NOTIFIABLE ANIMAL DISEASE CONTINGENCY PLAN TEMPLATE

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NOTIFIABLE ANIMAL DISEASE CONTINGENCY PLAN TEMPLATE Powered By Docstoc
					                   Essex Resilience Forum

    Notifiable Animal Diseases Operational
                  Procedures

                        Avian Influenza




Including information on;
Foot & Mouth Disease
Newcastle Disease
Classical Swine Fever
Blue Tongue Disease




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Contents

                 Subject                                           Page
                 Foreword                                          5
                 Distribution List                                 6
                 Amendment List                                    7
Chapter          Subject                                           Page
1.               Introduction                                      8
2.               Aim                                               8
2.1              Objectives                                        8
2.2              National and Regional Context                     9
3.               Risk                                              10
4.               Key External Stakeholders                         11
4.1              Department for Environment, Food and Rural        11
                 Affairs (Defra)
4.2              Animal Health Service (AH SERVICE)                12
4.3              Essex Police                                      14
4.4              Environment Agency (EA)                           14
4.5              Department of Health (DH)                         15
4.6              Health Protection Agency (HPA)                    15
4.7              Government Offices for the East of England (GO-   16
                 East)
5.               Wider Stakeholders                                17
5.1              The National Farmers Union (NFU)/ Farmers         17
                 Union of Wales (FUW) /Country Land and
                 Business Association (CLA)
5.2              Local Veterinary Practitioners                    17
5.3              Rural Representative Bodies                       18
5.4              Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to    18
                 Animals (RSPCA)
5.5              Charities                                         18
6.               National and Local Disease Control Structures     19
6.1              National Disease Control Structure –Flowchart     19
6.2              Local Disease Control Structure - Flowchart       20
7.               Plan Activation – Essex County Council            21
                 Functions and Responsibilities
7.1              Animal Health and Welfare Enforcement             21
7.2              Essex County Council Emergency Planning           21
                 Unit
7.2.1            Initiation                                        21
7.2.2            Activation                                        22
7.3              Communications and Public Relations               23
7.3.1            Initiation and Activation                         24
7.3.2            Stand Down and Recovery                           25
7.3.3            Role of Boroughs and Districts                    25
7.4              Highways and Public Rights of Way                 26
                 Responsibilities
7.5              Elected Members                                   27
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7.6               Wider Local Authority Services                      27
                  Responsibilities
8.                Infected Premises and Restricted Zones              28
8.1               Suspect Premise                                     28
8.2               Infected Premise (IP)                               29
8.3               Contact Premise or Dangerous Contact                30
8.4               Temporary Control Zone (TCZ)                        30
8.5               Protection Zone (PZ)                                30
8.6               Surveillance Zone (SZ)                              31
8.7               Restricted Zone (RZ)                                31
8.8               Vaccination Surveillance Zone                       32
Figure 1          Protection & Surveillance Zone – Avian influenza    33
Appendices Subject                                                    Page
Appendix A        Notifiable Disease List                             34
Appendix B        Notifiable Animal Disease Suspect Report Form       36
Appendix C        Essex County Council Internal Contact List          39
Appendix D        Delivery Partner and Key Stakeholder Contact List   41
Appendix E        Bio Security Guidance                               43
Appendix F        Duty Officer Call out Procedure for a report of     44
                  Avian Influenza
Appendix G        Foot and Mouth Disease                              47
Appendix H        Classical Swine Fever                               49
Appendix I        Newcastle Disease                                   50
Appendix J        Bluetongue Disease                                  51

Please remember that this Contingency Plan must be used in conjunction with
the Defra Exotic Animal Diseases Generic Contingency Plan (and annexes)
and the Avian Influenza (HPAI) Local Contingency Plan (Essex Trading
Standards).




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Foreword

Chair of the Essex Resilience Forum

The Civil Contingencies Act (CCA) 2004 establishes a new statutory
framework for emergency planning at the local level. It ensures that all
organisations at the core of an emergency response work together to prepare
for major emergencies within Essex. This will improve our ability to deal with
the consequences of a major emergency by improving the planning process at
a local level and by building stronger links between the responding
organisations.
All the organisations within the County of Essex that are involved in civil
protection have joined together to form the Essex Resilience Forum. The
forum is the principal mechanism for multi-agency co-operation under the Civil
Contingencies Act (CCA). The Forum is chaired by a lead officer from a
Category 1 responder agency, in this case Essex Fire & Rescue Service. It
involves emergency planners and relevant officers from all Category 1
responders including the emergency services, other local agencies, and
health professionals. It also includes representatives from Category 2
responders who are likely to be involved in certain emergencies; e.g. utilities
and transport companies. The Essex Resilience Forum is currently working
hard to deliver the new duties under the CCA.

Chairman of the Essex Resilience Forum




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Distribution List



Internal Contacts (to ECC)
Essex Trading Standards - Animal Health and Welfare Enforcement
Emergency Planning Unit
Communication and Public Relations
Highways Services
Financial Services
Facilities Management
Human Resources

External Contacts
All Essex Local Authorities – Districts, Boroughs & Unitaries
Southend – on – Sea Trading Standards- Animal Health and Welfare
Enforcement
Thurrock Trading Standards - Animal Health and Welfare Enforcement

Animal Health (Service) – Divisional Veterinary Manager
Go East - Resilience Team
Environment Agency
Essex Police
Health Protection Agency
Farming Industry Representatives
Essex Fire & Rescue Service
Essex PCT‟s (x5)
East of England Ambulance Service – Essex




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Amendment List

Amendment               Name
          Date                             Signature
Number                  (Block Capitals)




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      1. Introduction

This plan summarises the Essex response to an outbreak of Avian influenza
(High Pathogenic/H5N1) within the County. This will allow a co-ordinated
response from partner agencies and other Category 1 & 2 Responders. This
plan is linked to the DEFRA Exotic Animal Disease Generic Contingency plan.

This plan has been created in response to the perceived high level of risk of
Avian Influenza to Essex shown within the Essex Community Risk Register.
This is also supported by that fact the neighbouring counties are also
considered to be at risk from Avian influenza, and have indeed suffered from
outbreaks.

Originally the Risk Assessment Working Group maintained the Community
Risk Register and reviewed the risks in each category of threat or hazard, of
which animal disease is one area. This group no longer exists as the
structure of the Essex Resilience Forum has been streamlined and Animal
Health now sits under the remit of the Local Authority Working Group.

Animal Health and Welfare Enforcement service within (Essex) Trading
Standards will take the lead when responding to an outbreak situation whether
confirmed or not.

2.      Aim

The aim of the plan is to set out a co-ordinated response to an outbreak of
avian influenza by providing structures, processes and arrangements to
deliver the objectives set out below.


2.1     Objectives

Assisting Essex Trading Standards (and Animal Health (formally known as the
State Veterinary Service) an executive agency of DEFRA), in the control of
any outbreak of avian influenza in Essex.

Provide accurate and timely information to the public, local businesses and
the Media throughout the duration of the outbreak until the incident has been
closed.

Manage the wider impact of avian influenza of specific response measures to
minimise disruption to the Countryside, transport networks and to rural
communities within Essex.




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2.2    National and Regional Context

The Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) is the lead
government department in the event of a notifiable animal disease outbreak in
England and Wales, and has the responsibility for ensuring national
preparedness for such an event. [Therefore the information within this plan
should be used in conjunction with the Defra Exotic Animal Disease Generic
Contingency Plan, which is available at
http://www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/diseases/control/contingency/index.htm].

It is essential however, that each Category 1 Responding
agency creates and maintains its own plan in relation to Avian
Influenza.




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3.     Risk

The Risk Assessment of an outbreak of avian influenza is detailed in the
Community Risk Register, which can be found on the Essex Resilience Forum
web site. http://www.essexcc.gov.uk/microsites/essex_resilience/

Providing a timely and appropriate response to an outbreak of Avian influenza
is one of the top priorities for Category 1 Responders within the Essex
Resilience Forum and as such is working closely with Essex Trading
Standards and other partner agencies.

