Documents
Resources
Learning Center
Upload
Plans & pricing Sign in
Sign Out

Staying ahead of exotic threats

VIEWS: 1 PAGES: 8

Staying ahead of exotic threats

More Info
									             Staying ahead of exotic threats


                                                Western Australia is free of many market-
                                                sensitive animal and plant pests, diseases
                                                and weeds. While the State’s geographic
                                                                                             47
                                                isolation and few entry points makes the
                                                process of preventing pests and diseases
                                                easier, WA also uses a comprehensive suite
                                                of policies and operations to demonstrate
                                                the State’s freedom from important pests
                                                and diseases.

                                                The Department of Agriculture and Food,
                                                WA plays a crucial role in maintaining the
                                                State’s pest and disease free status and
                                                is currently involved in several important
                                                projects to protect the nation’s grains
                                                industry from exotic threats.




                                               Image: Pests and Diseases Image Library




Grains industry investment profile
     Intelligence gathering maintains markets
     Changes to World Trade Organisation legislation now require that countries participating in international trade, such as Australia, must prove that
     specific grain pests and diseases exotic to importing countries are known not to occur. To achieve this, the Australian grains industry must carry out
     extensive surveillance and quarantine work to gather intelligence about the pests and diseases present within Australia and to maintain strong border
     control to prevent exotic organisms from entering our shores.

     Stopping invading species before they spread
     History»has»demonstrated»that»exotic»pests»and»diseases»can»and»do»make»their»way»into»Australia.»How»such»incursions»are»dealt»with»can»mean»the»difference»between»
48   an»invading»pest»being»eradicated»or»becoming»widespread»and»causing»considerable»and»costly»damage.»
     To» enable» the»Australian» grains» industry» to» be» one» step» ahead» of»                                                     “How»an»insect»or»disease»interacts»with»its»environment»defines»to»         day»they»usually»move»for»example»whether»the»spores»are»released»
     potential» incursions,» Department» of» Agriculture» and» Food,» WA»                                                            a»large»extent»how»extensively»and»how»quickly»it»will»spread.»Once»         in»the»morning»or»throughout»the»day,»through»to»what»they»eat,»how»
     researchers» Art» Diggle» and» Fiona» Evans» are» collaborating» with»                                                          we»know»this»information»we»can»better»predict»how»organisms»                they»move»(such»as»wind,»vehicles»or»water)»and»how»they»reproduce.
     UWA»researchers»James»Bennett»and»Michael»Renton»and»CSIRO»                                                                     will»behave»in»Australian»conditions»–»and»that»means»we»will»be»in»
                                                                                                                                                                                                                  “Once»all»the»profile»information»has»been»loaded»into»the»model»we»
     Entomology»to»develop»a»model»that»can»rapidly»predict»where»an»                                                                a»far»better»position»to»control»a»disease»or»insect»incursion»when»
                                                                                                                                                                                                                  can» then» ask» it» to» predict» how» an» organism» will» behave» in» certain»
     invading»organism»has»spread»to»once»it»enters»Australian»shores.»                                                              it»happens,”»Dr»Diggle»said.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                  conditions,”»Dr»Diggle»said.»“In»this»way»quarantine»staff»will»be»much»
     Dr»Diggle»said»the»joint»research»is»marrying»biological»information»                                                           As» well» as» profiling» behavioural» information,» the» research» team»     better» informed» about» where» to» look» for» a» foreign» organism» and»
     about»invasive»pests»and»diseases»with»a»computer»model»developed»                                                              will»collect»data»from»biological»control»programs»in»the»Northern»          whether»an»eradication»campaign»is»likely»to»succeed.”
     to»mimic»the»movement»of»organisms»across»a»landscape.                                                                          Territory» to» ground-truth» the» model» with» real» examples» of» how»
                                                                                                                                     diseases»and»insects»spread.»
                                                                                                                                     “In» biological» control» programs,» exotic» insects» and» diseases»
                                                                                                                                     are» purposely» released» to» control» a» problematic» organism» such»
                                                                                          Images: Pests and Diseases Image Library




