Curriculum Planning Tool - DOC

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					                   Curriculum Planning Tool
     (Using the Four Literacy Roles of the Learner, Thinking
        Frameworks and pedagogy chosen with Preferred
       Learning Styles and Multiple Intelligences in mind.)



    This Planning Tool facilitates the implementation of the
     Victorian Essential Learning Standards by explicitly
           addressing the Educational Principles of :
                         Learning for all
                     Pursuit of excellence
                    Engagement and effort
                      Respect for evidence
                        Openness of mind


Esther Weichert 2005                                           1
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                           Inclusive Curriculum Planning Tool pro-forma.
Unit/lesson/integrated unit : Study of Ancient Societies: Greece




Focus: What do I want to achieve with this unit of work? (You should be guided by the Dimensions and Standards of the Domain you
are working with. Aim to infuse your unit of work with standards from the Interdisciplinary Strand.)



Learning focus
Students develop knowledge and understanding about ancient societies and their role in providing the foundations of modern
society. This enhances students’ knowledge and use of historical concepts such as time, change and continuity, and cause and effect,
and develops a broad historical map. Students explore key concepts of democracy, governance, the rule of law, justice, religion,
liberty, authority, leadership, culture. Students begin to use a variety of sources that record the features of these past
societies. They investigate daily life, the role and work of various groups, the division of labour between men and women, education,
rituals and family. They explore the values and beliefs of societies through their religions, myths and legends, and their social and
political structures. Students examine the ways the culture was expressed through art, music, literature, drama, festivals and education.
They learn about key events, significant individuals, and the influence of trade and contact with other cultures.
Students explore the legacies of ancient societies for Australian society. For example, they consider the origins of democracy
in the context of ancient civilisations.
Through their investigations, students develop their understanding of change and continuity over time, and the open-ended
nature of historical inquiry.
Students examine the influence of ancient societies on the present day, and make comparisons with contemporary societies and
with present-day Australia.
Students begin to frame key research questions to guide their investigations, use appropriate historical evidence to present a
point of view, and report on their findings. They learn to use primary and secondary sources, and begin to evaluate historical sources for
meaning, point of view, values and attitudes.
They reflect on some of the strengths and limitations of historical documents. They use historical concepts such as time,
evidence and change, and historical conventions such as documenting sources in both written and visual forms.




Esther Weichert 2005                                                                                                                2
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Domains, Dimensions and Standards covered:
Standards- History Level 5
Historical knowledge and understanding
At Level 5 students analyse and describe key aspects of life in ancient societies. They compare key aspects of past and
present societies, for example, social and political ideas and structures, and cultural values and beliefs. They analyse change and
continuity over time, sequence events and develop timelines, and use a range of evidence to describe features of past
societies.

Historical reasoning and interpretation
At Level 5 students frame key research questions to guide their investigations, and report on their findings. They use primary
and secondary sources in their investigations, document resources, evaluate historical sources for meaning, point of view, values
and attitudes, and identify some of the strengths and limitations of historical documents. They use relevant historical evidence, concepts
and conventions to present a point of view.
Standards English Level Five
Writing-reports, Speaking and Listening
Standards Communication Level Five
Listening, Viewing and Reporting, Presenting
Standards Thinking Level Five
Reasoning, processing and inquiry, Creativity, Reflection, evaluation and metacognition
Standards Interpersonal Learning Level Five
Working in teams


Assessment Tasks covered:

Assessment for Learning: Pre-test on important facts on Ancient Greece, using a KWLH, Visual Maps, Word Sunshine Wheels,
Classroom Fishbowls.
Assessment as learning: Rubric for process, Rubric for participation, Class Graph, short discussions, Classroom Fishbowls
Assessment of learning: Rubric on requirements of set tasks. i.e, Research/Inquiry task, analysis of change, comparison of key
aspects of past and present societies.

