Shop 10 Llankelly Kings Cross by lindayy

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									               ABD Holdings Pty LTD
           Heritage Impact Assessment




 Rear Shop No.3 117 Macleay St, Points Point
     (Also Known as No. 10 Llankelly Place, Kings Cross)
Prepared by Andrew Starr and Associates Heritage Consultants

                      February 2010
    Phone 9360 6540 Fax 93316431 astarr@bigpond.ne.au
Rear Shop No.3 117 Macleay St, Points Point                                      February 2010
Heritage Impact Assessment


Table of Contents
1.0    INTRODUCTION                                                         3
       1.1 Background                                                       3
       1.2 Site location                                                    3
       1.3 Methodology                                                      3
       1.4 Heritage Planning Controls                                       4
       1.5 Author identification

2.0    ITEM DESCRIPTION AND CONTEXT                                         5
       2.1 Item Description                                                 5
       2.2 Site Context                                                     8

3.0 HISTORICAL DEVELOPMENT OF THE SITE                                      12
       3.1 Historical Context                                               12
       3.2 Specific History of the Site                                     14

4.0 STATEMENT OF HERITAGE SIGNIFICANCE                                      15
       4.1 Assessment Criteria                                              15
       4.2 Statement of Significance                                        16

5.0 THE PROPOSAL                                                            17

6.0 HERITAGE IMPACT ASSESSMENT                                              19
       6.1 Statutory Controls.                                              19
       6.2 Assessments of Impacts                                           19
       6.2.1 City of Sydney Heritage Development Control Plan               20
       6.2.2 Questions to be Answered’ from the
        ‘Statements of Heritage Impact’ Guidelines of NSW
              Heritage Manual                                               22

7.0 CONCLUSION–CONSERVATION PRINCIPLES                                      23




                            Andrew Starr and Associates, Heritage Consultants               2
                                    Prepared for ABD Holdings PTY LTD
Rear Shop No.3 117 Macleay St, Points Point                                        February 2010
Heritage Impact Assessment



1.0
Introduction
1.1 Background
Andrew Starr Heritage has been engaged by ABD Holdings Pty Ltd to prepare the following
Heritage Impact Statement. It is proposed to make alterations to the existing shop at 10
Llankelly Place, Kings Cross. Changes are proposed to change the use of the shop from a
tailor’s shop to a small café. Proposed are changes to the existing aluminium framed window
and door, and the introduction of a glass louvered window. The changes are planned to
enhance this use for a new tenancy. The shop is located at the rear of ‘Cahors’ an Art- Deco
block of flats. It is one of three similar shop fronts. Two of the shops have been combined to
house a small gallery. The Llankelly Place frontage is not the main façade of the building. The
proposed work is designed by Annie Snell.

1.2 Site Location
The subject site is located on the eastern side of Llankelly Place a small street that runs
between Dalinghurst Road and Orwell Street.




Location marked with cross




                             Andrew Starr and Associates, Heritage Consultants                3
                                     Prepared for ABD Holdings PTY LTD
Rear Shop No.3 117 Macleay St, Points Point                                            February 2010
Heritage Impact Assessment


1.3 Methodology
This Heritage Impact Statement has been prepared in accordance with the NSW Heritage
Manual ‘Statements of Heritage Impacts’ and ‘Assessing Heritage Significance’ guidelines. The
philosophy behind this report has been guided by the Australia ICOMOS Burra Charter 1999.
The report has also been prepared in accordance with the City of Sydney guidelines on
documentation accompanying development applications involving heritage items and
conservation areas. The subject site has been assessed in relation to the controls and
provisions contained in the City of Sydney Development Control Plan and LEP.


This report considers the heritage significance of Shop 10 Llankelly Place, Kings Cross, and the
impact of the proposed alterations and additions upon this significance. The purpose of this
report is to:

•   Outline the historical background of the site.
•   Describe the locality and its significance.
•   Describe the building’s fabric and its condition.
•   Assess the heritage significance of the building.
•   Assess the impact of the proposed works upon the heritage significance of the site.