                                                                                                                                     as» a» weed» or» feral» animal» that» is» taking» over» a» landscape» and»
                                                                                                                                     damaging» native» animals» and» plants» or» domestic» crops.» By»
                                                                                                                                     tracking»how»these»biological»control»agents»spread»we»can»feed»
                                                                                                                                     real-life»information»into»our»model»to»gain»valuable»insight»into»
                                                                                                                                     how»different»types»of»organisms»interact»with»their»environment»
                                                                                                                                     as»they»move»through»it,”»Dr»Diggle»said.»»»
                                                                                                                                     Creating»the»behaviour»profiles»is»an»extensive»task.»Researchers»
     English grain aphid - exotic to Australia and considered a high impact pest to the                                                                                                                           Barley stripe rust - exotic to Australia and considered a high impact disease to the
     Australian grains industry                                                                                                      must»examine»everything»about»the»organisms»from»what»time»of»               Australian grains industry




                                                                                                                                                                                                                  d e p a r t m e n t o f a G r i c u lt u r e a n d f o o d , W a
                                                                                                                                                                                                                          49




                                                                                                                 Russian wheat aphid
Khapra beetle                                                                                                    The»Russian»wheat»aphid»has»a»history»of»severe»economic»impact.»Should»the»aphid»enter»Australia»
Khapra»beetle»is»considered»to»be»one»of»the»most»serious»grain»pests»in»the»world,»a»reputation»that»           there»is»a»high»risk»that»it»would»cause»severe»losses»in»many»of»the»nation’s»wheat»growing»areas.»
places»it»on»Australia’s»‘high-alert’»list»of»insects»to»keep»well»beyond»the»nation’s»borders.»»In»countries»   Since»its»appearance»in»Texas»in»1986,»Russian»wheat»aphid»has»become»a»major»pest»of»wheat»
where»the»beetle»is»endemic,»it»can»cause»losses»to»stored»grain»up»to»30»per»cent»with»losses»as»high»          and»barley»in»the»United»States,»causing»hundreds»of»millions»of»dollars»in»direct»and»indirect»grain»
as»70»per»cent.                                                                                                  losses.



Grains industry investment profile
     Field trials to monitor exotic pests
     The»Department»of»Agriculture»and»Food,»WA»is»widening»the»search»for»serious»exotic»grain»pests»by»enlisting»
     the»help»of»its»plant»variety»testing»program»as»a»pilot»for»field»surveillance.                                     National» grains» industry» biosecurity» co-ordinator» Lisa» Sherriff»
                                                                                                                          said»the»ultimate»aim»of»the»project»was»to»provide»the»nation’s»
                                                                                                                          international» markets» with» evidence» that» the» Australian» grains»
                                                                                                                          industry»is»free»of»specific»pests»and»diseases.
                                                                                                                          » “Continued» access» to» international» markets» requires» the»
                                                                                                                          Australian» grains» industry» to» gather» negative» surveillance» data»
                                                                                                                          for» exotic» pests» and» diseases» all» the» way» from» farm» to» port,”»
                                                                                                                          she»said.
50                                                                                                                        » “The» department’s» variety» trials» provide» an» ideal» opportunity»
                                                                                                                          for» additional» surveillance» for» exotic» pests» as» there» are» more»
                                                                                                                          than»150»trials»run»annually»across»the»State,»both»on»research»
                                                                                                                          stations»and»on»farms.”»
                                                                                                                          The»trials»include»many»grains»crops»such»as»wheat,»barley,»oats»
                                                                                                                          and»pulses.
                                                                                                                          “Information» collected» from» the» surveillance» system» will»
                                                                                                                          contribute»to»Western»Australia’s»claims»for»area»freedom,»which»
                                                                                                                          in»turn»will»help»to»protect»market»access,”»Ms»Sherriff»said.
                                                                                                                          Exotic» pests» that» will» be» looked» out» for» in» this» season’s» trials»
                                                                                                                          include»exotic»rust»strains»such»as»Ug99»and»barley»stripe»rust,»
                                                                                                                          branched»broomrape»weed,»and»in»stored»grain»Karnal»bunt»and»
                                                                                                                          Khapra»beetle.
                                                                                                                          Ms»Sherriff»said»the»use»of»the»department’s»variety»trials»not»
                                                                                                                          only» provided» for» expanded» surveillance» but» gave» the» added»
                                                                                                                          bonus»of»increasing»the»chances»of»early»detection»of»a»serious»
                                                                                                                          exotic»pest.

