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Join the Resolve to Fight Poverty

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									    Join the Resolve to Fight
            Poverty!




   Host the National Hunger
     and Homelessness
      Awareness Week
A joint project of the Student PIRGs National Student Campaign Against Hunger and Homelessness and
the National Coalition for the Homeless
The Resolve to Fight Poverty
We can live in a world where everyone has a roof over their head, enough food to eat and access to
clean drinking water. Unfortunately, despite some advances we’re far from this vision. Students get this
and are taking action. We’re volunteering, raising funds and getting involved in our communities. Now it’s
time to take our action to the next level.

To do that, we’re launching the Resolve to Fight Poverty, a national movement of students doing what it
takes to eliminate poverty. Working from coast to coast, students will be raising funds and necessities to
address people’s immediate needs to raising awareness and support for long term solutions on the local,
national and international level.

Students and organizations that are joining the Resolve to Fight Poverty will be taking all sorts of action—
holding awareness and education events, holding fundraisers, volunteering with shelters and advocating
for new and expanded anti-poverty programs. While we’ll be working at all different levels—from
neighborhood issues to global crises, we’ll be united together is a shared commitment to doing what we
can to fight poverty.

The National Student Campaign Against Hunger and Homelessness will help by connecting student
leaders to national efforts and resources, by keeping everyone up to date on the issues and by making
sure national leaders—from members of Congress to the media to foundations—know about the work
students are doing across the country.

This fall, we’re kicking that movement off with the National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week,
A joint project of the Student PIRGs National Student Campaign Against Hunger and Homelessness and
the National Coalition for the Homeless.

National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week: November 15-21, 2009

As the Thanksgiving holiday approaches, many people in the country will be facing harder times than they
have in years. According to the National Coalition for the Homeless, there are an estimated 3.5 million
homeless persons in the United States, and the number is increasing.

Now, as people are considering what they are thankful for, is the perfect time to make sure we’re
educating people and raising awareness of the problems of hunger and homelessness.

Every year, in the spirit of Thanksgiving and education, the National Coalition for the Homeless and the
National Student Campaign Against Hunger and Homelessness co-sponsor National Hunger and
Homelessness Awareness Week, one week prior to Thanksgiving. During this week, schools,
communities and cities throughout the nation endeavor to bring a greater awareness to the issues of
hunger and homelessness.

Participating in National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week not only raises awareness and
promotes ending hunger and homelessness in your community, but also strengthens the national
endeavor to end hunger and homelessness. The struggles faced by those that lack a home are often
lonely and certainly difficult. Bringing attention to the plight of the homeless by participating in this week of
awareness may foster greater understanding and solidarity.

What

Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week is a week-long series of events designed to educate your
community, draw attention to the problems of poverty and build a great base of volunteers and supporters
for you campaign throughout the year. Many campuses will also use the events as fundraisers too.

This year, campuses will also be announcing that they’re joining the Resolve to Fight Poverty by seeking
endorsements of campus and community VIP’s and holding press conferences. These events will not
only serve as a good kickoff to your group’s work for the campaign, but will also create an easy way to
identify influential people that can help you to fight poverty in your community.

How to

Register your event
        First, let us know that you’ll be hosting an awareness week. You can register online at
        http://www.studentsagainsthunger.org/awareness-week/register or send an email to us at
        info@studentsagainsthunger.org.

         Registering your event helps us to show that there’s a national movement of students doing what
         it takes to eliminate poverty in their community—helping to maximize the impact you have locally.
         It also lets our organizing team keep in touch, letting you know about great events and ideas
         students have in other areas and the latest updates on poverty nationally.

         Don’t worry if you are only planning one or two events during the awareness week—often nailing
         a couple of events will be more effective than trying to fill every day.

Build a team
         To pull off a great week, you’ll need a lot of people helping to pull the events off. Among the
         things that will need to be done: scheduling space, publicizing events, contacting the media,
         finding and preparing speakers, recruiting students to attend, creating materials for the event, etc.