1.4 Heritage Planning Controls
No. 117 Macleay Street is a heritage item Listed as No. 670 Gazette 97 South Sydney LEP. It is
also located within a Conservation Area, identified in City of Sydney’s Local Environment Plan.

The individual building at 117 Macleay Street “Cahors” is identified in the L. E. P as a Heritage
Item. It is not included on the register of the National Trust of Australia. There are no other
instruments existing under the Heritage Act pertaining to this site.

Recommendation of the NSW Heritage Branch is:
The building should be retained and conserved. A Heritage Assessment and Heritage Impact
Statement, or a Conservation Management Plan, should be prepared for the building prior to
any major works being undertaken. There shall be no vertical additions to the building and no
alterations to the façade of the building other than to reinstate original features. The principal
room layout and planning configuration as well as significant internal original features including
ceilings, cornices, joinery, flooring and fireplaces should be retained and conserved. Any
additions and alterations should be confined to the rear in areas of less significance, should not
be visibly prominent and shall be in accordance with the relevant planning controls.




                            Andrew Starr and Associates, Heritage Consultants                     4
                                    Prepared for ABD Holdings PTY LTD
Rear Shop No.3 117 Macleay St, Points Point                                           February 2010
Heritage Impact Assessment



2.0
ITEM DESCRIPTION AND CONTEXT
2.1 Item Description
The subject site is a shop in the rear façade of ‘Cahors’ 117 Macleay Street. The shop is located
in Llankelly Place.

Description Designer/Maker: Joseland and Gilling

Builder/Maker: T. Harper

Physical Description: Ten-storey Inter-War Art Deco style residential flat building with street
level shops. The walls are faced externally with pale buff face brickwork and the base is clad
with pale blue glazed terracotta tiles. There is a small entry awning over the timber-framed front
doors which have a simple leadlight transom window. The entrance lobby is largely intact.

Modifications and Dates: The openings of the Macleay Street shops have been replaced with
aluminium frames. The windows facing Macleay Street above ground floor have aluminium
frames.

Further Information: Heritage Inventory sheets are often not comprehensive, and should be
regarded as a general guide only. Inventory sheets are based on information available, and
often do not include the social history of sites and buildings. Inventory sheets are constantly
updated by the City as further information becomes available. An inventory sheet with little
information may simply indicate that there has been no building work done to the item recently:
it does not mean that items are not significant. Further research is always recommended as part
of preparation of development proposals for heritage items, and is necessary in preparation of
Heritage Impact Assessments and Conservation Management Plans, so that the significance of
heritage items can be fully assessed prior to submitting development applications.

Cahors is an Inter-war Art Deco Building as described in A Pictorial Guide to Identifying
Australian Architecture by R. Apperly, R. Irving and P. Reynolds.

       Background
       The Exposition des Arts Decoratifs et Industriels Modernes, Paris, in 1925 did much to
       popularize geometric semi-abstract decoration. A strong influence came from the US
       ‘skyscraper’ style of 1920s and 1930s (work of Raymond Hood, William Van Allen and
       Shreve, Lamb & Harmon). The style had a forward-looking image similar to INTER-WAR
       FUNCTIONALIST but more dynamic –powerful image of 1930s cinema musicals.
       Definitive building: Rockefeller Center, New York (Raymond Hood and others, 1931-39)

       Broad Characteristics
       Embodiment of dynamic progress and faith in modern technology. Strong suggestion of
       arrested vertical and/or horizontal motion. The style appealed to the adventurous youth
       rather than conservative maturity. Less emphasis on open, glassy appearance than
       European International style. Applied non-historic ornament used for dramatic emphasis.
       Predominantly a commercial style.
                            Andrew Starr and Associates, Heritage Consultants                    5
                                    Prepared for ABD Holdings PTY LTD
Rear Shop No.3 117 Macleay St, Points Point                                                            February 2010
Heritage Impact Assessment



        Settings and Relationships
        Principally urban and high density suburban

        Exterior Characteristics
        Symmetry common. Concern for three-dimensional quality in massing and details.
        Vertical and horizontal fins; zigzags; stepped, ‘skyscraper’ silhouettes; ‘streamlined
        effects; geometric curves; stylised decoration. Favoured materials ; faience, polished
        granite, Vitrolite, textured face brickwork, sandstone, and chromium plated steel.