     Each year the Department of Agriculture and Food, WA carries out thousands                                           “A»key»factor»in»early»detection»of»a»new»pest»incursion»is»that»
     of kilometres of crop trials from Kununurra in the north of the State through to
     Esperance in the south and throughout agricultural areas in the Eastern States. The
                                                                                                                          it»allows»for»prompt»control»measures»to»prevent»its»spread,”»Ms»
     trials offer a valuable opportunity to monitor for exotic pests and diseases which                                   Sherriff»said.»“In»this»way,»the»impact»on»the»grains»industry»is»
     could devastate the Australian grains industry if they became endemic.
                                                                                                                          lessened.”



                                                                                                                      d e p a r t m e n t o f a G r i c u lt u r e a n d f o o d , W a
                                     Biosecurity tool boosts market access
                                     New»hand-held»computer»technology»is»being»trialled»during»the»summer»of»2010»with»the»potential»to»improve»
                                     protection»of»Australia’s»vast»grains»storage»system,»generate»cost»savings»and»enable»greater»market»access.»

                                     Personal» digital» assistants» (PDAs)» are» being» used» to» transform»        Phosphine» is» the» chemical» used» to» fumigate» grain» stores» against»
                                     manual»paper»trails»into»electronic»information»that»can»be»used»to»           pests»and»diseases»but»is»only»effective»when»applied»at»the»correct»
                                     prove»freedom»from»specific»diseases»and»pests»and»also»alert»grain»           concentration»and»distributed»evenly»throughout»the»grain»store.
                                     managers»to»vulnerabilities»in»their»storage»systems.
                                                                                                                    “The»PDAs»can»be»used»to»map»phosphine»levels»across»bulk»stores»
                                     The» Department» of» Agriculture» and» Food,» WA» is» leading» the»            of» grain» thereby» highlighting» potential» leaks» or» inconsistencies,»
                                     Cooperative»Research»Centre»for»National»Plant»Biosecurity»project,»
                                     in»association»with»the»CBH»Group,»ABB»Grain,»GrainCorp»Operations»
                                                                                                                    which»the»grain»handler»can»then»act»upon»before»they»become»a»
                                                                                                                    problem»-»generating»considerable»cost»savings,”»he»said.»
                                                                                                                                                                                                51
                                     and»other»Western»Australian»agriculture»organisations.»
                                                                                                                    The»PDA»software»can»also»be»used»to»document»the»GPS»location»of»
                                     Department»researcher»Rob»Emery»said»the»potential»for»the»systems»            suspect»specimens»and»send»a»photograph»of»the»sample»via»email.»
                                     to»improve»market»access»would»be»invaluable.»                                 A»preliminary»identification»can»be»performed»via»the»internet»before»
                                                                                                                    the»sample»is»packaged»complete»with»a»bar»code»printed»in»the»field»
                                     “In»this»day»and»age»markets»expect»credible»evidence»to»validate»
                                                                                                                    providing»a»valuable»chain-of-evidence.
                                     claims»that»grains»are»free»from»pests»and»diseases,”»he»said.»
                                     “These» new» PDA» based» systems» will» be» able» to» document»
                                     surveillance»results»more»accurately»and»securely»to»prove»freedom»            The Department of Agriculture
                                                                                                                    and Food, WA plays a crucial
                                     from»pest»and»disease»risks.»This»will»greatly»assist»market»access»           role in maintaining WA’s pest-
                                                                                                                    free status and preserving the
                                     for»Australian»grains.”»                                                       State’s reputation as a major
                                                                                                                    exporter of clean produce.
                                     Mr»Emery»said»the»use»of»PDAs»would»also»help»to»improve»phosphine»            New technology such as
                                     treatment»of»stored»grain»by»allowing»more»extensive»monitoring»and»           the department-developed
                                                                                                                    hand held pest and disease
                                     on-site»evaluation»of»fumigation»effectiveness.»                               monitors (pictured) enables
                                                                                                                    accurate, traceable and
                                                                                                                    speedy surveillance of
                                                                                                                    the State’s grains pest
                                                                                                                    and disease status.

                                                                                        Flat grain beetle
                                                                                        Common pest of stored
                                                                                       grain. Maintaining sealed
                                                                                         farm silos increases the
                                                                                     effectiveness of phosphine
                                                                                fumigation, the procedure used
                                                                                to control pests of stored grain.