Avian influenza is a highly contagious viral disease that can potentially infect
most species of birds. The severity depends upon the strain of the virus and
the type of bird infected. Some strains known as 'highly pathogenic avian
influenza' (HPAI) viruses can cause severe disease in poultry, with a high
death rate (up to 100%). The disease can develop so rapidly that birds may
die without having shown any previous signs of disease.

Other strains known as 'low pathogenic avian influenza' (LPAI) viruses usually
results in milder, less significant disease. However, certain LPAI viruses can
mutate into highly pathogenic strains.

One of the earliest outbreaks of Highly Pathogenic Avian influenza (HPAI)
began in poultry in South Korea in mid-December 2003, and has affected
many countries in Asia. The outbreak is still ongoing in parts of China and
South East Asia. More recently there have been reports of infection of birds in
South East Russia, Kazakhstan, Turkey, Greece and Croatia and also the UK.

Information about current outbreaks of Avian Flu is available on the World
Health Organization website at:
http://www.who.int/csr/disease/avian_influenza/chronology/en




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4.     Key External Stakeholders
Communication between all partners and stakeholders is essential to the
effective control of an animal disease situation.

4.1    Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra)

Defra is the lead agency (government department) when preparing for and
managing a notifiable animal disease outbreak in England.

Defra have produced and maintain an Exotic Animal Disease Generic
Contingency Plan to facilitate this role, with specific annexes on foot and
mouth disease, avian influenza, Newcastle disease and classical swine fever,
and information is available on Bluetongue Disease. The national Exotic
Animal Disease Generic Contingency Plan is available on the Defra website,
and released for public consultation on an annual basis.

http://www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/diseases/control/contingency/index.htm

Defra will be responsible for establishing a National Disease Control Centre
(NDCC) to lead in managing the tactical level response to a disease outbreak.
The NDCC will include representatives from all relevant central government
departments and agencies, operational partners and wider stakeholders.

The NDCC provides a co-ordinated response to the information received from
the Strategic Group; to receive operational feedback, collate information and
provide accurate reports and devise tactics for operational implementation.
The NDCC provides information and guidance to the Defra Emergency
Management Board and Civil Contingencies Committee (CCC) via the Animal
Disease Policy Group.

Overview of Responsibilities – Defra
Pre event
  Produce, update and review a national contingency plan for notifiable
     animal diseases, in consideration of those developed by the Devolved
     Administrations.
  Regular exercising of national contingency plan
  Co-ordinate effective liaison with other government departments,
     government agencies, operational partners and wider stakeholders on an
     ongoing basis, and in the event of an animal disease outbreak.
  Create and implement legislation as necessary.
  Lead in the effective provision of information to delivery partners, wider
     government bodies, wider stakeholders, and the general public and
     media interests.
  Collate database for National Poultry Register and disseminate to
     stakeholders




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During event
  Establish and manage the National Disease Control Centre (NDCC) in
    the event of a notifiable animal disease outbreak.
  Ensure the rapid establishment of the Defra Emergency Management
    Board and Civil Contingencies Committee (CCC) or CCC (O) at official
    level.
  Make policy decisions as required, upon consideration of veterinary
    opinion and advice from appropriate delivery partners and stakeholders.
  Lead in the effective provision of information to delivery partners, wider
    government bodies, wider stakeholders, and the general public and
    media interests.
  Maintain awareness through the NDCC Human Resources Cell, of the
    resource pressures upon Defra staff, the Animal Health (State Veterinary
    Service) local vets and wider delivery partners.
  Fulfil national and European financial and auditing requirements.
  Address national procurement requirements.
  Ensure the needs and interests of the British farming community, the
    livestock population and general public are effectively balanced and
    represented.


4.2   Animal Health Service (AH) (previously known as State Veterinary
Service)

The AH Service was made an Executive Agency of Defra in April 2005. The
AH Service take the lead on all operational aspects of emergency
preparedness and control in relation to animal disease at both a national and
local level across Great Britain.

The AH Service will develop national and local animal disease contingency
plans, and lead the implementation of contingency plans if required.

The AH Service regularly test both national and local contingency plans
through contingency exercises. The AH Service ensure that operational
partners and stakeholders are engaged in the development and testing of the
contingency plans. This ensures all key parties have a common
understanding of roles and responsibilities in a disease outbreak.

At a national level, the AH Service has overall responsibility for tactical and
operational requirements, including taking a key role in the implementation of
the National Disease Control Centre (NDCC). The AH Service will ensure that
a Joint Co-ordination Centre is established within the NDCC to collect and
collate outbreak intelligence, escalate data to the strategic level, provide
tactical guidance to the operational level and facilitate two way
communications between disease eradication personnel.




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The AH Service also have a significant input into the decisions made at a
strategic level, and play a fundamental role in ensuring effective
communication takes place across central government and delivery partners.

The Animal Health Divisional Office(s) (AHDO) at a local level have
responsibility for establishing and managing the implementation of Local
Disease Control Centres (LDCCs) where appropriate. The Local Disease
Control Centres will facilitate the implementation of disease control measures
at an operational level, and enable effective co-ordination of all delivery
partners and stakeholders involved in controlling the disease at a ground
level.

The AH Service will use pre-arranged operational instructions contained within
the Veterinary, Instructions, Procedures and Emergency Routines (VIPER)
Manual when working at a local level.

Overview of National Responsibilities – Animal Health (AH Service)
Pre event
    Develop and implement national animal disease contingency plans.
    Organise and lead national contingency exercises at appropriate
      intervals.
    Organise regular testing of “local” animal disease contingency plans.
      (Local Authority Trading Standards Plans)
    Engage with key Defra officials, wider central government departments
      and key operational partners.

During event
   Overall responsibility for operational requirements in the event of
      disease outbreak, providing necessary input into strategic and tactical
      areas.
   Engage with key Defra officials, wider central government departments
      and key operational partners.
   Liaise with Government Officers for the Regions.
   Establish Joint Co-ordination Centre within NDCC.
   Co-ordinate and direct activities between LDCCs as required.

Overview of Local Responsibilities – Animal Health (AH Service)

Pre event
    Co-ordination of local disease control activity
    Develop and implement local animal disease contingency plans.
    Organise regular testing of local animal disease contingency plans.

During event
   Provide materials personnel and information to reduce the risk of
      spread of disease from infected to un-infected stock
   Co-ordination of local disease control activity


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      Establish a Local Disease Control Centre (LDCC) to co-ordinate the
       local aspects of the disease control operation.
      Ensure that local operational partners and stakeholders are aware of
       their responsibilities in a disease situation, and are actively engaged
       into the appropriate communication network.
      Provide veterinary resource for disease testing requirements.
      Lead in the identification of tracing the source of the disease and
       possible contact animals.
      Co-ordinate the effective serving of notices and movement licences.
      Work with delivery partners to organise enforcement activities based on
       local intelligence and consideration of disease risk.
      Co-ordinate slaughter activities on all premises where stock are to be
       slaughtered for disease control purposes
      Ensure valuations on livestock being slaughtered for disease control
       purposes in accordance with legislative and policy requirements

4.3 Essex Police

Essex Police will fulfil a number of specific roles in relation to an animal
disease outbreak, in addition to their wider role in relation to maintaining order
and protecting the public. Specifically the police will work closely with Essex
County Council and the local district/borough/unitary council to enforce
movement controls and the policing of control zones.

The work of Essex Police in an animal disease outbreak will be dependent
upon the severity and nature of other requirements being placed upon them.
Police are able to provide assistance to the AH SERVICE through the
provision of specialist knowledge in the area of management and
co-ordination of major incidents.

Overview of Responsibilities – Police
During event
   Assist local authorities with the policing of Surveillance Zones and
      enforcement of movement controls.
   Work in partnership with Essex County Council and the AH Service to
      consider local intelligence of flocks and keepers.
   Manage disturbances to the peace or obstruction to enforcement and
      veterinary activities.
   Provide representation at the Local Disease Control Centre (LDCC)
      where resource allows.
   Preventing public access to infected premises and closed rights of
      way/land

4.4 Environment Agency

The Environment Agency is the lead organisation for protecting and improving
the environment in England and Wales.


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The Environment Agency will work closely with other delivery partners to
handle and structure incidents in a co-ordinated manner, to reduce the
environmental consequences of the outbreak including advising on
environmental risks.