        Structure and Construction
        Steel and reinforced concrete used to achieve wide spans and high-rise construction
        which were expressed by strong vertical and horizontal lines. Extensive use of metal-
        framed windows.



The shop front stands at the foot of the rear façade of Cahors. It is not part of the buildings main
façade. The shops seem to have been built as an afterthought in Llankelly Place which may
have served as a service lane for buildings on Macleay Street. The shops generally make no
aesthetic contribution to the streetscape in their present form. Their aluminium framed windows
and door are not original and possibly date from the 1970s. Above the shop the building has a
Stylised low-relief ornament typical of Art Deco Style.




Fig. 1 The subject shop front is one of three similar shops in the Cahors Apartment Building which front Llankelly
Place. The shop formerly a tailor’s shop is to be converted to a small cafe. It is proposed to alter the window and
introduce timber framed bi-fold doors. It is also proposed to alter the glass brick window.




                              Andrew Starr and Associates, Heritage Consultants                                       6
                                      Prepared for ABD Holdings PTY LTD
Rear Shop No.3 117 Macleay St, Points Point                                       February 2010
Heritage Impact Assessment




Fig. 2 Gallery next door the shop.




Fig. 3 The gallery occupies two shopfronts.




                              Andrew Starr and Associates, Heritage Consultants              7
                                      Prepared for ABD Holdings PTY LTD
Rear Shop No.3 117 Macleay St, Points Point                                           February 2010
Heritage Impact Assessment




Fig. 4 Glass brick window.


2.2 Site Context
Llankelly Place runs from Darlinghurst Road to Orwell Street. The subject site is on the east
side of the lane. It is one of three related shopfronts all in the “Cahors” apartment building. The
subject site was a tailor’s shop. Llankelly Place has had a diverse range of shops, but now bars,
cafes and takeaway food shops dominate the lane. Llankelly Place is connected to Darlinghurst
Road the main street of Kings Cross. The area still contains the strip clubs bars and brothels of
the Sydney Adult Entertainment industry but increasingly the trend is for these clubs to close
and be replaced by hotels and nightclubs. Gradually Kings cross is being gentrified. It is a high-
density accommodation area which has become increasingly popular for its proximity to the city
and entertainment. The nearby cafes and restaurants are a desired facility for both residents
and tourists.




                             Andrew Starr and Associates, Heritage Consultants                   8
                                     Prepared for ABD Holdings PTY LTD
Rear Shop No.3 117 Macleay St, Points Point                                                            February 2010
Heritage Impact Assessment




Fig.5 Streetscape looking south.




Fig.6 Llankelly Place looking south. The three shops are to the east of the lane (left of the image)




                              Andrew Starr and Associates, Heritage Consultants                                   9
                                      Prepared for ABD Holdings PTY LTD
Rear Shop No.3 117 Macleay St, Points Point                                                          February 2010
Heritage Impact Assessment




Fig. 7 Louvered Glass windows are above the other two shop fronts. They are the same proportion as the glass
brick window.




Fig.8 Streetscape looking north. Subject site is behind the Danish backpacker in the foreground of the image.