Grains industry investment profile
     Forensic science used to curb
     crop pests
     Department» of» Agriculture» and» Food,» WA» plant»
     pathologist»Dominie»Wright»has»taken»a»temporary»
     career»shift»into»forensic»science»–»with»the»aim»of»
     thwarting»the»spread»of»exotic»crop»diseases»within»
     Australia.
                                                                                        Fungal spores such as stripe rust (right) are easily picked up and transported on clothing. Department pathologist Dominie Wright (below) is developing a forensic testing kit that
     Using» detective» methods» more» commonly» found» on» television»                  could eventually be used at Australian airports to identify exotic fungal diseases being inadvertently brought into Australia by overseas visitors and returning travellers.
52   episodes»of»CSI,»Ms»Wright»is»developing»a»forensic»test»to»identify»
     exotic» fungal» spores» on» the» clothing,» shoes» and» hair» of» people»
     entering»Australia»from»foreign»shores.»»                                          Staff» will» be» given» a» forensic» kit» to» take» with» them» into» the» field.»
                                                                                        Each»kit»contains»forensic»tape,»sample»bags»and»a»reply-paid»return»
     “I’ll»be»using»forensic»tape»to»finger-print»any»fungal»spores»that»have»
                                                                                        envelope»to»Ms»Wright’s»laboratory.»
     attached»themselves»to»people»returning»from»overseas»travel,”»she»
     said.»“The»aim»is»to»develop»a»method»to»identify»foreign»fungal»spores»           Ms»Wright»must»first»determine»how»to»extract»the»spores»from»the»
     quickly»so»that»we»can»act»swiftly»to»minimise»the»spread»of»potentially»          forensic»tape»and»then»develop»a»quick»diagnostic»test»to»identify»the»
     damaging»fungal»diseases»within»the»Australian»cropping»industry.”»                extracted»fungal»spores.

     Identifying» exotic» pathogens» before» they» enter»Australia» would» be»          “We» will» investigate» whether» a» laboratory» method» called» mass»
     highly»preferable»to»dealing»with»an»exotic»disease»outbreak»once»it»              spectrometry» can» be» used» to» identify» the» fungal» pathogens,”» Ms»
     has»spread»as»many»diseases»are»endemic»and»not»controllable»by»                   Wright»said.»“Mass»spectrometry»is»a»relatively»quick»technique»that»
     the»time»they»are»detected»at»a»field»level.                                       can»process»many»samples»at»once,»which»would»be»a»real»benefit»
                                                                                        in» identifying» potential» incursions» of» exotic» pathogens» as» speedily»
     Another»aspect»of»the»research»is»to»identify»clothing»materials»that»
                                                                                        as»possible.”
     are» poor» recipients» of» fungal» spores.» “If» we» can» design» research»
     clothing» that» resists» fungal» spores,» as» well» as» effective» ways» to»       Currently»AQIS»only»screens»for»prohibited»quarantine»material»that»
     thoroughly» decontaminate» clothing» we» will» reduce» the» likelihood»                                                                                »
                                                                                        can»be»seen»with»the»naked»eye»at»Australian»international»airports.»
     of» researchers» bringing» foreign» fungal» spores» into» Australia» from»         Inspectors»do»not»have»the»time,»resources»or»the»skills»to»inspect»
     overseas,”»Ms»Wright»said.                                                         for»‘micro’»material»such»as»plant»pathogens,»that»may»be»entering»
                                                                                        Australia»on»passengers’»hair,»clothing»or»footwear.»»
     The» fungal» forensic» test» will» initially» be» trialled» on» all» department»
     staff» working» in» field» situations.»The» aim» is» to» develop» a» working»      If»the»mass»spectrometry»method»is»successful»it»could»be»used»at»
     forensic»test»based»on»fungal»spores»that»cause»common»cereal»rust»                airports»to»identify,»in»real»time,»exotic»fungal»spores»on»passengers»
     diseases»already»endemic»in»Australia.                                             coming»in»from»overseas.