Overview of Responsibilities – Environment Agency
Pre event
    Participate in national contingency exercises to provide representation
      for the Environment Agency.
    Work to minimise the environmental impact of the disease situation.
    Notify and advise delivery partners on potential and actual
      environmental risks.

During event
   Represent the Environment Agency at the National Disease Control
      Centre (NDCC) and Joint Co-ordination Centre.
   Provide representation at the LDCC.
   Assess and advise on the environmental risk posed by the disease
      outbreak.
   Work to minimise the environmental impact of the disease situation.
   Notify and advise delivery partners on potential and actual
      environmental risks.
   To issue relevant permits before waste management / disposal
      activities commence based upon appropriate risk assessments.

4.5 Department of Health

The Department of Health role is to provide clear advice on the human health
implications of an animal disease outbreak.

The Department‟s role in the event of an outbreak would be to provide
strategic guidance and advice on prophylaxis and treatment where necessary.
This would be facilitated through the HPA and through local Primary Care
Trusts.

4.6 Health Protection Agency

The Health Protection Agency is the policy lead on the human health aspects
of an animal disease outbreak.

The major role of the Health Protection Agency is to provide better protection
against infectious disease and other dangers to health. One of the core
aspects of this role is to identify and respond to health hazards and
emergencies.




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Overview of Responsibilities - HPA

Pre event
    Ensure there are communication links into Essex County Council for
      lead agency information
    Assess the impact of disease control measures on human health.

During Event
   Respond to health related queries from the public, local health staff and
      delivery partners.
   Ensure continuity of health care in infected areas.
   Contribute to communication and briefing requests.
   Provide appropriate national representation within the National Disease
      Control Centre.

4.7       Government Offices for East of England GO-East

The key function of the Government Office - East is to improve co-ordination
and communication between central government and local responders and
other organisations to ensure that Essex (and East of England) is prepared to
respond to events which would affect most or all of the region or which could
overwhelm any locality. This role can assist in the co-ordination of Essex
County Council and neighbouring Councils at a regional level, as well as wider
delivery partners and stakeholders.

GO - East work to provide effective co-ordination of all emergency planning
functions at a regional level, thus have established regional contacts and links
to help support the logistical pressures upon all delivery partners.

Overview of Responsibilities – Government Offices for the Regions

         Responsible for the co-ordination and resilience of government at a
          regional level through Regional Resilience Forums.
         Key to identifying staff and other resources from Government
          departments and other agencies at a regional level.




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5.     Wider Stakeholders response to Avian Influenza
Essex County Council and the affected local authority must consider the wide
ranging needs and interests of their local community in the event of a
notifiable animal disease outbreak. The immediate needs of the farming
community and the wider needs of the local economy and tourism are served
by a range of representative groups that must be appreciated by local
authorities as wider stakeholders.

A list of specific contacts for each of these wider stakeholder representatives
is maintained by ECC Emergency Planning Unit and is contained in the Duty
Officer Folder for Emergency Planning (this role is covered 24 hours a day
and 7 days a week by a rota of officers) and Annex A and will be updated on a
regular basis. This will ensure rapid contact with wider stakeholders as
necessary.

Key Stakeholders

5.1    The National Farmers Union (NFU)/ Country Land and Business
       Association

Farming bodies and unions represent those people most affected by an
outbreak of notifiable animal disease. Local representatives from the farming
community can be extremely helpful in supporting the enforcement work of
local authorities, through their local knowledge, intelligence sources and in
depth awareness of farming practices. Farming representative bodies can
also provide general information on the wider impact of the disease upon local
communities from the initial disease confirmation and through the recovery
processes.

5.2    Local Veterinary Practitioners

Local Veterinary Practitioners may be able to assist with providing advice and
information to their clients on strategies being employed to combat a notifiable
disease outbreak. Co-ordination through the British Veterinary Association
regional structures and through the British Small Animals Veterinary
Association should be considered by Trading Standards.

Local Veterinary Practitioners may also be able to provide useful knowledge
to Trading Standards about the location of any unregistered animals. Such
information could be pertinent.

The AH Service may also engage private veterinary surgeons as casual
veterinary staff to assist with controlling the disease outbreak. The AH Service
already have a scheme planned whereby a pool of Local Veterinary
Inspectors (LVIs) is available on standby to perform certain veterinary
functions. The AH Service are providing training for LVIs as an emergency
preparedness measure.

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5.3    Rural Representative Bodies

Rural Bodies such as the National Trust, National Park Boards, Business
Link and Rural Commercial Organisations such as the Federation of Small
Businesses and Tourist Boards could also assist Essex Local Authorities in
evaluating the ongoing impact of the animal disease outbreak, and assist in
planning a fully comprehensive road to recovery. They will also need to be
represented as a Community or Rural community at LCC and NDCC where
necessary possibly by ECC.

5.4.1 Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA)

It is essential that the RSPCA and Trading Standards maintain strong
communication links in the event of a disease outbreak. Regular
communication will prevent duplication of resource, while allowing increased
sharing of information and the opportunity for local authorities to provide
guidance to the RSPCA on wider disease controls in place.

5.5    Charities

Charities, in particular farming charities including the Rural Stress
Information Network and the Samaritans can play a major role in
addressing the many human problems that manifest themselves during an
outbreak of notifiable animal disease. Close liaison at a local level will help
with the identification of those most in need of support and assist in the
protection of those most at risk.




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6.      National and Local Disease Control Structures for Avian
                            Influenza
6.1    National Disease Control Structure – Flowchart




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      6.2    Local Disease Control Structure – Flowchart for Avian Influenza




                                            DEFRA
                                National Disease Control Centre




 LACORS and the
  Local Authority
   Associations
                                      Animal Health Service
  Local Authorities
  Co-ordinators of                  Local Disease Control Centre
Regulatory Services/                          (LDCC)
 Local Government
    Association




                Local Authorities                                  Key Stakeholders
              (Trading Standards)




            Wider Local Authority
                Stakeholders
            (Districts & Borough
                 Authorities)




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7.     Plan Activation – Essex County Council
       Functions and Responsibilities – Avian Influenza

This section aims to provide an overview of each function throughout all
stages of an avian influenza disease situation.

Where appropriate, it also provides job specifications that should be
performed under each function should a disease situation occur.

7.1    Animal Health and Welfare Enforcement – Trading Standards

The animal health and welfare enforcement function is performed within the
Trading Standards Service of Essex County Council, and the two Unitaries.
Essex Trading Standards have created their own Operational Procedures for
responding to an outbreak of Avian influenza – please refer to Avian influenza
(HPAI) Local Contingency Plan – 07/06/06.

Essex Trading Standards share on a regular basis updated data on the UK
Poultry Register specifically for Essex in order to maintain the GIS mapped
information on poultry farm locations


7.2    Essex County Council Emergency Planning Unit

In the event of an avian „flu outbreak the Emergency Planning function will be
performed by Essex County Council Emergency Planning Unit (EPU) The
EPU can provide essential logistical, management and communication
support for those working directly in animal health and welfare enforcement,
and support to the affected Local Authority. There is a Duty Officer Folder for
Emergency Planning, this role is covered 24 hours a day and 7 days a week
by a rota of officers – this provides a direct link to the affected Local Authority
at any time night or day.

7.2.1 Initiation

The Emergency Planning Unit must be notified of any suspect avian influenza
case through informal communication channels, by Essex Trading Standards
and/or by the district/borough/unitary area directly affected.

Any information about a suspect avian influenza case should be immediately
discussed with the Animal Health and Welfare Operational Manager in
Trading Standards. This will enable a rapid evaluation of the actual situation,
and identification of any processes, facilities or resource that needs to be put
on standby to assist the enforcement team. If the suspect case is considered
to be serious then the Emergency Planning Unit must take the lead to
informally advise key internal services of the situation.


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It should be noted that not all suspect avian influenza cases will be confirmed
and therefore the avian influenza (High Pathogenic Avian influenza) Local
Contingency Plan – 07/06/06. may not always need to be formally activated.
In such circumstances, anyone that has been informally advised of the
situation should be contacted again to advise that the results have proved
negative.