                             Andrew Starr and Associates, Heritage Consultants                                  10
                                     Prepared for ABD Holdings PTY LTD
Rear Shop No.3 117 Macleay St, Points Point                                             February 2010
Heritage Impact Assessment




Fig.9 Rear façade “Cahors”                          Fig. 10 Streetscape looking north




Fig.11 “Cahors” 117 Macleay Street                 Fig.12 Façade Macleay Street




                             Andrew Starr and Associates, Heritage Consultants                   11
                                     Prepared for ABD Holdings PTY LTD
Rear Shop No.3 117 Macleay St, Points Point                                         February 2010
Heritage Impact Assessment



3.0
Historical Development of the Site
3.1 Historical Context
In 1828 Governor Darling made 18 grants for selected government nominees- heads of various
departments of the civil service on Woolloomooloo Hill. No emancipated convicts or pastoralists
were given grants. The area was set aside for houses with gardens and the houses had to be of
large size on large grounds. Owners stripped this land of native vegetation. This area was set
aside idealistically as Darling sought to construct a local aristocracy in an area free from any
convict taint.
It was to be.…
     “a high status area… which would serve as both example and chastisement to the
     debased populace of Sydney Town. In this he was supported by the Surveyor,
     Mitchell, who was anxious to encourage city expansion eastwards, and by the
     Colonial Secretary, Alexander Macleay, whose motive was simple greed. Thus, in
     1828 the land which had been dedicated to the aboriginal people was granted to a
     variety of high ranking officials and wealthy private citizens. Macleay secured 58
     acres, encompassing all of the land fronting Elizabeth Bay, but most grants were
     smaller averaging about eight acres Some of them contained both high land on the
     ridge and land running down to the basin below. The ridge was renamed
     ‘Darlinghurst’, although the name ‘Woolloomooloo Hill’ stuck for a good few years
     more. On it the chosen few built their fine houses with commanding views across the
     harbour and westward to the original town across the Domain. In order to ensure that
     these buildings were grand, Governor Darling himself approved the plans, which
     were subject to various conditions agreed by the grantees in writing. They had to
     undertake to build by 1831 a house with the minimum value of £1,000 with
     landscaping and only one house was to be built on grant.” Shirley Fitzgerald Sydney
     1842-1992, p32


John Hardwick, in letters held in the Mitchell library MSS 4448113 described Kings Cross and
Potts Point which at that stage was called Woolloomooloo Hill “ We traversed this whole point
which separates Woolloomooloo Bay and Rushcutters Bay- this charming locality is covered
with the most elegant villa houses-surrounded by extensive and pleasant grounds which fall
away down each declivity to the waterside where many of the properties have boat and bathing
houses.”

The villas were painted white with shady verandahs and green venetian blinds.

By 1847 many of the owners of these large properties wanted to subdivide and capitalise on
their holdings.

Bohemian district

The Kings Cross district was Sydney's bohemian heartland from the early decades of the 20th
century. From the 1960s onwards Kings Cross also came to serve as both the city's main tourist
accommodation and entertainment mecca, as well as its red-light district. It thereby achieved a
high level of notoriety out of all proportion to its limited geographical extent.
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Rear Shop No.3 117 Macleay St, Points Point                                                                February 2010
Heritage Impact Assessment



The area boomed during the late 1960s, with hundreds of American servicemen on R & R leave
flocking to the area each week in search of entertainment. Organised crime and police
corruption was well entrenched in the area—one of Sydney's most notorious illegal casinos
operated with impunity for many years, although it was known to all and located only yards from
Darlinghurst police station. This inevitably led to a rise in crime, vice and corruption, and a
massive increase in the influx and use of heroin, much of which was initially brought in by
American servicemen in the pay of drug rings.

A positive influence in the area during that time was The Wayside Chapel, run by the late Rev.
Ted Noffs. His church was open most of the time, providing a "drop in centre" and counselling
services to many of the itinerants who were drawn to the area. A foundation created in his name
has been running since 1971.

From the late 1960s, drug-related crime was one of the area's main social problems, leading to
the controversial establishment of Australia's first Medically Supervised Injecting Centre (where
users of illegal drugs can inject themselves in clean conditions) at a shopfront site near Kings
Cross railway station in May, 2001. An example of harm reduction, the injecting room is credited
with reducing the occurrence of fatal overdoses in the injecting drug user community, as well as
reducing the number of needles left in the street.