                                                                                                                                                                                   d e p a r t m e n t o f a G r i c u lt u r e a n d f o o d , W a
                                      Exotic rust being resisted with global
                                      breeding effort
                                      The»Department»of»Agriculture»and»Food,»WA»and»the»cereal»breeding»company»InterGrain,»
                                      of»which»the»department»is»a»major»shareholder,»are»part»of»a»global»effort»to»breed»wheat»
                                      varieties»resistant»to»the»devastating»rust»disease»Ug99.»So-called»because»the»rust»strain»
                                      was»initially»discovered»in»Uganda»in»1999,»Ug99»has»the»potential»to»wipe»out»80»per»
                                      cent»of»wheat»crops»worldwide.»»
                                      Ug99»is» a» more»virulent» strain» of»the»now» ubiquitous» fungal» disease» stem» rust,»which»
                                      wiped»out»40»per»cent»of»the»US»wheat»crop»when»it»first»appeared»in»the»1940s.»Of»the»
                                      50»genes»known»for»resistance»to»stem»rust,»only»10»work»even»partially»against»Ug99.»       »
                                      Plant»breeders»worldwide»are»in»a»race»against»time»to»develop»wheat»varieties»resistant»                  53
                                      to»Ug99,»which»so»far»has»spread»from»Uganda»to»Kenya»(2001),»Ethiopia»(2003),»Yemen»
                                      and»Sudan»(2006)»and»Iran»(2007).»»
                                      As»part»of»the»wheat»breeding»program»now»run»by»Intergrain,»advanced»wheat»lines»are»sent»
                                      from»WA»to»Kenya»each»year»to»test»their»resistance»to»Ug99.»Of»the»several»hundred»lines»
                                      sent»in»the»past»few»years»only»a»few»per»cent»show»full»resistance»to»the»fungal»disease.»»
                                      Of»concern,»is»the»fact»that»a»mutational»derivative»of»Ug99»has»been»found»to»overcome»
                                      an»important»gene»for»stem»rust»resistance»in»Australian»wheat»varieties.»»
                                      The»aim»is»to»combine»resistance»genes»into»wheat»to»provide»a»multi-pronged»resistance»
                                      that»should»make»it»more»difficult»for»the»fungal»strain»to»overcome.»




                                     Advanced wheat breeding lines are sent from Western Australia each year to Kenya to be screened for
                                     resistance to the devestating fungal disease UG99. While Australia is free of the disease it is important
                                     that disease-resistant wheat varieties are developed in case the disease makes it way into Australia.




Grains industry investment profile
     Fungus makes for foul flour
     Department»of»Agriculture»and»Food,»WA»pathologist»Dominie»Wright»
     is»part»of»an»international»effort»to»thwart»the»spread»of»the»cereal»
     fungus»Karnal»bunt»–»a»disease»that»can»render»wheat»flour»unfit»for»
     human»consumption.
     Should»the»fungus»enter»Australia,»many»international»wheat»markets»would»place»a»ban»on»
     Australian»wheat»imports»or»downgrade»wheat»destined»for»human»consumption»to»lower»
     value»animal»feed.

54   Although»the»fungus»does»not»present»a»risk»to»human»health,»karnal»bunt»reduces»flour»
     quality»by»replacing»part»or»all»of»the»wheat»seed»with»a»black»powder»that»smells»like»
     rotting»fish.»
     Ms» Wright» in» collaboration» with» plant» pathology» colleagues» in» New» South» Wales» has»
     developed»a»national»contingency»plan»for»Karnal»bunt»that»details»the»steps»to»be»taken»in»
     the»event»of»a»karnal»bunt»outbreak»and»also»outlines»how»to»identify»the»disease,»which»is»
     difficult»to»distinguish»from»other»bunt-like»diseases.
     “High»standards»of»quarantine»are»extremely»important»for»Australia»to»maintain»its»present»
     free»status»for»Karnal»bunt,”»said»Ms»Wright.»“Any»possible»incursion»of»the»fungus»would»
     cause»severe»disruption»to»Australia’s»international»trade.”                                         Department pathologist Dominie Wright (third from right) is part of an international effort to thwart the movement of the exotic wheat disease
                                                                                                          Karnal bunt. Pictured are participants of a workshop held in Western Australia to learn how to identify the spores of the disease. Karnal bunt
     Ms»Wright»said»an»extensive»education»campaign»about»karnal»bunt»had»been»carried»out»               replaces all or part of the wheat seed with a black powder that smells like rotting fish (below right).

     over»the»past»few»years»aimed»at»producers»and»grain»handlers.
     Western» Australia» is» the» only» State» that» has» been» surveying» harvested» grain» over» the»
     past» decade» to» demonstrate» area» freedom» from» Karnal» bunt.» Ms»Wright» has» collected»
     surveillance»information»to»document»the»range»of»fungal»spores»in»harvested»grain»that»
     commonly»get»mistaken»for»Karnal»bunt.


     “Any possible incursion of the fungus would
     cause severe disruption to Australia’s
     international trade.” Dominie Wright


                                                                                                                                                               d e p a r t m e n t o f a G r i c u lt u r e a n d f o o d , W a

								
To top