Classical Kids by P-IndependentPublish

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Travel back in time to see what life was like in ancient Greece and Rome while having fun with hands-on activities such as making a star gazer; chiseling a clay tablet; weaving Roman sandals; making a Greek mosaic; creating Roman jewelry; throwing Greek pottery; casting a vote in a Roman-style election; and much more. Learn how these civilizations contributed to our present-day world by participating in art, math, cooking, science, and geography activities. Interesting facts and trivia are included throughout. Helpful illustrations explain project steps.

More Info
									Classical Kids
Author: Laurie Carlson
Table of Contents

Time Line

THE ACE OF GREECE
Map of Ancient Greece
Epic Poetry
Dress Up Greek
Chiton
Peplos
Himation
Shoes
Hair
Hats
Greek Beauty
Birthstones
Stone Pendant

Eating Greek
Asparagus
Spinach Triangles
Mini Pizzas
Baked Fish in Grape Leaves
Roasted Chicken
Sesame Circles
Greek Slaves

The Arts
Greek Theater
Aesop's Fables
Make a Mask
Pandora's Box
Sculpt a Statue
What a Relief!
Paper Mosaic
Seed and Bean Mosaic Coaster
Pottery

Learning
Reading and Writing
Clay Tablet
Numbers Are Everything!
Triangular Numbers
Sieve of Eratosthenes
Magic Square
Platonic Bodies
Magic Pentacle
Make a Globe
Night and Day
Make a Constellarium
Planetary Model
Solar System Mobile
The Secret of the Moving Coin
Specific Gravity

Spinning and Weaving
Spin Some Cotton
Make and Use a Drop Spindle
Weave a Round Mat
String Art
String an Angle
String a Circle
Seven Wonders of the World
Simple Pulley
Olympiad
The Beginning of the End


THE AGE OF ROME
Map of Ancient Rome
Dress Up Roman
Toga
Stola
Palla
Makeup
Make Sandals
Beaded Bracelet
Earrings
Disappearing Eggshell
Bath Time!
Bath Oil
Dinner Roman Style
Artichokes
Bean Salad
Crustulum
Olive Rolls
Cinnamon Raisin Rolls
Bread in a Bag

Roman Army
Make a Standard
Papier-Mache Roman Army Helmet
Make a Catapult
Slingshot
Papier-Mache Elephant
Keep a Secret: Ciphers
Slaves

Counting and Measuring
Coins
Make Coins
Coin Rubbings
Roman Calendar
Roman Numerals
Abacus
How Far Was That? Make a Hodometer
How Do You Measure Up?

Home Sweet Home
It's All Downhill—Build an Aqueduct
Roman Merchant Ship Model
Weave a Mini Basket
Weave a Maximus Basket
Wreaths or Crowns?
Wax Tablets
Crayon Engraving
Games
Micatio
Odd or Even
Jacks
Dice
Trigon
Making Latin Small Talk
Give a Reading

Volcano Alert!
Build a Volcano

The End

Bibliography
Index
Description

Travel back in time to see what life was like in ancient Greece and Rome while having fun with hands-on
activities such as making a star gazer; chiseling a clay tablet; weaving Roman sandals; making a Greek
mosaic; creating Roman jewelry; throwing Greek pottery; casting a vote in a Roman-style election; and
much more. Learn how these civilizations contributed to our present-day world by participating in art,
math, cooking, science, and geography activities. Interesting facts and trivia are included throughout.
Helpful illustrations explain project steps.
Excerpt

Chapter 1: The Ace of GreeceDress Up GreekThe Greeks wore simple, loose-fitting clothing. They didn't
want to restrict the body with tight garments, and they wanted to show off the grace and beauty of their
physically fit bodies. It was a very warm climate, and keeping cool was more important than staying
warm. Women wove the cloth in their homes. The type of yarns used in the weaving depended on the
family's wealth and status. The rich wore linen; the poor and those living in the colder regions of the north
wore wool. No one threw out a garment until it wore out. The Greek styles were popular for more than four
hundred years and then were copied by the Romans, so there were no
fashion trends to keep up with.CHITON
Men wore a chiton, an oblong piece of cloth mostly worn draped around the body with a hole in one side
to put one's arm through. The two ends of the open side were fastened over the other shoulder with a
button or clasp. A free citizen (only boys whose parents were both citizens could become citizens) wore
a chiton that fastened at both shoulders. Workmen, artisans, and slaves wore a chiton with one hole for
the left arm; the right arm and half of the chest remained uncovered.In Greece, you could tell what social
class someone belonged to just by looking at his garment. What about underwear? There wasn't any but
women did wrap a linen cloth tight around their waists to look thinner.PEPLOS
Women wore a dress called a peplos, which was a narrow, ankle-length tunic that doubled over at the
shoulders to create a loose top that hung to the waist. It fastened at the shoulders with long straight pins.
A peplos was often made in a bright color with a decorative border. HIMATION
The himation was a sort of cloak in a large square shape that was worn by both men and women. How
gracefully one draped one's himation showed style and social status. Tiny weights were sewn in the hem
of the himation so it would drape elegantly.SHOES
Greeks wore sandals, some with thick soles to make men taller, some with a lot of jewels for rich ladies.
Greeks took off their sandals before going inside a house, but to make things even easier,they all went
barefoot most of the
time.HAIR
Greek women wore simple hairstyles: long hair tied up in the back with a band that crossed the brow or
parted in the center and pulled back into a bun. They liked curly hair and used curling irons to make
pretty hairdos. They also used oils and hair dressings to style their hair.
Men wore short haircuts because long-flowing tresses could be grabbed by an enemy on the battlefield.
As warfare grew less important, men allowed their hair to grow longer; sometimes it was braided and
pinned up at the sides or back.HATS
Queens and goddesses wore
coronets or diadems; other women wore scarves, simple veils,or hairnets to hide their hair. Men seldom
wore hats, but travelers wore a large-brimmed hat that looked sort of like a cowboy hat arid hung on the
back from a cord around the neck.GREEK BEAUTY
The Greeks paid a lot of attention to how their bodies looked. To keep in shape,
men...
Author Bio
Laurie Carlson
Laurie Carlson is the author of Colonial Kids, Westward Ho!, More Than Moccasins, Green Thumbs, and
Kids Camp! She has taught preschool, primary grades, and children’s art classes. She lives in Cheney,
Washington.<br/>
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