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					English Heritage Holiday Cottages 2006 ............................................................. 1
  Room with a view ............................................................................................. 1
Dover Castle, Dover, Kent ................................................................................... 3
  The Sergeant Major‟s House ........................................................................... 3
Osborne House, Isle of Wight .............................................................................. 6
  Pavilion Cottage............................................................................................... 7
St. Mawes Castle, St. Mawes, Cornwall .............................................................. 9
  Fort House ..................................................................................................... 10
Pendennis Castle, Falmouth, Cornwall .............................................................. 13
  The Custodian‟s House.................................................................................. 14
Rievaulx Abbey, Rievaulx, North Yorkshire ....................................................... 15
  Abbey Cottage ............................................................................................... 15
Belsay Hall, Belsay, Northumberland ................................................................ 18
  Field Hall Lodge ............................................................................................. 19
The Abbey Inn ................................................................................................... 22
Byland Abbey, North Yorkshire.......................................................................... 22
Essentials .......................................................................................................... 23
How to book ...................................................................................................... 26
Prices 2006-7 .................................................................................................... 27
     Terms and Conditions of Booking............................................................... 27



English Heritage Holiday Cottages 2006

Room with a view
Photograph showing the view through a window with white linen curtains. The
view is of a sunny day, a stretch of water with lots of sailing boats at anchor with
rolling hills in the distance.

Photograph showing a room interior looking through an open door. The room is
a bedroom with white linen bedding, a white towel, fresh flowers in a glass vase
with a bedside light that gives the room a warm glow. There are white curtains
covering the windows.

Dear Supporter,

I am delighted to welcome you to the launch of the English Heritage Holiday
Cottages portfolio.



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We are offering you the opportunity to stay at some of our finest historic
buildings. Each of our Holiday Cottages is located at the heart of an English
Heritage property, where history, discovery and enjoyment are just on the
doorstep.

All of our cottages have been renovated and refurbished to the highest standard.
Whilst being sympathetic to the period of the building, the emphasis has been on
creating a contemporary interior combining comfort with 21st century style.
All guests will be greeted on arrival by a hamper of essentials, milk, tea, coffee,
some local produce and a bottle of wine, together with a selection of English
Heritage toiletries. All the beds will be made up with crisp, white linen and towels
will be laid out for your arrival. A Welcome Folder will give you all the information
you need for enjoying the site you are staying at, as well as surrounding
attractions. A discount voucher will also be included to use in our shops and as a
complimentary entry ticket to all local English Heritage sites during your stay. Our
housekeepers will always call in to welcome you and check that all is well.

These cottages are the small beginnings of a portfolio that is planned to grow.
During 2006 work will be underway to open 10 new cottages at English Heritage
sites throughout the country including ones at Battle Abbey, Carisbrooke Castle,
Walmer Castle and Witley Court.

The role of English Heritage is to make sure the best of the past is cared for,
understood, valued and enjoyed today. Income generated from operating these
cottages will help us to fulfil our role. We want you to enjoy a special holiday
knowing that you are sharing in and contributing to our essential work.

Simon Thurley
Chief Executive

Portrait of Simon Thurley, Chief Executive.

Each English Heritage holiday cottage has a story to tell: its past inextricably
linked with an historic house, a fortified castle or a great estate. But rather than
try to recreate that past in our interiors we‟ve chosen instead to reflect the best of
contemporary design. By choosing some of the muted tones from the palette
created for us by The Little Greene Paint Company as background, and
combining them with furniture sourced from English designers, we‟ve created
interiors that are individual to us.

The overall feeling is one of understatement, with clean modern lines in harmony
with an historic interior. Our design team have sourced furniture that is both
relaxed and informal whilst being really comfortable and wholly practical.


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Bespoke oak kitchens have been designed to become the heart of the cottage,
whilst bathrooms are sleek and modern in white with powerful showers and bright
chrome fittings.

Relax in peace and privacy. Return home revived and inspired.

Photograph showing a detail of a room interior. There are fresh flowers and a
radio in the distance.

Photograph showing a room interior. A brown armchair with 2 cushions, a book
and a cup of tea resting on the arm. In the doorway are a pair of walking boots.
There are flowers in a vase in the foreground.


Dover Castle, Dover, Kent
Setting the scene

Dover Castle boasts the longest history of any fortress in Britain. Standing on top
of the White Cliffs of Dover, the most iconic natural monument in England, the
Castle commands the shortest sea crossing between England and the continent.
William the Conqueror built the first castle here in 1066. Over the succeeding
centuries it has been massively altered, extended and strengthened. It has
withstood sieges, acted as a garrison headquarters and most recently, in May
1940, was the operational headquarters for Operation Dynamo, the evacuation of
the British Army from Dunkirk.

Photograph showing the view of Dover castle from below. There are lots of trees
in the foreground. The sky is blue.

The Sergeant Major‟s House
Dover Castle
Sleeps: 6 guests + cot
Price Band: A
Full week holidays start: Friday
Weekend 3 night breaks start: Friday
Midweek 4 night breaks start: Monday

Pictograms representing the facilities in the house:
Max 2 well behaved dogs allowed
Travel cot
Highchair


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TV
DVD
CD/DAB radio music system
Microwave
Fridge with freezer compartment
Dishwasher
Washer/Tumble dryer
Telephone
Hair Dryer
Within 1 mile of a pub
Within 1 mile of the sea

There are four floor plans of the house:

Basement and Ground Floor

Entrance hall leading down short flight of stairs to television room and games
room in semi-basement, and up five steps to living room, kitchen with dining
area, utility room and toilet.

First Floor

Two double bedrooms and bathroom with shower.

Second Floor

One twin bedroom with zip-link beds and shower room.

Outside

There is parking for two cars. The garden is laid to lawn with fencing and a
protective beech hedge around. There is a paved terraced area with a table and
chairs. Visitors to the castle walk past the house but the hedging gives privacy.

Four photographs on the page giving an overview of things to do at Dover Castle
and the surrounding area.

Image 1
Photograph showing the outside of the Sergeant Major's House. The house is
made of brick with a white picket fence. There is a tree outside the front door.