         Along with getting the volunteers in your own organization excited to throw a great awareness
         week, you should also outreach to other groups on campus. They will often have their own pool
         of volunteers to recruit from, access to other great speakers and even resources to help pull the
         events off. Here are some ideas of groups to approach:
          • Community Service Organizations—when it comes to hunger and homelessness issues,
              campus community service groups are great partners. Work with community service
              coordinators to organize service projects including shelter visits.
          • Campus Ministry/Religious Groups--Very often, religious groups are already planning events
              on campus for Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week. Ask religious groups to
              organize a clothing, food, or book drive. Ask the campus minister to lead a sermon on
              hunger and homelessness issues.
          • Fraternity/Sorority -- Work with philanthropy chairs at Greek houses, to get their sorority or
              fraternity houses to adopt the Week as one of their annual service events. Organize a
              contest between houses, e.g. who can get the most volunteers to participate in the Fast or
              Sleep Out, who can raise the most money by selling tickets to the Hunger Banquet or who
              can collect the most canned food.
          • Student Government -- Student government groups may have the ability to issue a
              proclamation declaring this Hunger and Homelessness Week on campus, supply funding for
              printing posters or other materials, provide volunteer or staff time to help organize the Week,
              or fund a guest speaker or film.
          • Dorms/Residence Halls -- The Fast is a great way for dorm students to participate. Because
              there are many people living under the same roof, use existing systems of communication to
              get students involved -- speak at dorm meetings, table at the dining hall dinner line to get
              people to commit to the Fast, etc. You can also create competitions between dorm floors or
              halls.
          • Newspaper/Campus Media -- The newspaper and radio station can donate free ad or public
              service announcement space, cover your events as news, and editorialize about the issues
              of hunger and homelessness and the importance of getting involved. They can also
              cosponsor an event; for example, the radio station can cosponsor a benefit concert and
              broadcast from the event.
          • Ethnic Minority Organizations -- Ask them to organize a particular event -- maybe something
              specific to their community -- and/or to involve their membership in some of the events of the
              week.
         •   Art/Photography Club or Class -- Sponsor an art or photography exhibit or contest on hunger
             and/or homelessness.
         •   Sports Teams -- The basketball team can sponsor a free throw contest or Hoops Against
             Hunger. Football team members can make an announcement at halftime and encourage
             people to make a donation as cans are passed around or left by refreshment stands. Any
             team can offer a discount ticket price to people who bring canned food or clothing to a
             game. Also, on many campuses, sports stars are campus celebrities who will increase
             attendance and media coverage if they attend your event or endorse it with their photo on
             your posters.
         •   Program or Activities Board -- This group can help arrange a major speaker or film on
             hunger and homelessness or help to organize a benefit concert.
         •   Faculty -- Professors can sponsor interns to get course credit for organizing the week,
             announce events to class members, or speak at events themselves. Faculty members will
             often have useful contacts in the larger community, as well. On many campuses, faculty
             members are an untapped resource with lots of potential.

Build Your Leadership Team
        For a large series of events, it’s important to delegate out leadership roles. This will help build
        leadership skills within your group and make sure that no one person has too much on their plate.
        Students who have run successful Weeks in the past suggest the following leadership positions.
        This structure is based on a Week including the Oxfam Fast, Sleep Out, and a letter writing
        advocacy campaign.
         • Hunger and Homelessness Week Coordinator - This person works with the project leaders
             below and chairs the overall meetings.
         • Sleep Out Coordinator -- This person is the overall coordinator for all details of the Sleep
             Out and works with the following project leaders:
         • Recruitment Coordinator -- This coordinator and committee are responsible for recruiting
             groups and individuals to sleep out and following-up with them on fundraising.
         • Logistics Coordinator -- This committee makes specific arrangements for the Sleep Out,
             such as reserving the campus quad, inviting speakers, and lining up food.
         • Visibility Coordinator -- This committee is responsible for designing and putting up posters,
             banners, and displays to publicize the fast; getting coverage in the media; and speaking at
             dorm meetings or in classes to publicize the event.
         • Fast Coordinator -- Same project structure as the Sleep Out with Recruitment, Logistics, and
             Visibility Coordinators and Committees.
         • Advocacy Coordinator -- Same as above.
         • Media / Publicity -- You might want to have one group that is in charge of publicizing the
             week in general and working with each project group to generate coverage.

