Docstoc

Dr

Document Sample
Dr Powered By Docstoc
					Comparative American Studies
CAST 205: Queer Mobilities
Oberlin College
Fall, 2009


Dr. Kara Thompson                                                 CAST 205
775.8688                                                          MWF: 11-11:50
kara.thompson@oberlin.edu                                         King 106
office: King 141G                                                 CRN: 8636
office hours: M: 4-5 & Th: 9:30-11:30


                                CAST 205: QUEER MOBILITIES

     *CAST 205 is a gateway course to the Gender, Sexuality, and Feminist Studies major*



COURSE NARRATIVE

        mobility, n.

        1. a. The ability to move or to be moved; capacity for movement or change of place;
        movableness, portability.
        b. Movement or capacity for movement of a limb, part, or organ of the body.
        c. Ease or freedom of movement; capacity for rapid or comfortable locomotion or travel.
                                                 (definitions from Oxford English Dictionary)

        While returning by taxicab from Juarez, Mexico, to El Paso, Texas, on 6 January 1960,
        Sara Harb Quiroz was stopped for questioning by an immigration-service agent. Quiroz
        was not a newcomer to the United States. She had acquired permanent U.S. residency in
        July 1954, at the age of twenty, and lived in El Paso where she worked as a domestic.
        […] The attorney who handled her case believes she was stopped because of her
        appearance. „Based on looks. Based on the way she dressed. The way she acted. The
        way she talked.‟ In the eyes of the immigration inspector who stopped her, Quiroz
        seemed to be a lesbian.
                                                (from Eithne Luibhéid, Entry Denied, p. 77)

The scene Luibhéid sets of Quiroz‟s experience at the Mexico/Texas border begins to unravel
dominant assumptions that people migrate to the U.S. for “freedom,” sexual and otherwise. The
definitions of mobility capture the complexities of the term to which we will turn throughout the
semester. In many ways, these excerpts provide the narrative and description for our course.
Throughout the semester, we will ask: what do we mean by queer and what do we mean by
mobilities? What is the relationship between mobility and sexuality? Between mobility and
privilege? What is the relationship between queerness and citizenship status? What is the role of
identity politics in seeking asylum? What is “gay rights politics”? What happens when gay
rights politics go transnational? What is gay travel and how is that different than queer mobility?

OBJECTIVES
    To understand how migration, citizenship, and sexuality are mutually constitutive.
    To historicize the U.S. national construction of the immigrant as a heteronormative
      subject.
Comparative American Studies
CAST 205: Queer Mobilities
Oberlin College
Fall, 2009

      To consider how claiming queerness is associated with racialized, bodily, and classed
       privilege.
      To investigate specific issues related to migration into the U.S., analyzing the historical
       relationships among colonialism and constructions of race and sexuality.
      To examine the contemporary mobility of U.S. gay rights discourse.
      To build a critical vocabulary of key terms in queer, migration, ethnic, and American
       cultural studies, such as: queer, mobility, diaspora, globalization, citizen, naturalization,
       asylum, transnational, alien, neoliberalism, liberal politics, and gay rights.
      To develop methods for close reading and analyzing a range of texts, from visual and
       literary to juridical and historical.
      To develop methods for articulating one‟s position on the key topics of this course.
      To be mindful of opinions and positions with which one may not agree, and to develop
       methods for responding articulately and respectfully.

REQUIRED TEXTS

Books
Available at the Oberlin College Bookstore and on reserve at Mudd Library

Arenas, Reinaldo. Before Night Falls
Penguin, 1994.

Díaz, Junot. The Brief and Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao
Penguin, 2007.

Santos-Febres, Mayra. Sirena Selena: A Novel
Picador, 1st. ed

Valentine, David. Imagining Transgender: An Ethnography of a Category
Durham: Duke University Press, 2007.

Articles, book sections
Available on our Blackboard course site under the “course documents” tab. All articles denoted
with an asterisk on the syllabus.

Dawes Act, or General Allotment Act of 1887. Link available on Blackboard.

Alexander, M. Jacqui. “Imperial Desire/Sexual Utopias: White Gay Capital and Transnational
Tourism” from Pedagogies of Crossing: Mediations on Feminism, Sexual Politics, Memory, and
the Sacred.
Durham: Duke University Press, 2005. 66-88.

Arondekar, Anjali. “Border/Line Sex: Queer Postcolonialities or How Race Matters Outside the
U.S.” Interventions: International Journal of Postcolonial Studies 7.2 (2005): 235-249.
Comparative American Studies
CAST 205: Queer Mobilities
Oberlin College
Fall, 2009


Cantú, Lionel Jr., et al. “Well-Founded Fear: Political Asylum and the Boundaries of Sexual
Identity in the U.S.-Mexico Borderlands,” from Queer Migrations: Sexuality, U.S. Citizenship,
and Border Crossings.
Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2005. 61-74.