PoLT components covered: 1,2,aspects of 3 (Students’ interests and needs), 4, 5, 6.




Esther Weichert 2005                                                                                                                3
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                                                Thinking Tools and Frameworks:
Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy:       Remembering: Recognise, list, name, describe, identify

Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences and a variety of other thinking tools and frameworks, are manifested in the pedagogy chosen to
facilitate the set focus.

                                      Literacy across the learning contexts: Code Breaker
Learners ask: What do I need to know in order to cope with this task?
Teachers in all learning contexts ask:
    What prior knowledge of language and thinking do students bring to this activity?
    What explicit teaching will support students in coping with this activity / task?
Literacy emphasis is on                                              Possible Strategies and tools
rules and skills:                      (teachers add the strategies they are familiar with and those they learn from professional
                                                            reading and from collegiate group interactions)
 Recognising and using
  the alphabet, sounds,              Pre-teaching of vocabulary & specialist terminology         Analogies
  words, sentences, letter           Word splash                                                 Song Hunter
  relationships                      Glossaries and Taxonomies / word classification.            My Star
                                     Skimming and scanning the text                              Question Matrix: What is?..Who is?..
 Text type / genre                  Using headings, titles and illustrations to make             Where is?..How is?..What Can?..
 Text design / layout                predictions                                                 KW ( from KWLH )
 Spelling accurately                Word Wizards                                                Thinker’s Keys ( Alphabet and reverse )
 Grammar, punctuation,              Context clues                                               Analogies
  syntax and vocabulary              Graphic outline / organiser appropriate for this level      Habits of Mind: Persisting, Thinking
                                      of literacy and thinking.                                    Flexibly, Striving for accuracy, Applying
                                     Facts File                                                   responsible Risks
                                     Number Cruncher                                             Think-pair-share
                                     People Search                                               Co-operative learning strategies
                                                                                                  De Bono’s White Hat


    Esther Weichert 2005                                                                                                                 4
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Select and list the strategies                                                  Lesson/Unit content
(pedagogy) which will be most        Before unit activities:
appropriate to facilitate the         Use the KWLH chart, or a Visual Map, or a Word Sunshine Wheel, or organise for a Classroom
chosen focus and achieve the            Fishbowl, to show how much you know about any aspects of the Ancient Greek World.
set standards.

My explicit teaching:
                                     Unit Activities:
                                        1. Use the Alphabet Key to record words from A-Z, which have to do with the geography of Greece. You
   Thinker’s keys
                                           can include the names of towns, cities, rivers, mountains, seas, neighbouring countries, valleys and so on.
   Hats (review)
   Habits of mind (Review)             2. Create a visual representation of what you think a day in an Ancient Greek town would be like. Think of
   Pre-teaching of specific               the jobs and responsibilities different people would have, what the town infrastructure would be like, what
      vocabulary                           people would wear and eat etc. You can either draw or use pictures from magazines or the internet. You
   Word taxonomies                        can consider drawings on vases, walls of palaces, secondary sources such as your text book. What is one
   People search                          thing one would not find in your drawing? (Reverse Key)
   Revisit HoM
                                        3. Use the White Hat to record what the ancient Greeks believed about Medicine, Astronomy and
My assessment FOR learning: : Pre-         Mathematics
test on important facts on Ancient
Greece, using a KWLH, Visual            4. Do a People Search on the following figures from ancient Greece: Alexander the Great, Odyseus, Pericles,
Maps, Word Sunshine Wheels,                Aristotle, Pythagoras and Archimedes. Which of these figures would your maths and science teachers be
Classroom Fishbowls.                       interested in and why?

                                        5. The Habits of Mind you need to complete the work in this unit are: Persisting, Thinking Flexibly, Striving
                                           for accuracy, Applying responsible Risks. What habits did Odyseus use to come up with the idea of the
                                           Wooden horse?