7.2.2 Activation

Upon formally activating this plan, the Emergency Planning Unit will:
(see Appendix F – Duty Officer Call Out procedure)

         notify the
             o County Emergency Planning Officer
             o Head of Corporate Resources
             o Chief Executive of the situation
          and the political leader(s) of the local authority.

         inform the “affected1” Local Authority (or Authorities if cross border) of
          the potential incident, and offer support.

         Liaise regularly between the Emergency Planning Unit and the Animal
          Health and Welfare Operational Manager to ensure that resource,
          equipment, communication, property or health and safety requirements
          are identified. The Emergency Planning Unit will then lead in ensuring
          these requirements are fulfilled and issues resolved.

         activate the County Emergency Response Centre

         mobilise/put on standby the necessary County Emergency Planning
          Liaison Group members (CEPLG2) to bring it to operational status.

         Liaise with and utilise “Contact Essex” as a local help line if necessary.
          There is scripted information within the Avian influenza (HPAI) Local
          Contingency Plan – 07/06/06.

         Utilise GIS mapping information which shows all Poultry Farms/flocks
          across Essex to identify “vulnerable” areas, and plot the relevant zone
          areas.




1 Affected – the Local Authority area in which the Infected Premises is located or where a number of wild birds have
been found.
2 CEPLG – County Emergency Planning Liaison Group this is made up of Senior Managers from each
Service/Directorate within the County Council who would be able to make decisions and provide appropriate
responses if required in times of “emergency”.


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         consider communication with the neighbouring local authority (to the
          affected area as there maybe knock on affects with regards to transport
          etc), and with external stakeholders, in partnership with the
          Communication and Public Relations team. This would be managed by
          the Emergency Planning Unit.
         ensure that lessons identified are documented and fed back into the
          overall emergency management system.


CEPLG should meet regularly to discuss the holistic impact upon the local
community, and act as an escalation point for major concerns. It may be
prudent to invite appropriate elected members and key external stakeholders.

The Emergency Planning Unit must ensure that effective communication is
taking place across the different local authority services, and the required
information is reaching elected members. This work will be led by the
Communications and Public Relations team.

It must also maintain an awareness of the wider and long term impact of the
notifiable animal disease outbreak, and direct the CEPLG to begin to consider
the recovery processes that will need to be put in place.


7.3       Communications and Public Relations

Successful communication is essential to the control and eradication of
a notifiable animal disease and to the effective protection of the whole
local community.

The declaration of a notifiable animal disease outbreak will provoke
widespread public concern and will rapidly attract the attention of the local,
national and even international media.

The Essex County Council will need to work constructively with the affected
Local Authority and all delivery partners and stakeholders to co-ordinate the
media response to communicate quickly and accurately with the public and
relevant organisations upon the nature of the outbreak, its implications, and
what action people should take.

It is essential that any communications are accurate, up to date and are
consistent with the national and regional information being provided by other
delivery partners and stakeholders.

Defra will co-ordinate the media strategy from central government. As
such, the local authority Communications and Public Relations function will
need to co-ordinate their own media response in line with Government
strategy via the Local Disease Control Centre (LDCC) and the Government
News Network (GNN). It would be useful to create a holding statement
deferring to Defra to issue in the early stages of the suspected/confirmed
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outbreak. It is also essential to consider localised issues and the direct effects
on the local Community.

The Communications and Public Relations function must engage effectively
with the Animal Health and Welfare function to ensure that all internal and
external communications are accurate and up to date.

The Communications & Public Relations department must work closely with
the affected Local Authority Press Officers and utilise existing
Communications Strategies until specific information is forthcoming from
Defra. This will include the Communications Strategy for Animal Diseases
created by the Media & Public Information Working Group under the Essex
Resilience Forum of which all Local Authority Press Officers (and all Cat 1
Responders) are a member of.

From previous outbreaks it is vital that the local Community is kept informed of
what is going on. Therefore it may be prudent for the local press officers to
report on local information and procedures in general.


7.3.1 Initiation and Activation

Upon formally activating this plan, the Communications & Public Relations
team will:

      Confirm all information given and received is accurate

      Engage with the ECC Emergency Planning Unit to ensure internal
       communications are active and implemented within CEPLG, providing
       information to Members and to the local community.

      Reflect the information posted on the DEFRA website.
       www.defra.gov.uk

      Ensure that elected members have current information, and respond to
       their queries as appropriate

      Consider all means of public information, including local authority
       website, and arranging for leaflets and posters to be circulated via
       libraries, one-stop shops, and tourist information centres where
       appropriate. Where appropriate provide a “talking lead” for Essex
       County Council – the Portfolio holder may be an appropriate choice.
       This would be in co-ordination with the affected Local Authority and
       Defra via Trading Standards.

      Prepare public information messages for transmission on local radio
       and television.

      Work with the Emergency Planning unit to consider the implementation
       of a local help line, including the provision of guidance for telephone
Compiler R Hutchinson                                                          24
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       operators. The use of “Contact Essex” will be discussed; there is
       scripted information within the Avian influenza (HPAI) Local
       Contingency Plan – 07/06/06.

      Contribute to the lessons identified enquiry and implementation of
       subsequent recommendations.


(The Defra website will be a key source of information in the outbreak of a
disease providing information on infected premises, details of infected areas,
disease information, control measures and restrictions, legislative changes,
updated information on emergency vaccination and advice to the public,
farmers and agencies involved in the response).

The Communications and Public Relations team should ensure that ongoing
management of information during an Avian influenza outbreak adheres to
any applicable media liaison plans that have been put in place to cope with
events that generate a high level of media and public interest.

7.3.2 Stand Down and Recovery

It is likely that an Avian influenza outbreak would remain of interest to the
public after the incident has ended. The Communications and Public Relations
department may therefore want to keep the local emergency communications
plan running after the specific contingency plan has been stood down.

7.3.3 Role of Borough and District Councils

The Role of Local Authorities in Avian Influenza Outbreak as stated by
LGA

Animal Health & Welfare and Local Authority Environmental Health Officers
will: -

      Have plans in place for the local authority‟s response to the various
       stages of a notifiable animal disease outbreak (Defra Contingency
       Plan/Trading Standards Local Plan/LACORS Plan)
      Assist Defra in enforcing various preventative measures –restrictions
       on bird gatherings
      Assist Defra in enforcing legislation in event of disease outbreak
      Enforce movement restrictions – licensing moves
      Assist in signposting restricted areas
      Cleansing and disinfectant – source suitable products
      Gather info on local bird/poultry owners and offer local information to
       Trading Standards and Animal Health Service
      Work with disease control partners
      Use PPE (disposable overshoes & antibacterial hand gel) where
       necessary
      Encourage poultry owners to register their flock
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           o http://www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/diseases/vetsurveillance/poultry
             /index.htm


Role of Local Authority Emergency Planners

    Engage with regional and national emergency planning structures
    Assist Environmental Health Officers in managing logistical
     requirements – possible provision of help line for public enquiries
    Ensure LA media arrangements are in place – in partnership with Defra
     (Media & Public Information Working Group - Generic Media Plan
     supported by Animal Diseases Communications Strategy)
    Ensure accurate information is available to Elected Members, staff,
     and the Community with Environmental Health Officers –
     website/newsletter in event of outbreak
         o Staff may live within a “zone” or have to visit within a “zone” -
            ensure that accurate information is available to everyone
    Door to door leaflet drops within the Protection Zone may be necessary
     to ensure the whole Community is aware of implications and activity.
     The Community on the border of the Protection Zone should also be
     targeted if in a densely populated area.
    Support the Animal Health Service and Animal Wardens &
     Environmental Health Officers


7.4    Highways and Public Rights of Way
Essex County Council has a department responsible for various aspects of
highways and public rights of way management. It may be necessary to utilise
this resource to carry out the responsibility of erecting signs on roads and
public rights of way in the events of a notifiable disease outbreak. This
decision will be based on the resource available within the Animal Health and
Welfare Enforcement function as a consequence of the size and nature of the
disease outbreak.

7.4.1 Initiation and Activation

Upon formally activating this plan, the Highways and Transportation team will
(in liaison with Trading Standards – and through direct contact with CEPLG)


      Provide and utilise the road and public rights of way signs described
       within Avian influenza (HPAI) Local Contingency Plan – 07/06/06.
       Trading Standards will access these signs when required.