Since the turn of the century Kings Cross has witnessed a large number of real estate
developments, both refurbishments of historic apartment buildings and the construction of new
ones. This has resulted in demographic changes as affluent professionals are increasingly
residing in the area and are in turn significantly altering the character of the area


3.2 Specific History of Site
Land Title Search
The building was designed by Joseland and Gilling. It was built by T. Harper in the 1930s as a
rental property. The building has changed from largely being tenanted to now being mainly
owner occupied.

Land Titles Office
Kelly Max. Sydney City of Suburbs
A Pictorial Guide To Identifying Australian Architecture Richard Apperly, Robert Irving & Peter Reynolds
The Illustrated Burra Charter ICOMOS
Sands Directory
South Sydney Heritage Study , prepared by Tropman and Tropman Architects. November 1995
Sydney 1998
Street Scene A History of Oxford Street Clive Faro with Garry Wotherspoon




                                 Andrew Starr and Associates, Heritage Consultants                                  13
                                         Prepared for ABD Holdings PTY LTD
Rear Shop No.3 117 Macleay St, Points Point                                            February 2010
Heritage Impact Assessment



4.0
Statement of Heritage Significance
4.1 Assessment Criteria
The following assessment of significance addresses the criteria endorsed by the NSW Heritage
Council, and is in accordance with the NSW Heritage Manual ‘Assessing Heritage Significance’
guidelines. The assessment is based upon the limited historical information, and the inspection
of the fabric of the item and the surrounding area.

a)      an item is important in the course, or pattern, of the local area’s cultural or natural
        history.
The subject building ‘Cahors’, No. 117 Macleay Street is an Art Deco Apartment Building c.
1930. Macleay Street features many buildings build around the same period . Style of the
buildings varies with Art Deco styles mixed with earlier more conservative designs. The subject
site is a minor part of ‘Cahors’. Situated in Llankelly Place it is one of a group of three shops,
two of which have been converted to a gallery. The shops were possibly introduced into
Llankelly Place at a later date to the original construction of ‘Cahors’, they do not appear part of
the original design. The shop window and door appear to be a later design. Llankelly Place
features a variety of small shops. The variety of shops adds a dynanism important in the local
area’s cultural history.

b)   an item has strong or special associations with the life or works of a particular
person, or group of people, of importance in the local area’s cultural and natural history

The subject building was designed by Joseland and Gilling. It was built by T. Harper in the
1930s. The building has been occupied by many people since first constructed. The shop was
last a tailor.

c)   an item is important in demonstrating aesthetic characteristics and/ or a high
degree of creative achievement in the local area.

The shopfront itself has low architectural integrity and has been compromised by an
unsympathetic alteration to doors and windows.

d)    an item has strong or special association with a particular community or cultural
group in the local area for social, cultural or spiritual reasons.

The subject item does not appear to have any strong and special association with local groups
and communities.

e)     an item has potential to yield information that will contribute to an understanding
of the local area’s cultural or natural history

No. 117 Macleay Street has no potential to provide information and an understanding of the
local area’s cultural or natural history.




                            Andrew Starr and Associates, Heritage Consultants                    14
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Rear Shop No.3 117 Macleay St, Points Point                                               February 2010
Heritage Impact Assessment

f)     an item possesses uncommon, rare or endangered aspects of the local area’s
       cultural or natural history

Not relevant to this criterion

g)     an item is important in demonstrating the principal characteristics of a class of the
       local area’s
       • cultural or natural places; or
       • cultural or natural environments

Not relevant to this criterion

4.2 Statement of Significance
The site has historical significance through its association with the subdivision of the area and
the residential and commercial development of the locality. The site has heritage significance. It
is situated in an Art Deco Apartment Building constructed c. 1930. This style of architecture has
been classified in the book A Pictorial Guide to Identifying Australian Architecture by Richard
Apperly, Robert Irving and Peter Reynolds.