Publicize Your Week
        Publicity is critical to a successful hunger and homelessness awareness week. Not only will it
        help you recruit more people to come out to your events and learn about the problems of poverty
        in your community, but it can also do a lot to educate people in itself. Ideas for publicity:
         • Posters
         • Flyers
         • Chalking
         • Facebook events, messages, wall posts, status messages, profile pictures
         • Emails to listserves
         • Announcements in classes, other events and group meetings

Get media attention
       Be sure to include media outreach as part of any project. It can be an educational tool itself.
       Media coverage enables you to reach many more people than those who you speak to at the
       table or who attend your event. Be creative and thorough in media outreach. Ask the campus
       paper to dedicate a full page or section to the issues of hunger and homelessness during the
        Week. Campus radio and TV stations can be helpful in making public service announcements as
        well. Approach the media about writing articles and taking pictures of your events. Creative
        displays and lots of volunteers will make your events more worthy of photographs. Invite them to
        come with you on a volunteer trip to a local shelter or agency and urge them to write about the
        program and volunteer opportunities. (Be sure to ask for the permission of the shelter director
        first.) Another idea is to have group members write letters to the editor about the problems of
        hunger and homelessness and what students are doing about it.

Event ideas
Below is a list of suggested events for National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week. Please feel
free to develop new activities for your unique community. If your idea is a great success, please let us
know so that we can share your event with other communities!
    • Sign students and VIP’s (think campus administrators, City Council members, the Mayor, local
         legislators, Business Owners) on as supporters of the Resolve to Fight Poverty. Hold a news
         conference to announce the campaign launch.
    • Host a “Faces of Homelessness” educational panel. Invite speakers, such as homeless persons
         to share their experiences, service providers and community speakers. Show videos and
         distribute fact sheets or other informational material (refer to the National Coalition for the
         Homeless’ website: www.nationalhomeless.org).
    • Organize a “One Night Without a Home” awareness sleep out on campus or in front of city hall.
         (See the detailed description included later in this packet).
    • Organize Oxfam America’s Hunger Banquet in your community to take place during Awareness
         Week. (See the detailed description included later in this packet).
    • Organize an “Empty Bowls” fundraiser (see the detailed description later in this packet).
    • Organize a fundraiser:
              o Sponsor a benefit concert with local musicians. Donate collected money to a local
                  shelter.
              o Arrange a walk or a run. Have each participant collect sponsorship money; set a
                  minimum, such as $20 per participant. Donate collected money to a local shelter.
                  Encourage local businesses to donate food and drinks. Encourage local bands to provide
                  entertainment.
              o Designate one day for community members to skip a meal. Instead of purchasing lunch
                  that day, they can donate the money that they would have spent to hungry people in your
                  community.
              o Host a talent show or talent competition—think dance off, karaoke off, “Guitar Hero,”
                  “Rock Band” or similar. Use the ticket sales as a fundraiser or ask people to donate
                  canned goods to get in.
    • Arrange a Community Service Day where people can volunteer at different local organizations
         and learn about their activities. Suggested contacts: food pantries, homeless shelters, and soup
         kitchens.
Faces of the Homeless Panel
One powerful educational event that has become immensely popular on campuses across the country
and at the Campaign's Fall Conference is the Faces of Homelessness Panel.

A Faces Panel provides an opportunity for dialogue between homeless or formerly homeless persons
with those who want to learn more about homelessness. The Panel members speak about their
experiences and answer questions from the audience. The Panel is typically made up of 4 people of
different ages, ethnicities, backgrounds and gender who all have one thing in common--they are either
currently or have in the past been homeless. Having the panel members share their experiences of
hunger and homelessness helps the audience make a personal connection, and learn more about what
causes people to become hungry and homeless, stereotypes about homeless people, the challenges they
face, and (for the formerly homeless) how they got out of the situation.

This event brings awareness to the community and can provide your organization with deeper insight into
what programs may be effective in helping those who are homeless.

How To:
   1. Contact one or two local homeless shelters. Tell them about the purpose of the panel and ask if
      they know of any clients who would be interested in participating.
   2. Compile a diverse group of 4 panel members. The more diverse the personal stories are, the
      more valuable it will be to your audience.
   3. Arrange for a classroom or auditorium where you can hold the panel discussion and audio and
      visual equipment that you may need.
   4. Publicize the event using leaflets, class announcements and tabling.
   5. At the event, give each speaker 8-10 minutes to introduce themselves and tell the story about
      how they became homeless. Have a facilitator to introduce the speakers, keep track of time, and
      keep the discussion moving.
   6. After all the speakers are finished, hold a discussion period where the audience can comment on
      the stories or ask panel members questions.