   Esther Weichert 2005                                                                                                                          5
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                                             Thinking Tools and Frameworks
Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy: Understanding Interpret, explain, infer, summarise, paraphrase

 Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences and a variety of other thinking tools and frameworks, are manifested in the pedagogy chosen to
facilitate the set focus.

                               Literacy across the learning contexts: Text Participant / Meaning Maker

Learners ask: What does it mean to me? (How well do I understand the task, how well do I understand the texts I need to use.)
Teachers in all learning contexts ask:
   o What knowledge do students bring to the meaning of this text?
   o What explicit teaching will support students in understanding and interacting with the meaning of this text?

Literacy emphasis is on the
knowledge of the topic that the                                    Possible Strategies: ( Pedagogy )
participant brings to the text:        (teachers add the strategies they are familiar with and those they learn from professional
                                                            reading and from collegiate group interactions)
   Background or prior
    knowledge
   Comparing own experiences         Concept maps / mind maps – Graphic                   Fat / skinny questions
   Comparing experiences with         Organisers ( Star bursts, Chain of Events, Tri-      Maths Jigsaw
    other texts                        Pie )                                                Sequence Chart
   Reflecting on interests in        Read and retell                                      Written Text / picture sequencing
    these texts                       Guided reading                                       Three level guides
   Cultural experiences              Predict / observe / Explain (POE)                    Co-operative close
   General or world knowledge        Compare and contrast                                 Thinker’s Key ( Question Key )
   How are these texts               Similarities & differences                           Question Matrix: Why did…, How did…., Where
    constructed to make               De Bono’s White Hat                                   did…, What did…
    meaning?                          Hot Seat                                             Habits of Mind: Questioning and Posing
                                      Team Webbing.                                         Problems, Thinking Flexibly, Gathering Data
                                      Cooperative controversy.                              Through all Senses, Taking Responsible Risks,
                                      Reciprocal teaching                                   Remaining Open to Continuous Learning,
                                      Information gap                                       Listening With Empathy and Understanding.
                                      Improvement Rubric (Maths)

     Esther Weichert 2005                                                                                                            6
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Select and list the strategies                                                  Lesson/Unit content
(pedagogy) which will be most         1. What pieces of information would help describe the location of Greece.
appropriate to facilitate the
chosen focus and achieve the          2. The answer is Democracy. What are some of the questions?
set standards.                        The answer is Parthenon. What are some of the questions?
                                      The answer is Trojan Horse. What are some of the questions? (Question key)

My explicit teaching:                 3. Create a word search on the following: Gods and Religion, Democracy and politics, The Olympic Games, Art
    Reciprocal teaching              and Architecture.
    Read and retell
    Graphic organisers-Venn          4. What happened to people who were ostracised from Athens? (Question matrix)
    Team webbing on Athenian
      and Australian Democracy       5. Use a Venn diagram to show the similarities and differences between Democracy in Athens and Democracy in
                                        Australia. What has remained the same? What would an ancient Athenian citizen think if he was to spent time
My Assessment AS learning:              in Australia today? (graphic organiser)
 Graffiti Board of all answers to   6. Look up the word Spartan in the dictionary. Why do you thing it has to have such a meaning today? (Question
  question 7                            matrix)
 Peer assessment rubric on          7. List three things that women do today, which ancient Athenian women could not do.
  question 5 (students identify what 8. Design and decorate an Athenian pot. Explain why you chose the particular decorations that you did. (Written
  is important to include in the        text/picture sequencing)
  rubric)




    Esther Weichert 2005                                                                                                                      7
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                                                   Thinking Tools and Frameworks
Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy: Applying ; Implement, carry out, Using information gained in different or familiar situations
 Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences and a variety of other thinking tools and frameworks, are manifested in the pedagogy chosen to
facilitate the set focus.

                                            Literacy across the learning contexts: Text User:
Learners ask: What do I do with this text? What text am I asked to produce?
Teachers in all learning contexts ask:
    What knowledge do students bring to the social purposes and uses of this kind of text?
    What explicit teaching will support students in using and producing the texts?