Image 2



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Photograph showing one of the rooms in Dover Castle. It is one of the secret
wartime tunnels and shows lots of maps and chart tables.

Image 3
Photograph of a stained glass window in Canterbury Cathedral from the 12th
Century.

Image 4
Photograph showing a wooden sign within the landscape. On the sign is written
'North Downs Way', 'Footpath' and 'Coastal Path'. In the distance is green
landscape with a blue sky with clouds.

The Sergeant Major‟s House
Dover Castle
Sleeps 6 + cot

Two maps show the location of the House.

Map 1 is of most of England. Using a red symbol to highlight the location of
Dover Castle.

Map 2 is a more detailed map showing the local area to Dover Castle. On the
map are marked the main roads and sites in the area: Deal Castle, Walmer
Castle and Dover Castle. Also marked on the map are local towns: Canterbury,
Ashford, Margate, Ramsgate, Deal and Folkestone.

This is an elegant and spacious four-storey Georgian house standing in it‟s own
grounds with expansive views to the English Channel, one of the busiest
waterways in the world. On one side of the house are the inner fortified
battlement walls reaching to the castle above and the, on the other side, the
outer walls sweeping down to the moat and town below. Just behind is the 13th-
century Peverall‟s Gateway. Once home to the Battery Sergeant Majors
garrisoned at the Castle, the house was more recently lived in by the Custodian
of the Castle.

On the doorstep

Whilst staying at the Sergeant Major‟s House, you will be at the heart of Dover
Castle and able to enjoy all it has to offer: guided tours of the Secret Wartime
Tunnels, audio tours of the Medieval Tunnels and The Battlement Walk, a
Regimental Museum and a film recreating the time when the castle prepared for
the visit of Henry VIII in 1539.



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Days Out

Walmer Castle - a costal fort built in the reign of Henry VIII transformed into an
elegant stately home and residence of the Lords Warden of the Cinque Ports,
including the Duke of Wellington.

Deal Castle – fascinating costal fort dating back to Henry VIII.

Canterbury Cathedral – a UNESCO World Heritage Site.

North Downs Way – over 150 miles of footpaths from the Surrey Hills, across the
Kent Downs Area of Outstanding Beauty to the White Cliffs of Dover.

Romney Marsh Walks – waymarked walks crisscrossing the mysterious area: a
world apart.

Royal Tunbridge Wells – an elegant former spa town with unique shops, good
restaurants and lots to see.

Lunch in France – go on foot, or take the car, on the short Channel crossing from
Dover to Calais or Boulogne and spend the day in France.


Osborne House, Isle of Wight
Setting the scene

The Isle of Wight was a great favourite with Queen Victoria. When she married
Prince Albert in 1840 she determined to buy a home there. „It is impossible to
imagine a prettier spot‟ she wrote after visiting Osborne House. „We have a
charming beach quite to ourselves – we can walk anywhere without being
followed or mobbed‟. The house was re-built under the personal direction of
Prince Albert. It was to be the country home where she, the Prince Consort and
their children could enjoy a private family life. After her death in 1901, the house
and the estate were given to the nation. Osborne House then became a part of
the Royal Naval College and a convalescent home for officers before the opening
of the Royal Apartments in 1954 followed by the Royal Nursery suite in 1989.

Photograph showing Osborne House from a distance, across a grassy field with
daisies in the foreground. Part of the garden is in view. The sky is blue with some
clouds.




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Pavilion Cottage
Osborne House
Sleeps: 4 guests + cot Price
Band: B
Full week holidays start: Friday
Weekend 3 night breaks start: Friday
Midweek 4 night breaks start: Monday

Pictograms representing the facilities in the house:
Travel cot
Highchair
TV
DVD
CD/DAB radio music system
Microwave
Fridge with freezer compartment
Dishwasher
Washer/Tumble dryer
Telephone
Hair Dryer
Within 1 mile of a pub
Within 1 mile of the sea

The floor plan shows the layout of the cottage.

Single storey

Kitchen, living room with dining area, double bedroom, twin bedroom with zip link
beds and bathroom with shower over bath. There are doors on to the verandah
from the living room and both bedrooms.

Outside

There is parking for two cars at the cottage. The garden goes right around the
cottage and is hedged and fenced.

Photograph showing a basket filled with fresh ingredients. There are half a dozen
eggs, a loaf of bread, apples, a jar of jam, cartons of milk and orange juice, tea
and coffee and a bottle of wine.

Photograph showing 3 different soaps lying on a towel.



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Four photographs on the page giving an overview of things to do at Pavilion
Cottage.

Image 1
Photograph showing Pavilion Cottage from outside. There is a grass lawn in front
of the cottage. The cottage has a wooden porch and long sloping roof. It is a
sunny day.

Image 2
Photograph showing the view from the cottage of the Isle of Wight with a costal
path in the fore ground.

Image 3
Photograph showing a couple walking along the private sandy beach at Osborne
House.

Image 4
Photograph of a boat sailing in the Solent with a colourful blue and yellow sail.
The sea and sky are blue and there are waves in the water.

Pavilion Cottage
Osborne House
Sleeps 4+ cot

Two maps show the location of the cottage.

Map 1 is of most of England. Using a red symbol to highlight the location of
Osborne House.

Map 2 is a more detailed map showing the local area to Osborne House. The
map shows the Isle of Wight and some of the mainland. On the map are marked
the main roads, ferry routes and sites in the area: Osborne House and Gardens,
Carisbrooke Castle and Yarmouth Castle. Also marked on the map are local
towns: Southampton, Portsmouth, Lymington, Cowes, Fishbourne, Ryde and
Newport.

This former cricket pavilion was built in the early 1900‟s for the young officer
cadets at the Royal Naval College. The pitch has long since reverted to fields,
but the pavilion‟s long south-facing verandah, once a convenient viewing point to
cheer sporting prowess, is now a peaceful place to relax and enjoy the quiet of a
summer evening. Guests in this cottage also have use, subject to access, of a
private shingle beach once used exclusively by the Royal Family. It is easily
reached from the cottage by a mile and half long estate roadway.


