5) Parent Participation (2) Business community support Franklin Initiative activities Students

Human Resources Quality issues regarding faculty/staff
Quality of Teachers (24) Quality of Administrators(5) Guidance Counselors

Innovation Through Research / Development New ways to increase students’ success using best practices
Influence of IU (4) Variety of learning opportunities(2) Extended educational programs Athletics Technology Use

Leverage Maximizing financial resources

Academic Standards (3)

Facilities (4) High Income Community

Question #2 – Problems or Issues (59 answers)
Academic Performance Curriculum Equity and Access For ALL students
Redistricting (5) Lack of Special Education(2) Lack of discipline for at-risk students Lack of economic diversity Do not address all learning styles Over-emphasis of athletics Redistrict Fairview to a higher SEC area Lack of non-athletic/nonarts extra-curricular activity

Family and Community Outside influences
Lack of parent participation Community apathy towards education Exclusion of God from Curriculum Religious Right and their non-academic attitude Need more Franklin Initiative opportunities

Human Resources Quality issues regarding faculty/staff
Administration and Principals (5) School board delays (2)

Innovation Through Research / Development New ways to increase students’ success using best practices
Drop-Out rate (5) Overweight students and lack of physical activity in school (4) Lack of focus on college alternatives (2) Gang culture in schools Inadequate counseling Ballroom dance as part of social skills curriculum Lack of options in high school Pushing reading through and lacking enjoyment Student turnover

Leverage Maximizing financial resources
Budget Constraints (8) Overcrowding (4)

Weak Math and Science curriculum (2) Academic stereotypes: “Math is too hard” Everyday Math Lack of academic rigor Low test scores Low academic ranking in Indiana Over emphasis on testing

Teachers put personal agendas into curriculum Lack of teacher commitment Faculty turn-over Superintendent

Teacher/student ratio too high (3) Shortness of school day (3) Lack of all-day kindergarten (2) Capital improvements over classroom spending Cost of books Teacher salaries

Questions #3 – One Wish (44 answers)
Academic Performance Curriculum Equity and Access For ALL students
Address all learning styles (3) Decrease emphasis on athletics (2) Neighborhood schools (2) Stable environment for atrisk students (2) School choice availability

Family and Community Outside influences
Increase community support for teachers (2) Increase parent involvement (2) Increase opportunities for under achievers (2) Biblical values taught in classrooms Help families

Human Resources Quality issues regarding faculty/staff
Improve faculty and administrative leadership Increase teacher’s interest in discipline Morality on school board and in administration New superintendent Quality teacher retention

Innovation Through Research / Development New ways to increase students’ success using best practices
Increase experiential learning in the community (2) Increase length of school day Make Kindergarten enrollment earlier Benchmark other successful districts Increase teacher/student involvement in program decisions Enable success in students Foster life-long learning Increase counseling Increase diversity of teaching methods and resources Homerooms needed in high schools

Leverage Maximizing financial resources
Smaller class size (5)

Decrease importance of testing (2) Increase academic rigor and GT opportunities Let students choose their own literature Teach basics Improve math and science education

More money for education (4) Increase teacher salaries (2) Increase taxes to fund education Increase arts and PE funding Equal funding for college and non-college alternatives More money for room decorations

Increase GT opportunities

Unified students, faculty, board and community

Two school boards, 1 per high school Better trained teachers Make people responsible for their actions

Summary:
Strengths: The only strength that had any sizeable consensus was “Quality of teachers” (25%). All other answers constituted 10% or less of the replies. Problems: No one problem constituted more than 10% of the total. “Budget constraint” was listed the most at 10%, “Redistricting” at 9%, “Overcrowding” and “Administration and Principals” at 7%. One Wish: “Smaller class sizes” appeared as 11% of the total. All other replies appeared 5% or less. In addition: It appears that there is a wide variety of answers to the questions of Problems and One Wish.