   Literacy emphasis is on                          Possible Strategies:                  Gathering / Sorting tools ( PCD, SCUMPS.)
understanding the purposes of                                                             Stakeholders PMI
 and uses of different texts :           Modelling and construction of texts             Share and justify a personal response to a text
                                         Summarising a text                              De Bono’s Blue and White Hats
   Understanding cultural and           Graphic Organisers                              Question Matrix: How can…, What can…, Why
    social factors & contexts            Data Charts                                      can…, Who can…
   Structure and features of text       Note Making / note taking                       Thinker’s Keys: Construction Key
    types – Purpose & Audience            Research Grids                                 Habits of Mind
   Options & alternatives for text      Paired Partner Problem Solving (Maths)            ( 1,4,6,7,8,9,13,14,15,16 )
    to convey meaning (written,          Graph it. (Maths)
    oral, graph, film, art,              Stock Exchange (Maths)                       Add your own
    technology, etc. )                   Round Table
                                         Mobile Maker
                                         Writer’s Workshop
                                         The Hamburger Model for writing paragraphs
                                         Body Sculpture (The Arts)
                                         Line Ups
                                         Detective




     Esther Weichert 2005                                                                                                            8
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Select and list the strategies                                             Lesson/Unit content
(pedagogy) which will be most      1. Create a mobile with information on the following: either the gods of Olympus or the different kinds of
appropriate to facilitate the         ancient Greek art
chosen focus and achieve the
set standards                      2. Use the PCD organiser to explain the problem of Greece being a mountainous country. Examine it from the
                                      point of view of trade, life style, communication, war strategies, diet or anything else you might consider
                                      important. You are required to do a PCD on two aspects only.
My explicit teaching:              3. You are a private detective for the government of Sparta. What would you be expected to report on?
   The use of PCD (problem
     solving thinking organiser)   4. In a specially gift wrapped parcel, give one of your class mates one of the ‘gifts’ of the Ancient Greeks and
   Note making/ note taking          explain how this gift has impacted on our lives today.

My assessment AS learning:
 Oral presentation of PCDs-
    peer response/comments from
    two class members. Use the
    following structure:
Is the chosen problem clearly
articulated?
Are the consequences identified
logical and realistic?
Are the decisions/solutions
offered plausible?




    Esther Weichert 2005                                                                                                                     9
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                                           Thinking Tools and Frameworks
Bloom’s Revised Taxonomy: Analysing Compare, Contrast, Organise, Deconstruct, Separate, Distinguish.

Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences and a variety of other thinking tools and frameworks, are manifested in the pedagogy chosen to
facilitate the set focus.
                                         Literacy across the learning contexts: Text Analyst
Learners ask: What does this text mean to me? Where do I position myself towards this text?
Teachers in all learning contexts ask:
   o What knowledge do students bring of the ways this text is designed to represent particular point of view and interests?
   o What explicit teaching will support students in developing critical language awareness of the ways language works to create
        particular meanings?

Literacy emphasis on                                                           Possible Strategies:
understanding that ideas and
information are not neutral             Stakeholders PMI
and can be challenged:                  Habits Of Mind ( Questioning and posing problems, Thinking and Communicating with clarity and
                                         precision, Responding with wonderment and awe, Thinking Interdependently. )
    Recognising the author’s           Problem solving (CoRT thinking )
     purpose in creating the text       De Bono’s Red and White hats
    What is excluded from the          Debates / Alternate positions
     text?                              Thinker’s Keys :Picture Key, Disadvantages Key
    Is there a message in the          Critical / Analytical thinking Frameworks: Taylor’s Multiple Talent Model.
     text?                              Analytical Writing Frames
    Recognising bias & points          Graphic Organisers: Comparison Alley, Starburst, Bridges, Mind Wind, Stair Steps, Fishbone
     of view                             Diagram, Mind Maps, Lotus Blossom, BAR, SCAMPER.
    Expressing ideas or                Question Matrix: What Would…, Who Would…., How Would…, Why Would…,
     information                        Problem Solver
    Expressing an alternative          Classifier
     position to the one in the         Media Watch
     text                               Perspeculator
    Critical literacy
    Explain why people might
     interpret a text differently.