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On the doorstep

Pavilion Cottage is within a half-mile easy walk of Osborne House where there
are countless insights into a Victorian royal family life on show. The Royal
Apartments include the charming Nursery Suite and the more formal Durbar
Wing and Council Room. Outside there are the grand garden terraces and the
Swiss Cottage Garden, an area where the royal children were encouraged to
develop their gardening skills. The Swiss Cottage itself was built for the royal
children as the place where they could learn the rudiments of housekeeping and
cookery.

Days out

Carisbrooke Castle – a defensive castle for over 600 years and once prison to
Charles I

Appuldurcombe House – the shell of one of the grandest houses on the Isle of
Wight, stands in „Capability Brown‟ designed grounds

Morton Manor – dating from the 13th-century, extended and re-furbished, now
shown as an elegant Georgian home with magnificent gardens

Isle of Wight Coastal Path – a 65-mile circular route via saltmarshes and over cliff
tops and through coastal villages and towns.

Sporting days – sailing, watersports, cycling, paragliding, sea angling

Quieter days – potteries, arts centres, village churches


St. Mawes Castle, St. Mawes, Cornwall
Setting the scene

Looking out across the sheltered waters of the Fal estuary to Pendennis Castle
and beyond to the open sea, St Mawes Castle is witness to over 450 years of
history. This unique clover leaf shaped castle was built on the orders of Henry
VIII when invasion from France and Spain was feared in the mid 16th century.
Although built as an artillery fort, the castle nevertheless had a great deal of care
lavished on the quality of the masonry and the detail of the stonework. This care
and artistry is still clear today in a series of carved inscriptions, the royal coat of
arms above the entrance and in the detail of the unusual gun loops.

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Image 1
Photograph with St Mawes Castle in the foreground and a calm sea beyond. The
end of a peninsula is just visible with a lighthouse on it. The sea and sky are
clear blue.

Fort House
St. Mawes Castle
Sleeps 4 + cot

Sleeps: 4 guests + cot
Price Band: B
Full week holidays start: Friday
Weekend 3 night breaks start: Friday
Midweek 4 night breaks start: Monday

One map of most of England. Using a red symbol to highlight the location of the
house.

Pictograms representing the facilities in the house:
Max 2 well behaved dogs allowed
Travel cot
Highchair
TV
DVD
CD/DAB radio music system
Microwave
Fridge with freezer compartment
Dishwasher
Washer/Tumble dryer
Telephone
Hair Dryer
Barbeque
Within 1 mile of a pub
Within 1 mile of the sea

The floor plan shows the layout of the house.

On the doorstep

Fort House looks down on St. Mawes Castle perched on its headland just a very
short walk away. Although built to ward off enemy invasion, today the Castle‟s


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squat profile, designed to make it a difficult target, gives the visitor a real
impression of welcome. Once the bridge into the castle is crossed not only the
martial areas such as the Upper Gun Room and the Forward Gun Platform are
open to view but also the domestic areas including the kitchen and mess room.
Outside the Grand Sea Battery is an impressive sight.

Single storey

Long entrance hall, living room, dining room, kitchen, double bedroom, twin
bedroom with zip-link beds, bathroom and separate toilet.

Outside

There is a fenced and hedged garden all round the house and a small sheltered
terrace with great views. It can be reached by French doors from the dining room
so is ideal for summer meals. There is a parking area for two cars to the rear of
the house from where steps lead down to the front door.

Fort House, St Mawes Castle

Even the most dedicated cook could be forgiven for being distracted from the
task in the kitchen at Fort House. The sweeping views over the Castle to the
open sea, to Pendennis Point in one direction and St Anthony Head in the other,
are breathtaking. The house stands in a lane just above the castle and its prime
location means that sailors can enjoy watching the yachts coming and going into
St Mawes harbour below, and walkers can enjoy the direct access to the South-
West Coastal Path. The pretty harbour of St. Mawes is just ten minutes walk
away.

The Custodian‟s House, Pendennis Castle

High on the steep ramparts with sweeping views over Falmouth Bay, this solid
single storey building stands in an enviable position. The approach is through the
Gatehouse, now the main entrance to the fortress, and the Custodian‟s House
stands just behind the former Guardhouse. From all the main rooms there are
views over to sandy Gyllyngvase Bay, the mouth of the Helford River and in the
far distance to the Lizard Peninsula. Guests here have the unique privilege of
enjoying the grounds of this great fortress „out of hours‟.
Days out

Days Out




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National Maritime Museum Cornwall – housed in an award-winning building on
the harbour at Falmouth, visitors are taken into an enchanting world of small
boats and Cornish maritime history.

The Eden Project – this is living theatre housed in two giant greenhouses or
biomes showing the vital and exciting relationship between plants, people and
resources.

The Lost Gardens of Heligan – the restoration of 22-acres of garden that had
been virtually untouched since 1914 now delights and intrigues visitors.

The Roseland Peninsula – this is one of the most picturesque and unspoilt parts
of Britain with glorious coastal walks. St. Just-in-Roseland Church is one of the
most beautifully situated churches in Britain.

The Lizard Peninsula – this Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty is unique with its
thatched white cottages, tiny harbours and colourful fishing boats.

Chysauster Ancient Village – this Celtic settlement not far from St Ives was
originally occupied over 2000 years ago. There were eight stone-walled
homesteads – the remains of which now form one of the oldest village streets in
the country.

Padstow – a bustling and picturesque fishing port on the Camel estuary. Now a
favourite with foodies enjoying the many good restaurants serving local produce
including Rick Stein‟s world famous seafood restaurant.

Helston – a bustling market town with many attractive Victorian and Georgian
houses.

Active Days – sailing, diving, surfing, swimming, sea fishing trips, walking the
South-West Coastal Path.

Quieter Days – art galleries, craft workshops, village churches, glorious sub-
tropical gardens.

A detailed map showing the local area to St Mawes Castle. On the map are
marked the main roads and sites in the area: St Mawes Castle, Pendennis castle
and Chysauster Ancient Village. Also marked on the map are local towns:
Falmouth, Truro, Helston, Penzance, St Ives, Newquay, Bodmin, Wadebridge
and Padstow.