Decena, Carlos Ulises. “Tacit Subjects.” GLQ 14.2-3 (2008): 339-359.

Fajardo, Kale Bantigue. “Transportation: Translating Filipino and Filipino American Tomboy
Masculinities through Global Migration and Seafaring.” GLQ 14.2-3 (2008): 403-424.

Luibhéid, Eithne. “Birthing a Nation,” Race, Ethnicity, and Childbearing,” from Entry Denied:
Controlling Sexuality at the Border.
Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2002. 55-76.

---. “Queer/Migration: An Unruly Body of Scholarship.” GLQ 14.2-3 (2008): 169-190.

---. “Sexuality, Migration, and the Shifting Line Between Legal and Illegal Status.” GLQ 14.2-3
(2008): 289-315.

Manalansan, Martin F. “In the Shadows of Stonewall: Examining Gay Transnational Politics and
the Diasporic Dilemma.”
The Politics of Culture in the Shadow of Capital, ed. Lisa Lowe and David Lloyd.
Durham: Duke University Press, 1997. 485-504.

Massad, Joseph. “Re-orienting Desire: The Gay International and the Arab World,” from
Desiring Arabs
Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2007. 160-190.

Puar, Jasbir. “Circuits of Queer Mobility: Tourism, Travel, and Globalization.” GLQ 8.1-2
(2002): 101-137.

Randazzo, Timothy J. “Social and Legal Barriers: Sexual Orientation and Asylum in the United
States,” from Queer Migrations: Sexuality, U.S. Citizenship, and Border Crossings.
Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2005. 30-60.

Reddy, Chandan. “Asian Diasporas, Neoliberalism, and Family: Reviewing the Case for
Homosexual Asylum in the Context of Family Rights.” Social Text 23.3-4 (2005): 101-119.

Rodríguez, Juana María. “The Subject on Trial: Reading In re Tenorio as Transnational
Narrative,” from Queer Latinidad: Identity Practices Discursive Spaces
New York: New York University Press, 2003.

Scott, Joan. “The Evidence of Experience,” from The Lesbian and Gay Studies Reader, ed.
Henry Ablelove, et al.
New York: Routledge, 1993. 397-415.
Comparative American Studies
CAST 205: Queer Mobilities
Oberlin College
Fall, 2009

Somerville, Siobhan. “Notes toward a Queer History of Naturalization.” American Quarterly
57.3 (2005): 659-675.

Somerville, Siobhan. “Queer Loving.” GLQ 11.3 (2005): 335-370.


ASSIGNMENTS

Participation: You should participate in at least three different ways: 1) attend all class meetings
2) active participation in our class discussions 3) post questions or propose discussions on
Blackboard (this is separate from the key topics assignment below). I take your active
participation in this course very seriously—it comprises 15% of your total grade.

Key Topics: Each of you is responsible for devising key topics for discussion at least twice
throughout the semester. By 3:00 pm on the day before the next class, you will post at least three
topics from our reading that you would like to take up in class discussion. They could be as
specific as, “on p. 54, [the author] argues…but I disagree and propose” or you could post
something more general such as “the author uses the term illegal several times and I‟d like to
discuss this as a group because…”. The two goals for this assignment are: 1) to give your peers
something specific to think about as they read for the next class and 2) to provide a starting point
for group discussion.

Position Papers: You will write two papers (3-5 pages each) in which you take up a specific
reading (or two) from our syllabus and develop an original position or response. You may
incorporate outside reading if it helps. This is your chance to articulate a thoughtful critique
(which does not necessarily entail a negative response) to specific topics and readings from our
course. The goals of this assignment are: 1) to hone your skills at developing a clear thesis; 2) to
write a concise and well-organized paper that develops your thesis; 3) to isolate specific points
from a given reading and articulate your response to them.

Final Project: You will choose a final topic for a 10-12 page a paper based on your original
research. This assignment is divided into three parts: an annotated bibliography; prospectus; and
final paper. More details will be provided in class. For those who are interested in community
involvement/activism, please see me about the possibilities for an alternative project.

SUMMARY OF GRADES

       Participation: 15%
       Key topics for discussion (posted on Blackboard): 5%
       Position Paper #1: 15%
       Position Paper #2: 15%
       Final Project in 3 parts:
            o Annotated Bibliography: 10%
            o Prospectus: 15%
            o Final Draft: 25%
Comparative American Studies
CAST 205: Queer Mobilities
Oberlin College
Fall, 2009

MAJOR DEADLINES

On-going: participation; key topics for discussion on Blackboard
September 25: Position Paper #1
October 14: Position Paper #2
November 6: Annotated Bibliography
November 25: Prospectus
December 18: Final project/paper


SCHEDULE OF READINGS

Introduction: Queer/Mobilities

M       8.31: Introductions and syllabus review

W       9.2: *Joan Scott, “The Evidence of Experience,” 397-415.