    Esther Weichert 2005                                                                                                           10
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Select and list the strategies                                                      Lesson/Unit content
(pedagogy) which will be most           Research Project: Olympics
appropriate to facilitate the
chosen focus and achieve the            Focus question: Ask: How and why has the nature of the Olympic games changed in modern times?
set standards
                                        Investigate: Form Inquiry questions, identify sources, look for information, record relevant information.

My explicit teaching:                   Create: Compile a report on your findings
   Explain the inquiry process
   Help students understand the        Discuss: Share your ideas with others
     nature of inquiry questions
     and then proceed to negotiate      Reflect: take the time to look back at the question, the research path, and the conclusions made. Has a solution
     questions they wish to use as      been found? Do new questions come into light? What might those questions be?
     basis for research.
   Teach ‘Hot Seat’ strategy for
     sharing ideas


   My assessment of Learning:
   Reflection, self assessment of the
   research process
   Teacher rubric for the research
   process including a report




    Esther Weichert 2005                                                                                                                             11
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                                              Thinking Tools and Frameworks
Bloom’s revised Taxonomy: Evaluating: Check, Critique, Judge, Justify, Hypothesise, Rank, Substantiate, Argue, Validate and Assess.

 Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences and a variety of other thinking tools and frameworks, are manifested in the pedagogy chosen to
facilitate the set focus.

                                        Literacy across the learning contexts: Text Analyst
Learners ask: What does this text mean to me? Where do I position myself towards this text?
Teachers ask:
      What knowledge do students bring of the ways this text is designed to represent particular point of view and interests?
      What explicit teaching will support students in developing critical language awareness of the ways language works to create
        particular meanings?

    Literacy emphasis is on                                                   Possible Strategies:
 understanding that ideas and
information are not neutral and          Stakeholders PMI
       can be challenged:                Habits Of Mind : Thinking About Thinking, Questioning and Posing Problems, Managing Impulsivity,
                                          Thinking Flexibly.
   Recognising the author’s             Problem solving (CoRT thinking )
    purpose in creating the text         Six Thinking Hats : Green Hat, Yellow Hat, Black Hat
   What is excluded from the            Debates / Alternate positions
    text?                                Evaluation strategies: KWLH
   Is there a message in the            De Bono’s Thinking Tools
    text?                                Thinker’s Keys: Combination, Inventions, Ridiculous
   Recognising bias & points of         Directed Thinking: Why No?, Why Wait?, What Else?, Way to Go.
    view                                 Divergent Thinking
   Expressing ideas or                  Critical/ Analytical Thinking Frameworks: POOCH, PCD, PMI, SCAMPER,
    information                          Argument / persuasive Frames
   Expressing an alternative            Graphic Organisers: The Funnel, Playoffs, See/Saw.
    position to the one in the text
                                         Question Matrix: What might…?, Where might…?, When might…?, Which might…?, Who might…?,
   Critical literacy                     Why might…?, How might…?
   Explain why people might
    interpret a text differently.


     Esther Weichert 2005                                                                                                           12
     .
Select and list the strategies                                                Lesson/Unit content
(pedagogy) which will be most
appropriate to facilitate the
chosen focus and achieve the
set standards.                          1. Write a newspaper article on one of the following events from Ancient Greece: Alexander’s death, The
                                           conquest of Troy by the Greeks, Winning the marathon in ancient Greece and in Bejing 2004, Trial by jury
                                                                         in ancient Athens, a night at a Greek theatre.