Page 17


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Four photographs on the page giving an overview of things to do at Fort House
and The Custodian’s House.

Image 1
Photograph showing Mevagissey Harbour. In the foreground are colourful fishing
boats with their reflections clear in the calm water. The stone buildings of the
town sit around the harbour with green hills in the background.

Image 2
Photograph of The Custodian’s House seen from the courtyard. The single storey
stone building has a slate roof and red picket gates. In the foreground is a grassy
slope; the sky is blue with thin white clouds.

Image 3
Photograph showing a corner of Fort House. The single storey building is
pebbledash painted grey. In the foreground are a variety of shrubs in the garden.
Beyond them is a view of the sea and the end of a headland. The sky is blue with
thin white clouds.

Image 4
Photograph showing a section of the South West Coastal Path. It leads through a
rocky bay with sandy inlets. The sea is rough with a breaking wave in the
foreground.


Pendennis Castle, Falmouth, Cornwall
Setting the scene

The most westerly of Henry VIII‟s chain of forts, Pendennis Castle stands proudly
on a rugged headland overlooking the entrance to the Fal. Built to guard
Cornwall from invasion, its central gun tower is the oldest part challenging all
comers for over four centuries. The Castle is said to have been last armed during
the English Civil War in the 1640s when the Royalists bravely stood out against a
five month siege. Later the castle fell into disrepair but in the late 18th and early
19th centuries the fortress was strengthened and new gun batteries, stores and
barracks were built. In 1939 Pendennis, with St.Anthony, became the main
harbour defence commanding the south Cornish coastline.

Photograph showing Pendennis castle. The stone gun tower has a red and white
flag flying from the top. It is surrounded by a lower stone wall with ramparts.
There is a green lawn in the foreground with daisies growing. A gun
emplacement is just visible. The sky is blue with a few white clouds.

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The Custodian‟s House
Pendennis Castle
Sleeps: 2 guests + cot Price
Band: C
Full week holidays start: Friday
Weekend 3 night breaks start: Friday
Midweek 4 night breaks start: Monday

One map of most of England, using a red symbol to highlight the location of
Pendennis Castle.

Pictograms representing the facilities in the house:
Max 2 well behaved dogs allowed
Travel cot
Highchair
TV
DVD
CD/DAB radio music system
Microwave
Fridge with freezer compartment
Dishwasher
Washer/Tumble dryer
Telephone
Hair Dryer
Within 1 mile of a pub
Within 1 mile of the sea

The floor plan shows the layout of the house.

On the doorstep

The Custodian‟s House is within the rampart walls of Pendennis Castle so guests
have every chance to start – here there is 450 years of hands on history! Henry
VIII‟s 16th-century castle stands in a prime position and visitors can see the
Governor‟s lodgings and relish the sights and sounds of a Tudor gun deck in
action. There are fine views from the Battery Observation Post and at the Half
Moon Battery it‟s possible to relive a World War II air raid in the underground
ammunition stores.

Single storey



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Entrance hall, living room with dining area, kitchen, double bedroom with en suite
bathroom with shower, toilet.

Outside

There is an enclosed and sheltered courtyard garden. Guests may bring their car
into the fortress for loading and unloading but are asked to park in the main
public car park which is about five minutes walk away. For disabled guests, for
those who require it, a car parking space will be allocated within the fortress.


Rievaulx Abbey, Rievaulx, North Yorkshire
Setting the scene

One of the most atmospheric of all the great ruined abbeys of the north, Rievaulx
Abbey, has a history dating back to the 12th-century.The Abbey reflected the
philosophy of Cistercian monastic life of the great abbot, St. Aelred: being self-
sufficient and far removed from other settlements. The Abbey‟s estates
expanded in the 12th-century until they were capable of sustaining the large
community living within the 92-acres originally enclosed within the precinct wall.
Rievaulx was still a vibrant community when it was dissolved by Henry VIII in
1538.Today it is an archaeological treasure and lives up to the description written
by St. Aelred over eight centuries ago „Everywhere peace, everywhere serenity,
and a marvellous freedom from the tumult of the world‟

Photograph of Rievaulx Abbey. A large part of the ruined stone abbey is still
standing although it has no roof or windows. In the foreground is a smooth grass
lawn that runs through the Abbey. A wooded hill can be seen in the background
through the ruins. The sky is blue with wispy clouds.

Rievaulx Abbey Cottage
Rievaulx Abbey
Sleeps 4 + Cot

Two maps show the location of the Rievaulx Abbey.

Map 1 is of the north of England. Using a red symbol to highlight the location of
Rievaulx Abbey.

Map 2 is a more detailed map showing the local area to Rievaulx Abbey. On the
map are marked the main roads and sites in the area: Rievaulx Abbey, Byland


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Abbey, Helmsley Castle, Pickering Castle, Mount Grace Priory, Whitby Abbey,
Scarborough Castle, Clifford’s Tower. Also marked on the map are local towns:
York, Leeds, Bradford and Kingston upon Hull.

Built in the early 20th Century for the Custodian of the Abbey, but using reclaimed
abbey stone, this cottage is a reminder of the original medieval masons who built
the Abbey. Their marks can still be seen on many of the blocks used in its
construction. Tucked into a corner of the car park, the cottage stands
conveniently close to the entrance to the Abbey and a short walk from the River
Rye.

On the doorstep

Rievaulx Abbey Cottage could hardly be more convenient for exploration of the
evocative and glorious ruins of Rievaulx Abbey. There is much to see including,
most importantly, the Church, one of the most elaborate Cistercian churches to
survive from the 12th and 13th-centuries. Of equal interest, but with a more
domestic bias, are the Refectory, dating back to 1190, and one of the most
magnificent examples of buildings of its type, and the Dormitory, a vast room
which housed up to 140 monks. There is also a fascinating exhibition – The
Works of

Days out

Helmsley Castle – spectacular ruins of a 12th-century castle on the edge of the
medieval market town of Helmsley

Pickering Castle – a well preserved castle used by a succession of medieval
kings as a royal hunting lodge

Mount Grace Priory – a 14th-century priory with a reconstructed monks cell and a
herb garden giving an insight into the lives of its medieval residents.