No relics exist on the site.

Shop 10 Llankelly Place has little significance in itself. Its significance is due to its location in a
heritage item. Focusing directly on shop 10 the specific site has little historic, aesthetic or social
significance. It is not a rare design. It has no technological significance.




                            Andrew Starr and Associates, Heritage Consultants                       15
                                    Prepared for ABD Holdings PTY LTD
Rear Shop No.3 117 Macleay St, Points Point                                           February 2010
Heritage Impact Assessment



5.0
The Proposal
It is proposed to make alterations to the façade of Shop 10 Llankelly Place which is situated in
‘Cahors’ a 1930s apartment building. The two changes are the replacement of the existing
fenestration with timber framed bi-fold doors and the replacement of glass bricks in the fanlight
window above the shop window with glass louvres. The windows at the other two similar
shopfronts have already had glass louvres installed. The proposed louvered window is to
increase light into the shop and to improve ventilation for the new café. The ceiling height in the
café has the potential to be raised to the same height as the other two shops. The change of
use from a shop to café seems an appropriate change within the context of the Lane. Llankelly
Place is dominated by bars, cafes and take-away food outlets.




                                               Existing plan




                            Andrew Starr and Associates, Heritage Consultants                   16
                                    Prepared for ABD Holdings PTY LTD
Rear Shop No.3 117 Macleay St, Points Point                                     February 2010
Heritage Impact Assessment




                                              Existing elevation




                                               Proposed Plan




                            Andrew Starr and Associates, Heritage Consultants            17
                                    Prepared for ABD Holdings PTY LTD
Rear Shop No.3 117 Macleay St, Points Point                                     February 2010
Heritage Impact Assessment




                                   Proposed Elevation and Section




Section




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Rear Shop No.3 117 Macleay St, Points Point                                          February 2010
Heritage Impact Assessment



6.0
Heritage Impact Assessment
6.1 Statutory Controls
Shop 10 Llankelly Place is at the rear of ‘Cahors’ No. 117 Macleay Street, a heritage item and is
within a Conservation Area, identified in South Sydney Council's Heritage Local Environment
Plan 1996. They are in an area of protected streetscape.



6.2 Assessment of Impacts
6.2.1 City of Sydney Heritage Development Control Plan 2006
Heritage items include buildings, sites, building elements, and archaeological, townscape and
landscape items of both State and local significance, and identified on the State Heritage
Register and/or in a schedule of the relevant Local Environmental Plan. Any proposals for
development must achieve a reasonable balance between the meeting amenity and
contemporary needs, and protecting the heritage significance of the item.

3.1 Objectives
The objectives of these provisions are to ensure that development to heritage items:
(i) encourages the retention of existing heritage items and their significant elements;
(ii) is based on the understanding and conservation of the heritage significance of the item;
(iii) encourages heritage items to be used for purposes that are appropriate to their heritage
      significance;
(v) maintains the setting of the heritage item including the relationship between the item and its
      surroundings;
(vi) encourages the removal of inappropriate alterations and additions, and the reinstatement of
      significant missing details and building elements; and
(vii) is consistent with policy guidelines contained in the Heritage Inventory

3.2 Provisions
(1) Any development application involving a heritage item is to be accompanied by a Heritage
    Impact Statement, Conservation Management Plan, or Conservation Management Strategy.

(2) Development to a heritage item is to:
(a) be consistent with an appropriate Heritage Impact Statement, Conservation Management
     Plan or Conservation Management Strategy;
(b) be consistent with the Heritage Inventory Assessment Report;
(c) protect the setting of the heritage item;
(d) retain significant internal and external fabric and building elements;
(e) retain significant internal and external spaces;
(f) remove unsympathetic alterations and additions;
(g) reinstate missing details and building elements;
(h) use materials, finishes and colours that are appropriate to the significant periods of
     development or architectural character of the item; and

                            Andrew Starr and Associates, Heritage Consultants                   19
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Rear Shop No.3 117 Macleay St, Points Point                                            February 2010
Heritage Impact Assessment

(i) respect the pattern, style and dimensions of original windows and doors.