F       9.4: *Eithne Luibhéid, “Queer/Migration: An Unruly Body of Scholarship,” 169-190.

M       9.7: No class, Labor Day

Queering the Diaspora

W       9.9: *Carlos Ulises Decena, “Tacit Subjects,” 339-359; begin reading The Brief and
        Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao. Turn in signed course policies sheet.

F       9.11: Junot Díaz, The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao, at least through One (up to p.
        51)

M       9.14: Díaz, Oscar Wao, to p. 165

W       9.16: Díaz, Oscar Wao, to p. 201

F       9.18: Díaz, Oscar Wao, to p. 261

M       9.21: Díaz, Oscar Wao, to the end

Tuesday, 9.22: Discussion session on The Brief Wondrous Life of Oscar Wao with Christopher
      Rivera and Kara Thompson, hosted by the Multicultural Resource Center

W       9.23: Diaz, Oscar Wao wrap-up

Wednesday, 9.23: Convocation by Junot Díaz, 8:00 pm in Finney Chapel

F       9.25: *Juana María Rodríguez, “The Subject on Trial: Reading In re Tenorio as
        Transnational Narrative.” Position Paper #1 due
Comparative American Studies
CAST 205: Queer Mobilities
Oberlin College
Fall, 2009

M      9.28: No class, Yom Kippur

Tuesday, 9.29: Special session with Juana María Rodríguez

Immigration, Naturalization, and the Institution of Asylum

W      9.30: Read the *Dawes or General Allotment Act of 1887 (see link on Blackboard)

F      10.2: *Eithne Luibhéid, “Birthing a Nation: Race, Ethnicity, and Childbearing,” from
       Entry Denied, 55-76.

M      10.5: *Siobhan Somerville, “Notes toward a Queer History of Naturalization,” 659-675.

W      10.7: Discussion of *“A Guide to Naturalization,” look especially at the Oath of
       Allegiance on p. 28; general examination of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services
       website, http://www.uscis.gov/portal/site/uscis

F      10.9: *Timothy J. Randazzo, “Social and Legal Barriers: Sexual Orientation and Asylum
       in the United States,” from Queer Migrations, 30-60.

Friday, 10.10-Tuesday 10.13: The Sexualized Other: A Symposium on Asian Sexuality and
        Gender Identity. Four of the five speakers at the symposium are on this syllabus,
        including Anjali Arondekar, Joseph Massad, Martin Manalansan, and Jasbir Puar. I
        encourage you to attend.

M      10.12: *Lionel Cantú Jr., with Eithne Luibhéid and Alexandra Minna Stern, “Well-
       Founded Fear: Political Asylum and the Boundaries of Sexual Identity in the U.S.-
       Mexico Borderlands,” from Queer Migrations, 61-74.

W      10.14: *Chandan Reddy, “Asian Diasporas, Neoliberalism, and Family: Reviewing the
       Case for Homosexual Asylum in the Context of Family Rights.” Position Paper #2 due

F      10.16: Screening and discussion of “fragments of migration” by mónica enríquez-
       enríquez. Discussion of Queers for Economic Justice, http://q4ej.org/

Fall break

Language and Desire

M      10.26: Reinaldo Arenas, Before Night Falls, 1-71. [Note: I have suggested one way to
       break up the text, but I encourage you to read as much as possible over the break]

W      10.28: Arenas, Before Night Falls, 71-154.

F      10.30: Arenas, Before Night Falls, 154-201.

M      11.2: Arenas, Before Night Falls, 201-end. *Eithne Luibhéid, “Sexuality, Migration, and
       the Shifting Line Between Legal and Illegal Status,” 289-315.
Comparative American Studies
CAST 205: Queer Mobilities
Oberlin College
Fall, 2009


W      11.4: *Kale Bantigue Fajardo “Transportation: Translating Filipino and Filipino
       American Tomboy Masculinities through Global Migration and Seafaring,” 403-424.

F      11.6: Annotated bibliography due

M      11.9: David Valentine, “Introduction,” and “Imagining Transgender,” 3-65.

W      11.11: Valentine, “Making Community,” pp. 68-104.

F      11.13: Valentine, “„I Know What I Am‟: Gender, Sexuality, and Identity,” pp. 105-137.

M      11.16: Mayra Santos-Febres, Sirena Selena, pp. 1-51 (chapters 1-10)

W      11.18: Santos-Febres, Sirena Selena, pp. 52-94 (chapters 11-20)

F      11.20: Santos-Febres, Sirena Selena, pp. 95-152 (chapters 21-34)

M      11.23: Santos-Febres, Sirena Selena, pp. 153-214 (chapters 35-49)

W      11.25: Review of final project. Prospectus due

F      11.27 No class; Thanksgiving observed

Internationalizing “Gay Rights” and the Privileges of Mobility

M      11.30: *Siobhan Somerville, “Queer Loving,” 335-370.