Clifford‟s Tower – the surviving keep of York‟s main medieval castle. An imposing
building where you can get superb views of the city of York.

York – with the magnificent Gothic York Minster, the Roman City Wall, the Jorvik
Viking Centre, National Railway Museum and shopping in the maze of medieval
streets known as The Shambles.

Walking – the North York Moors are a walkers paradise with miles of footpaths
over some of the most dramatic countryside in England.



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Visit our website www.english-heritage.org.uk/holidaycottages

Four photographs on the page giving an overview of things to do at Rievaulx
Abbey Cottage.

Image 1
Photograph showing the front of the cottage built from large stone blocks. The
wooden front door is painted white and there is a climber plant growing around
one of the windows.

Image 2
Photograph showing the inside of the National Railway Museum. It is in an old
station with a glazed roof and steel beams. On the platform is an old station clock
and a green steam train with carriages sitting alongside.

Image 3
Photograph of the North Yorkshire Moors. The fields are green with gorse
bushes and trees in patches; they are divided into a square grid. In the
foreground is a dry stone wall. There is a dark grey cloud in the blue sky which
casts a shadow over the moors.

Image 4
Photograph showing part of the front of York Minster. The stone building has tall
arched windows. At the top is a circular window with stone detailing in the shape
of a flower.

Rievaulx Abbey Cottage
Sleeps: 4 guests + cot Price
Band: B
Full week holidays start: Friday
Weekend 3 night breaks start: Friday
Midweek 4 night breaks start: Monday

Pictograms representing the facilities in the house:
Max 2 well behaved dogs allowed
Travel cot
Highchair
TV
DVD
CD/DAB radio music system
Microwave
Fridge with freezer compartment
Dishwasher


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Washer/Tumble dryer
Telephone
Hair Dryer
Barbeque

The 2 floor plans show the layout of the house.

Ground floor

Entrance hall, living room, and kitchen with dining area, utility room with toilet.

First floor

One double bedroom, one twin bedroom and bathroom with shower over bath.

Outside

The garden runs around the cottage and is bounded by a mature copper beech
hedge. The rear part of the garden is a good size and being screened is quite
private. Parking is next to the cottage in the main visitors‟ car park and there is a
visitor centre and a new tea room a short distance away.


Belsay Hall, Belsay, Northumberland
Setting the scene

Belsay is extraordinary. A medieval castle and a Greek revival house, linked by
an outstanding garden, and all the home of one family for over seven centuries.
The Middleton‟s connection with Belsay began in 1270 when the great tower that
still dominates the castle was built and extended into a rambling country house in
the reign of James I. Here the family lived until the new house was completed in
1817. Designed by Sir Charles Monck, who was obsessed by ancient Greece
and owned every book published on Greek architecture, the Hall is very clearly
inspired by his great love of ancient classical Greek temples. The garden is a fine
example of the Picturesque style fashionable in the 18th century.

Photograph showing the outside of Belsay Hall. The turreted stone castle sits
along side the ruins of a stone house which has no roof. There are gardens in
front with gravel paths. In the foreground is a grassy field with three sheep
grazing. There is a large tree to one side and the sky is blue.




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Field Hall Lodge, known locally as Lake Cottage
Belsay Hall
Sleeps 6 + cot

Two maps show the location of the Lodge.

Map 1 is of the north of England. Using a red symbol to highlight the location of
the Belsay Hall.

Map 2 is a more detailed map showing the local area to Belsay Hall. On the map
are marked the main roads and sites in the area: Belsay Hall, Prudhoe Castle,
Tynemouth Priory and Warkworth Castle. Also marked on the map are local
towns: Newcastle upon Tyne, Sunderland, Durham and Ashington.

Field Hall Lodge is certainly unusual. With its unexpected pillared and porticoed
front, it stands in splendid seclusion surrounded by fields and distant views to
Belsay Hall. This grade II listed cottage, designed by Sir Charles Monck, is from
the exterior at least a modest miniature of the hall itself and was used by the
Middleton family as a summer house.

On the doorstep

Visitors to Belsay in its heyday often remarked on its splendid location and the
warmth of its welcome. Little has changed. Although now unfurnished, there are
regular exhibitions in the Hall that continue to reflect the history of innovative
design. The Pillar Hall in the centre of the house is the architectural climax of
Belsay with all the family and domestic staff rooms built around it. The castle and
its addition, now largely ruined, can still be visited. The tower is particularly
impressive being one of the finest examples of a Peel Tower in Northumberland.
Grade 1 listed, the spectacular gardens are unsurpassed for their design and
planting.

Days out

Hadrian‟s Wall – the best preserved of all the fortified lines of the Roman Empire.
A World Heritage Site it spans 75 miles of English countryside.

Prudhoe Castle – a military stronghold, symbol of power and centre of a great
estate, this castle has been occupied continuously since the Norman Conquest.

Warkworth Castle – once home of the powerful Percy family, this castle standing
high above the River Coquet is one of the most impressive in England.


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Dunstanburgh Castle – dramatically located on a headland famous for its
seabirds, this 14th century castle has a gripping history of siege and conflict.

Alnwick Castle – set in a magnificent „Capability Brown‟ landscape, this is the
family home of the Duke of Northumberland.

Durham Cathedral – a part of a World Heritage Site and a place of prayer and
pilgrimage for over 900 years.

Northumberland coast – some of the country‟s most spectacular beaches and
best wildlife watching in the country can be found here.

Walking – this is one of the best ways to experience the true wild beauty of
Northumberland. Try St. Cuthberts Way between the Borders and Lindisfarne or
a part of the 73 mile Weardale Way that starts in the North Pennines.

Four photographs on the page giving an overview of things to do at Field Hall
Lodge.

Image 1
Photograph of the outside of the Lodge. It is built from sandy coloured stone with
small columns at one end. There is a chimney on the roof and a grass lawn in the
foreground. The sky is light blue with wispy white clouds.

Image 2
Photograph showing Dunstanburgh Castle sitting on a headland overlooking a
bay. The castle spreads across a grassy green slope with cliffs below. There are
small white waves breaking over the rocks in the bay.