(3) Alterations to the room layout of heritage items are to ensure that the original room
configuration remains discernable and can be interpreted.

(4) If there is any likelihood of an impact on any significant archaeological relics from a period
prior to the current building, development must ensure that the impact is managed according to
the assessed level of significance of those relics.

(5) Original and early trees, plantings, garden layouts and landscaping should be retained and
traditional garden designs should be reinstated where possible.

3.4 Changing the use of a heritage item
(1) Any proposal involving the change of use (including the adaptive reuse) of a heritage item is
    to demonstrate that:
(a) the new use requires minimal alterations to significant fabric and building elements, and that
any changes to these are reversible or have minimal impact on the heritage significance of the
item;
(b) any internal changes do not compromise the heritage significance of the external
    appearance of the building;
(c) alterations and/or additions required to support the new use do not obscure the
      understanding of the building’s significant use;
(d) the significant use can be interpreted;
(e) the introduction of new services will not have a detrimental impact on significant fabric or
      spaces; and
(f) the new use is consistent with the agreed conservation policy identified in the Conservation
Management Plan or Heritage Inventory Assessment Report for the heritage item.

(2) Proposals to change the use of public and community buildings must take into account the
effect on significant interior elements and fittings.

(3) The significant use of the building should be interpreted on site. Interpretation of the use may
include the use of historic artefacts, the in situ retention of machinery and signage, or artistic
interpretation.

Part 4 Heritage Provisions
No. 238 Crown Street is a heritage item as well as being in a Conservation area identified in the
2006 Heritage DCP. Because the Council must take into consideration the likely effect of the
proposed development on the heritage significance on the item, the conservation area and
streetscape, a Heritage Impact Statement is required.


Heritage Provisions Conservation Guidelines and Controls
General Principles South Sydney Heritage DCP
Alterations and extensions to heritage buildings will generally be acceptable, provided they
respect the heritage values of the existing building and the character of the area. Any proposal
to alter or add to a heritage building should start by assessing the heritage significance of the
building and its various parts and also the context within which it will be placed.



                            Andrew Starr and Associates, Heritage Consultants                    20
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Rear Shop No.3 117 Macleay St, Points Point                                                 February 2010
Heritage Impact Assessment

The retention of as much as possible of the original fabric that contributes to the character of the
conservation area will be required. It is therefore important that you and your architect
understand the relative contribution of your building, and its various parts and what is of heritage
value. In some cases, later additions to a building may be significant and may themselves
contribute to the character of the area.

In buildings that are not individually listed as heritage items, it is the parts of the building that are
visible from the street that are of most importance to the conservation area, i.e. the building’s
streetscape appearance. Alterations and additions to buildings should therefore be confined to
the rear or designed in such a way that they will not change the streetscape appearance of the
building. Internal alterations should also relate to external design of the building, particularly
floor levels and window openings. For example, when large warehouse buildings are proposed
for adaptive re-use, existing floor levels should be retained wherever possible, especially if the
interiors are visible from the street below.

Alterations to contributory buildings should, in general, be confined to removing non-contributory
parts and putting back detail known from documentary evidence, to have existed.

Discussion of the proposal against General Principles
Andrew Starr, a generalist heritage consultant, registered with the NSW Heritage office, has
been contracted by ABD Holdings PTY LTD to evaluate the proposal, and to write a Statement
of Heritage Impact. The building has been gazetted by the City of Sydney as a heritage item.
The NSW Heritage Branch recommends that new work on the building be restricted only to the
restoration of the original features.