      Erect signs in accordance with directions from the Animal Health and
       Welfare Operational Manager. This will predominantly be in relation to
       the boundaries of both the Protection Zone and Surveillance Zone.

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      Replace signs as necessary.

      Remove all local authority signs after the notifiable disease contingency
       plan has been stood down

      Nominated contact to liaise with Parish Council contacts in relation to
       Rights of Way

Essex County Council and the affected Local Authority should only place
restriction signs relating to public rights of way after careful consideration of
legislative powers and appropriate consultation with the DVM. Essex County
Council and the affected Local Authority can place warning signs next to
footpaths aimed at ensuring that the public are fully aware of the disease risk
and take appropriate precautions.


7.5    Elected Members – Responsibilities
The level of interest and responsibility taken on board by individual elected
members in relation to an Avian influenza outbreak will vary depending upon
their specific role within Essex County Council or the affected Local Authority,
and the interests of the community that they represent. For Essex County
Council this would be the Portfolio holder and a Senior Officer from Trading
Standards as support.

It is essential to keep elected members proactively involved in the information
and decision making processes during an Avian influenza outbreak to ensure
that they can re-assure their community why decisions are made and that the
work of Essex County Council is fully recognised and understood.

7.6    Wider Local Authority Services
The extent to which wider County Council services will be affected by an
Avian influenza outbreak will depend upon the size and nature of the
outbreak.

If an Avian influenza outbreak continues to affect the Community for an
extended period, then it is inevitable that functions such as Animal Health and
Welfare Enforcement or Emergency Planning Unit will require specific support
from Financial Services in relation to funding (Section 151), or Human
Resources in relation to increasing personnel concerns.

These services should endeavour to provide a rapid response to any such
requests. Services such as these should provide a specific contact in relation
to any queries associated with the disease outbreak, and establish a clear
escalation point should urgent resolution or involvement be required.

Wider local authority services should review the facilities, skills and resources,
they have that may assist with the response to a notifiable disease outbreak.
Services such as libraries and community centres can distribute information,
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or arrange seminars relating to the outbreak. Resources and equipment may
be available to assist with the production and dissemination of guidance.

Services such as Education and Social Care also need to be aware of the
impact that a notifiable disease outbreak can have on a Community,
especially the Farming Community. Proactive anticipation of problems in
these areas and the dissemination of guidance can assist local communities.

Services such as Social Care or even WRVS who may need to have direct
contact within a restricted area should notify this at CEPLG and to the
Emergency Planning Unit as PPE will need to be considered. Disposable
protective “overshoes” should be suitable and anti-bacterial hand gel.

The Emergency Planning Unit will ensure that any relevant local authority
services will have direct representation at the tactical (Silver) level where
appropriate.

On a local level Essex County Council and the affected Local Authority
Emergency Planning Officer will need to be mindful of implications to;

Environmental Health Officers
   Provide advice on public health implications of the disease control
      operations (e.g. disposal operations).

Waste Management.
   Provide support, in conjunction with the Environment Agency to LDCC
     on disposal of slaughtered carcasses if option is being considered.
     (N.B: this is VERY unlikely)
   Disposal of dumped carcases1.

Other Services which may become involved;
Contact/Call Centre – volume of calls
Media Officers – local press and media will require a story
Business Continuity – Farming Community is a local business Community as
well as businesses inside Protection Zone.

8.     Infected Premises and Restricted Zones
This section provides guidance on the terms used to describe infected
premises and varying restricted zones, including information on any conditions
that may apply to such areas.

8.1    Suspect Premise

When a farmer or veterinary professional has contacted the AH Service to
report concerns about the disease status of livestock on that premise, it will be
classified as SUSPECT. A notice will be verbally issued to the premise owner
or keeper declaring the premises to be suspect premises.


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The AH Service will ensure that a farm inspection takes place. Most suspect
cases are cleared at this stage, though in some cases samples are taken to
confirm disease free status of the premises. These tests are often an extra
precaution where only a minimal risk of disease suspected.

However, in some cases the notifiable animal disease is confirmed, and the
farm declared an Infected Premise.

The following requirements are likely to be applied to a Suspect Premise –
    Restrictions upon the movement of susceptible animals.
    Restrictions upon the movement of items likely to transmit disease,
       including vehicles.
    Publicising suspect infection.
    Possible restrictions upon movement of people for bio-security
       measures.
    Increased cleansing and disinfection standards.
    Closure or restriction of some public rights of way on or near the
       property
1 Suffolk County Council had information reported to them to indicate that dead poultry and wild birds were
being dumped in numbers on the road side




Essex County Council should be made aware of any suspect premises where
samples have been sent for veterinary testing. See Temporary Control Zone
section 8.4

8.2      Infected Premise

Premises where Avian influenza has been confirmed are known as
INFECTED premises.

The following restrictions are likely to apply to an Infected Premise: –
    Restrictions upon the movement of susceptible animals.
    Subsequently, all susceptible animals are likely to be culled.
    Restrictions upon the movement of items likely to transmit disease,
       including vehicles.
    Restrictions upon the movement of non-susceptible animals.
    Publicising disease infection.
    Possible restrictions upon movement of people.
    Closure or restriction of some public rights of way on or near the
       property
    Increased cleansing and disinfection standards.
    Full information to be provided to the AH SERVICE in relation to all
       livestock movements on and off the Infected Premise.

Local Authority employees should not enter an infected premise. The Animal
Health Service (AH Service) will fulfil all requirements on the infected premise.


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8.3    Contact Premises or Dangerous Contacts (DC)

It is likely that all farming premises directly adjacent to the Infected Premises
will be named as CONTACT premises. Such premises would undoubtedly fall
into the Protection Zone, and therefore these restrictions would apply.
However, it is likely that the AH Service would prioritise inspections and
samples from these premises.

The AH Service, in conjunction with the local authority, may begin tracing
movements of birds/poultry/animals and subsequently discover other Contact
Premises. These may not be in the immediate geographic location of the
Infected Premises, and therefore would be put under the same restrictions as
a Suspect Premises until further testing had been completed.

Essex County Council and/or the affected Local Authorities may assist with
tracing of livestock movements in relation to the Infected Premises, however
this must be restricted to office based assistance. Local Authority employees
should not visit Contact Premises or Dangerous Contacts as this should
always be carried out by the AH Service.

8.4    Temporary Control Zone

Following notification or detection of disease or suspected disease in any part
of Great Britain, the Secretary of State may declare a Temporary Control
Zone around the SUSPECT or CONTACT premises of a size appropriate to
the prevent the spread of disease. The size of this area is not fixed and can
be changed as required. The restrictions placed on premises within a
Temporary Control Zone will be in line with those applied to the Suspect
Premise.

8.5    Protection Zone

A Protection Zone will extend to a minimum radius of three kilometres
around an infected premise. The three kilometre radius of the Protection Zone
may be extended according to veterinary risk assessment.

A range of restrictions can be applied within a Protection Zone, depending
upon the type of disease and the nature of the outbreak.

Full details of the restrictions will be provided within the appropriate
legislation, however the following areas will be considered –
     Record keeping.
     Movements of all animals.
     Stray animals.
     Controlling domestic animals.
     Restrictions in relation to animal products and animal by-products.
     Restrictions upon animal gatherings – poultry markets / pigeon racing
        etc.
     Increased bio-security and cleansing and disinfection requirements.
     Movement of vehicles and other things likely to spread disease.
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         Possible restrictions on people gatherings.

It is therefore essential that the full requirements of the legislation for each
disease be reviewed during the suspicion phase.

The enforcement role will be fulfilled in partnership with the AH Service and
Police, and is likely to involve proactive patrols with police officers. Local
Intelligence will also be vital.

8.6       Surveillance Zone (See figure 1)

A surveillance zone will normally extend to a minimum radius of ten
kilometres around an Infected Premise. The ten kilometre radius may be
extended according to veterinary risk assessment.

A range of restrictions can be applied within a Surveillance Zone, depending
upon the type of disease and the nature of the outbreak.