Image 3
Photograph taken from the top of Hadrian’s Wall looking along its length. There is
an orange light from the evening sun which casts long shadows. The wall snakes
along the top of the craggy hills with black and white sheep scattered around.
The sky is clear blue with a white haze.

Image 4
Photograph of the outside of Durham Cathedral. The Cathedral is made of
different types of stone and there are two turreted towers. There are tall arched
windows running around the building and a green grass lawn in the foreground.

Field Hall Lodge
Sleeps: 6 guests + cot Price
Band: B


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Full week holidays start: Friday
Weekend 3 night breaks start: Friday
Midweek 4 night breaks start: Monday

Pictograms representing the facilities in the Lodge:
Max 2 well behaved dogs allowed
Travel cot
Highchair
Open fire
TV
DVD
CD/DAB radio music system
Microwave
Fridge with freezer compartment
Dishwasher
Washer/Tumble dryer
Telephone
Hair Dryer
Within 1 mile of a pub

The floor plan shows the layout of the Lodge.

Single storey

Entrance hall, kitchen with dining area, living room, two double bedrooms, one
with ensuite bathroom, twin bedroom, bathroom with shower over bath.

Outside

There is a small courtyard and a secluded, fenced garden. The cottage is
approached from a lane by a short private track. Belsay Hall is about a quarter of
a mile away.

Field Hall Lodge is managed and marketed by English Heritage on behalf of the
Belsay Trust. The interior design has not been led by the design team working
on our other cottages so is less contemporary than others in this brochure. The
style is traditional, very comfortable and still of 5 star standard. We regret that
the Lodge is not available for rental between 1 December and 28 January 2007
when it is in use by the Belsay Trust.

Photograph showing a shelf with some upright books and more in a pile next to
them. The corner of a picture on the wall above is just visible.



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Photograph showing a table set for breakfast. The crockery is all white sitting on
a white linen table cloth. There are two glasses of orange juice, a pot of tea, a full
cup of tea, a plate of brown toast, an eggcup with a boiled egg and some
newspapers and magazines. In the corner is a vase with purple flowers.


The Abbey Inn
Byland Abbey, North Yorkshire
Two maps show the location of Byland Abbey.

Map 1 is of the north of England. Using a red symbol to highlight the location of
Byland Abbey.

Map 2 is a more detailed map showing the local area to Byland Abbey. On the
map are marked the main roads and sites in the area: Rievaulx Abbey, Byland
Abbey, Helmsley castle, Pickering castle, Mount Grace Priory, Whitby Abbey,
Scarborough Castle, Clifford’s Tower. Also marked on the map are local towns:
York, Leeds, Bradford and Kingston upon Hull.

Once one of the greatest Cistercian Monasteries in the north and one of the
largest ecclesiastical buildings in Europe, Byland Abbey is an outstanding
example of early Gothic architecture. Its ruins, standing on the edge of the North
York Moors, are hauntingly beautiful and are testament to its former
magnificence.

Overlooking the Abbey and enjoying one of the best locations in the country is
the ancient Abbey Inn built in the early 19th- century – again by monks, but this
time of the Benedictine Order. Today it is an award-winning country inn with
three beautiful bedrooms. Owned and run by English Heritage it has been
renovated and refurbished and its bar and restaurant provides a special welcome
with huge open fireplaces, polished wood and flagstone floors and stripped deal
tables. The menu changes to reflect the seasons and availability of local
produce, winning well-deserved accolades for the restaurant.

Upstairs one bedroom has a four-poster bed, one half-tester and the other a
brass bed. All have ensuite bathrooms, televisions and videos and a private
dining table where guests can enjoy a romantic dinner or a leisurely breakfast.

Much of the success of the Abbey Inn lies in attention to detail: bowls of fresh
fruit are waiting in rooms on arrival, fragrant bath oils and enveloping bath robes
relax the weary traveller.

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Sustained by a full Yorkshire breakfast, there is plenty of exploring to be done:
Rievaulx Abbey, the walled city of York, the spa town of Harrogate and the
market town of Helmsley are all within easy driving distance. For walkers the
North York Moors are a paradise. Lots to explore with the knowledge that at the
end of the day a hot bath, delicious food and a good nights sleep awaits within
the shadows of the ruins of ancient Byland Abbey.

For reservations call 01347 868204 or for more information visit
www.bylandabbeyinn.com

Photograph showing the ruins of Byland Abbey. There is one wall remaining with
tall arched openings for windows. There is a dark cloud in the blue sky which
casts a shadow over the lawn in front of the Abbey.

Photograph of The Abbey Inn sitting at the junction of two roads. The two storey
stone building has green ivy growing all over it. There is a red sign over the front
door.


Essentials
Linen

All beds have duvets and will be made up with white linen for your arrival. Extra
blankets will be available. Two hypo-allergenic pillows are provided in each
cottage. One hand towel and one bath towel per person per week is provided.
Extra hand towels will be provided where there is a lavatory separate from bath
or shower rooms and in the kitchen. Sufficient tea towels will be provided in the
kitchen. Towels are not provided for swimming or beach use. We regret that linen
is not provided for cots.

Heating and Lighting

All electricity, gas and oil are included during your stay. We do ask that you
respect the use of these services.

Fuel for Fires

An open fire is an important part of a holiday in the country, particularly in the
cooler months. The availability of an open fire or a multi-fuel or wood-burning
stove is shown in our brochure / website. Where one is provided, you will find
matches, firelighters and sufficient wood or coal for the start of your stay.

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Information will be provided in the cottage on where to purchase additional
supplies.

Provisions and Supplies

On arrival there will be a welcome hamper that will include tea, coffee, milk,
bread, eggs, orange juice, marmalade or jam, cheese and a bottle of wine.
Where possible goods will be of local origin. A selection of English Heritage
toiletries will also be available including soap, shower or bath gel and body lotion.
Cleaning materials and toilet paper will also be provided.

Special Occasions

If you are making a holiday booking for a special occasion such as a birthday or
anniversary, please let us know at the time of booking. We have a range of gifts
that can be waiting for you in your holiday cottage, as a part of your celebration.
You can place an order through our reservation staff when making a booking. We
will do our very best to fulfil your request but this does not form part of our
contract with you.