Tips for Recruiting Homeless People as Speakers:
    1. If you know homeless people who would like to speak, ask them directly.
    2. Send letters to your local shelters asking them if someone from their shelter would like to speak.
        It’s good to get a few “success stories” of people who are no longer homeless, as well as stories
        of people who are currently homeless. If you contact the shelter, you need to make follow-up calls
        to make sure the speakers will come. Sometimes shelters are not willing to let their clients speak.
        Shelters that house women fleeing domestic abuse, families, or youth, often want their clients to
        concentrate on their own problems and are sometimes overly protective. If possible, organize a
        diverse group of speakers (age, race, sex, homeless/formerly homeless).
    3. Make sure to arrange transportation for your speakers; this can include giving them bus/cab fare
        or simply picking them up. Sometimes the shelter will assign a staff member/volunteer to
        transport the client to and from the event.
    4. Make sure to contact the shelter and inform them that a resident will be speaking on your
        campus, and ensure that the speaker(s) will not lose their beds for the night if they return late.
    5. Check with the shelter you’re working with about whether it would be appropriate to compensate
        the homeless/formerly homeless speakers with an honorarium: $35-$50 is a typical amount for
        local speakers.

Other Ideas
   1. Make sure to get the community and campus media to cover the event. Ideally, take pictures or
        videotaping the panel.
   2. To get the speakers started, meet with them beforehand and ask that they address the following
        in their talk: if they are formerly homeless — what their life was like before homelessness, what
        their life was like while they were homeless, what brought them out of homelessness, and how
        their life is currently. If the speakers are currently homeless, have them share what their life was
       like before homelessness, what it is like to be homeless, and what are their hopes and dreams
       are for the future. Ideally, each speaker should talk for 10-15 minutes.
    3. Take questions from the floor. Let the audience know that no question is too stupid or
       embarrassing. You should mention that some speakers will get a little emotional or riled up if
       posed with certain questions. Expect tears when people are asked about their
       contact/relationships with family. Francine, a speaker for the National Coalition for the
       Homeless, invited a student to give her a hug after the student said, with tears running down her
       face, that she was sorry that her mother gave her the wrong perception of homeless people.
       Another speaker, John, wrote a song about being homeless and not one eye in a room is dry
       after it is performed.
    4. Find a moderator to introduce the speakers. This moderator should be someone that knows
       about homelessness on a local or national level. It is sometimes hard for homeless people to
       relate to people with homes, and vice versa. Therefore, it is necessary for the moderator to act as
       a bridge between the two. The moderator can also interject statistics and other important
       information in between the stories of the speakers. Generally, the moderator is a local advocate
       who is working with a local homeless organization.
    5. The National Coalition for the Homeless has three videos/DVDs available. Adding a short
       screening to your event can also be a helpful addition.
       • The highly regarded "Faces of Homelessness I" video features images of America’s
            homeless people. This 13-minute video (VHS or DVD) features images taken by award-
            winning photographers from around the country accompanied with powerful homeless-
            themed music that enables the viewer to get a sense of who is homeless in America. Cost:
            $20 (includes S&H).
       •     “Faces of Homelessness II” DVD was done by a trio of student filmmakers who interviewed a
            number of homeless people in the nation's capital. (DVD only). Cost: $20 (includes S & H).
       •     “The National Coalition for the Homeless: Bringing America Home” DVD was sponsored by
            the Homewood Suites by Hilton. A short documentary that outlines the history and promotes
            the work of the National Coalition for the Homeless. Contact the National Coalition for the
            Homeless for more information if you wish to obtain a copy.

For more information, contact Michael O’Neill with the National Coalition for the Homeless at
(202) 462-4822 x222 or moneill@nationalhomeless.org
“One Night Without a Home” Awareness Sleep Out
The “One Night Without a Home” Awareness Sleep Out takes place nationally during Awareness Week.
The “One Night” is an opportunity for residents to spend a night outside to discuss, think, and learn about
homelessness. Although one night outside can in no way simulate homelessness, this awareness-raising
activity can promote advocacy, protest, and education.