Explicit teaching:
 Writing newspaper reports
 Skimming/scanning         texts
                                                                              NEWSPAPER REPORT
  (newspaper       articles   on
  women’s voting rights in
  Iraq                            Purpose:       To inform the public of current events.

                                  Focus:         World events, national events, local events, current issues.


                                  FRAMEWORK
                                                                                           Reduced language title.
                                                                                           Sometimes deliberately
                                      Headline                                             ambiguous to attract attention.



                                                                                        Writer’s name.
                                      By-line

                                  ,                                                     Summary of most
                                                                                        important information,
                                      The lead                                          i.e. who, what, where,
                                                                                        when and how.




    Esther Weichert 2005                                                                                                                    13
    .
                       Most important point


                                                                          Details.
                       Next most important point
                                                                          Can include comments
                                                                          from eye witnesses,
                                                                          interested parties who
                       Next most important point                          hold opposing views.


                       Least important point




                       Conclusion                                        Often concludes with consequences,
                                                                         possible future leads.

                       NEWSPAPER REPORT

                       Language Features             Commonly Used                                            Avoid using
                       Tense                               The headline is written in the
                       - in the headline                    present or past tenses:
                                                       e.g. ‘Acid spill Forces Evacuation’
                                                            Iraq Rapped Over Human
                                                            Rights.’
                       - in the body of the report                                                    Avoid changing tenses for no reason.
                                                           The body of the report is
                                                            generally written in the past tense
                                                            (report on what has happened):
                                                       e.g. ‘…warned yesterday’
                                                            ‘has shocked and angered
                                                            people’.



Esther Weichert 2005                                                                                                                   14
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                                           The present tense is used to
                                            describe the present situation.
                                            (events/ situations not yet
                                            finished)
                                       e.g. ’The Prime Minister faces a tough
                                       election.’
                                            ‘The figure represents a dramatic
                                            drop.’

                                            The future tense is used to
                                             describe future events.
                                       e.g. ‘The judge will give his decision
                                       tomorrow.’
                                        ‘The defense will question…’
                       Point of view     The third person objective point          Avoid writing in the second person
                                             of view, i.e. he, she, they, it,        point of view (you) or the first person
                                             people’s names.                         point of view (I, we).
                                             Neither the first person not the
                                             writer’s ideas or feelings are          Avoid revealing your thoughts and
                                             included in the report. The              feelings,
                                             passive is used instead.            e.g. ‘I think the captain was very stupid
                                        e.g. ‘The captain was asked…’            and found it difficult to interview…’
                                             ‘Enquiries were made…’              ‘I made tedious inquiries…’
                       Vocabulary        Words that signal time:                 Avoid confusing the reader about
                                       e.g. ‘Yesterday’, ‘…now working’,              when exactly events occurred.
                                       ‘are occurring daily’, ’since Friday’,
                                       ‘about 10.45 pm’.
                                           Vocabulary related to the event –
                                                                                     Avoid using non-specific vocabulary
                                            time , place, people involved.
                                                                                      that doesn’t reveal time, place people
                                       e.g. ‘The Queen Elizabeth II limped
                                                                                      involved.
                                       into Boston Harbour on Monday as
                                                                                 e.g. ‘A big boat with engine trouble
                                       U.S. Officials tried to determine…’
                                                                                 arrived in a port in the U.S.A. sometime
                                                                                 this week.’




Esther Weichert 2005                                                                                                    15
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                       2. How important is the work of the following ancient Greek scientists in our life today?
                       Hippocrates, Aristotle, Erasistratus, Pythagoras, Anaxagoras, Eratosthenes, Archimedes.
                        Give an answer as if you were the following people:
                            A doctor
                            A scientist
                            A mathematician
                            A patient
                            A student of maths
                            A farmer

                       3. How has the role of women changed since the days of ancient Greece? Did all city states have the same rules
                       and regulations regarding the status and role of women? Do all modern societies have the same rules on the status
                       and role of women? Investigate changes in women’s rights in Iran and Iraq during 2005.