Smoking

Smoking is not allowed in English Heritage holiday cottages. If you smoke
outside in the garden you are asked to dispose of used cigarette stubs carefully.

Guests with Disabilities

English Heritage is to adopt the Visit Britain National Accessible Scheme as it
develops its holiday cottage programme. Surveys will be conducted at each
property prior to renovation and an Access Statement will be produced. All
Housekeepers will be trained in the Welcome All programme. If you have special
requirements please discuss these with our reservation staff before making a
booking, so we can do our best to meet them.

Dogs

A maximum of 2 well behaved dogs are allowed at properties where indicated.
There is a charge of £20 per week/short break per dog. Please notify our
reservations staff at the time of booking that you will be bringing your dog/s with
you. No other pets or animals are permitted in English Heritage Holiday
Cottages.

Access and Location


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One of the many attractions of staying in an English Heritage holiday cottage is
their outstanding location and architectural interest. This can mean that access is
varied and may at times be over unmade roads, or that the interiors designed for
another age, are more irregular than modern buildings. For instance stairs may
be steeper or ceilings lower. We try to make any such points clear in our
brochures and on our website. But if you have any particular concerns in these
areas, please discuss them before booking. Extreme winter weather could make
some of our cottages difficult to reach. In these rare circumstances we will do our
best to notify you in advance.

Telephones / Messages

We aim to provide all cottages with card operated payphones where feasible.
Calls are charged but incoming and emergency calls are free. If you prefer to use
your mobile telephone please check signal strength with our reservation staff.
Our Housekeepers cannot receive or deliver messages to you during your stay
as most do not live on site.

Internet Access

Our aim is to offer wireless broadband where possible. In some cases there may
be an administration fee and you may be asked for a deposit to cover call
charges. Please ask for more information when booking.

English Heritage Property Visits

Where possible and subject to staff availability, guests will be offered a brief
introduction to the English Heritage site on which they are staying. This will cover
the key points of interest and a brief historical background. Details of how to
arrange this will be in the welcome folder in each cottage. Guests and English
Heritage members have free access to sites during opening hours. Guests will
also be given a discount voucher for use in English Heritage shops.

Events

Special events that are open to the public are held at many English Heritage
properties throughout the year. Depending on the location of your holiday
cottage, they will have more or less impact on your stay. We will always do our
very best to tell you about any event during your stay at the time of booking. If an
event is scheduled after you have made your booking, and it will impact on your
holiday, we will notify you and give you the option to cancel without charge. All



25
guests staying at a cottage whilst a public event is taking place will be given a
discounted or complimentary ticket during their stay.

Cancellation or Curtailment

Having to cancel or curtail your holiday can be very distressing. We do not offer
insurance cover as a part of our cottage rental programme but can refer you to
English Heritage‟s insurance partner, Endsleigh Insurance Services
www.endsleigh.co.uk/english-heritage or call 0800 0858836.

Country Life

Some English Heritage holiday homes are in very rural areas where sounds
created by the rural economy such as harvesting or haymaking, or by animals
can sometimes be heard, and at certain times late into the evening. Insects and
pests can be a nuisance at some times of year and even the best housekeeping
standards may not be able to totally eradicate these.


How to book
For reservations call 0870 3331187
Visit our website www.english-heritage.org.uk/holidaycottages

Opening times are: Monday to Friday 8.30 am to 5.30 pm Saturday 9.00 am to
5.00 pm Sunday and Public Holidays Closed

Discuss your cottage choice with our staff who will check availability for you.

You can make a booking by paying the deposit by credit or debit card.

OR

You can ask for the cottage to be held for you for 7 days whilst you talk to friends
or family. This provisional booking will be cancelled automatically if the deposit is
not paid within this 7 day period. Payment can be made either by telephone with
a credit or debit card, or by completing the booking form and enclosing a cheque
payable to English Heritage.

Full payment is due 8 weeks before your holiday start date. On receipt full details
of your cottage with directions, key collection and local contacts will be sent to
you.

Weekly prices Short breaks

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All prices are per cottage per week and include VAT at 17.50%. All full week
bookings begin on a Friday, except over Christmas and New Year when other
start days may apply. For bookings of two weeks or more, each
week will be priced as in the date bands above.

Supplements may be charged on certain cottages on specific dates where
demand is high due to a special event locally. English Heritage reviews its pricing
annually and may move cottages up or down in the price bands.

Short breaks

There are two lengths of short break: 3 nights starting on a Friday and 4 nights
starting on a Monday.

For Christmas and New Year short breaks can only be booked 4weeks in
advance but different start days may apply,

They are bookable up to two years in advance at most times of the year.
Exceptions are: Easter (April 14th to 20th), late Spring Bank Holiday (May 26th to
June 1st) and high season (June 30th to August 31st) when they can only be
booked 2 weeks in advance.

Key to facilities

Pictograms representing the facilities


Prices 2006-7
For reservations call 0870 3331187 Visit our website www.english-
heritage.org.uk/holidaycottages Or write to English Heritage, PO Box 569,
Swindon, SN2 2YP
Booking office opening times:
Monday to Friday 8.30 am to 5.30 pm Saturday 9.00 am to 5.00 pm Sunday and
Public Holidays Closed

Terms and Conditions of Booking
For the purposes of these Terms and Conditions, English Heritage means The
Historic Buildings and Monuments Commission for England of 23 Savile Row,
London W1S 2ET.

1.Agreement

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1.1 These terms and conditions which are printed in the Brochure form the basis
of the agreement between you and English Heritage for the holiday rental of the
Property named in the Invoice/Confirmation (“the Property”) together with all
other conditions set out in the Brochure.
1.2
By signing the Booking Form you agree that you are over 18 years of age and
that you accept full responsibility for all payments due and for the consequences
of any actions of all persons who will use the Property during your holiday. If
payment is made by credit/debit card by telephone, you will have deemed to
have read all the Booking Conditions and agreed to be bound by them.

