Getting Even by P-Wiley

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Tripp and Bies educate employees and managers about the right and wrong ways to deal with workplace conflict, specifically revenge. The authors have amassed dozens of lively stories, insights and counter-intuitive truths to bring to the book. Not only will managers and employees find this information useful and entertaining, but most readers will find applications in their home lives as well as in their work lives.The core argument is that revenge is about justice. Avenging employees are not unprofessional, out-of-control employees; rather, they are victims of offenses who feel compelled to seek justice on their own. The authors address specific questions, such as:What kinds of offenses result in revenge?Why do some victims respond more aggressively to harm than others?What role does the organization play in how victims respond to offenses?What's the best advice for managers who wish to prevent their employees from seeking revenge?Most employees experience the desire for revenge, and are ready to settle their own scores at work when management won't enforce justice.This book offers a model that sequences avengers' thoughts and behaviors, from the beginning of the conflict to its end. The model is grounded in scientific research and organizes disparate findings into a whole.

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									Getting Even
Author: Thomas M. Tripp
Author: Robert J. Bies



Edition: 1
Description

Tripp and Bies educate employees and managers about the right and wrong ways to deal with workplace
conflict, specifically revenge. The authors have amassed dozens of lively stories, insights and counter-
intuitive truths to bring to the book. Not only will managers and employees find this information useful and
entertaining, but most readers will find applications in their home lives as well as in their work lives.

The core argument is that revenge is about justice. Avenging employees are not unprofessional, out-of-
control employees; rather, they are victims of offenses who feel compelled to seek justice on their own.
The authors address specific questions, such as:



What kinds of offenses result in revenge?

Why do some victims respond more aggressively to harm than others?

What role does the organization play in how victims respond to offenses?

What's the best advice for managers who wish to prevent their employees from seeking revenge?

Most employees experience the desire for revenge, and are ready to settle their own scores at work when
management won't enforce justice.



This book offers a model that sequences avengers' thoughts and behaviors, from the beginning of the
conflict to its end. The model is grounded in scientific research and organizes disparate findings into a
whole.
Author Bio
Thomas M. Tripp
Robert J. Bies is a professor of management and founder of the Executive Master's in Leadership
Program at the McDonough School of Business at Georgetown University. Bies's current research
focuses on leadership and the delivery of bad news, organizational justice, and revenge and forgiveness in
the workplace. He has published extensively on these topics and related issues in academic journals.He
currently serves on the editorial boards of Journal of Applied Psychology, Journal of Organizational
Behavior, Journal of Management, International Journal of Conflict Management, and Negotiation and
Conflict Management Research. <br>


Robert J. Bies
<br>Bies has received several teaching awards, including the Best Teacher award at Northwestern
University's Kellogg School of Management. At Georgetown, he has twice received the Joseph Le Moine
Award for Undergraduate and Graduate Teaching Excellence at the McDonough School of Business, and
he received the Outstanding Professor of the International Executive MBA Program (IEMBA-2) at the
McDonough School of Business. He received his Ph.D. from Stanford University in organizational
behavior, and a B.A. in business administration and an M.B.A. from the University of Washington. <br>

								
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