Sleep Outs are events where a number of participants choose to sleep outside (or in a large room)
overnight to form a community exchange of ideas, goals, and facts. They are creative tools for advocacy,
fundraising, protest, education, or a combination of these. The Sleep Out could incorporate a graphic
display communicating the urgency of the problem of homelessness, a teach-in on the causes of
homelessness, or call upon elected officials to take a stand on the issue. The event should be an
opportunity to educate and recruit more volunteers for ongoing community action.

Duration
Approximately 12 hours, beginning at 7 PM and running until 7 AM the next morning.

How to
Set your goals and plan. Determine with your committee:
     • Who you want to invite to participate--other campus groups, speakers from the community,
        homeless or formerly homeless people.
     • How many participants you want.
     • What the primary purpose(s) of the event is -- educational, fundraiser, etc.
     • How much money to raise and where to donate it.
Confirm the date for the event and set a week-to-week plan working backwards from the date which
includes a plan for logistics, visibility, recruitment, program and fundraising.

Establish Committee leaders and plans for the following committees:
    • Logistics:
            o Choose a site central to student activities. Take care of logistics right away. You will have
                to get permission for an overnight event and check in with campus security, plus arrange
                for portable toilets or access to facilities.
            o Local businesses can donate food, supplies, or money.
            o Have fact sheets ready to give to participants and passersby.
    • Program:
            o Have community leaders, homeless people, students, and/or professors speak at the
                event. Music is a great way to bring people together. Arrange for a local musician who
                sings about the issues to come or encourage people to bring their acoustic instruments.
            o Prepare good discussion topics.
            o Starting the night with a vigil or march will draw people and attention.
            o Have a time for reflection the next morning so participants can share their experiences
                and thoughts. This is important for every event you organize.
    • Recruitment:
            o Begin early to recruit participants through tables, class raps, and other groups.
            o Be sure to contact other groups to cosponsor the event.
            o Have Food Not Bombs or a local group serve a meal for the homeless folks who join you.
                Contact local shelters or homeless advocates about bringing homeless people to
                campus. You will want to have some amount of control over who attends and/or have
                people there who are experienced with problems that may arise.
            o Be strict about a No Drug or Alcohol policy and other necessary rules. Be sure
                participants know about these beforehand and that the rules are posted at the event.
            o Be sure to pass around a sign-up sheet so you can contact participants for future events.
                Use the event to recruit and inspire volunteers to participate beyond the Sleep Out in
                events that help solve the problems of hunger and homelessness (e.g. letter writing,
                joining your group, participating in community service events, etc.).
    • Visibility:
       o Hand out flyers announcing the Sleep Out to actively recruit people to participate.
       o Put up posters and banners.
       o Contact local radio stations to run public service announcements.
       o Be sure to invite the campus and community media.
•   Fundraising:
       o Contact businesses for donations.
       o Get volunteers to gather pledges for each hour they sleep out to donate to local, national,
           international groups.
The Oxfam America Hunger Banquet
Today an estimated 840 million people -- one in five persons -- are chronically hungry. Yet, more than
enough food is grown to feed everyone. It is the unequal distribution of resources --not lack of food-- that
is at the root of world hunger. The Hunger Banquet dramatizes this inequity.

Only a few people will leave this unusual banquet with satisfied stomachs. Though most will receive little
to eat, all will go away filled with new understanding about the problem of world hunger.

The Hunger Banquet works best with at least 60 people. Banquets of several hundred people are
becoming increasingly common, and some banquets have drawn nearly a thousand people. The more
guests, the more effective the demonstration.

Overview
A large meal is prepared and divided among the guests in proportions that represent the earnings of
people who live in the world’s high, middle and low-income countries. By random drawing, Hunger
Banquet guests end up in one of three groups. Fifteen percent of participants represent the high-income
countries and enjoy a gourmet meal with all the trimmings. Thirty percent eat a simple meal of rice with
beans or broth. Fifty-five percent represent the majority of people who live in low income countries; this
group shares rice and water. The Hunger Banquet demonstrates the inequities of living conditions among
people throughout the world; it doesn’t give precise measures of hunger or numbers of hungry people.