2.Booking
2.1 English Heritage will confirm the booking on receipt of the Booking Form and
a deposit of one third of the holiday rental fee (“the Deposit”).
2.2 Once English Heritage has confirmed the booking from you and has received
the Deposit then an agreement exists between us on these terms and conditions.
2.3 English Heritage will accept a provisional booking and reserve the Property
for your holiday provided that we receive the Deposit from you within 7 working
days.
2.4 f the holiday is due to start within 8 weeks of the date of booking the total of
the holiday rental fee is payable at the time of booking.
2.5 No subsequent changes may be made to any part of the Booking Form
without English Heritage‟s express written approval.

3. Final Payment

3.1 The balance of the holiday rental fee less any Deposit will become due 8
weeks before the start of the holiday. English Heritage will not send you a
reminder or a receipt unless you have requested one and sent us a stamped
addressed envelope at the time of booking. If the balance is not received on time
English Heritage reserves the right to cancel your booking and retain the Deposit.
3.2 English Heritage‟s prices contain VAT where appropriate. If VAT rates
change we reserve the right to amend our prices accordingly.

4. Cancellation

4.1 You may cancel your booking at any time provided you do so in writing to
English Heritage but you will remain liable for the full balance of the holiday rental
fee. English Heritage will seek to re-let the Property for all or part of the booking
period and, if successfully, will refund the money paid by you less an
administration charge of £40.00.



28
4.2 English Heritage reserves the right to re-let at a discount or for a shorter
period in which case we will pay the refund or a proportion of it if the Property is
re-let for a shorter period, less the discount and administration charge.
4.3 English Heritage does not operate any scheme of cancellation or travel
insurance and you should obtain your own insurance cover for the holiday.
4.4 English Heritage reserves the right to cancel the booking any time in the
event of circumstances beyond the reasonable control of English Heritage or if in
the reasonable opinion of English Heritage it is necessary to undertake essential
works at the Property. In these unlikely circumstances English Heritage will
endeavour to offer a suitable alternative English Heritage holiday. If no such
alternative holiday is agreed between us then English Heritage will refund in full
all money received by us for the booking. English Heritage will not otherwise be
liable for any loss incurred by you as a result of the cancellation.

5.Change of Booking

5.1 English Heritage will endeavour to assist you in a transfer of a booking to an
alternative property or an alternative date at your request and an administrative
charge of £40 will be made in such a case in addition to any increased rent due
on the alternative property.
5.2 Changes cannot be accepted within one month of the start date of the
holiday. If a change results in a reduction in the length of the holiday it will be
regarded as a cancellation.

6. Occupation of the Property

6.1 You must not use the Property for any purpose other than that of a holiday.
6.2 The number of people staying in the Property must not exceed the maximum
number stated in the brochure and the use of tents or sleeping in motor vehicles
adjacent to the Property is not permitted.
6.3 You must not use the Property for any activity or in such a way as to cause
nuisance or annoyance to English Heritage, its visitors or its neighbours.
6.4 You and your guests must comply with any reasonable regulations relating to
the Property, or the site within which the Property is situated, which will be
communicated to you on your arrival at the Property.

7. Your Obligations

7.1 You agree to keep the Property and its contents in the same condition and
repair as on your arrival at the Property and to pay to English Heritage upon
written demand any costs incurred in making good any loss or damage to the
Property or its contents caused by your action or omission or that of any guest or
animal accompanying you.


29
7.2 No pet is permitted at a property other than two well behaved dogs at those
properties indicated in the brochure. You must keep dogs off furniture and under
proper control at all times. A charge of £20 per week or short break is made for
each dog (guide dogs or hearing dogs are excepted). If you use a guide dog or a
hearing dog and wish to stay at one of our properties where dogs are not
normally permitted, please discuss with our reservation staff, who will make
every effort to accommodate your needs within localised property restrictions.
7.3 You must allow anyone authorised by English Heritage to enter the Property
during the holiday. English Heritage will endeavour to give you reasonable notice
of such a visit except in an emergency when immediate access must be allowed.
7.4 You must ensure that the Property is left in a clean and tidy condition on your
departure at the end of your holiday. English Heritage may make a charge for
any additional cleaning if this is considered necessary.

8. English Heritage‟s Right to Refuse/Terminate

8.1 English Heritage reserves the right to refuse any booking.
8.2 English Heritage reserves the right to terminate this Agreement and ask you
and your guests to leave immediately if this is deemed necessary by English
Heritage as a result of your behaviour or that of your guests or any other material
breach by you of the terms of this Agreement.

9. Arrival and Departure

9.1 The holiday rental period begins at 3.00pm on the first day of the booking
period and ends at 10.00am on the day of the departure. If your stay extends
beyond this period you may be subject to a charge for the additional days.

10. Description and facilities

10.1 English Heritage will endeavour to inform you at the time of booking of any
changes to the brochure or web site description of the Property or of any events
which may be taking place at its site near the Property during your holiday.
English Heritage does not accept any liability for any works or activity of any sort
occurring on its premises adjoining or neighbouring the Property.

11. Tenancy

11.1 This Agreement is for the purposes of a holiday rental only and does not
create the relationship of Landlord and Tenant between you and English
Heritage. You will not be entitled to a tenancy or to any other form of statutory
security of tenure as a result of this Agreement.



30
12. Complaint

12.1 If you have any cause for complaint during your holiday at the Property
please notify the Housekeeper who will make all reasonable efforts to assist and
resolve the issue. English Heritage will not normally make any refund or
recompense in respect of a complaint made after departure if the complaint was
not made known to the Housekeeper during the holiday rental period

13 Lost Property

13.1 English Heritage shall not be responsible for loss or damage to any of your
belongings or for any injuries sustained by you or any of your guests unless
caused by the negligence or default of English Heritage.

14. Data Protection

All personal data provided to English Heritage will be held and processed in
accordance with the requirements of the 1998 Data Protection Act. We will keep
your personal data safe and secure. We will not share it with other organisations
without your knowledge and consent, unless required by law to do so.

English Heritage champions England‟s historic environment for the people of
today and for future generations


Cover: View from bedroom at Fort House, St Mawes, page 14 Product code:
22926




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