Full details of the restrictions will be provided within the appropriate
legislation, however the following areas will be considered –
     Record keeping.
     Movements of all animals.
     Stray animals.
     Controlling domestic animals.
     Restrictions in relation to animal products and animal by-products.
     Restrictions upon animal gatherings.
     Increased cleansing and disinfection requirements.
     Movement of vehicles and other things likely to spread disease.
     Possible closure or restriction of some public rights of way on or near
        the property

The enforcement role will be fulfilled in partnership with the AH Service and
police, and is likely to involve proactive patrols with police officers. Local
intelligence will also be vital.

8.7       Restricted Zone

The Secretary of State may, following confirmation by the Chief Veterinary
Officer of an outbreak of a notifiable disease in Great Britain, declare an area
deemed appropriate as a Restricted Zone.

This is an additional measure that can be put in place where veterinary
opinion suggests that increased restrictions outside the immediate protection
zone and surveillance zone are required.

The conditions that apply within the Restricted Zone will be more confined
than those within the Protection Zone and Surveillance Zone.



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8.8    Vaccination Surveillance Zone

Vaccination Zones may be established by Defra as a control mechanism in
some disease situations. In this event vaccination Surveillance Zones, where
non-vaccinated animals would be monitored to detect disease, would be
declared to a radius of not less than 10 kilometres surrounding the
Vaccination Zone.

Trading Standards and police may be required to enforce movement
restrictions within these areas as with Protection Zones and Surveillance
Zones. It is likely that the DVM will assist in determining the level of
enforcement that is to be carried out in the particular circumstances of the
outbreak.

Successful partnership work with the AH Service and police would be critical
to effective local authority enforcement. Exchange of intelligence with other
government delivery partners and external stakeholders will also be vital.




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Figure 1: Protection and Surveillance Zone – Avian Influenza




                              Surveillance Zone




       10 km                   Protection Zone
                               Infected
                                              3 km
                               Premise
                                      IP




Note: Total area of 13km. All Protection and Surveillance Zones fall within
the boundaries of an infected area. The infected area will be defined in the
declaratory order by natural and physical boundaries.




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Appendix A

Notifiable Disease List

A notifiable disease is a disease named in Section 88 of the Animal Health Act
1981 or an Order made under the Act.

Section 15 (1) of the Animal Health Act 1981 requires that

‘ANY PERSON HAVING IN THEIR POSSESSION OR UNDER THEIR
CHARGE AN ANIMAL AFFECTED OR SUSPECTED OF HAVING ONE OF
THESE DISEASES MUST, WITH ALL PRACTICABLE SPEED, NOTFIY
THAT FACT TO A POLICE CONSTABLE’

In practice, any person that suspects signs of a notifiable disease must
immediately notify a Defra Divisional Veterinary Manager (DVM)

www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/diseases/notifiable/index.htm

Notifiable                    Disease Species Affected          Occurred last
(with link to fact sheet on the Defra                           in      Great
website)                                                        Britain
African Horse Sickness               Horses                     Never
African Swine Fever                  Pigs                       Never

Anthrax                              Cattle  and          other 2002
                                     mammals
Aujeszky's Disease                   Pigs and other mammals 1989
Avian Influenza (Fowl plague)        Poultry                    Present

Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy Cattle                         Present
(to BSE home page)
Blue Tongue                          Sheep and Goats            Present in UK
                                                                Sept 2007
                                                                & Northern
                                                                Europe
Brucellosis (Brucella abortus)       Cattle                     2004
Brucellosis (Brucella melitensis)    Sheep and Goats            1956
Classical Swine Fever                Pigs                       2000
Contagious agalactia                 Sheep and Goats            Never
Contagious Bovine Pleuro-            Cattle                     1898
pneumonia
Contagious Epididymitis (Brucella    Sheep and Goats            Never

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ovis)
Contagious Equine Metritis         Horses                    2007
Dourine                            Horses                    Never
Enzootic Bovine Leukosis           Cattle                    1996
Epizootic Haemorrhagic Virus       Deer                      Never
Disease
Epizootic Lymphangitis             Horses                    1906
Equine Viral Arteritis             Horses                    2004
Equine Viral Encephalomyelitis     Horses                    Never
Equine Infectious Anaemia          Horses                    1976
Foot and Mouth Disease             Cattle, sheep, pigs and   2007
                                   other cloven hoofed
                                   animals
Glanders and Farcy                 Horses                    1928
Goat Pox                           Goats                     Never
Lumpy Skin Disease                 Cattle                    Never
Newcastle Disease                  Poultry                   2006
Paramyxovirus of pigeons           Pigeons                   Present
Pest des Petits Ruminants          Sheep and Goats           Never
Rabies                             Dogs and other            2006
                                   mammals (also bats)
Rift Valley Fever                  Cattle, Sheep and Goats Never
Rinderpest (Cattle plague)         Cattle                    1877
Scrapie (on Defra's BSE website)   Sheep and goats           Present
Sheep pox                          Sheep                     1866
Swine Vesicular Disease            Pigs                      1982
Teschen Disease (Porcine           Pigs                      Never
enterovirus encephalomyelitis)
Tuberculosis (Bovine TB)           Cattle and deer           Present
Vesicular Stomatitis               Cattle, pigs and horses   Never
Warble fly                         Cattle, (also deer and    1990
                                   horses)
West Nile Virus                    Horses                    Never




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Appendix B

Notifiable Animal Disease Suspect Report Form

DATE ___________________TIME ______________________________

OFFICER RECEIVING REPORT
_____________________________________________________________

Keep calm and re-assure the caller – do not be hurried. Make clear and
legible notes.

Section 1: Details of the Informant
NAME: _______________________________________________________
TEL NO: ______________________________________________________

ADDRESS:
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________

HAS THE CALLER NOTIFIED ANY OTHER GOVERNMENT BODY OR
VETERINARY PROFESSIONAL?
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________

Section 2: Details of Suspect Case
NAME OF OWNER OF SUSPECT ANIMAL:
______________________________________________________________

ADDRESS OF OWNER OF SUSPECT ANIMAL:
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________

TELEPHONE NUMBER:
______________________________________________________

LOCATION OF ANIMAL (General locality if wildlife or animal not
contained):
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________

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______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________

HOLDING NUMBER (If known):
_____________________________________________________________

SPECIES TYPE:
_____________________________________________________________

FURTHER DESCRIPTION OF THE ANIMAL, INCLUDING IDENTIFICATION
NUMBER WHERE APPLICABLE:
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________

DISEASE SYMPTOMS:
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________

WHAT SPECIES AND QUANTITIES OF ANIMALS ARE KEPT ON THE
SUSPECT PREMISE?
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________

Section 3:              Veterinary Information

NAME OF VETERINARY SURGEON:
______________________________________________________________

ADDRESS:
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________




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Section 4:              Movement Information

HAVE ANY SUSCEPTIBLE SPECIES BEEN MOVED TODAY?
YES / NO

PLEASE PROVIDE FULL DETAILS OF THE MOVEMENT, INCLUDING
HAULIER INFORMATION WHERE APPROPRIATE
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________

Section 5:               Additional Information

ANY OTHER RELEVANT DETAILS:
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________

Section 6:              Rabies Information

PLEASE PROVIDE DETAILS OF ANY OTHER ANIMALS OR HUMANS
THAT MAY HAVE BEEN BITTEN OR SCRATCHED BY THE SUSPECT
ANIMAL. IF THE SUSPECT ANIMAL IS NOT CONTAINED, WERE OTHER
ANIMALS SPOTTED IN THE NEAR VACINITY?
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________
______________________________________________________________




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RESTRICTED

Appendix C
Essex County Council Internal Contact List

Also see Emergency Planning Unit Duty Officer Operational Call Down List
Annexe A
Head of Service responsible for Animal Health and Welfare Enforcement
Name
Telephone No
Mobile No
24 Hr Contact
No
Fax No
Email
Lead Officer responsible for Animal Health and Welfare Enforcement
Name
Telephone No
Mobile No
Fax No
24 Hr Contact
No
Email
Head of Service responsible for Emergency Planning
Name
Telephone No
Mobile No
24 Hr Contact
No
Fax No
Email
Head of Service responsible for Communications and Public Relations
Name
Telephone No
Fax No
24 Hr Contact
No
Email
Head of Service responsible for Highways, Footpaths and Public Rights
of Way
Name
Telephone No
Fax No
Email
Accessible through Emergency Planning Unit 24/7 Duty Officer
Highways & Public Rights of Way Officer
Telephone No
Fax No
Compiler R Hutchinson                                                 39
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Accessible through Emergency Planning Unit 24/7 Duty Officer
Head of Service responsible for Human Resources
Name
Telephone No
Fax No
Email
Accessible through Emergency Planning Unit 24/7 Duty Officer
Head of Service responsible for Finance
Name
Telephone No
Email
Accessible through Emergency Planning Unit 24/7 Duty Officer




Compiler R Hutchinson                                          40
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Appendix D
Delivery Partner and Key Stakeholder Contact List
All contact lists must be reviewed on an annual basis, and amended to reflect
any changes that have taken place since the last review.