However the shops in Llankelly Place most possibly were not part of the original design of
Cahors. It is likely that they were introduced in the 1960s when King Cross expanded as a
tourist area. Llankelly Place itself appears to have been a service lane for the buildings fronting
Macleay Street. Increased tourist numbers in the 1960s created opportunities in the area for
small shops. The aluminium style framing for the door and window of the shop date from a later
period than the original building. The fact that it is unlikely that the shops are an original
component of ‘Cahors’ offers a flexibility in approach to the refitting of the shopfronts. No
original fabric will be lost because the shops are not an original feature. The timber-framed
doors are an appropriate response to both the building and the lane. The new use as a café is
appropriate to the context of the site.

No significant area of the facade of Cahors will be affected by the proposal.

Although not proposed at this stage the site of the café affords the potential for street seating.
This is appropriate to the context of the site. An awning is alsonot proposed for the café.
However Andrew Starr and Associates sees the potential for a retractable awning to define the
space for street seating. This would have minimal impact on the integrity of the building and
make a positive contribution to the streetscape.




                            Andrew Starr and Associates, Heritage Consultants                         21
                                    Prepared for ABD Holdings PTY LTD
Rear Shop No.3 117 Macleay St, Points Point                                            February 2010
Heritage Impact Assessment


6.2.2 ‘Questions to be Answered’ from the ‘Statements of Heritage
Impact’ Guidelines of NSW Heritage Manual
Has the advice of a heritage consultant or structural engineer been sought? Has the
consultant’s advice been implemented? If no, why not?

Andrew Starr and Associates were contracted to evaluate the proposal for the building. After
consultation it was decided that the current proposal was appropriate within the context of the
current streetscape.

Does the existing use contribute to the significance of the heritage item?

The commercial use of the building is retained by the proposal.

How is the impact of the addition on the heritage significance of the item to be
minimised?

The design of the new doors is sympathetic to the item and an appropriate response to the
streetscape. The reinstatement of louvers into the fanlight replaces the glass bricks, which are
intrusive fabric. This make a cohesive statement as it follows the design of the two windows of
the neighbouring shopfronts in this section of the building.

Will the additions visually dominate the heritage item?
This is a subtle change to the building it does not dominate.

Is the addition sited on any known, or potentially significant archaeological deposits? If
so, have alternative positions for the additions been considered?

No excavation is to undertaken.

Are the additions sympathetic to the heritage item? In what way (e.g. form, proportions,
design)?

The changes are sympathetic is their scale, choice of materials and style. No original fabric is
lost. The only fabric removed is unsympathetic introduced fabric installed long after the original
construction of !Cahors".




                            Andrew Starr and Associates, Heritage Consultants                    22
                                    Prepared for ABD Holdings PTY LTD
Rear Shop No.3 117 Macleay St, Points Point                                            February 2010
Heritage Impact Assessment



7.0
Conclusion – Conservation Principles
The subject building at Shop 10 Llankelly Place is in No. 117 Macleay Street a heritage item
and is in a conservation area. The historical research and fabric investigation of the building has
revealed that although the existing building of the 1930s has high integrity and historic heritage
significance the shop itself has low heritage significance on all criterions. The site offers
potential for the development of a cafe. This is a use sympathetic to Llankelly Place. The
proposal achieves this outcome with minimal impact on the heritage item. The new café will
make a positive impact on the streetscape. This potential could be further enhanced with the
introduction of an awning and street seating. The Llankelly Place façade is the minor façade of
the building. None of the significant detailing of the façade is impacted on in the proposal. The
use of the building as a commercial premises, has led to the removal of all significant internal
fabric on the ground floor. The subject site because of this has no potential for a full restoration
as desired by the NSW Heritage Branch because it is not part of the original design of the
heritage building, but a later alteration

The scale and size of the proposal is appropriate within this context. The subject proposal is
considered as an example of sympathetic development desired in this section of Kings Cross. It
has little impact on the streetscape.

Andrew Starr Heritage
February 2010




                            Andrew Starr and Associates, Heritage Consultants                    23
                                    Prepared for ABD Holdings PTY LTD

								
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