Esther Weichert 2005                                                                                                              16
.
                                                   Thinking Tools and Frameworks
Bloom’s revised Taxonomy: Creating: Design, Construct, Plan, Produce, Make
 Gardner’s Multiple Intelligences and a variety of other thinking tools and frameworks are manifested in the pedagogy chosen to
facilitate the set focus.

                                                         Literacy: Text Analyst
Learners ask: What does this text mean to me? Where do I position myself towards this text?
Teachers ask:
      What knowledge do students bring of the ways this text is designed to represent particular point of view and interests?
      What explicit teaching will support students in developing critical language awareness of the ways language works to create
        particular meanings

    Literacy emphasis is on
 understanding that ideas and                                                 Possible Strategies:
information are not neutral and
       can be challenged:
                                         Stakeholders PMI
   Recognising the author’s             Habits Of Mind: Thinking About Thinking, Questioning and Posing Problems, Managing Impulsivity,
    purpose in creating the text          Thinking Flexibly.
   What is excluded from the            Problem solving (CoRT thinking )
    text?                                Six Thinking Hats : Green Hat, Yellow Hat, Black Hat
   Is there a message in the            Debates / Alternate positions
    text?                                Evaluation strategies: KWLH
   Recognising bias & points of         De Bono’s Thinking Tools
    view                                 Thinker’s Keys: Combination, Inventions, Ridiculous
   Expressing ideas or                  Directed Thinking: Why No, Why Wait, What Else, Way to Go
    information                          Divergent Thinking (an integrated approach to thinking)
   Expressing an alternative            Critical/ Analytical Thinking Frameworks: POOCH, PCD, PMI, SCAMPER,
    position to the one in the text      Argument / persuasive Frames
   Critical literacy                    Graphic Organisers: The Funnel, Playoffs, See/Saw and more.
   Explain why people might             Question Matrix: What might…?, Where might…?, When might…?, Which might…?, Who might…?,
    interpret a text differently.         Why might…?, How might…?




     Esther Weichert 2005                                                                                                            17
     .
Select and list the strategies                                                           Class Olympics
(pedagogy) which will be most
appropriate to facilitate the chosen
                                            It's around 480 BCE. You are an Olympian contestant, representing your city-state at the Olympic Games! How
focus and achieve the set standards
                                            would you behave? Let's find out!

                                            Use different resources to identify content which will help to create a profile of the following ancient Greek City
                                            States: Sparta, Athens, Corinth, Argos, Megara.
Materials:
                                            All teams must have the following:
        Handouts
             o Profiles of 5 Greek
                                                  Matching arm bands
                 city-states, compiled by
                 groups of students               A flag designed to promote the achievements of their city state
                 using different                  Team chants to reflect the profile of the city states
                 resources (                      Code of behaviour which reflect the characteristics of the society of each city state
             o Use SCAMPER to
                                                  A salute for their fellow citizens
                 create suitable Olympic
                 Events, which can take
                                            PREPARE FOR THE GAMES ( use SCAMPER to create games or use the following games)
                 place at an identified
                 location at school.
                                             Opening Procession. ( Play Chariots of Fire)
        Paper, crayons, colour pencils,
         or paint
                                            Report to the agreed location on time! Join your city-state and form a line behind the person holding your flag.
        A bag of bows (red, white, and
                                            Make sure you are wearing your arm band and you remember your chant NO talking! Line-up alphabetically by
         blue) to use as prizes
                                            teams, with flags. March into class. Be disciplined. Stay in line while marching around the table, in the middle of
        Tape recorder, music
                                            the room. Continue marching until all Olympians have entered the classroom and have marched around the table
         appropriate for Olympic
                                            in the middle of the room, at least once. Lead team (Argives), stop at the podium in the corner. Quietly await the
         procession. (I used the
                                            instructions of your Olympic coordinator (your teacher). You are Olympians, the finest of all the Greek athletes!
         Chariots of Fire)                  Hold your heads high!
After my students negotiated their
games with me and with their peers, I       Olympic Tongue Twisters. One member, selected in advance, from each team. Selected Olympian will
bought the games form the Two               say, three times, the tongue-twister they have drawn at random from the Olympic Tongue Twister Shoebox. The
Dollar shop.                                Olympic coordinator (the teacher) or her nominee, will time this event. Best time wins! First place receives a