Department for the Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA)
Address        1 A Page Street, London SW1P 4PQ
Telephone No
Website        www.defra.gov.uk
State Veterinary Service (AH SERVICE) / Animal Health Divisional Office
Address        Beeches Rd
               Chelmsford
               Essex
               CM1 2RU
Telephone No
Fax No
Website        www.AH Service.gov.uk
Local Authorities Coordinators of Regulatory Services (LACORS)
Address        Local Government House, Smith Square, London SW1P 3HZ
Telephone No 020 7665 3888
Fax No         020 7665 3887
Website        www.lacors.gov.uk
Local Police Force
Address        Police HQ Springfield Essex
Telephone No 01245 491491
Website        http://www.essex.police.uk/
Fax No
Environment Agency
Telephone No General Enquiries: 08708 506 506 (Mon-Fri 8-6)
               Incident hotline: 0800 807060 (Free phone 24 Hour)
Website        www.environment-agency.gov.uk
Health Protection Agency
Telephone No 01223 372 824
Website        www.hpa.org.uk or www.hpa.org.uk/eastofengland
Government Office for the Region
Telephone No 01223 372500
Fax No         01223 372501
Website        http://www.go-east.gov.uk/goeast/contact_us/
National Farmers Union (NFU)
Local Contact Pamela Forbes – Agriculture House, Willie Snaith Road,
Name           Newmarket, Suffolk CB8 7SN
Telephone No 01638 672100
Fax No         01638 672101
Website        www.nfu.org.uk
Rural Stress Information Network
Address        Arthur Rank Centre, Stoneleigh Park, Warwickshire CV8 2LZ
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Telephone No 024 76 412916
Fax No          024 76 412560
Website         www.rsin.org.uk
The Samaritans
Telephone No 08457 90 90 90
Website         www.samaritans.org.uk
Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty Against Animals (RSPCA)
Telephone No 0870 33 35 999 advice line
Website         www.rspca.org.uk
British Veterinary Association
Telephone No 020 7636 6541
Fax No          020 7436 2970
Website         www.bva.co.uk
British Small Animal Veterinary Association
Telephone No 01452 726700
Website         http://www.bsava.com/
Livestock Auctioneers Association (LAA)
Telephone No 01697 475433
Website         www.laa.co.uk
Road Haulage Association (RHA) (Livestock Carriers Group)
Telephone No 01932 841515
Fax No          01932 852516
Website         www.rha.net
Tenants Farmers Association
Address         5 Brewery Court, Theale, Reading, Berkshire RG7 5AJ
Telephone No 0118 9306130
Fax No          0118 9303424
Website         www.tenant-farmers.org.uk
National Trust
Website         www.nationaltrust.org.uk
Business Link
Website         www.businesslink.gov.uk
Federation of Small Businesses
Website         www.fsb.org.uk
Local Tourist Board(s) – Visit Britain
Website         www.visitbritain.com/VB3-en/destinationguides/index.aspx
Local Park Board(s)
                Essex County Council Parks Information
Telephone No 01245 437706




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Appendix E

Bio-Security Guidance for Avian Influenza

During a disease situation it is best practice for local authority enforcement
officers not to enter farm premises. If communication is required with a farmer,
then where possible prior contact should be made to ensure arrangements
can be put in place to meet at the parameter of the farm.

It is accepted that in some circumstances local authority enforcement officers
may be required to access farm premises, or encounter diseased animals. It is
essential that best practice bio-security standards are followed.

Local authority enforcement officers should clearly follow bio-security best
practice during all enforcement activities, including during a disease outbreak.

Full bio-security guidance for disease circumstances is available on the Defra
website at
http://www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/diseases/control/biosecurity/index.htm

Adult Social Care, WRVS (Meals of Wheels), Community Nurses etc may
have to visit Infected Premises – if this occurs, the use of disposable
overshoes is recommended. Put them on before leaving your vehicle and
remove whilst outside of vehicle once the visit is over. Disposal can be in a
plastic bag until it can be placed in the bin. Use of anti-bacterial hand
wipes/gel to clean hands is recommended, as basic hygiene practice.




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Appendix F

Duty Officer Call Out Procedure for a report of Avian Flu

Avian influenza is an infection of poultry or other captive birds caused by any
influenza A virus of the subtypes H5 or H7 and as such the lead agency
responsibility lies with DEFRA.

On declaration of Avian influenza from DEFRA the Duty Officer should
ascertain the following information:

      Details of who has notified the Duty Officer (Defra/LA/Police etc.)
      If (Essex/Unitary) Trading Standards has already been informed. They
       will refer to the Essex County Council Generic Notifiable Animal
       Disease contingency Plan (dependant on area)
      Exact location of the incident – grid ref if possible
      Name of the owner of the Farm (if relevant)
      Type of poultry/bird
      Number in flock/of birds
      Refer to Internal Operational call down list under the heading “Head of
       Trading Standards”

Actions
    Contact CEPO – refer to Internal Operational call down list
    Contact Essex Police – if they did not alert in the first instance
    Contact relevant Local Authority to inform of situation
    Contact “Contact Essex” to raise awareness of potential increased call
      volume – use pre-prepared script (see following page) to refer to Defra
      website and information there.
    Contact ECC Internal Communications – pre-prepared Trading
      Standards information to deliver to public within Protection &
      Surveillance Zones (3km & 10km), and to those within vicinity of PSZ –
      Appendix 6 General Public Advice Leaflet – Essex Trading Standards
      Avian influenza (HPAI) Local Contingency ~Plan
    Provide liaison officer to attend Local Disease Control Centre (LDCC)
      meetings
    Refer to annex CERC activation procedure

The Police will assist the affected Local Authority with
  enforcement of Infected areas
  co-ordination of emergencies support – legal entry into premises
  assisting in preventing public access to closed rights of way
  stop checks on vehicles
  attendance at LDCC if necessary
  managing breaches of the peace




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Avian Influenza Consumer Services Direct Enquiries
Guidance for Consumer Direct from Monday 10 April 06

General Queries
       If you have any general queries about Avian Influenza, please use the following link:-

Frequently Asked Questions produced by DEFRA
http://www.defra.gov.uk/animalh/diseases/notifiable/disease/ai/index.ht
m

      Enquiries on the disease not covered by the Q and A should be referred to the            Defra
       Help line (08459 33 55 77)
       (Currently the Help line is available between the following hours Monday - Friday 8am
       to 8pm and Saturday - Sunday 9am to 6pm)


Enquiries Reporting;

      Suspicion of Avian Influenza in captive birds

      The discovery of one or more dead swans/wild fowl (ducks and geese)

      The discovery of more than 3 dead birds of the same species

      The discovery of more than 5 dead birds of different species, in the
       same place

Must be transferred to Defra Help line 08459 335577

Any enquiries taken outside of the Defra Help line and Trading standards
normal working hours regarding signs of Avian Influenza and dead wild birds
as above should be transferred to the Local State veterinary Service on

      01245 358383 Local State Veterinary Service

Requests for Essex County Councils Avian Influenza guidance leaflet for poultry
keeper should be e-mailed to tradingstandards@essexcc.gov.uk

Keeper‟s wishing to register their flocks should call the National Poultry register on
0800 6341112.


These are the various levels of suspicion that are assessed after a Defra vet
has carried out a clinical investigation. We as the LA would not normally be
notified by Defra of any suspect disease unless it was a level 2 or higher.

       Level 0 - Disease not suspected following a veterinary inquiry.