How to:
   • Raise funds -- Charge an admission price or simply raise donations. Invite local businesses or
        community groups to buy tables at the banquet or cosponsor the event to defray any expenses,
        and ask local restaurants and markets to donate food.
   • Set the stage -- Consider holding the Banquet in a public area, such as a cafeteria, community
        hall, or the lobby of the student union. Set up a special table to distribute educational materials
        available from Oxfam America. Designate seating for the different income groups. Go all out for
        the wealthiest 15 percent; use table cloths, candles, china and silverware. Arrange plain, bare
        tables or benches for the middle-income 30 percent. Have the poorest 55 percent sit on the floor
        and eat without utensils. Consider having everyone share from a single bowl.
   • Assign Roles -- As guests arrive, have them pull a ticket out of a hat or bowl. By the color or
        number, they will know in which group they belong. If more people show up, unexpectedly, direct
        them to Group Three, so that most people will end up in the low income group.
   • Educate -- Use the event as an educational tool. Host speakers to talk about the issues of hunger
        or show slideshows or videos. Encourage members of the group to discuss their experiences and
        feelings. As always, be sure to have a clear opportunity for participants to sign up to volunteer
        after the end of the Banquet.

For more background, including scripts for the event, download the Hunger Banquet Planning Kit directly
from Oxfam at http://www.hungerbanquet.org/
Empty Bowls
Empty Bowls is a great fundraiser to be coordinated in partnership with your school’s art department or a
local art center. Volunteers create ceramic bowls (you’ll want to get the supplies donated) which are then
used to serve a simple meal of soup and bread. Guests at the meal give a suggested donation of ten
dollars in exchange for the meal and the bowl, which they keep as a reminder of their experiences at the
meal. The money raised is then used to support local, national, or international hunger relief efforts.
Empty Bowls is an ideal fundraiser to be combined with an educational event, e.g. a speaker during the
meal.

Contact: Empty Bowls
P.O. Box 167
Oxford, MI 48371
www.emptybowls.net
More Food, Clothing, Blankets and Toys: Tips for the Best "Drives"
There are a variety of ways to organize "drives." Be sure to make it easy and accessible for volunteers
and donors. The most successful drives are usually where volunteers go to the donors. The first step, of
course, is to contact local agencies to find out what is most needed. Below are some effective examples:
    • Necessity Drives:
        Ask shoppers on their way into a supermarket to buy some extra food to donate on the way out.
        Give them a leaflet as a reminder and with suggestions of foods that are most useful to local food
        banks.
    • Clothing Drives:
        Clothing drives are especially effective at the end of the year as students are moving out of their
        apartments, dorms, and Greek Houses. Again, be sure to talk with local shelters to evaluate their
        needs. They may need only specific items, such as children's clothing, professional clothing, or
        winter clothing.
    • Toy or Book Drives:
        Oberlin students created libraries in shelters by doing book drives on campus and approaching
        local book stores for donations. Toys and bicycles are also much appreciated by the increasing
        number of families in need.
    • Gleaning:
        If you live in or near a rural area, you can often ask local farmers to allow volunteers to pick
        leftover produce to donate to a local food bank. Students at the University of Massachusetts,
        Amherst picked 10 tons of apples from a local orchard to benefit area food banks.
Spare Change for Social Change
During National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week, we strongly encourage students to
incorporate education, community service, advocacy, and fundraising into the week. The National Student
Campaign Against Hunger and Homelessness is sponsoring Spare Change for Social Change, a penny-
drive. Organizing such an event is easy to do, and is a minimal-effort way to raise a significant amount of
money. Proceeds from Spare Change for Social Change will help support the national organizing efforts
and projects that the National Student Campaign Against Hunger and Homelessness sponsors by
strengthen our student network and its impact at the local and national level.