       Esther Weichert 2005                                                                                                                             18
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                              bow. Send a runner (but walk!) to stick this bow on your flag!

                                 1.  Miss Smith’s fish-sauce shop seldom sells shellfish
                                 2.  There’s a sandwich on the sand which was sent by a sane witch.
                                 3.  Buckets of black bug’s blood.
Assessment OF learning:          4.  Five fat friars frying flat fish.
Class Participation rubric.      5.  Betty bought some bitter butter and it made her batter bitter, so Betty bought some better butter to make
                                     her batter better.
                                 6. Ray Rag ran across a rough road. Across a rough road Ray Rag ran. Where is the rough road Ray Rag ran
                                     across?
                                 7. To begin to toboggan first, buy a toboggan. But do not buy too big a toboggan. Too big a toboggan is too
                                     big to buy to begin to toboggan.
                                 8. She had shoulder surgery.
                                 9. She sells seashells on the seashore. The seashells she sells are seashore seashells.
                                 10. I would if I could, and if I couldn’t, how could I? You couldn’t, unless you could, could you?

                              Sticky Ball. All Olympians compete. Each member of each team throws a ball that sticks to a felt griper,       as
                              far as they can. All Olympians compete in this activity, and receive a total team score. Best team score wins! First
                              place receives a bow. Send a runner (but walk!) to stick this bow on your flag!

                              Music Appreciation (Humming). Three Olympians per team. Hum the tune you have selected for the
                              Olympics coordinator (the teacher). Try to select a tune your Olympic coordinator might know. Best tune wins.
                              First place receives a bow. Send a runner (but walk!) to stick this bow on your flag!

                              Boxing (Items in a Box). One member, selected in advance, from each team. Each selected
                              representative will proceed to the "Boxing" Arena, where you will be shown one box full of items for 20 seconds.
                              You will have one minute to write down everything you can remember. Best score wins. First place receives a
                              bow. Send a runner (but walk!) to stick this bow on your flag!

                               Ball in a Basket. All Olympians compete. Your goal is to toss balls into a basket. Best count wins. Team
                              score. First place receives a bow. Send a runner (but walk!) to stick this bow on your flag!

                              Art Recognition. One member, selected in advance, from each team. For this one, you'll need to use the
                              white board or an overhead projector. A member from each team will select at random (from the Olympics Art
                              Appreciation Shoebox) an item to draw. Your team-mates must guess what it is. Best time wins. First place
     Esther Weichert 2005                                                                                                                 19
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                       receives a bow. Send a runner (but walk!) to stick this bow on your flag!

                        SOCCER: Two members form each team to participate. The team that scores the most goals wins. Each
                       member has two attempts at scoring a goal. First place receives a bow. Send a runner (but walk!) to stick this bow
                       on your flag!

                        Award Presentation. Honour First, Second, and Third place winners. Winners selected by totalling
                       number of events won at the Olympics. Take your place to be honoured! All Olympians cheer winners - HAIL
                       HAIL! The Olympics coordinator will present olive branch, for you to carry proudly around your school for the
                       day.

                       Closing Procession. All city-states get your flags. NO talking!        Line up by city, alphabetically by teams,
                       with flags. March proudly around the table at least twice. Exit the Olympic Arena. When all Olympians have
                       exited the Arena, the games are officially over.




Esther Weichert 2005                                                                                                              20
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