W      12.2: *Martin Manalansan, “In the Shadows of Stonewall,” 485-504.

F      12.4: *Joseph Massad, “Re-orienting Desire: The Gay International and the Arab World,”
       from Desiring Arabs, 160-190.

M      12.7: *Anjali Arondekar, “Border/Line Sex: Queer Postcolonialities or How Race
       Matters Outside the U.S,” 235-249.

W      12.9: *Jasbir Puar, “Circuits of Queer Mobility: Tourism, Travel, and Globalization,”
       101-137.

F      12.11: *M. Jacqui Alexander, “Imperial Desire/Sexual Utopias: White Gay Capital and
       Transnational Tourism” from Pedagogies of Crossing, 66-88.\

December 18: Final project/paper due by 11 am
Comparative American Studies
CAST 205: Queer Mobilities
Oberlin College
Fall, 2009

COURSE POLICIES: I put these last not because they are least important, but because I ask you to
read them carefully on your own after I provide an overview in class. If you have any questions
or concerns, feel free to email me, visit my office hours, or schedule an appointment. Otherwise,
by Wednesday, September 9 you must return a copy of this (which I will provide) along with
our devised guidelines for discussion. Each page should include your signature that tells me you
have read the course policies and guidelines.

Discussion: Much of the course will be discussion-based. I expect consistent and respectful
 participation by everyone in the class (this may take several different forms—see “Assignments”).
 Many of the topics we will discuss this semester may invoke strong feelings and we must be
 mindful that there is never a “right” answer. Certainly, people will have different opinions. One of
 the objectives of this course is to learn strategies for articulating one‟s opinion and for responding to
 others‟ comments both articulately and respectively. In the first week of class, we will develop
 guidelines for discussion, which I expect all of us to abide by throughout the semester.

Attendance: I expect you to attend every class meeting. If you know you will be absent from class,
 please let me know as soon as possible. Participation is a significant amount of your grade and you
 cannot participate if you are not in class. Also, being present in class—both physically and
 mentally—is crucial to building a cohesive and collegial community.

Timeliness: Assignments must be submitted on time in order to receive full credit. I collect
 assignments at the beginning of class. I will deduct 1/3 of a grade for each 24 hours an assignment
 is late (i.e., from B+ to B). Assignments submitted later than one week past the original deadline
 without a written extension will be given credit at my discretion and will generally earn no greater
 than a minimum passing grade. Requests for extensions must be submitted by email at least 72
 hours prior to the assignment due date and are generally available only for extenuating
 circumstances. If you receive an extension, you must include a printed copy of my approval
 (including revised due date) with your assignment in order to receive credit. Late papers may not
 receive written comments. No late assignments will be accepted past the end of reading period
 without an approved incomplete from the Dean of Studies. Extensions on final projects also require
 an incomplete. There are no exceptions to this policy.

Assignment Format: Written assignments should typed, double-spaced, and use a standard font
 type and size (11 or 12 pt. Times New Roman or the equivalent). Include your name, the date, a
 title, and page numbers. If you are required to submit a paper copy, you must staple the pages.
 Please be sure to proofread carefully for style and grammar. Use either MLA or Chicago
 Manual of Style for formatting in-text citations and endnotes/footnotes/or bibliographies. These
 style guides are available in the library or online. Papers that do not follow proper formatting
 instructions may receive a 1/3 a grade deduction.

P/NP: If you are taking this course P/NP, you must fulfill all course obligations and complete all
 assignments in order to receive credit for the course.

Email: I check my email regularly but not obsessively. Do not expect a response from me until at
 least 24 hours after your email was sent. I am also happy to read drafts of written work, but I will
 not do so less than 48 hours from the assignment‟s due date—this includes drafts sent by email and
 given to me in-person.
Comparative American Studies
CAST 205: Queer Mobilities
Oberlin College
Fall, 2009

Honor Code: This course will follow the policies described in the Oberlin College Honor Code and
 Honor System. Please include the statement “I affirm that I have adhered to the Honor Code in this
 assignment” in all written work. If you have any questions about academic honesty, citation, or the
 relationship of the Honor Code to your work in this course, please let me know.

Students with Disabilities: If you need disability-related accommodations for your work in this
 course, please let me know. Support is available through Student Academic Services—please
 contact Jane Boomer, Director of the Office of Disability Services, for assistance in developing
 a plan to address your academic needs.

GUIDELINES FOR DISCUSSION (to be devised as a group)

				
DOCUMENT INFO
Shared By:
Categories:
Stats:
views:17
posted:4/26/2010
language:English
pages:9