How To:
   • Contact NSCAHH to register and receive materials for the drive. We will provide labels and
       support to participating campuses. Collect empty jars and paste labels on them.
   • Put the jars everywhere: dorms, stores, academic departments, dining halls, etc. Ask local and
       campus cafes and coffee shops to place donation jars by the cash register for people to donate
       their change. Advertise the drive around campus.
   • Be creative! Some campus groups have raised thousands of dollars by going door to door in
       campus apartments or dorms and asking people to donate the change they have around the
       house on coffee tables, jars, and in couches. American University students organized a dorm
       penny drive competition. Each residence hall had a huge jar in the lobby, and residents were
       urged to toss extra change into the jar. In order to increase competition and money raised, the
       organizers added the rule that paper money was subtracted from the total. So, in order to reduce
       other hall's points, residents put dollar bills in other dorms' jars.
   • Collect the jars from campus. Send an update and money (money order or checks, no cash) to:
       National Student Campaign Against Hunger and Homelessness
       407 S. Dearborn St., Suite 701
       Chicago, IL 60605
       (312) 291-0349 x302
Swipe Twice For Hunger
Through Swipe Twice for Hunger students donate points/money from their meal card to benefit anti-
hunger and homelessness efforts. Most students find that they have funds remaining on their meal plans
at the end of the semester. Instead of relinquishing all their points, students and campus dining services
have agreed to allow students to donate money (equivalent to a meal value) to anti-hunger and
homelessness programs.

This is a great opportunity to work with the campus dining program and other student groups, while
educating the campus public about the issues of hunger and homelessness. Swipe organizers ask
students to pledge to skip a meal on a designated day and donate the money they saved to help the
hungry and homeless. Set up tables with information in front of the campus dining hall to ask students to
commit ahead of time to skip that meal. Publicize the program through posters, flyers, and media to
recruit additional participants and make the most of the event.

Through a strong partnership with the campus dining services, students at University of Connecticut,
Storrs raised over $4,000 for several non-profits. UConn's campus dining services allows students to
swipe twice (donate two meals) through this program.
Sample News Advisory
XXPIRG Letterhead

NEWS ADVISORY                                             CONTACT:
November 16, 2009                                         Polly PIRGer, XXPIRG Campaign Coordinator
                                                          Office: (555) 537-5309
                                                          Cell: (555) 537-5309


XXCAMPUS JOINS STUDENTS FROM ACROSS THE COUNTRY IN LAUNCHING THE RESOLVE TO
                               FIGHT POVERTY

Students at XXCampus are joining hundreds of others across the country this week to launch the Resolve
to Fight Poverty, a national student movement to fight poverty across the country. XXCampus is joining
students from more than 60 other schools in joining the campaign this week in conjunction with the
National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week.

While the recession has taken its toll on communities across the US, students have been volunteering,
raising funds, and getting involved in their communities to alleviate its impact. In addition to the
announcement, XXPIRG will be holding YY events throughout the week.

WHEN:           Time and day of your news conference

WHO:            Polly PIRGer, XXPIRG Campaign Coordinator
                VIP 1, their title
                VIP 2, their title

WHERE:          Location on campus
                Directions to that location from the most likely routes the media will take

Additional National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week Events:
   • Event name 1, 1 sentence description, location
   • Event name 2, 1 sentence description, location
Sample News Release
XXPIRG Letterhead

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE                                     CONTACT:
November 16, 2009                                         Polly PIRGer, XXPIRG Campaign Coordinator
                                                          Office: (555) 537-5309
                                                          Cell: (555) 537-5309


XXCAMPUS JOINS STUDENTS FROM ACROSS THE COUNTRY IN LAUNCHING THE RESOLVE TO
                               FIGHT POVERTY

[XXCITY]—Today, VIP1 and VIP2 joined students with XXPIRG in launching the Resolve to Fight
Poverty, a national student movement to fight poverty across the country. XXCampus is joining students
from more than 60 other schools in resolving to fight poverty. XXPIRG announced the Resolve to Fight
Poverty as part of the National Hunger and Homelessness Awareness Week.

While the recession has taken its toll on communities across the US, students have been volunteering,
raising funds, and getting involved in their communities to alleviate its impact. This week, students with
XXPIRG will be holding a series of education events to raise awareness of the problems of hunger and
homelessness in XXCITY.

“I’m joining the resolve to fight poverty because these problems are too big to be ignored. We’re working
to make sure that everyone in XXCity is aware of the problem and how they can help,” said Polly PIRGer,
the Hunger and Homelessness coordinator for XXPIRG.

The students were joined by VIP 1 and VIP 2 who both pledged to help the students’ efforts to fight
poverty in XXCity.

“Now more than ever, it’s important that we all do what we can to make sure everyone in our community
has access to food and shelter,” said VIP 1. “I applaud the work that XXPIRG is doing to help the XXCity
community,” continued VIP 1.