       Level 1 - Lesions and clinical disease not typical – but disease cannot
       be ruled out entirely on
                clinical grounds.


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       Level 2 – lesions and clinical disease suggestive of the notifiable
disease but not entirely
                 convincing.

        Level 3 – Veterinary staff on farm and at HQ believe from investigation
on clinical grounds that
                  disease exits.

      Level 4 – As at level 3 plus disease already confirmed in the country or
substantial evidence that
                  disease may have entered the country e.g. disease in
              imported animals originating
                 from a region with confirmed disease.




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Appendix G

Foot and Mouth Disease (FMD) overview

FMD is a highly infectious viral disease affecting cloven-hoofed animals, in
particular cattle, sheep, pigs, goats and deer. Other susceptible animals
include some wild animals such as coypu, deer and zoo animals including
elephants.

Fever is followed by the development of vesicles or blisters - chiefly in the
mouth or on the feet. There are 7 main types of virus, which produce similar
clinical signs and which can only be differentiated in the laboratory. FMD can
spread by direct or indirect contact with infected animals. Infected animals
begin excreting the virus a few days before signs of the disease develop.
Pigs in particular produce large numbers of virus particles.

The disease is spread mechanically by the movement of animals, persons,
vehicles and other things, which have been contaminated by the virus.
Airborne spread of the disease can also take place. The prevailing
meteorological conditions and local topography determine the distance that
the disease can travel and this may be considerable.

Meat from the carcases of animals infected with FMD at the time of slaughter
can transmit the virus. In the past, outbreaks of the disease have been
linked with the importation of infected meat and meat products.

Advice from the Department of Health is that it is very rare for humans to be
affected by FMD. There has only been one recorded case of FMD in a human
being in Great Britain in 1966. The general effects of the disease in that case
were similar to influenza with some blisters. The Food Standards Agency has
advised that the disease has no implications for the human food chain.

The FMD virus can be destroyed by heat, low humidity, or certain
disinfectants, but it may remain active for a varying time in a suitable medium
such as the frozen or chilled carcase of an infected animal and on
contaminated objects.

Good bio-security is required to stop onward spread. The prompt detection
and reporting of the initial outbreak of disease are crucial in limiting the
ultimate scale of the emergency, and arrangements to enhance surveillance
are being taken forward under the Veterinary Surveillance Strategy which was
launched in October 2003. Part of this strategy aims to upgrade the use of
information on the numbers and location of livestock, which will be important
in the smooth operation of the contingency plan in the event of an outbreak.
Management of the outbreak will also depend upon the availability of
geographical information systems and expertise, which is being developed
with the Defra Exotic Animal Diseases Generic plan.

An updated illegal imports action plan for 2003-2004 was published in June

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2003, which consolidates and builds upon progress made since March 2002.
Since 1 January 2003 the import of meat, milk and their products into the
United Kingdom

Defra’s Exotic Animal Disease Generic Contingency Plan FMD 4
              from most non-European Union (EU) countries for personal use
Version 1.1 (UK)
has been prohibited. There are also restrictions on other products of animal
origin. The concession, which provides for small quantities of controlled plants
and plant products to be imported by travellers from outside the EU for
personal use is currently under review.




Excerpt taken from Defra Exotic Animal Disease Generic Contingency Plan Version 1.1


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Appendix H

Classical Swine Fever (CSF) overview

CSF is a highly contagious viral disease, which affects pigs. Infected
animals suffer a variety of clinical signs including loss of appetite, purple
discolouration of the skin, and constipation followed by diarrhoea.

More severe cases of the disease may result in abortion or weak litters, as
well as nervous signs such as tremors or convulsions, particularly in new born
piglets. The disease can result in mortality of affected animals.

The movement of infected pigs is a common method of spreading CSF.
However all excretions from an infected animal contain the virus. Therefore
any animal, human, or object which has been in contact with such excretions
and then in turn comes into contact with a pig, can spread the disease.

Although other animals are able to mechanically spread the disease through
contact with infected excretions it is not possible for them to display clinical
signs of CSF. The main source of its spread appears to be from pigs eating
infected pork or pork products. In this form the CSF virus can remain active
for many months.




Excerpt taken from Defra Exotic Animal Disease Generic Contingency Plan Version 1.1


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Appendix I

Newcastle Disease (ND) overview

ND is a highly infectious disease affecting poultry and other birds. Disease
is caused by infection with virulent strains of Newcastle disease virus (NDV).
There are a variety of strains of NDV, which range in virulence. Low virulence
strains may cause sub clinical or mild respiratory disease. Highly virulent
strains can cause severe disease which is characterised by high death rates
and a range of clinical signs. Control is targeted at strains with a high
pathogenicity (ability to cause severe disease).

The severity of the disease also varies depending upon the species, degree
of immunity and age of bird, environmental conditions and general health
status of the flock.

Controls would apply to domestic fowls, turkeys, geese, ducks, guinea
fowls, quails, pigeons, ratites (e.g. ostriches), pheasants and partridges
reared or kept in captivity for breeding, the production of meat or eggs for
consumption or eggs for restocking supplies of game.

ND could be introduced to domestic poultry by contact with infective wild
pigeons and other wild birds or indirectly through contamination of feed or
objects. NDV can be carried on objects or clothing contaminated with
excretions from infective birds, particularly faeces. Such material could be
imported on clothing or shoes of people that had been in contact with infective
birds.

Illegal imports of live birds also pose a risk of introduction but this is difficult
to quantify.

Good bio-security reduces the risk of onward spread.

The ND virus has been shown to be infectious to humans and other
animals, although severe disease has only been observed in birds. In humans
infection occasionally results in mild disease characterised by conjunctivitis.
The majority of human cases have occurred in laboratory workers or people
handling live vaccines. NDV does not pose a significant risk to public health.




Excerpt taken from Defra Exotic Animal Disease Generic Contingency Plan Version 1.1

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Appendix J

Bluetongue Disease Virus (BTV) overview

Bluetongue is a virus spread by insects which affects all ruminants, such as
cattle, goats, deer and sheep. Clinical signs can vary by species – although
symptoms are generally more severe in sheep, cattle can also show signs of
disease (and can act as a reservoir for disease to keep infection circulating).

Since August 2006, Bluetongue has been found in the Netherlands, Belgium,
Luxembourg, in parts of Western Germany and in areas in Northern France.
Since 1998 there have been widespread outbreaks of different strains of
Bluetongue in Greece, Italy, Corsica and the Balearic Islands. Cases have
also occurred in Bulgaria, Croatia, Macedonia and Yugoslavia.

Clinical signs in sheep may include: fever; swelling of the head and neck;
inflammation and ulceration of the mucous membrane of the mouth, nose and
eyelids; lameness; muscle degeneration and leaking of blood or serum from
blood vessels into the surrounding tissues; haemorrhages in the skin and
other tissues; respiratory signs such as froth in the lungs and an inability to
swallow; and a high mortality rate. Sometimes, although it is rare with BTV8,
there may be some discolouration and swelling of the tongue.

Due to clinical signs, deaths of sheep in a flock may reach as high as 70%.
The condition can lead to a reduction in meat and wool production in the
animals that survive (although this is generally not observed with BTV8).

Although Bluetongue usually causes no apparent illness in cattle or goats,
cattle are displaying clinical signs during the current outbreak of BTV8 in
Western Europe. These have included nasal discharge, swelling and
ulceration of the mouth and swollen teats.

Bluetongue affects all ruminants (cattle, goats, sheep, camels, llamas,
giraffes, bison, buffalo, deer, wildebeest and antelope). There is no evidence
of Bluetongue infection in any other species.

Bluetongue is an insect-borne viral disease which affects all ruminants, such
as cattle, goat, deer and, in particular, sheep. Bluetongue does not affect
humans.

Virus transmission between animals occurs via an insect vector (midges of
Culicoides species), when a midge bites an infected animal and passes the
infection to an uninfected naive animal. Transmission of the virus during an
outbreak therefore depends on continuing cycles of infection between infected
animals and vector insects. Bluetongue cannot be naturally transmitted
directly between animals.

Excerpt taken from Defra Web pages www.defra.gov.uk/



Compiler R Hutchinson                                                         51
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