Kick the Tin by P-IndependentPublish

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When Doris Kartinyeri was a month old, her mother died. The family gathered to mourn their loss and welcome the new baby home. But Doris never arrived to live with her family – she was stolen from the hospital and placed in Colebrook Home, where she stayed for the next fourteen years.The legacy of being a member of the Stolen Generations continued for Doris as she was placed in white homes as a virtual slave, struggled through relationships and suffered with anxiety and mental illness.This is a life that has been kicked around. It is the compelling and sometimes witty memoir of a courageous journey, a journey into the soul of an individual to find meaning and substance after the loss of everything the rest of us take for granted.

More Info
									Kick the Tin
Author: Doris Kartinyeri
Table of Contents

Acknowledgments ix
Preface xiii
Foreword xvii
Glossary xx
STOLEN 5
PROTECTION 13
THE BEGINNING OF GRIEF 29
SHUNTED ABOUT 57
NEED TO BELONG 69
JOURNEY FROM REALITY 81
The Great Gardens of Monato 81
Broken Spirit 92
Oh, What a Feeling! 99
MY GUIDING HANDS 105
Connections 120
FINDING MY VOICE 123
NGARRINDJERI MIMINI 135
Description

When Doris Kartinyeri was a month old, her mother died. The family gathered to mourn their loss and
welcome the new baby home. But Doris never arrived to live with her family – she was stolen from the
hospital and placed in Colebrook Home, where she stayed for the next fourteen years.The legacy of being
a member of the Stolen Generations continued for Doris as she was placed in white homes as a virtual
slave, struggled through relationships and suffered with anxiety and mental illness.This is a life that has
been kicked around. It is the compelling and sometimes witty memoir of a courageous journey, a journey
into the soul of an individual to find meaning and substance after the loss of everything the rest of us take
for granted.
Excerpt

Colebrook originated at the United Aboriginal Mission at Oodnadatta in the year of 1924. By 1926, there
was a small house with Sister Hyde in charge. The government policy at that time was to remove half-
caste children from their traditional culture and family and to assimilate them into white society. The
original home accommodated only five children taken from their families. Soon there were twelve. In May
of 1927 a small house on the outskirts of Quorn was rented and when it became too small, another was
purchased. It was officially named Colebrook Home after a UAM President and remained there in Quorn
for sixteen years, by which time conditions had become quite overcrowded. In 1943 a third home was
estab lished at Eden Hills for the children and was renamed Colebrook Training Centre.
The Eden Hills Colebrook was a huge and beautiful looking building with a verandah surrounding the sides
and front, supported by rows of great posts. It stood on acres of land with beautiful gardens and tall gum
trees. The front steps led to the entrance of the main office and the common room. It had a huge cellar.
The girls’ dormitories faced the main drive. The centre courtyard sepa rated the boys quarters from the
girls quarters. The courtyard was the centre point for a lot of happenings.
This building was home for many maru kids like myself. We were the stolen children who, for some
reason, were taken away from our biological Aboriginal parents and heritage and placed in Colebrook
Home. Between 1943 and 1972 some three hundred and fifty Aboriginal children passed through
Colebrook Home. This was our home and we
respected it. We were happy in our own way, laughing, crying, and just being an extended family with a
lot of love.The children who came to the home were from
near and far, north, south, east and west, so we developed a lingo that was taught to us by the older
ones. It was Ngarrindjeri, Pitjantjatjara, English and some of our own words all mixed up together. Some
of our maru words are used through out the book.I felt secure with my many brothers and sisters. I recall
two older boys arriving: Yami who was blind and a much older lad Monty, who carried their only
possessions, their swags. They had both come down from the north. Monty was a tall, sleek, full-blooded
Aboriginal who wore cowboy boots. He made quite an impression.
The older girls sometimes had responsibility to look after their ‘special babies’. We called them Auntie.
My Colebrook sister, Avis, was cared for by Auntie Amy O’Donoghue. And Auntie Lois O’Donoghue, now
Dr Lowitja O’Donoghue, cared for me.Most of the Colebrook kids had nicknames. Some of the nicknames
that were given to the kids really suited them. I was called Canary, as I always seemed to be whistling
about the place. I remem ber one of the boys, Graham McKenzie, whom we used to call Spider Legs. He
was always carving. He carved an Aboriginal face from a rock that he had found in the cliffs. I thought he
was so clever. I remember we all gathered around him as he showed off his carving. There was Jappy.
She always pressed her nose against a widow pane. We thought she looked like a Jap. Alice, with her
curly hair, we called Jibby because she reminded us of a sheep. There was Bulldog who resembled a
bulldog and Bullock who was always chasing the boys. I could name quite a few others but I don’t think it
would be appreciated.
Author Bio
Doris Kartinyeri
When Doris Kartinyeri was a month old, her mother died. The family gathered to mourn their loss and
welcome the new baby home. But Doris never arrived to live with her family – she was stolen from the
hospital and placed in Colebrook Home, where she stayed for the next fourteen years.The legacy of being
a member of the Stolen Generations continued for Doris as she was placed in white homes as a virtual
slave, struggled through relationships and suffered with anxiety and mental illness.This is a life that has
been kicked around. It is the compelling and sometimes witty memoir of a courageous journey, a journey
into the soul of an individual to find meaning and substance after the loss of everything the rest of us take
for granted.<br/>

								
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