XXPIRG will be holding a series of events to educate the community, raise funds and raise awareness
this week including XXX, YYY and ZZZ. For a full listing of the events and their locations, visit
www.xxpirgstudents.org.
[student pledge]
Resolve to Fight Poverty

    •    Because we live in the richest nation in the world, yet every day there are people who cannot
         meet their basic needs for food and shelter
    •    Because within the United States, 36.2 million people lived in households considered to be food
                          1
         insecure in 2007
    •
                                                                                                          2
         Because each year approximately 3.5 million people experience homelessness in the U.S. alone
    •    Because international response to disasters rarely meets the immediate or long term needs of the
         afflicted community
    •    Because the world-wide recession means that as many as 89 million additional people will live in
                                                                         3
         extreme poverty, on less than $1.25 a day, by the end of 2010

Resolving to Fight Poverty Means:
   • I will do what I can to help meet people’s immediate needs in my community, by raising funds,
       necessities and volunteering my time.
   • I will work to raise awareness of the problems of poverty
   • I will support long term solutions to poverty

I’m joining the Resolve to Fight Poverty!

Name_______________________________________________________________________________

Address_____________________________________________________________________________

Phone______________________________________________________________________________

Email_______________________________________________________________________________

Organization_________________________________________________________________________

School______________________________________________________________________________




1
  Food Research and Action Center, 2009. http://www.frac.org/html/hunger_in_the_us/hunger_index.html
2
  National Coalition for the Homeless, 2009. http://www.nationalhomeless.org/factsheets/How_Many.html
3
  Bloomberg, 2009. http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601086&sid=aMi0zYhypiTs
[Elected official pledge]
Resolve to Fight Poverty

    •    Because we live in the richest nation in the world, yet every day there are people who cannot
         meet their basic needs for food and shelter
    •    Because within the United States, 36.2 million people lived in households considered to be food
                          4
         insecure in 2007
    •
                                                                                                          5
         Because each year approximately 3.5 million people experience homelessness in the U.S. alone
    •    Because international response to disasters rarely meets the immediate or long term needs of the
         afflicted community
    •    Because the world-wide recession means that as many as 89 million additional people will live in
                                                                         6
         extreme poverty, on less than $1.25 a day, by the end of 2010

Resolving to Fight Poverty Means:
   • I will support efforts to meet people’s immediate needs in my community
   • I will support policies that provide long term solutions to poverty

I’m joining the Resolve to Fight Poverty!

Name_______________________________________________________________________________

Address_____________________________________________________________________________

Phone______________________________________________________________________________

Email_______________________________________________________________________________

Office_______________________________________________________________________________




4
  Food Research and Action Center, 2009. http://www.frac.org/html/hunger_in_the_us/hunger_index.html
5
  National Coalition for the Homeless, 2009. http://www.nationalhomeless.org/factsheets/How_Many.html
6
  Bloomberg, 2009. http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601086&sid=aMi0zYhypiTs
[Elected official pledge]
Resolve to Fight Poverty

    •    Because we live in the richest nation in the world, yet every day there are people who cannot
         meet their basic needs for food and shelter
    •    Because within the United States, 36.2 million people lived in households considered to be food
                          7
         insecure in 2007
    •
                                                                                                          8
         Because each year approximately 3.5 million people experience homelessness in the U.S. alone
    •    Because international response to disasters rarely meets the immediate or long term needs of the
         afflicted community
    •    Because the world-wide recession means that as many as 89 million additional people will live in
                                                                         9
         extreme poverty, on less than $1.25 a day, by the end of 2010

Resolving to Fight Poverty Means:
   • I will do what I can to help meet people’s immediate needs in my community, by raising funds,
       necessities and volunteering my time
   • I will work to raise awareness of the problems of poverty
   • I will support long term solutions to poverty

I’m joining the Resolve to Fight Poverty!

Name_______________________________________________________________________________

Address_____________________________________________________________________________

Phone______________________________________________________________________________

Email_______________________________________________________________________________

Organization_________________________________________________________________________




7
  Food Research and Action Center, 2009. http://www.frac.org/html/hunger_in_the_us/hunger_index.html
8
  National Coalition for the Homeless, 2009. http://www.nationalhomeless.org/factsheets/How_Many.html
9
  Bloomberg, 2009. http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601086&sid=aMi0zYhypiTs

								
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